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Encyclopedia > Missing in action

Missing in action is a status assigned to a member of the armed services who is reported missing following combat and may be injured, captured, or dead. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Missing in action is the status of a missing member of the armed services. ...

Contents

US armed forces & Indian Armed Forces

The term was first used in America in 1946 to refer to a member of the armed services who is reported missing following a combat mission and whose status as to injury, capture, or death is unknown[citation needed]. The missing combatant must not have been otherwise accounted for as either killed in action or a prisoner of war. Its American abbreviation (not commonly used elsewhere) is MIA. Indian Armed Forces = During the Indo Pak War 1971, more than 90000 POWs were taken in East Pakistan( now Bangladesh ). While the war spilled over to West Pakistan ( Now Pakistan ),Pakistan took Indian defence personnel as POWs on the western front. After ceasefire, though India gave back all Pakistani POWs, Pakistan retained about 54 Indian defence personnel by not disclosing their capture. These 54 Indian officers are in Pakistan prisons and are MIA's in India since 1971 ( approx 36 years ) Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ...


Kerry POW/MIA Committee

During the late 1970s and 1980s the friends and relatives of unaccounted for American GIs became politically active, requesting the U.S. government reveal what steps were taken to follow up on intelligence regarding last known alive MIAs and POWs. When initial inquiries revealed important information had not been pursued, many families and their supporters asked for the public release of POW/MIA records and called for an investigation.


Serious charges were leveled at the George H. W. Bush administration regarding the POW/MIA issue. The Defense Department, headed by then Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, had been accused of covering up information and failing to properly pursue intelligence about American POW/MIAs. In 1991, Vietnam veteran U.S. Senator Robert C. Smith introduced a resolution to create a Senate Select POW/MIA Committee. Senator John Kerry was eventually named chairman, and was joined on the committee by Senator and former POW John McCain, who had been a strong opponent of the creation of a Senate Select POW/MIA Committee. Six live sighting investigators hired by the committee unanimously concluded that the live sighting intelligence through 1989 showed Vietnam and Laos were still holding American prisoners.[1] Controversy erupted when Kerry ordered the report of the live sighting investigators to be shredded along with all of their personal notes.[2] Committee staffer Jon McCreary, on loan from the Defense Intelligence Agency, filed a memorandum on the shredding incident. Journalist Sydney Schanberg, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for some of his Southeast Asia coverage during the Vietnam War, described Kerry’s actions in a February 24, 2004 article for the Village Voice: George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Robert C. Bob Smith (born March 30, 1941) is an American politician who has served in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... Sydney H. Schanberg (born January 17, 1934 in Clinton, Massachusetts) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

He gave orders to his committee staff to shred crucial intelligence documents. The shredding stopped only when some intelligence staffers staged a protest. Some wrote internal memos calling for a criminal investigation. One such memo—from John F. McCreary, a lawyer and staff intelligence analyst—reported that the committee's chief counsel, J. William Codinha, a longtime Kerry friend, "ridiculed the staff members" and said, "Who's the injured party?" When staffers cited "the 2,494 families of the unaccounted-for U.S. servicemen, among others," the McCreary memo continued, Codinha said: "Who's going to tell them? It's classified.[2]

Some argue that it is likely that prisoners taken by Vietnam are not alive today. They argue these prisoners would most likely have been killed and buried, to prevent their discovery. They argue that intelligence data is now out-of-date; such prisoners would be costly for the Vietnamese government to house, feed, and guard; and their existence, if discovered, would damage Vietnam's emerging economy.


Others emphasize that the United States has a responsibility to the men to determine their fate, and it should not be assumed that Vietnam executed all of the Americans. They point out that Vietnam has brought up the billions of dollars the U.S. promised in war reparations when the U.S. has asked about the fate of the missing. They feel that the U.S. government should release all intelligence related to the POWs, and that the Vietnamese government should be required to reveal what they did with the American prisoners.


POW/MIA issue today

POW MIA flag
POW MIA flag

Families have complained that POW/MIA records were not all released by the U.S. government.[citation needed] In 2006, the National Alliance of Families found 1992 documents discussing the admission by Vietnam of capturing a number of missing Americans. The National Alliance contacted the families they could locate, and found that the Vietnamese admissions had been concealed from the families by the U.S. government.[citation needed] The U.S. and Vietnamese governments had given every indication to the families that the men had been killed in their loss incidents. However, at least one MIA, San Dewayne Francisco was reported to be alive by a North Vietnamese newspaper which was confirmed by radio transmissions by Francisco immediately after his aircraft crashed. [3] The names of the captured men and more details about the concealment can be found in newsletters of the National Alliance of Families—available on their website. According to the 1989 Intelligence Authorization Act, next-of-kin are to be provided live sighting records in a prompt manner. [citation needed] A bill including criminal penalties for deliberately withholding POW/MIA records in violation of the law unanimously passed the House of Representatives in the 1990s. However, as also reported by Sydney Schanberg, such penalties were stripped from the law due to the efforts of former POW John McCain. [citation needed] Image File history File links POW_MIA_flag. ... Image File history File links POW_MIA_flag. ... San Dewayne Francisco, Major, USAF (born 1944) is an officer in the United States Air Force who is missing in action (MIA) from the Vietnam War. ...


Iraq

During the Persian Gulf War of 1991, an American pilot named Scott Speicher was reported as MIA after his F/A-18 was shot down in northern Iraq. In 1997, a Defense Department document leaked to the New York Times showed that the Pentagon had not been forthcoming with information previously requested by U.S. Senator Rod Grams.[citation needed] Senator Grams publicly accused the Pentagon of misleading him, and joined with Senator Bob Smith in calling for an investigation by the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee. That investigation is ongoing. Much intelligence regarding Speicher's fate remains classified.[citation needed] In the lead up to the Second Persian Gulf War Speicher's status was changed from Missing in Action to Missing-Captured, a move that suggested he was alive and imprisoned in Iraq. However, he has not been found and there is no proof that he is still alive. See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Scott Speicher (July 12, 1957–January 17, 1991?) was a U.S. Navy pilot, whose F/A-18 Hornet fighter was shot down during the Gulf War on January 17, 1991. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Rod Grams (born February 4, 1948) is an American politician. ...


A small number of coalition soldiers went missing in action in Iraq following the 2003 invasion. In one prominent case, a US Marine of Lebanese background, Wassef Ali Hassoun, went missing and claimed to have been captured. He later turned up in Lebanon, and was flown home to the U.S. It was soon discovered Hassoun made the kidnapping story up, and Hassoun is currently a fugitive.[4] The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Wassef Ali Hassoun (born January 1, (1980) is a United States Marine Corps Corporal who is to be charged with desertion for leaving his unit and apparently engaging with others in a hoax to make it appear that he had been captured by terrorists on June 19, 2004 while serving...


US Army Sgt. Keith Maupin from Batavia, Ohio, was captured by insurgents on April 9, 2004. He was allegedly executed in June 2004. A video showing Maupin's alleged execution was broadcast on Al Jazeera but the U.S has not confirmed Maupin is dead. He is still listed as captured. On October 23, 2006 US Army soldier Spc. Ahmed Qusai al-Taayie was captured by insurgents and is listed as missing-captured. A $50,000 reward is being offered by the US government for information leading to his recovery. On May 12, 2007 a US Army observation post was overrun by Iraqi insurgents, four American and one Iraqi soldier were killed, three other US Army soldiers were captured. They were Pfc. Joseph J. Anzack Jr., Pvt. Byron W. Fouty and Spc. Alex R. Jimenez. Pfc. Anzacks' body was found in the Euphrates River South of Baghdad on May 23, 2007 bearing signs of torture. One June 4]], 2007. the ISI claimed that they killed Fouty and Jimenez and also claimed that their bodies are buried and will not be returned to their families. Since the war began 4 US servicemen are still listed as MIA. U.S. Army PFC Keith Maupin. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Specialist Ahmed Qusai al-Taayie (pronounced: AH-meht KOO-say ahl tah-YEE)(b. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Euphrates (the traditional Greek name for the river, which is in Old Persian Ufrat, Aramaic Prâth/Frot, in Arabic الفرات, in Turkish Fırat and in ancient Assyrian language Pu-rat-tu) is the westernmost of the two great rivers that define... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Colloquial usage

MIA is sometimes used in American English to describe difficulty finding something. "The TV remote is MIA." - it is less often used in this context in UK English, where the equivalent phrase is "gone AWOL". AWOL can also stand for: Alcohol Without Liquid AWOL is an acronym for the United States and other armed forces expression Absent WithOut Leave or Absence Without Official Leave. The United States Marine Corps uses the term Unauthorized Absence (UA) instead. ...


See also

Temporary grave of an American machine-gunner during the Battle of Normandy. ... WIA is a three letter abbreviation meaning Wounded in action. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) is a joint task force within the United States Department of Defense (DOD) whose mission is to account for all United States prisoners of war (POW) and missing in action (MIA) from all past wars. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Schanberg, Sydney H.. "Did America Abandon Vietnam War P.O.W.'s?", Village Voice, 2004-03-02. Retrieved on 2007-06-01. 
  2. ^ a b Schanberg, Sydney H.. "When John Kerry's Courage Went M.I.A.", Village Voice, 2004-02-24. Retrieved on 2007-06-01. 
  3. ^ http://www.pownetwork.org/bios/f/f055.htm
  4. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4150479.stm

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Missing in Action (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (166 words)
Missing in Action (film) is a 1984 action film starring Chuck Norris and directed by Joseph Zito.
The film was followed by two sequels in 1985 and 1988, Missing in Action 2: The Beginning and Braddock: Missing in Action III.
Missing in Action 2 was filmed at the same time as this film, and was actually set to be released first before the producers changed their minds.
Missing In Action - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1097 words)
Missing In Action (abbreviated MIA), is a term (dating from 1946) referring to a member of the armed services who is reported missing following a combat mission and whose status as to injury, capture, or death is unknown.
The missing combatant must not have been otherwise accounted for as either killed in action or a prisoner of war.
In the lead up to the Second Persian Gulf War Speicher's status was changed from Missing in Action to Missing-Captured, a move that suggested he was alive and imprisoned in Iraq.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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