FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Missile silo

A missile silo is a underground vertical cylindrical container for the storage and launching of ICBMs. They typically have the missile some distance under the surface, protected with a huge "blast door" on top. A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ...


Until the 1960s ICBMs had been launched from surface bases. The Soviet Union used completely aboveground launchers similar to those found at a spaceport, which made them vulnerable to US bomber attack. The missile silo was first suggested in the 1950s in the United Kingdom as a suitable housing for Blue Streak missiles. Only one test missile silo was built in the UK at RAF Spadeadam and with the cancellation of the Blue Streak project in 1960 the UK ICBM nuclear missile capability was transferred to submarines. However the idea of the underground rocket bunker was adopted by the USA. A spaceport is a site for launching spacecraft, by analogy with airport for aircraft. ... Motto: Official (Latin): E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Translated: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal... A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping bombs. ... The Blue Streak missile was a British ballistic missile development programme of the mid to late-1950s, the initial design being based on licensed US technology. ... RAF Spadeadam is a Royal Air Force station spanning England and Scotland. ...


The US Atlas missile used four basing schemes. The first were vertical, above ground launchers at Vandenberg AFB, CA. The second was stored horizontally in a warehouse- / shed- like structure with a retractable roof at Warren AFB, WY. The third was somewhat better protected, stored horizontally in a concrete building known as "coffins", then raised to the vertical shortly before launch. These rather poorly protected systems were a side effect of the cryogenic liquid fuels used, which required the missiles to stand empty and then be fueled immediately prior to launch. The fourth version of the Atlas ICBM (the Atlas F) were stored vertically in underground silos. The Atlas was fueled in the silo and then had to be raised to the surface for launch. It could not be launched from within the silo. The Titan I missile used a similar silo basing scheme to the Atlas F. Mercury Atlas 9 rocket and capsule on pad The Atlas is a venerable line of space launch vehicles built by Lockheed Martin. ... Vandenberg Air Force Base is a base with a spaceport, located in Santa Barbara County, California. ... Warren AFB is a town located in Laramie County, Wyoming. ... The Titan I was the United States first true multistage ICBM. It was the first in a series of Titan rockets, but was unique among them in that it used LOX and RP-1 as its fuels, while the later versions all used storable fuels instead. ...


Things changed with the introduction of the US Titan missile and the Soviet UR-100 missile series. Both used new liquid fuels that could be stored in the missiles, thereby allowing for rapid launch. Both systems were then moved to the silo system. The introduction of solid fuel systems in the later 1960s made this even easier. Titan is a family of U.S. expendable rockets. ... The UR-100 was an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) developed and deployed by the Soviet Union from 1966 to 1996. ...


The silo has remained the primary basing system for land based missiles since that time. However, the increased accuracy of inertial guidance systems has since rendered them somewhat less protected than they were in the 1960s. The US spent considerable effort in the 1970s and 1980s designing a replacement, but none of the complex systems were ever produced. The US, the USSR, and China all developed mobile ICBMs as well, but only the Soviet Union and China put them into production. An inertial navigation system measures the position and altitude of a vehicle by measuring the accelerations and rotations applied to the systems inertial frame. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ...

  • MPS (Mobile Protective Shelters) plan, in which 200 MX missiles would be shuttled around between 4600 soft shelters.
  • Midgetman missile
  • one version of the Topol-M
  • Dong Feng-31 (CSS-9): Chinese road mobile ICBM (China also two older mobile IRBMs)

Today much of the US arsenal has been placed on submarines (as SLBMs), while Russia has downsized their own force to a handful of mobile and silo-based weapons. China also has silo-based weapons, but is now concentrating development on expanding its submarine and road mobile weapon capability. A Midgetman test launch The MGM-134 Midgetman, also known as the SICBM (see below), was an intercontinental ballistic missile developed by the United States of America. ... The Topol-M or SS-27 is the newest of the Russian Strategic Rocket Forces ICBMs. ... French M45 SLBM and M51 SLBM Submarine-launched ballistic missiles or SLBMs are ballistic missiles delivering nuclear weapons that are launched from submarines. ...


The increase in decommissioned missile silos has led governments to sell them to individuals, who then convert them to indisputably unique abodes.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Titan II Missile Complex (465 words)
Each Titan II silo was directly connected to an underground launch control capsule manned by a missile combat crew of two officers and two airman.
To deflect and channel the exhaust gases, each silo was fitted with a flame deflector at the base and two exhaust ducts that ran up the length of the silo and vented to the surface.
The silo was covered with a steel and concrete door that weighed 740 tons and could be opened in 17 to 20 seconds.
Missile silo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (564 words)
The missile silo was first suggested in the 1950s in the United Kingdom as a suitable housing for Blue Streak missiles.
Only one test missile silo was built in the UK at RAF Spadeadam and with the cancellation of the Blue Streak project in 1960 the UK ICBM nuclear missile capability was transferred to submarines.
The Titan I missile used a similar silo basing scheme to the Atlas F. Things changed with the introduction of the US Titan missile and the Soviet UR-100 missile series.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m