FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Misanthropy" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Misanthropy

Misanthropy is a general dislike, distrust, or hatred of the human species, or a disposition to dislike and/or distrust other people. The term is also applicable to those who self-exile themselves or become loners because of the aforementioned feelings. The word comes from the Greek words μίσος ("hatred") and άνθρωπος ("man, human being"). A misanthrope or misanthropist is a person who dislikes or distrusts humanity as a general rule. Le Misanthrope is a 17th century comedy of manners written by French playwright Molière. ... Misanthrope is a French metal band, formed in 1989. ... This article is about modern humans. ...

Contents

Forms of misanthropy

While misanthropes express a general dislike for humanity on the whole, they generally have normal relationships with specific individuals. Misanthropy may be motivated by feelings of isolation or social alienation, or simply contempt for the prevailing characteristics of humanity. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Overt expressions of misanthropy are common in satire and comedy, although intense misanthropy is generally rare. Subtler expressions are far more common, especially for those pointing out the shortcomings of humanity.


Some religions, or schools of religious thought, maintain that humanity as a whole is evil, or an unnatural cancer on the earth, leading to their practitioners turning themselves into religious misanthropes.[who?] For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ...


Misanthropy in literature

Misanthropy has been ascribed to a number of writers of satire, such as William S. Gilbert ("I hate my fellow-man"), but such identifications must be closely scrutinized, because a critical or darkly humorous outlook toward humankind may be easily mistaken for genuine misanthropes. 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... Sir William Schwenck Gilbert Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (November 18, 1836 – May 29, 1911) was an English dramatist, librettist and illustrator best known for the fourteen comic operas produced in collaboration with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan. ... The term problem plays is applied to the three plays William Shakespeare wrote between the last of his pure comedies (Twelfth Night) and the first of his pure tragedies (Othello) They are Alls Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida. ...


The character of Heathcliffe in Wuthering Heights is an intense misanthrope due to the societal constraints which hinder the fulfillment of his love for Cathy. For other uses, see Wuthering Heights (disambiguation). ...


In 1992, Southern American essayist and National Review columnist Florence King, a self-described misanthrope, wrote a humorous book on the history of misanthropy called With Charity Toward None: A Fond Look at Misanthropy. National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... Florence King Miss Florence Virginia King (b. ...


Perhaps the most famous example of a misanthrope in literature is the protagonist in Molière's 1666 play, Alceste. (Fr. Le Misanthrope). A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... For the 2007 film, see Molière (film). ... Le Misanthrope is a 17th century comedy of manners written by French playwright Molière. ...


Iago, the villain in William Shakespeare's play Othello manipulates those around him with utter contempt and reaps a genuine pleasure from doing so. One critic has said, for Iago, "Honour, loyalty, reverence, and fidelity - the highest and the holiest virtues of humanity - are but base commodities to be bought and sold."[1]. Shakespeare's most thoroughgoing misanthropist, however, is probably the invective-spewing Timon of acts four and five of the play, Timon of Athens. For other uses, see Iago (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Timon (disambiguation). ...


The American satirical author Kurt Vonnegut often expressed misanthropic views in his books. In one of his most popular works, Slaughterhouse Five, the protagonist Billy Pilgrim "becomes unstuck in time." He is taken hostage by the Tralfamadorians, a race able to see in 4D, who can travel through time and experience all the events in their lives, not necessarily in chronological order. Through the novel they teach him a fatalistic philosophy, summed up in the book's signature phrase, "so it goes." Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which principally ridicules its subject (individuals, organizations, states) often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Slaughterhouse-Five; or, The Childrens Crusade: A Duty-Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... The Tralfamadorians are a fictional alien race mentioned in several novels by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Dimension (from Latin measured out) is, in essence, the number of degrees of freedom available for movement in a space. ... This article is about the general notion of determinism in philosophy. ...


In another Vonnegut novel, Breakfast of Champions, the protagonist Kilgore Trout, a science fiction author, writes many books about man destroying the world and the pointlessness of human existence. The book has passages throughout showing the destruction of earth due to man and man's pointless existence. For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ... Kilgore Trout is a fictional character created by author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


Some works by Franz Kafka such as The Metamorphosis and "A Hunger Artist" also display misanthropic views. Kafka redirects here. ... The Metamorphosis (German: ) is a novella by Franz Kafka, first published in 1915, and arguably the most famous of his works along with the longer works The Trial and The Castle. ... A Hunger Artist (Ein Hungerkünstler), also translated as A Fasting Artist, is a short story by Franz Kafka published in Die Neue Rundschau in 1922. ...


In No Exit, Jean-Paul Sartre wrote, "So that is what hell is. I would never have believed it. You remember: the fire and brimstone, the torture. Ah! the farce. There is no need for torture: hell is other people." For other uses, see No Exit (disambiguation). ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ...


Eighteenth century Irish satirist Jonathan Swift, in a letter to the poet Alexander Pope concerning Gulliver's Travels, a novel penned by the former, wrote: "[but] principally I hate and detest that animal called man." Lemuel Gulliver, considered by many to be Swift's alter ego and mouthpiece, expresses an overwhelming disgust with human beings, particularly in "A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms." Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... For other uses, see Alexander Pope (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gullivers Travels (disambiguation). ...


Misanthropy in philosophy

In Plato's Phaedo, Socrates states, "Misology and misanthropy arise from similar causes."[2] He equates misanthropy with misology, the hatred of speech, drawing an important distinction between philosophical pessimism and misanthropy. Immanuel Kant said, "Of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing can ever be made," and yet this was not an expression of the uselessness of humanity itself. Similarly, Samuel Beckett once remarked, "Hell must be like... reminiscing about the good old days when we wished we were dead." This statement that may, perhaps, be seen as rather bleak and hopeless, but not as anti-human or expressive of any hatred of humankind. For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Platos Phaedo (IPA: , Greek: Φαίδων, Phaidon) is one of the great dialogues of his middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. ... This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ... Misology is defined as the fear or distrust of reason or logic. ... In the Is the glass half empty or half full? phenomenon, the pessimistic approach would be to pick half empty. ... Kant redirects here. ... This article is about the Irish writer. ...


Seneca the Younger, in his treatise On Anger, suggests that one's misanthropy can be mitigated or cured by laughing at the foibles of humanity rather than resenting them. Seneca's Stoic philosophy regarded all forms of anger as corruptions of reason and therefore detrimental to good judgement; he thus argues that hatred and misanthropy must be eliminated for the individual to attain sanity.


The German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, on the other hand, was almost certainly as famously misanthropic as his reputation. He wrote, "Human existence must be a kind of error." Schopenhauer concluded, in fact, that ethical treatment of others was the best attitude, for we are all fellow sufferers and all part of the same will-to-live. He also discussed suicide with a sympathetic understanding which was rare in his own time, when it was largely a taboo subject. However, his metaphysics ultimately led him to conclude that suicide was no escape from the suffering of the world. He claimed that the world was one side representation--how we perceived it, and one side will--the underlying indivisible metaphysical matter that was the basis of existence. Because suicide does not allow one to escape from the will (from which all suffering proceeds), it is pointless to kill oneself. Schopenhauer instead suggests aesthetic enjoyment as the only escape from the suffering of the world. This would be along the lines of the cathartic release points of Mozart's Requiem, or the charmingly mysterious smile of the Mona Lisa. He also offers an escape from suffering through compassion; however, he believed that very few are capable of reaching this state, and those who do reach it have rejected their humanity (further demonstrating his misanthropy). Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher best known for his work The World as Will and Representation. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general; for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... In cognitive psychology a representation is a hypothetical internal cognitive symbol that represents external reality. ... // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... The Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was composed in 1791. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ...


The Finnish eco-philosopher Pentti Linkola is considered the most influential misanthrope currently living. He has openly advocated genocide as means of population control, Social Darwinism to promote euthanasia campaigns for extermination of life unworthy of living, execution of doctors keeping stillborns alive and Plato-style aristocracy as form of governance to keep living standards low enough for sustainable ecology. Pentti Linkola Kaarlo Pentti Linkola (born December 7, 1932 in Helsinki) is a radical Finnish environmentalist who has often been accused of ecofascism. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... Social Darwinism is the idea that Charles Darwins theory can be extended and applied to the social realm, i. ... For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Aristocrat redirects here. ...


The Cynic philosopher Diogenes of Sinope was a well known misanthrope. Known for his contempt for all human beings and his enormous respect for animals such as mice and dogs, Diogenes dedicated his life to showing that the norms and conventions which most people live by are in fact worthless and utterly counterproductive to true happiness. This article is about the ancient Greek school of philosophy. ... Diogenes (Greek: Diogenes o Sinopeus) the Cynic, Greek philosopher, was born in Sinope (modern day Sinop, Turkey) about 412 BC (according to other sources 399 BC), and died in 323 BC at Corinth. ...


Misanthropy in popular culture

Comic books/graphic novels

Cerebus the Aardvark is often described as being a misanthropic character. Dave Sim's aardvark protagonist lives among humans and has always disliked them despite living with them. Cerebus the Aardvark, or simply Cerebus (pronounced Sehr-uh-bus[1]), is an award-winning independent comic book, written and illustrated by Canadian artist Dave Sim, with backgrounds by fellow Canadian Gerhard. ... David Victor Sim (born May 17, 1956 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian comic book writer and artist, best known as the creator of the 6,000 page graphic novel Cerebus the Aardvark. ...


The character of Poison Ivy, a villain in the Batman franchise, exhibited strong misanthropic characteristics, as portrayed in comic books, television series and film. She very openly expressed an aggressive and violent disdain for human beings, as she displayed a neurotic preference for the botanical world. She is depicted as being an inmate of an asylum for the criminally insane. For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ...


Stryfe, clone-brother of Cable is the epitome of a misanthrope, he sees everyone he has/had a connection with as being part of the suffering he experiences. He, at one point, attempts to kill every single member of his "family" (ie, Cable, Cyclops, Jean Grey, Apocalypse, etc)and only wishes his suffering to pass on to others, as he feels it is the same generosity that all others(humanity/mutant-kind)have shown him. Stryfe is a Marvel Comics supervillain, an adversary of the X-Men and related characters, especially Cable and X-Force. ... For other uses, see Cable (disambiguation). ...


Johnny, the serial killer protagonist from one of Jhonen Vasquez's graphic novels Johnny the Homicidal Maniac, shows signs of misanthropy. Johnny C. Johnny C. is a fictional character starring in the comic book series Johnny The Homicidal Maniac. ... (JCV) redirects here. ... Johnny the Homicidal Maniac. ...


In the Japanese manga Backstage Prince the main male Kabuki character is a very misanthropic to people in general usually getting very tense around people. Backstage Prince (極付 楽屋裏王子) is a manga by Kanoko Sakurakoji. ... The oldest Kabuki theatre in Japan: the Minamiza in Kyoto The Kabukiza in Ginza is one of Tokyos leading kabuki theaters. ...


Television

The character of Bernard Black from the series Black Books, can be defined as a misanthrope. Most of the humour derives from such a man dealing with the public in a retail shop. Black Books is a British television sitcom, broadcast on Channel 4 and written by Dylan Moran, Graham Linehan, Arthur Mathews, Kevin Cecil and Andy Riley. ... Black Books is a British sitcom broadcast on Channel 4 starring Dylan Moran, Bill Bailey and Tamsin Greig. ...


The character of Gregory House, MD on the TV show of the same name is misanthropic and often opines that all people lie and generally behave poorly to each other, especially when their own self-interest is at stake. When confronted with someone whose behavior or philosophy flies in the face of his opinions, he will often go to great lengths to prove that his underlying philosophies are, in fact, correct.[3] Dr. Gregory House, M.D., is a fictional character and protagonist of the Fox medical drama House. ... House, also known as House, M.D., is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning American medical drama, which debuted on the FOX network on November 16, 2004. ...


Oscar the Grouch on Sesame Street exhibits misanthropic behavior.


Daria Morgendorffer from MTV's Daria is a misanthrope. In the season finale, she wins the Dian Fossey Award "for dazzling academic achievements in face of near total misanthropy." Daria Morgendorffer is a fictional animated character from MTVs animated series Beavis and Butt-Head and Daria. ... This article is about the animated series. ...


From The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, Mandy is said to be misanthropic. The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy is an Annie- and Emmy-winning[1] American animated television series aired on Cartoon Network. ... Mandy is a title character from the television series The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy. ...


Chandler Bing, from popular television show Friends, shows signs of misanthropy in several ground-breaking episodes. Chandler Muriel Bing[1] (born April 8, 1968) is a fictional character on the popular US television sitcom Friends (1994–2004), played by Matthew Perry. ... This article is about the television show. ...


The character of John Becker, MD from the series Becker has misanthropic behaviour and opinions, though he is usually more compassionate when dealing with his patients, or anyone needing medical assistance. Becker may refer to one of the following: // Albrecht Becker (1906–2002), German production designer, photographer, actor, imprisoned by Nazis for homosexuality Ansgar Becker, German software developer (see HeidiSQL) Barbara Becker (born 1966), wife of Boris Becker Benjamin Becker (born 1981), German tennis player (not related to Boris Becker, below...


Cinema

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... There Will Be Blood is a 2007 film directed, written and produced by Paul Thomas Anderson. ... “Tycoon” redirects here. ...

Popular music

The topic is used frequently in most extreme music lyrics, from proto-punk to black metal and beyond, also including some elements also found in classical. Famous example is the song "Misanthrope" written by Chuck Schuldiner, the deceased singer/leadguitarist of the group Death. The songs lyrics in a way describes how misanthropic thoughts grow on the humans who later become misanthropes, and how there is hope for them that eventually turns out to be misanthropes. Shai Hulud are also a band of misanthropes from the hardcore metal scene. Their recent album Misanthropy Pure is an example of this. Probably the most famous, is GG Allin, the pure epitome of nihilism, misanthropy and general self hate, best described in songs such as "You Hate Me, and I Hate You", "Commit Suicide, "Son of Evil, "Don't Talk To Me" and "Expose Yourself To Kids". After many arrests, and beatings, he eventually died of an overdose, although he promised to commit suicide on stage. Also, Sampler to the Nu-Metal Band Slipknot, Craig "133" Jones is either joked or considered to be a Misanthrope, while never appearing to the public after shows and consistantly not speaking during interviews and once in a interview said the following, "If i wasn't in slipknot, i would probably be a serial killer" In one of slipknot's early records the song "Killers Are Quiet" is repotedly supposed to be about Craig "133" Jones. Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Look up Classical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Charles Michael Chuck Schuldiner (May 13, 1967, Long Island, New York – December 13, 2001) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and genre innovator. ... Death was an influential American death metal band founded in 1983 by guitarist and vocalist Chuck Schuldiner, and dissolved in 2001. ...


Other

Lee Chung, the main antagonist to Callum Archer in Thomas Steadman's "Flames of the West" shows very Misanthropic traits.


Wicked's Elphaba Thropp (Miss Thropp) has a great disdain for humanity and has been referred to as a misanthrope. Wicked is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Winnie Holzman. ... Elphaba is the name given to the Wicked Witch of the West in Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire, as well as in the Broadway adaptation, Wicked. ...


Stand-up comedian Bill Hicks would sometimes perform material that could be classed as misanthropic and would sometimes subject unreceptive audiences to misanthropic rants.[4] William Melvin Bill Hicks (December 16, 1961 – February 26, 1994) was an American stand-up comedian. ...


Kefka, the main antagonist from the video game Final Fantasy VI is deeply misanthropic. Although, at first he appears to be a comical sadist, during the conclusion of the game it is revealed that he hates everything associated with humanity. Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ...


References

  1. ^ Othello. Shakespeare Online.
  2. ^ 1 Plato, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo. The Perseus Digital Library.
  3. ^ "One Day, One Room". David Shore (writer) & Juan J. Campanella (director). House. FOX. 2007-1-30. Season 3 Ep. 12.
  4. ^ Tribute to Bill Hicks. lastingtribute.co.uk.

One Day, One Room is the twelfth episode of the third season of House and the fifty-eighth episode overall. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Juan José Campanella (born July 19, 1959 in Buenos Aires, Argentina) is an Academy Award-nominated for El Hijo de la Novia (Son of the Bride) as best foreign language film in 2002 and Daytime Emmy Award-winning Argentinian-American television and film director. ... FOX redirects here. ...

See also

Look up Misanthropy in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Antihumanism is a term applied to a number of thinkers critical of Enlightenment-era values. ... Biocentrism is the belief that all life, or even the whole universe living or otherwise taken as a whole, is equally valuable and humanity is not the center of existence. ... This article is about the current understanding of the word cynicism. ... Pessimism, generally, describes a belief that things are bad, and tend to become worse; or that looks to the eventual triumph of evil over good; it contrasts with optimism, the contrary belief in the goodness and betterment of things generally. ... For other uses, see Hate (disambiguation). ... it means bad things. ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... For the town, see Recluse, Wyoming. ... For other uses, see Human condition (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Human nature (disambiguation). ... For the specific belief system, see Humanism (life stance). ... There are a number of meanings for humanitarianism: humanitarianism, humanism, the doctrine that peoples duty is to promote human welfare. ... Statues in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht, attacked in Reformation iconoclasm in the 16th century. ... Look up Misandry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Eva Prima Pandora, by Jean Cousin (Louvre Museum), Eve, the equivalent of Pandora embodies Original Sin Misogyny (pronounced ) is hatred or strong prejudice against women; an antonym of philogyny. ... Misotheism is the hatred of God or hatred of the gods (from the Greek adjective μισόθεος hating the gods, a compound of μίσος hatred and θεός god). In some varieties of polytheism, it was considered possible to inflict punishment on gods by ceasing to worship them. ... This article is about the philosophical position. ... Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... The sign of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed To Woman Suffrage Sexism is commonly considered to be discrimination and/or hatred towards people based on their sex rather than their individual merits, but can also refer to any and all systemic differentiations based on the sex of the... Sexualism is the belief that one set of sexual behaviors is intrinsically superior to another set of sexual behaviors. ... The relevance of particular information in (or previously in) this article or section is disputed. ... For other uses, see Survival of the fittest (disambiguation). ... VHEMT logo The Voluntary Human Extinction Movement, or VHEMT (pronounced vehement[1]), is a movement that calls for the voluntary extinction of the human race. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
misanthropy: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1408 words)
Misanthropy does not necessarily imply an inhumane, antisocial, or sociopathic attitude towards humanity and on the contrary is generally a reaction to the observed prevalence of these and other backward properties of the present state of the human race.
Misanthropy may be motivated by feelings of isolation or social alienation, or simply contempt for the prevailing characteristics of humanity.
Misanthropy has been ascribed to a number of writers of satire, such as William S. Gilbert ("I hate my fellow-man"), but such identifications must be closely scrutinized, because a critical or darkly humorous outlook toward humankind may be easily mistaken for genuine misanthropy.
Misanthropy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1398 words)
Misanthropy is a hatred or distrust of the human race, or a disposition to dislike and mistrust other people.
Misanthropy may be motivated by feelings of isolation or alienation.
Misanthropy has been ascribed to a number of writers of satire, such as William S. Gilbert ("I hate my fellow-man"), but such identifications must be closely scrutinized, because a critical or darkly humorous (Dark comedy) outlook toward humankind may be easily mistaken for genuine misanthropy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m