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Encyclopedia > Miracles of Jesus
A series of articles on

Jesus Christ and Christianity
Christology
Chronology
Ministry
Miracles
Parables
Names and titles
Relics Image File history File links JesusYeshua. ... i hate god ... This page is about the title or the Divine Person. For the Christian figure, see Jesus. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... Christology is that part of Christian theology which studies and attempts to define Jesus the Christ. ... The chronology of Jesus depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of the life of Jesus by the four canonical gospels (which allude to various dates for several events). ... According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years, with the Synoptic Gospels generally being considered to argue for it having been a period of 1 year, and the Gospel of John arguing for... The Parables of Jesus are a collection of parables told by Jesus that embody much of his teaching and are recorded in the four Gospels. ... A large variety of names and titles are used in the New Testament to describe Jesus. ... There are many relics attributed to Jesus that people believe or believed to be authentic relics of the Gospel accounts. ...

Non-religious aspects
Background
Historicity
GreekAramaic
Race The story of the cultural and historical background of Jesus is the story of a tempestuous time when Rabbinic Judaism and Christianity first diverged. ... This article discusses whether Jesus, the central figure of Christianity, actually existed as a historical figure. ... It is often accepted that Aramaic was the mother tongue of Jesus of Nazareth. ... The race of Jesus has been a subject of debate since at least the 19th century. ...

Perspectives on Jesus
New Testament view
Christian views
Religious perspectives
Jewish view
Islamic view of his death
Yuz Asaf
Historical Jesus
Jesus Seminar
Jesus as myth
This article presents a description of Jesus life, as based on the four gospels. ... This article presents a description of Jesus as based on the views of Christians. ... Religious perspectives on Jesus is the specific significance some religions place on Jesus. ... Judaisms view of Jesus per se reflects Jewish views of eschatology, the characteristics of the Messiah, the gift of prophecy, and the cosmological nature of God, which are derived from the Torah and Biblical prophecies expressed by Isaiah, Ezekiel, and others from Biblical times through the destruction of Solomon... Main article: Jesus Islam holds Jesus (Arabic: ‎ `Īsā) to have been a messenger and a prophet of God and the Masih. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Yuz Asaf (یوذسف) (or Yus Asaph, or Shahzada Nabi Hazrat Yura Asaf) is believed by Ahmadis to be the name adopted by Jesus after he survived the crucifixion and subsequently migrated to Kashmir. ... Scholars arguing in favor of the existence of Jesus as a historical figure attempt a reconstruction of his life using the historical method. ... The Jesus Seminar is a research team of about two hundred academic New Testament scholars founded in 1985 by the late Robert Funk under the auspices of the Westar Institute. ... This article is part of the Jesus and history series of articles. ...

Jesus in culture
Popular culture
Dramatic portrayals
Images
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Dramatic portrayals of Jesus Christ. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Jesus in popular culture. ... There are no undisputed historical images of Jesus; he sat for no portraits which are preserved and of unquestioned authenticity and undoubted provenance. ...

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According to the canonical Gospels, Jesus worked many miracles in the course of his ministry. The large bulk of them are various cures, though there are also a large number of exorcisms, three instances of raising the dead, and various other miracles that do not fit into these categories. For other articles with similar names, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... i hate god ... According to many religions, a miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person of which they have possessed (taken control of). ... Resurrection of the Flesh (1499-1502) Fresco by Luca Signorelli Chapel of San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto The term resurrection is used in the literal sense to mean either the religious concept of the reunion of the spirit and the body of a dead person, or the return to life of...

Contents

Critical scholarship and the miracles of Jesus

Many scholars argue that miracles cannot be historically proven, and therefore are not falsifiable, and consequently discussion of them is inherently unscientific, and so does not belong in a discussion of any possible historical Jesus. The Jesus Seminar, a critical study by major theologians of what aspects of the Gospel accounts are likely to be factual, held that while the various cures for diseases are probably true, since there were many others in the ancient world credited with healing power, most of the other miracles of Jesus are unfactual, at least in their literal interpretation from the Bible. This page discusses how a theory or assertion is falsifiable (disprovable opp: verifiable), rather than the non-philosophical use of falsification, meaning counterfeiting. ... Scholars arguing in favor of the existence of Jesus as a historical figure attempt a reconstruction of his life using the historical method. ... The Jesus Seminar is a research team of about two hundred academic New Testament scholars founded in 1985 by the late Robert Funk under the auspices of the Westar Institute. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason) means reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God. ...


The veracity of exorcisms carried out by Jesus is particularly questioned among critical scholars, as according to modern science there is no evidence whatsoever for demonic possession, while there is a large amount of evidence that what ancient peoples attributed to demonic forces were actually the result of psychological disturbances and mental illness. Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person of which they have possessed (taken control of). ... Demonic possession, in supernatural belief systems, is a form of spiritual possession whereby certain malevolent extra-dimensional entities, demons, gain control over a mortal persons body, which is then used for an evil or destructive purpose. ...


Types of miracles

Curing disease and disability

The largest group of miracles mentioned in the New Testament are those concerning disease and disability. The Bible gives varying amounts of detail for each episode, and sometimes portrays Jesus curing simply by saying a few words, or laying on of hands, and at other times quite elaborate rituals involving spit are described. In most cases they are recorded by all the Synoptic Gospels, but not by that of John, and in the few cases mentioned both by John and by the Synoptics certain of the more periphery details vary substantially. The miracles concerned with disease and disability that are mentioned by the Canonical Gospels include cures of the following: The laying on of hands is a religious practice found throughout the world in varying forms. ... Spit may refer to: Look up spit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Synoptic Gospels is a term used by modern New Testament scholars for the Gospels according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke of the New Testament in the Bible. ...

  • Fever - The Synoptics (but not John) describe Jesus as having healed the mother-in-law of Simon Peter, when he visited Simon's house in Capernaum, around the time of Jesus recruiting Simon as an Apostle (Mark has it being just after recruiting Simon, while Luke has it occurring just before). The synoptics imply that this led other people seeking out Jesus, and him travelling over the whole of Galilee to preach to them.
  • Leprosy - The Synoptics (but not John) state that, early in Jesus' ministry, he healed a leper, who he then instructed to offer the requisite ritual sacrifices as proscribed by the Deuteronomic Code and Priestly Code for being healed from leprosy. Jesus is described as instructing the ex-leper not to tell anyone who had healed him, but the man is described as disobeying, causing Jesus' reputation to become better known, and so Jesus tries to hide in lonely places, but is followed there also. Luke also states that later, while on his way to Jerusalem, Jesus sent ten lepers, who had sought his assistance, away to the priests, and that they were healed as they went, but that the only one amongst them that came back to thank Jesus was a Samaritan.
  • Long term bleeding - The Synoptics (but not John) state that while heading to Jairus' house (see the section below on power over death), Jesus was approached by a woman who had been suffering from bleeding for 12 years, and that she touched Jesus' cloak (fringes of his garment: Matt 9:20, 14:36), resulting in her being instantly healed. Not noticing her do so, but aware that something had happened, Jesus is described as looking around the crowd to identify the perpetrator, and when the woman comes forward, Jesus says that her faith has healed her. The bleeding is sometimes interpreted as menorrhagia, but most scholars consider that the duration, 12 years, makes it more plausible that something more like hemophilia is being referred to.
  • Withered hands - The Synoptics (but not John) state that Jesus entered a synagogue on the Sabbath, and found a man with a withered hand there, who Jesus heals, having first challenged the people present to decide what was lawful for a Sabbath - to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill . The Gospel of Mark adds that this angered the Pharisees so much that they started to plot about killing Jesus.
  • Dropsy - Luke (but not Mark, Matthew, or John) states that, during a Sabbath, Jesus ate in the house of a prominent Pharisee, opposite someone who suffered from dropsy, and so Jesus asks the Pharisees that were present if it was lawful to heal on the Sabbath, but after getting no reply heals the man. Jesus is described as then challenging the Pharisees to say that they wouldn't immediately pull out an ox, or a son (or a donkey, according to some ancient manuscripts of Luke), if it fell into a well during a Sabbath.
  • Deafness - Mark (but not Matthew, Luke, or John) states that Jesus went to the Decapolis and met a man there who was deaf, and mute, and then cured him. Specifically, Jesus is described as doing this by first touching the man's ears, and touching his tongue after spitting, and then saying Ephphatha!, an Aramaic word meaning Be opened
  • Blindness - All four Canonical Gospels state that Jesus met a man named bar-Timai (meaning son of Timai), who is a blind beggar but still identifies Jesus as the Jewish Messiah; Jesus says that the man's faith has healed him, and the man receives his sight, and is allowed to follow Jesus. The Synoptics (but not John) states that this happened when Jesus was leaving Jericho, while John states that it happened near the Pool of Siloam. Matthew and Luke do not name the beggar, and Luke adds that there was another healed at the same time. John's description of the event is quite elaborate, adding that:
    • the disciples first questioned Jesus whether bar-Timai's blindness derived from the sins of his parents or those of himself, and that Jesus said that both the parents and bar-Timai were blameless
    • Jesus healed bar-Timai by spitting on the ground, mixing his spit with mud, and putting the mixture in bar-Timai's eyes, then sending bar-Timai to wash in the Pool of Siloam
    • the event happened on a Sabbath, and the Pharisees question how someone could not uphold the Sabbath and still have the divine power to heal
    • the Pharisees don't believe that bar-Timai is the same person as the man who was healed, and ask bar-Timai's parents if the healed man is their son, and the parents respond that he is
    • the Pharisees criticise bar-Timai for becoming a follower of Jesus, and argue that he was steeped in sin since birth, so throw him out
    • Jesus identifies himself as Son of Man, and so bar-Timai worships him
Additionally, Mark (but not Matthew, Luke, or John) states that Jesus went to Bethsaida and met another man there who was blind, and then cured him. Specifically, Jesus is described as spitting in the man's eyes, to which the man responds that his vision is now blurred, and then Jesus touches the man's eyes, and the man responds that he can see clearly now. John's account of the healing of bar-Timai has been argued by some scholars to be a conflation of the account of bar-Timai in Mark, together with the healing method given by Mark's account of the second healing of a blind man.
  • Paralysis - All four Canonical Gospels state that a paralytic was brought to Jesus on a mat, Jesus told him to get up and walk, and the man did so. Jesus is additionally described as saying to the man that his sins were forgiven, which according to the Synoptics irritated the Pharisees, and according to John irritated the people in general. Jesus is described as responding to the anger by asking whether it is easier to say that someone's sins are forgiven, or to tell the man to get up and walk. The Synoptics state that this happened in Capernaum, Luke adding that Jesus was in a house at the time, and that the man had to be lowered through the roof by his friends due to the crowds blocking the door, while John states that the event happened at Bethesda.
  • Unspecified sickness - All four Canonical Gospels state that Jesus was asked by an official to heal a person important to them, and although Jesus is somewhat annoyed at being constantly asked to perform miracles, rather than being asked for teachings, he says that the person would be healed, and the official returns home to find that this has happened. The Synoptics state that official was one of royalty, originating from Canaan, and that it was his son who was sick, while the Gospel of John states that the official was a centurion, and that it was the centurion's pais that was sick. Pais can mean servant, but it can also mean son; however, the most common meaning was young slave with whom sexual activity occurs, and the context has been argued by many to imply that the centurion was asking for a homosexual lover to be healed. Jesus' treatment of this Pais, and lack of any condemnation of the centurion, has sometimes been argued to imply that Jesus approved of homosexual relationships, but most Biblical scholars take care to avoid such eisegesis.

Aside from literal interpretations, and assumptions of it being pure fiction, numerous other explanations of the events have been put forward throughout history. Beginning with the Gnostics, it has been suggested that the reports of alleged miracles were actually intended just as allegories, not as factual events. Healing the blind has been argued to be a metaphor for people who previously could not, or would not, see the truth being shown it; healing the deaf has been interpreted as simply meaning that people who could not, or would not, listen to true teachings were made to; similarly, healing paralysis has been interpreted as an allegory for rectifying inaction; and healing leprosy for removing the societal stigmatism associated with certain stances. It has also been argued that bar-Timai is a direct reference to Plato's Timaeus, a literary work, and that bar-Timai symbolises the hellenic audience of Mark's gospel, and that curing his blindness is a metaphor for the Gospel giving a revelation to the audience. An analogue medical thermometer showing the temperature of 38. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... Catholic church built over the house of Saint Peter Capernaum (pronounced k-pûrn-m; Hebrew/Aramaic: Kfar Nahum) was a settlement on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. ... The Twelve Apostles (, apostolos, Liddell & Scott, Strongs G652, someone sent forth/sent out) were men that according to the Synoptic Gospels and Christian tradition, were chosen from among the disciples (students) of Jesus for a mission. ... Leprosy, also known as Hansens disease,[1] is an infectious disease caused by a DNA plasmid (transposon, or ultravirus, a small circle of DNA) carried in Hansens bacillus (the Mycobacterium leprae bacterium) which is thus the vector. ... According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years, with the Synoptic Gospels generally being considered to argue for it having been a period of 1 year, and the Gospel of John arguing for... The Deuteronomic Code is the name given, by academics, to the law code within Deuteronomy, except for the portion discussing the Ethical Decalogue, which is usually treated seperately. ... The Priestly Code is the name given, by academia, to the body of laws expressed in the torah which do not form part of Deuteronomy, the Holiness Code, the Covenant Code, the Ritual Decalogue, or the Ethical Decalogue. ... Jerusalem (Hebrew:  , Yerushaláyim or Yerushalaim; Arabic:  , al-Quds (the Holy); official Arabic in Israel: أورشليم القدس, Urshalim-al-Quds (combining the Biblical and common usage Arabic names) is the capital and largest city[1] of the State of Israel with a population of 724,000 (as of May 24, 2006[2... For other uses, see Samaritan (disambiguation). ... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Menorrhagia is an abnormally heavy and prolonged menstrual period. ... Haemophilia or hemophilia is the name of any of several hereditary genetic illnesses that impair the bodys ability to control bleeding. ... Lesko synagogue, Poland A synagogue (Hebrew: בית כנסת ; beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: שול, shul; Ladino אסנוגה esnoga) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ... This artyicle concerns the Sabbath in Christianity. ... The Pharisees (from the Hebrew perushim, from parash, meaning to separate) were, depending on the time, a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought among Jews that flourished during the Second Temple Era (536 BCE–70 CE). ... Edema (BE: oedema, formerly known as dropsy) is swelling of any organ or tissue due to accumulation of excess fluid. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the topic of this article may be unencyclopedic. ... The oval forum and cardo of Gerasa (Jerash) The Decapolis (Greek: deka, ten; polis, city) was a group of ten cities on the eastern frontier of the Roman Empire in Syria and Judea (renamed Palestine in 135 AD). ... It is often accepted that Aramaic was the mother tongue of Jesus of Nazareth. ... It is often accepted that Aramaic was the mother tongue of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Blindness is the condition of lacking visual perception due to physiological or psychological factors. ... In Judaism and Jewish eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) has traditionally referred to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during the Messianic... The Taking of Jericho, by Jean Fouquet Near central Jericho, November 1996 For other meanings of the word Jericho, see: Jericho (disambiguation) Jericho (Arabic ; ʼArīḥā; Hebrew ; Standard Hebrew YÉ™riḥo; Tiberian Hebrew YÉ™rîḫô, YÉ™rîḥô, Greek Ίεριχώ = Ίερή ηχώ, HierÄ“ Ä“chō - Holy echo) is a town in the West Bank, near... Pool of Siloam (Hebrew sent or sending) is a landmark mentioned several times in the Bible. ... Bethsaida (beth-sā´i-da; Βηθσαΐδά, BeÌ„thsaidá, “house of fishing”) // Bethsaida Julias A city east of the Jordan River, in a “desert place” (that is, uncultivated ground used for grazing) at which Jesus miraculously fed the multitude with five loaves and two fishes (Mark 6:32; Luke 9:10). ... Paralysis is the complete loss of muscle function for one or more muscle groups. ... Catholic church built over the house of Saint Peter Capernaum (pronounced k-pûrn-m; Hebrew/Aramaic: Kfar Nahum) was a settlement on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. ... Bethesda, the name of a pool in the New Testament, has been adopted as a name by many other places and things. ... For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... Modern reenactment including a centurion of 70 AD Artistic impression of a centurion. ... A mediaeval copy of the Bible. ... This article discusses textual hermeneutics. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article discusses the relationship between Gnosticism and the New Testament. ... An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative mode of representation conveying a meaning other than (and in addition to) the literal. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Timaeus is a theoretical treatise of Plato in the form of a Socratic dialogue, written circa 360 BC The work puts forward speculation on the nature of the physical world. ... The term Hellenistic (derived from HéllÄ“n, the Greeks traditional self-described ethnic name) was established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen to refer to the spreading of Greek culture over the non-Greek peoples that were conquered by Alexander the Great. ...


Other scholars have suggested that the Bible is more literal than that, but that the events can be scientifically explained by arguing that Jesus had a high knowledge of herbalism, as was common amongst the teachers of many mystery religions, and ascetic groups like the Essenes, and simply applied quite ordinary and scientific cures for the symptoms described. Though things like blindness and deafness may seem incurable without very modern medicine, it has been argued by these scholars that it is not true blindness, deafness, etc., being referred to, but more easily curable illness such as conjunctivitis, and glue ear. Out of the Canonical Gospels, Matthew adds several other episodes of Jesus healing people who are blind, deaf, mute, lame, or some combination of these four; many scholars see this as an example of the common trait of Matthew trying to portray Jesus as fulfilling an Old Testament prophecy, in this case Isaiah 35:5-6. Those who believe the miracles happened as literally stated also sometimes think there is a reference to this part of Isaiah, though in their case, these believers argue that Jesus was fulfilling the prophecy, rather than the author editing Jesus to fit it. It has been suggested that Herbal supplements be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ... The Essenes (es-eenz) were followers of a religious way of living in Judaism that flourished from the 2nd century BC to the 1st century AD. Many scholars today argue that there were a number of separate but related groups that had in common mystic, eschatological, messianic, and ascetic beliefs... Otitis media (also known as glue ear) is an inflammation of the middle ear, usually associated with a buildup of fluid. ...


Expelling demons

See also: Exorcism#Jesus

Belief in supernatural creatures was very common in first century Palestine, especially due to certain preachings of the Pharisees. According to a literal reading of the Synoptic Gospels, Jesus was present at multiple examples of demonic possession, while these incidents are not mentioned whatsoever by the Gospel of John. Most modern scholars dismiss these as simply being cases of mental illness and afflictions such as epilepsy, which provides the same external symptoms without requiring the need for a supernatural force, and hence is favoured by Ockham's razor. Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person of which they have possessed (taken control of). ... The Pharisees (from the Hebrew perushim, from parash, meaning to separate) were, depending on the time, a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought among Jews that flourished during the Second Temple Era (536 BCE–70 CE). ... The Synoptic Gospels is a term used by modern New Testament scholars for the Gospels according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke of the New Testament in the Bible. ... Demonic possession, in supernatural belief systems, is a form of spiritual possession whereby certain malevolent extra-dimensional entities, demons, gain control over a mortal persons body, which is then used for an evil or destructive purpose. ... Mental illness (or emotional disability, cognitive dysfunction) is a broad generic label for a category of illnesses that may include affective or emotional instability, behavioral dysregulation, and/or cognitive dysfunction or impairment. ... Occams Razor (also Ockhams Razor or any of several other spellings), is a principle attributed to the 14th century English logician and Franciscan friar, William of Ockham that forms the basis of methodological reductionism, also called the principle of parsimony or law of economy. ...


The accounts in the Synoptic Gospels are, at face value:

  • The man possessed by a demon at Capernaum - Jesus is described as carrying out an exorcism and forbidding the demon from informing people about Jesus. (Mark 1:21-28, Luke 4:31-37)
  • Jesus said many will drive out demons in his name. (Matthew 7:21-23)
  • Jesus drove out evil sprits with a word. (Matthew 8:8, 8:14-17, Mark 1:29-39; Luke 4:33-41)
  • The man possessed by demons at Gerasenes, who the people had tried to chain up but had escaped, and lived in caves, and roamed the hills, screaming - Jesus is described as asking the man's name, but is told by the man/demons that his name is Legion, ...for we are many; then the demons request to be transferred to some pigs, so Jesus obliges, and the pigs rush into a river and drown. The pig owners tell the townsfolk what had happened, and when the townsfolk see that the man is now sane, they are disturbed enough to expel Jesus from the area. The man, on the other hand, informs the whole of the decapolis what had happened. (Matthew 8:28-34, Mark 5:1-20, Luke 8:26-39)
  • Jesus drove a demon out of a mute man who then spoke, the Pharisees said it was by the power of Beelzebub. (Matthew 9:32-34, Mark 3:20-22)
  • Jesus gave the Twelve Apostles the authority to drive out evil spirits. (Matthew 10:1-8, Mark 3:15, 6:7, 6:13, Luke 9:1, 10:17)
  • Jesus said if he drove out demons by the Spirit of God or Finger of God then the Kingdom of God has come. (Matthew 12:22-32, Luke 11:14-23, 12:10;, Mark 3:20-30)
  • Jesus told the story of an evil spirit coming back to the body from which it was expelled as seven evil spirits more powerful than the first. (Matthew 12:43-45, Luke 11:24-26)
  • The possessed daughter of the Canaanite or phoenician woman in Tyre - the woman asks Jesus to heal her daughter, but Jesus criticises her for giving the children's bread to the dogs. However, the woman replies that even the dogs eat the children's crumbs, and so Jesus tells the woman that her daughter is healed, and when the woman returns home she finds that this is true. (Matthew 15:21-28, Mark 7:24-30)
  • The boy possessed by a demon that is brought forward to Jesus straight after Jesus' transfiguration, and who foams at the mouth, gnashes his teeth, becomes rigid, and involuntarily falls into both water and fire - Jesus' followers are unable to heal the boy, and Jesus condemns the people as unbelieving, but when the father of the boy questions if Jesus can heal the boy, Jesus says everything is possible for those that believe, so the father says he believes that the boy could be healed, and Jesus does so. (Matthew 17:14-21, Mark 9:14-29, Luke 9:37-49)
  • Jesus had driven seven demons out of Mary Magdalene. (Mark 16:9, Luke 8:2)
  • Jesus continued to cast out demons even though Herod Antipas wanted to kill him. (Luke 13:31-32)
  • Jesus said those who believe will cast out demons in his name. (Mark 16:17)

Scientifically, while many of these cases have an uncertain explanations, due to the minimal description of the possessions themself, the possession of the man at Gerasenes could be explained as simply being a case of schizophrenia, while the possession of the boy, brought forward after the transfiguration, has symptoms more scientifically explainable by epilepsy. Critical scholars typically see these exorcisms of such illness as allegorical, representative of Jesus' teachings clearing even the most troubled mind. Some critical scholars, however, have suggested that the events could have been real, though with the scientific explanation of the illnesses, and that the cures given were really just psychological drugs that Jesus, like many others in the era, would have been aware of; for example, Sage and Mistletoe were used in early times to treat epilepsy, and Snakeroot was used to treat schizophrenia. Catholic church built over the house of Saint Peter Capernaum (pronounced k-pûrn-m; Hebrew/Aramaic: Kfar Nahum) was a settlement on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. ... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person of which they have possessed (taken control of). ... The oval forum and main street of Roman Jerash, with modern Jerash rising behind them Jerash (ancient Antioch-on-the-Chrysorhoas, also known as Gerasa) was a city of the Graceo-Roman Decapolis, its ruins now located in the Gilead region of northwest Jordan. ... Legion, also known as the Gadarene demon, or is translated as Lots, is a demon found in the Christian Bible in Mark 5:9 and Luke 8:30. ... Sanity is a legal term denoting that an individual is of sound mind and therefore can bear legal responsibility for his or her actions. ... The oval forum and cardo of Gerasa (Jerash) The Decapolis (Greek: deka, ten; polis, city) was a group of ten cities on the eastern frontier of the Roman Empire in Syria and Judea (renamed Palestine in 135 AD). ... The Pharisees (from the Hebrew perushim, from parash, meaning to separate) were, depending on the time, a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought among Jews that flourished during the Second Temple Era (536 BCE–70 CE). ... Beelzebub as depicted in Collin de Plancys Dictionnaire Infernal (Paris, 1863). ... The Twelve Apostles (, apostolos, Liddell & Scott, Strongs G652, someone sent forth/sent out) were men that according to the Synoptic Gospels and Christian tradition, were chosen from among the disciples (students) of Jesus for a mission. ... Spirit of God may refer to Holy Spirit Spirit of God may refer to The Spirit of God Like a Fire Is Burning, a popular hymn of the Latter Day Saint movement Category: ... Fingers of God is an effect in cosmology that causes clusters of galaxies to be elongated in redshift space, with an axis of elongation pointed toward the observer. ... The Kingdom of God (Greek basileia tou theou,[1] or the Kingdom of Heaven) is a key concept in Christianity based on a phrase attributed to Jesus of Nazareth in the gospels. ... For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... Phoenicia was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plains of what is now Lebanon. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ... Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... Psychopharmacology is the study of the effects of any psychoactive drug that acts upon the mind by affecting brain chemistry. ... Sage or SAGE can refer to: Look up sage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Families Santalaceae(Viscaceae) Loranthaceae Mistletoe is the common name for various parasitic plants of the families Santalaceae (in the section of the family formerly separated as Viscaceae) and Loranthaceae. ... Species many, see text Snakeroot (Ageratina) is a genus of about 290 annual herbs and rounded shrubs from the Sunflower family (Asteraceae). ...


Nonetheless, many Christians accept these exorcisms as having really happened as actual evictions of real demons. The Roman Catholic Church maintains a detailed protocol of what is to be done to perform an exorcism, and most local denominations have an exorcism 'specialist' at hand, as does the Anglican Church of England, which maintains an exorcist in each diocese. Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person of which they have possessed (taken control of). ... The demon Satan In folklore, mythology, and religion, a demon is a supernatural being that is generally described as an evil spirit, but is also depicted to be good in some instances. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see Terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus, with its traditions first established by the Twelve Apostles and maintained through... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ...


Controlling nature

Another group of Jesus' miracles reported in the Canonical Gospels, would at face value show power over the created world:

  • The Feeding of the 5000 and of the 4000 - despite the disciples only being able to collect just a few loaves of bread and a handful of fish, a large number of people are fed, and there are even a number of baskets of leftovers.
  • The Cursing of the Fig Tree - Jesus is described as cursing a fig tree, and it subsequently withers.
  • Turning Water into Wine - at a wedding, when the host runs out of wine, the disciples of Jesus fill vessels with water, but the waiter pronounces the content of the vessels as the best wine that has been served that night.
  • Walking on water - Jesus is described as having walked over a lake to meet a boat.
  • Transfiguration of Jesus - Jesus is described as having climbed a mountain and been changed so that his face glowed.
  • The Catch of 153 fish - Jesus is described as having instructed the disciples to throw their net over the side of the water, resulting in them hauling in the huge catch (for hand fishing) of 153 fish.
  • Calming a storm - during a storm, the disciples are described as having woken Jesus, and he as having rebuked the storm causing it to become calm. Jesus then rebukes the disciples for lack of faith.

To these, some Christians, predominantly Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglo Catholics, would add Transubstantiation during the last supper meal, though this is not clear in the narrative, and requires taking Jesus' words in this part of the Gospels extremely literally. Most Protestants reject this instance of transubstantiation, as do most non-Christians. It is worth noting, however, that not all schools of non-Christian philosophy rule out the possibility of transubstantiation in general; in Aristotelian schools of metaphysics the possibility is considered quite mundane rather than indicative of divine power - indeed Aristotle allowed the possibility of transubstantiation but rejected the possibility that God could intervene in the world. The Feeding of the 5000 redirects here. ... The story of the Fig Tree appears in the Synoptic Gospels, though in the Gospel of Matthew and that of Mark, it is as a narrative about Jesus, and though a similar tale appears in the Gospel of Luke it is instead framed as a parable told by Jesus. ... In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee. ... Walking on water is one of the miracles that the Gospels attribute to Jesus. ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... The Catch of 153 fish is an episode in the appendix of the Gospel of John, in which seven of the Twelve Apostles were out fishing when they unexpectedly witness one of the resurrection appearances of Jesus. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... Transubstantiation (from Latin transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ, the change that according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church occurs in the Eucharist. ... According to gospel, the Last Supper was the last meal Jesus shared with his apostles before his death. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – March 7, 322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Plato and Aristotle, by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome). ...


Power over death

The Canonical Gospels, as they currently stand, report three cases where Jesus calls a dead person back to life: The Biblical canon is an exclusive list of books written during the formative period of the Jewish or Christian faiths; the leaders of these communities believed these books to be inspired by God or to express the authoritative history of the relationship between God and his people (although there may...

  • Jairus' daughter - Jairus, a major patron of a synagogue, asks Jesus to heal his daughter, but while Jesus is on his way, men tell Jairus that his daughter has died. Jesus says she was only sleeping and wakes her up with the word Talitha koum!.
  • The son of the widow at Nain - A young man, the son of a widow, is brought out for burial in Nain. Jesus sees her, and his pity causes him to tell her not to cry. Jesus approaches the coffin and tells the man inside to get up, and he does so.
  • The raising of Lazarus - a close friend of Jesus who has been dead for four days is brought back to life when Jesus commands him to get up.

If the Secret Gospel of Mark is to be considered genuine, then there is a fourth case in the Canonical Gospels, in which Jesus brings back to life a rich man who is loved by Jesus, and lived in Bethany. The rich man in question is implied by the Secret Gospel to be the almost naked individual that Mark states followed Jesus during his arrest, and the individual that Mark states was found in the otherwise empty tomb. Lesko synagogue, Poland A synagogue (Hebrew: בית כנסת ; beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: שול, shul; Ladino אסנוגה esnoga) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ... It is often accepted that Aramaic was the mother tongue of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Nain may refer to: Nain, an Iranian city. ... Cry may refer to: The mammalian behavior that brings about tears Usually an expression of a sad emotion A song, from an album of the same name, released in 2002 by the band Simple Minds A single released in 2002 by American pop artist Mandy Moore This is a disambiguation... Resurrection of Lazarus by Juan de Flandes, around 1500. ... The Secret Gospel of Mark refers to a non-canonical gospel which is the subject of the Mar Saba letter, a previously unknown letter attributed to Clement of Alexandria which Morton Smith claimed to have found transcribed into the endpapers of a 17th century printed edition of Ignatius. ... Bethany was originally two places in ancient Israel, the best known located near Jerusalem, see Bethany (Israel). ... Gethsemane by Wassilij Grigorjewitsch Perow The Arrest of Jesus is a pivotal event recorded in the Canonical Gospels, in which Jesus is arrested. ... entering into the sepulchre, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment - an image from the Pericopes of Henry II In the Gospels, the empty tomb is the first sign of the Resurrection of Jesus. ...


While the raising of the daughter of Jairus is in all the Synoptic Gospels (but not in the Gospel of John), the raising of the son of the widow of Nain appears only in the Gospel of Luke, and the raising of Lazarus appears only in the Gospel of John. It has been argued by several scholars and commentators that the story of the raising of Lazarus and that of the Nain widow's son really refer to the same event, and amongst those scholars also taking the Secret Gospel of Mark to be genuine, these two events are considered to derive from the raising of the youth in the original Mark (i.e. the event that was later excised from Mark, but survives in the Secret Gospel). That the story of the daughter of Jairus does not appear in the Gospel of John, despite the story clearly stating that John the Apostle was one of the only three people that Jesus took with him to witness it, is one of the reasons that most scholars doubt the Authorship of John. The Synoptic Gospels are the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... John the Apostle (יוחנן The LORD is merciful, Standard Hebrew Yoḥanan, Tiberian Hebrew Yôḥānān), also known as John the Revelator, was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... El Grecos rendition of John the Apostle shows the disputed author of the Johannine works as a young man. ...


To these must be added Jesus' own resurrection from the dead, if the Gospels are to be taken completely literally rather than allegorically. Most Christians accept this as fact without question, indeed almost defining being a Christian with a belief in the resurrection. Others, like Rudolf Bultmann, argue that the resurrection was not a historical event, as did a large number of early Christians, known as Gnostics, at one point almost a majority. Most non-Christian scholars point to the paucity of evidence, as well as the lack of evidence and scientific plausibility for other people having come back from the dead, and so reject the resurrection's historicity. The Jesus Seminar concluded: "in the view of the Seminar, he did not rise bodily from the dead; the resurrection is based instead on visionary experiences of Peter, Paul, and Mary."[1] The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ... Rudolf Karl Bultmann (August 20, 1884 - July 30, 1976) was a German theologian of Lutheran background, who was for three decades professor of New Testament studies at the University of Marburg. ... This article is written in the style of a debate rather than an encyclopedic summary. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... The Jesus Seminar is a research team of about two hundred academic New Testament scholars founded in 1985 by the late Robert Funk under the auspices of the Westar Institute. ... The vision hypothesis is a term used to cover a range of theories that question the physical resurrection of Jesus, and suggest that sightings of a risen Jesus were visionary experiences. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ...


To the Gnostics, death had a profoundly allegorical meaning; people who had renounced their lack of knowledge and their carnality, becoming gnostics, were referred to as having died, since they had metaphorically escaped the prison of the body. The Gnostics viewed resurrection as an allegory for people attaining gnosis, and not as something that had to literally have happened, hence viewing these miracles as metaphors, and teaching devices, not actual events. According to those who see Gnosticism as the original version of Christianity, this is how the events were intended to be interpreted, and hence they were non historic, never really having been meant to be seen as historic. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Power over the mind

Historically, Scholastic Theologians argued that the act of Jesus' casting out the moneylenders from the temple was a miracle showing the power of Jesus over the minds of those in the temple. They reasoned that it would not be possible for one man to eject everyone from the premises without being attacked. In more recent times, hypnotists and magicians have argued against this, for example Derren Brown demonstrated mass conversion of atheists to theism (and subsequently unconverted them by explaining his trickery). Scholastic redirects here. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Jesus vertreibt die Händler aus dem Tempel by Giovanni Paolo Pannini The narrative of Jesus and the Money Changers occurs in both the Synoptic Gospels and in the Gospel of John, although it occurs close to the end of the Synoptic Gospels (at Mark 11:15-19, Matthew 21... Derren Brown (born 27 February 1971) is an English psychological illusionist and skeptic of paranormal phenomena. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more gods or deities. ...


Supernatural knowledge

The ability of Jesus to know things by supernatural means could also be classed as a miracle. This may explain the reason why Nathaniel responded to Jesus saying, "Before that Philip called thee, when thou was under the fig tree, I saw thee", by answering, "Rabbi, thou art the Son of God; thou art the King of Israel."[1] It could be perhaps that when he was under the fig tree, Nathaniel had been praying in secret which elicited this response, rather than that he didn't know that he had merely been observed in the natural way. In the New Testament, Nathanael is a Galilean called by Christ to be a disciple, see John 1:45-50 and 21:2. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese...


List of miracles attributed to Jesus

It is not always clear when two reported miracles refer to the same event. An attempt has been made to indicate those that probably are related. Summarizing the table below, there are 47 miracles of Jesus recorded during his life-time, 40 of them recorded in the canonical Gospels and 7 recorded only in non-canonical sources[2]. The chronological order of the miracles is difficult to determine, so this list should not be viewed as a sequence.

Miracle Matthew Mark Luke John Other sources
Miraculous baptism Matthew 3:13-17 Mark 1:9-11 Luke 3:21-22 John 1:32-34
Angels protected Jesus in the desert Matthew 4:11 Mark 1:12-13
Vision of Nathanael John 1:48-51
Turned water into wine John 2:1-11
Exorcism in Capernaum Mark 1:21-28 Luke 4:31-37
Healed every disease Matthew 4:23-25 Mark 1:39
Caught large number of fish, converted fishermen to "fishers of men" Luke 5:1-11
Jesus' name exorcises demons and performs many miracles Matthew 7:22 Mark 9:38-40, 16:17 Luke 9:49-50, 10:17 John 1:12-13. 2:23, 3:18, 14:13-14, 17:11-12 Acts 3:6, 4:10, 4:30, 16:18, 19:11-20
Cured a leper Matthew 8:1-4 Mark 1:40-45 Luke 5:12-16 Egerton Gospel 2, Qur'an
Miraculous conversion of a Samaritan woman John 4:28-29
Cured a centurion's boy-servant Matthew 8:5-13 Luke 7:1-10
Cured a royal official's son John 4:46-54
Cured Peter's mother-in-law's fever and drove out many evil spirits Matthew 8:14-17 Mark 1:29-34 Luke 4:38-41
Drove 7 demons out of Mary Magdalene Mark 16:9 Luke 8:2
Calmed a storm at sea by rebuking the wind and waves Matthew 8:23-27 Mark 4:35-41 Luke 8:22-25
Healed the Gerasene Demoniac Matthew 8:28-34 Mark 5:1-20 Luke 8:26-39
Cured a paralytic at Capernaum Matthew 9:1-8 Mark 2:1-12 Luke 5:17-26
Cured a paralytic at the Pool of Bethesda John 5:1-18
Raised the son of a widow at Nain Luke 7:11-17
Raised Jairus' daughter by saying Talitha koum! Matthew 9:18-26 Mark 5:21-43 Luke 8:40-56
Healed a woman with a hemorrhage who touched the fringes of his garment [3] Matthew 9:20-22 Mark 5:24-34 Luke 8:43-48
Healed two blind men, a mute, and every disease and ailment Matthew 9:27-35
Twelve Apostles given authority to exorcise demons and raise the dead Matthew 10:1, 10:8 Mark 3:13-15, 6:7 Luke 9:1
Unnamed miracles at Chorazin, Bethsaida, Capernaum Matthew 11:20-24 Luke 10:13-15
Healed a man's withered hand Matthew 12:9-13 Mark 3:1-6 Luke 6:6-11
Healed huge crowds Matthew 12:15-21 Mark 3:7-12 Luke 6:17-19
Healed a blind and dumb demoniac Matthew 12:22-32 Mark 3:20-30 Luke 11:14-23; 12:10
Fed 5000 Matthew 14:13-21 Mark 6:30-44 Luke 9:10-17 John 6:1-14
Walked on water Matthew 14:22-33 Mark 6:45-52 John 6:15-21
All those who touched the fringes of his garment were cured Matthew 14:34-36 Mark 6:53-56
Exorcised a Canaanite (Syro-Phoenecian) woman Matthew 15:21-28 Mark 7:24-30
Healed a deaf-mute by saying Ephphatha! Mark 7:31-37
Healed large numbers of crippled, blind and mute Matthew 15:29-31
Fed 4000 Matthew 15:32-39 Mark 8:1-10
Restored a man's sight at Bethsaida Mark 8:22-26
Transfiguration Matthew 17:1-13 Mark 9:2-13 Luke 9:28-36 2 Peter 1:17-18
Exorcised a possessed boy Matthew 17:14-21 Mark 9:14-29 Luke 9:37-43
Payed temple tax with a stater coin taken from a fish's mouth Matthew 17:23-27
Healed a woman on the Sabbath Luke 13:10-17
Continued to cast out demons even though Herod Antipas wanted to kill him Luke 13:31-32
Raised Lazarus John 11:1-44 Qur'an
Healed a man with dropsy Luke 14:1-6
Healed ten lepers Luke 17:11-19
Healed large crowds in Judea Matthew 19:1-2
Healed two blind men Matthew 20:29-34
Healed the blind beggar Bartimaeus Mark 10:46-52 Luke 18:35-43 Qur'an
Blind man given sight John 9
Healed blind and lame at the temple Matthew 21:14
Cursed a fig tree Matthew 21:18-22 Mark 11:12-14, 11:20-25
Transubstantiation of bread and wine[4] Matthew 26:26-30 Mark 14:22-26 Luke 22:14-20 John 6:48-66 1 Cor 11:23-26
Satanic possession of Judas John 13:26-30
Healed High Priest's servant's ear Luke 22:49-51
Many of the dead resurrected when Jesus died Matthew 27:50-54
Resurrection appearances Matthew 28:1-20 Mark 16:1-18 Luke 24:1-49 John 20:1-23 Acts 1:1-8, 2:24, Romans 10:9, 1 Cor 15:1-15
Ascended to Heaven Mark 16:19-20 Luke 24:50-53 Acts 1:9-11, 1 Peter 3:21-22, Secret Book of James 10:1-3
Doubting Thomas John 20:24-31
Catch of 153 fish post-resurrection John 21:1-14
Miraculous conversion of Paul Acts 9:1-19,22:1-22,26:9-24
Descended into Hell Ephesians 4:8-10, Apostles' Creed, Ante-Nicene Fathers
Sent Paraclete/Holy Spirit John 14:26 Acts 1:8,2:4,2:38, Qur'an
Rich young man raised from the dead Secret Gospel of Mark 1
Water controlled and purified Infancy Thomas 2.2
Made birds of clay and brought them to life Infancy Thomas 2.3, Qur'an 3:49
Resurrected dead playmate Zeno Infancy Thomas 9
Healed a woodcutter's foot Infancy Thomas 10
Held water in his cloak Infancy Thomas 11
Harvested 100 bushels of wheat from a single seed Infancy Thomas 12
Stretched a board that was short for carpentry Infancy Thomas 13
Resurrected a teacher he earlier struck down Infancy Thomas 14-15
Healed James' viper bite Infancy Thomas 16
Resurrected a dead child Infancy Thomas 17
Resurrected a dead man Infancy Thomas 18
Miraculous Virgin Birth verified by midwife Infancy James 19-20

The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Mark is traditionally the second New Testament Gospel, ascribed to Mark the Evangelist. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ... The Baptism of Christ, by Piero della Francesca, 1449 The Baptism of Jesus is the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. ... In Christianity, the temptation of Christ refers to the temptation of Jesus by the devil as detailed in each of the three Synoptic Gospels, specifically at Matthew 4:1-11, Mark 1:12-13, and Luke 4:1-13. ... In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee. ... for the WW1 tank see Mark I for the type of British railway carriage, see British Railways Mark 1 Mark 1 is the first chapter of the Gospel of Mark of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Alternate meaning: See Apostle (Mormonism) The Christian Apostles were Jewish men chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth (as indicated by the Greek word απόστολος apostolos= messenger), by Jesus to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles, across the... A large variety of names and titles are used in the New Testament to describe Jesus. ... Leprosy, also known as Hansens disease,[1] is an infectious disease caused by a DNA plasmid (transposon, or ultravirus, a small circle of DNA) carried in Hansens bacillus (the Mycobacterium leprae bacterium) which is thus the vector. ... The Egerton Gospel (British Library Egerton Papyrus 2) refers to a group of fragments of a codex of a previously unknown gospel, found in Egypt and sold to the British Museum in 1934 and now dated to the very end of the 2nd century AD. It is one of the... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran (the traditional term in English), and Al-Quran), is the central religious text of Islam. ... Centurion can mean: In the military: Centurion (Roman army), a professional officer of the Roman army who commanded a large amount of men. ... for the WW1 tank see Mark I for the type of British railway carriage, see British Railways Mark 1 Mark 1 is the first chapter of the Gospel of Mark of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ... Mark 4 is the fourth chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Mark 4 is the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Mark 2 is the second chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Paralysis is the complete loss of muscle function for one or more muscle groups. ... Bethesda was originally the name of a pool in Jerusalem. ... It is often accepted that Aramaic was the mother tongue of Jesus of Nazareth. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... The Twelve Apostles (, apostolos, Liddell & Scott, Strongs G652, someone sent forth/sent out) were men that according to the Synoptic Gospels and Christian tradition, were chosen from among the disciples (students) of Jesus for a mission. ... Chorazin was a village in northern Galilee, two and a half miles away from Capernaum and the Sea of Galilee. ... Bethsaida (beth-sā´i-da; Βηθσαΐδά, BeÌ„thsaidá, “house of fishing”) // Bethsaida Julias A city east of the Jordan River, in a “desert place” (that is, uncultivated ground used for grazing) at which Jesus miraculously fed the multitude with five loaves and two fishes (Mark 6:32; Luke 9:10). ... Catholic church built over the house of Saint Peter Capernaum (pronounced k-pûrn-m; Hebrew/Aramaic: Kfar Nahum) was a settlement on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. ... Mark 3 is the third chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Mark 3 is the third chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The Feeding of the 5000 redirects here. ... Walking on water is one of the miracles that the Gospels attribute to Jesus. ... Mark 6 is the sixth chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Mark 7 is the seventh chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the topic of this article may be unencyclopedic. ... It is often accepted that Aramaic was the mother tongue of Jesus of Nazareth. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Blindness is the condition of lacking visual perception due to physiological or psychological factors. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the topic of this article may be unencyclopedic. ... The Feeding of the 5000 redirects here. ... The Mark-8 is a microcomputer design from 1974, based on the Intel 8008 CPU (which was the worlds first 8-bit microprocessor). ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Mark 9 is the ninth chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Herods Temple in Jerusalem was a massive expansion of the Second Temple along with renovations of the entire Temple Mount. ... A tax (also known as a duty) is a financial charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... The Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) is one of the most popular freshwater aquarium fish species in the world. ... This artyicle concerns the Sabbath in Christianity. ... Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... Resurrection of Lazarus by Juan de Flandes, around 1500. ... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran (the traditional term in English), and Al-Quran), is the central religious text of Islam. ... Edema (BE: oedema, formerly known as dropsy) is swelling of any organ or tissue due to accumulation of excess fluid. ... Leprosy, also known as Hansens disease,[1] is an infectious disease caused by a DNA plasmid (transposon, or ultravirus, a small circle of DNA) carried in Hansens bacillus (the Mycobacterium leprae bacterium) which is thus the vector. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran (the traditional term in English), and Al-Quran), is the central religious text of Islam. ... The story of the Fig Tree appears in the Synoptic Gospels, though in the Gospel of Matthew and that of Mark, it is as a narrative about Jesus, and though a similar tale appears in the Gospel of Luke it is instead framed as a parable told by Jesus. ... Transubstantiation (from Latin transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ, the change that according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church occurs in the Eucharist. ... Gethsemane by Wassilij Grigorjewitsch Perow The Arrest of Jesus is a pivotal event recorded in the Canonical Gospels, in which Jesus is arrested. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Resurrection. ... In the Supper at Emmaus, Caravaggio depicted the moment the disciples recognise Jesus The Resurrection appearances of Jesus are reported by the Canonical Gospels to have occurred after the discovery of the empty tomb. ... The Christian doctrine of the Ascension holds that Jesus bodily ascended to heaven by His own power in presence of His disciples, following his resurrection. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Incredulity of Saint Thomas by Caravaggio. ... The Catch of 153 fish is an episode in the appendix of the Gospel of John, in which seven of the Twelve Apostles were out fishing when they unexpectedly witness one of the resurrection appearances of Jesus. ... The Road to Damascus is a Biblical reference to the conversion of a persecutor of Christians named Saul on the road from Jerusalem to Damascus in the Roman province of Syria in 36 C.E. According to the Acts of the Apostles, Jesus appeared to Saul and he immediately converted... Christs Descent into Limbo by studio of Andrea Mantegna, c. ... The Apostles Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum), sometimes titled Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief, a creed or symbol. ... The Ante-Nicene Fathers, subtitled , is a selected set of books containing English translations of the major early Christian writings. ... Paraclete comes from the Koine Greek word (Strongs G3875) meaning one who consoles or one who intercedes on our behalf, which appears in the New Testament in the Gospel of John (14:16, 14:26, 15:26, 16:7). ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran (the traditional term in English), and Al-Quran), is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Secret Gospel of Mark refers to a non-canonical gospel which is the subject of the Mar Saba letter, a previously unknown letter attributed to Clement of Alexandria which Morton Smith claimed to have found transcribed into the endpapers of a 17th century printed edition of Ignatius. ... The Infancy Gospel of Thomas is a non-canonical Christian text that was part of a popular genre of the 2nd and 3rd centuries— a miracle literature of Infancy gospels that was both entertaining and inspirational, written to satisfy a hunger for more miraculous and anecdotal stories of the childhood... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran (the traditional term in English), and Al-Quran), is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Gospel of James, also sometimes known as the Infancy Gospel of James or the Protevangelium of James, is an apocryphal Gospel probably written about AD 150. ...

See also

The Parables of Jesus are a collection of parables told by Jesus that embody much of his teaching and are recorded in the four Gospels. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Moses strikes water from the stone, by Bacchiacca Moses (Hebrew: מֹשֶׁה, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: موسى, ; Geez: ሙሴ Musse) is a Biblical Hebrew liberator, leader, lawgiver, prophet, and historian. ... Josue or Yehoshua (Hebrew: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ, Tiberian: , Israeli: Yəhoshúa) is a person mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, especially in the Book of Joshua. ... Elijah in the wilderness, by Washington Allston Elijah (אֱלִיָּהוּ Whose/my God is the Lord, Standard Hebrew Eliyyáhu, Tiberian Hebrew ), also Elias (NT Greek Hλίας), Ilia (NT Bulgarian Илия), Ilie, is a prophet of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. ... Elisha (אֱלִישַׁע My God is salvation, Standard Hebrew Elišaʿ, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔlîšaʿ) is the name of a Biblical prophet. ... Rageh Omaar (b. ... Michael Symmons Roberts was born in Preston, Lancashire, in 1963. ...

References

  • Trench, Richard Chenevix, Notes on the miracles of our Lord, London : John W. Parker, 1846 and many later editions
  • Brown, Raymond E. An Introduction to the New Testament, Doubleday, 1997 ISBN 0-385-24767-2
  • Brown, Raymond E. et al. The New Jerome Biblical Commentary Prentice-Hall, 1990 ISBN 0-13-614934-0
  • Kilgallen, John J. A Brief Commentary on the Gospel of Mark, Paulist Press, 1989. ISBN 0-8091-3059-9
  • Meier, John P. A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, v. 2, Mentor, Message, and Miracles, Doubleday, 1994, ISBN 0-385-46992-6
  • Miller, Robert J. Editor The Complete Gospels, Polebridge Press, 1994 ISBN 0-06-065587-9

Richard Chenevix Trench (September 9, 1807 - March 28, 1886) was an Anglican archbishop and poet. ... John Paul Meier is a prominent Biblical scholar and Catholic priest. ...

Notes

  1. ^ John 1:48,49
  2. ^ This count includes his own resurrection, but excludes transubstantiation.
  3. ^ Jewish Encyclopedia: Jesus: "Jesus wore the Ẓiẓit (Matt. ix. 20)"; Strong's Concordance G2899; Walter Bauer's Greek-English Lexicon of the NT, 3rd ed., 1979: "κράσπεδον: 1. edge, border, hem of a garment - But meaning 2 is also possible for these passages, dependending on how strictly Jesus followed Mosaic law, and also upon the way in which κράσπεδον was understood by the authors and first readers of the gospels. 2. tassel (ציצת), which the Israelite was obligated to wear on the four corners of his outer garment, according to Num 15:38f; Dt 22:12." ... Of the Pharisees ... Mt 23:5.
  4. ^ This is viewed as a miracle in Roman Catholicism. Protestant churches do not view the Lord's Supper as a miracle.

Walter Bauer (died 17 November 1960) was a scholar of the development of the early Christian churches. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ...

External links

Apologist

  • "The Miracles of Jesus: A Historical Inquiry" by Christopher Price
  • The Historicity of Jesus' Miracles a feature of the Christan Cadre.
  • Pool of Bethesda

Critical

  • Final Words on the Miracles of Jesus

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