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Encyclopedia > Miracle on Ice
U.S. captain Mike Eruzione(left) celebrates with Bill Baker (center) moments after scoring the decisive goal against the Soviet Union.
U.S. captain Mike Eruzione(left) celebrates with Bill Baker (center) moments after scoring the decisive goal against the Soviet Union.

The "Miracle on Ice" is the nickname given to a February 22 medal-round men's ice hockey game during the 1980 Olympic Winter Games, in which a team of amateur and collegiate players from the United States, led by coach Herb Brooks, defeated the Soviet Union 4-3. Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympic Games This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympic Games This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Eruzione tees up the go-ahead goal in the Miracle on Ice game against the Soviet Union. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... For the 1994 film, see Amateur (film). ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... Image:Miracle on Ice -colin healy. ...


The United States went on to win the gold medal by beating Finland (4–2) in their final game.


The Soviet Union took the silver by beating Sweden in their final game. Sweden received the bronze medal, and Finland finished 4th.

Contents

Background

The United States team, composed of young collegiate players and amateurs, entered the competition seeded seventh in the final round of twelve teams that qualified for the Lake Placid Olympics. The Soviet Union was the favored team. Though classed as amateur, Soviet players essentially played professionally (the Soviet Government gave them different job titles to compete) in a well-developed league with excellent training facilities. They were led by legendary players in world ice hockey, such as Boris Mikhailov (a right-winger and team captain) and Vladislav Tretiak (considered by many to be the best ice hockey goaltender in the world at the time), as well as talented, young, and dynamic players such as defenseman Viacheslav Fetisov and forwards Vladimir Krutov, Sergei Makarov, and Valery Kharlamov. In exhibitions that year, Soviet club teams had gone 5–3–1 against National Hockey League (NHL) teams, and a year earlier the Soviet national team had routed the NHL All-Stars 6–0 to win the Challenge Cup. In 1979–80, virtually all the top North American players were Canadians, although the number of U.S.-born professional players had been on the rise throughout the 1970s. The 1980 U.S. Olympic team featured several young players who were regarded as highly promising, and some had signed contracts to play in the NHL immediately after the tournament. Boris Mikhailov (born October 6, 1944 in Moscow) was a Soviet ice hockey right winger. ... In certain sports, such as football, field hockey, ice hockey, rugby union and rugby league, the term winger is the name of a position. ... Vladislav Tretiak This article is about the goaltender. ... Viacheslav (Slava) Alexandrovich Fetisov (Russian: Вячеслав (Слава) Александрович Фетисов, Vjačeslav (Slava) Aleksandrovič Fetisov; born April 20, 1958, in Moscow, Soviet Union now Russia) is the current Minister of Sport in Russia, and a former ice hockey defenseman, considered one of the best defensemen of all time, a long-time captain for the Soviet... Vladimir Krutov (Владимир Евгеньевич Крутов; born June 1, 1960 in Moscow, Soviet Union) is a former Russian hockey forward. ... This article is about the ice hockey player. ... Valery Borisovich Kharlamov (Russian: Валерий Борисович Харламов; January 14, 1948 - August 27, 1981) was a star ice hockey player from the Soviet Union. ... NHL redirects here. ... 1979 Challenge Cup was an ice hockey exhibition series between the Soviet national ice hockey team and a team of all-stars from the National Hockey League, held in New York City. ...

Coach Herb Brooks calms his players' nerves during the game.
Coach Herb Brooks calms his players' nerves during the game.

The Soviet and American teams were natural rivals due to the decades-old Cold War. In addition, President Jimmy Carter was at the time considering a U.S. boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympics, to be held in Moscow, in protest of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, which had begun the year before. Carter eventually decided in favor of the boycott. Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympics This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympics This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Image:Miracle on Ice -colin healy. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... A Soviet soldier on guard in Afghanistan in 1988. ...


On February 9, the two teams met for an exhibition match at Madison Square Garden in order to practice for the upcoming competition. The Soviet Union won handily, 10–3. is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ...


In Olympic group play, the United States surprised many observers with their physical, cohesive play. In their first game against favored Sweden, the U.S. earned a dramatic 2-2 tie by scoring with 30 seconds left after pulling goalie Jim Craig for an extra attacker. Then came a stunning 7–3 victory over Czechoslovakia, considered by many to be second only to the Soviet Union and a favorite for the silver medal. With their two toughest games in the group phase out of the way, the U.S. team reeled off three more wins to go 4-0-1 and advance to the medal round from their group along with Sweden. In the other group, the Soviets stormed through their opposition undefeated, often by grossly lopsided scores – knocking off Japan 16–0, the Netherlands 17–4, and Poland 8–1 – and easily qualified for the next round although both the Finns and the Canadians gave the Russians unexpectedly tough games for two periods. In the end, the Soviet Union and Finland (who overcame a disastrous start after sensationally losing to lowly Poland in their opening game of the tournament but then rallied to upset Canada) advanced from their group. After his win in the final game of the 1980 Olympics, Craig searches the stands for his father. ...


The U.S. and USSR prepared for the medal round in different ways. Soviet coach Viktor Tikhonov rested most of his best players, preferring to let them study plays rather than actually skate. U.S. coach Herb Brooks, however, continued with his tough, confrontational style, skating "hard" practices and berating his players for perceived weaknesses. Victor Vasilevich Tikhonov (Russian: , born June 04, 1930) is a prominent Russian ice hockey player and coach. ... Image:Miracle on Ice -colin healy. ...


The day before the match, columnist Dave Anderson wrote in the New York Times, "Unless the ice melts, or unless the United States team or another team performs a miracle, as did the American squad in 1960, the Russians are expected to easily win the Olympic gold medal for the sixth time in the last seven tournaments." Dave Anderson (born May 6, 1929 in Troy, New York) is an American sportswriter based in New York City. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ...


"Do you believe in miracles?"

The home crowd, reinforced by the U.S. team's improbable run during group play and the Cold War "showdown" mentality, were in a patriotic fervor throughout the match, waving U.S. flags and singing patriotic songs such as "God Bless America."[citation needed] The rest of the United States (except those who watched the game live on Canadian television) would have to wait to see the game, as ABC decided to broadcast the late-afternoon game on tape delay in prime time.[citation needed] As in several previous games, the U.S. team fell behind early. Vladimir Krutov deflected a slap shot by Aleksei Kasatonov past U.S. netminder Jim Craig to give the Soviets a 1–0 lead, and after Buzz Schneider scored for the United States to tie the game, the Soviets rallied again with a Sergei Makarov goal. Defence of the fatherland is a commonplace of patriotism: The statue in the courtyard of École polytechnique, Paris, commemorating the students involvement in defending France against the 1814 invasion of the Coalition. ... Union Jack. ... God Bless America is an American patriotic song originally written by Irving Berlin in 1918 and revised by him in 1938. ... Aleksei Kasatonov is known as The Russian Rocket. Many regard him as one of the best defensive ice hockey players of all time. ... William Buzz Schneider (born September 14, 1954 at Grand Rapids, Minnesota) is an American ice hockey player best remembered for his role on the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team that won the gold medal at Lake Placid. ...

Eruzione tees up the go-ahead goal.
Eruzione tees up the go-ahead goal.

Down 2–1, Craig improved his play, turning away many Soviet shots before the U.S. team had another shot on goal (the Soviet team had 39 shots on goal in the game, the Americans only 16). In the waning seconds of the first period, Dave Christian fired a slap shot on Tretiak. [1] The Soviet goalie saved the shot but misplayed the rebound, and Mark Johnson scooped it past the goaltender to tie the score with one second left in the period.[2] The Soviet team played the final second of the period with just three players on the ice, as the rest of the team had retired to their dressing room for the first intermission. [3]. Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympics This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympics This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Dave Christian (born May 13, 1959 in Warroad, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... A rebound, in some sports, is the retrieval of the ball after a missed shot, especially in basketball and netball. ... gvhbjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbnnnnnnnnnnntyguhjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkjbhnmj,,n,mrtfkfjotigkfffffff fxkfdkdf fdkmfdkfmkldf dfkfdidfMedia:Example. ...


Tikhonov replaced Tretiak with backup goaltender Vladimir Myshkin to start the second period, a move which shocked many players on both teams.[4] Fetisov later identified this as the "turning point of the game."[citation needed] Myshkin allowed no goals in the second period. Aleksandr Maltsev scored on a power play to make the score 3–2 for the Soviets, but Craig made numerous saves to keep the U.S. in the game. [5] Vladimir Myshkin (born June 19, 1955 in Kirovo-Chepetsk, USSR) was a goaltender for the Soviet Unions national ice hockey team in the 1970s and 1980s. ... Aleksandr Maltsev (born April 20, 1949) was a Soviet ice hockey player. ...


Johnson scored again for the U.S., 8:39 into the final period, firing a loose puck past Myshkin to tie the score just as a power play was ending. Only a couple shifts later, Mark Pavelich passed to U.S. captain Mike Eruzione, who was left undefended in the high slot. Eruzione fired a shot past Myshkin, who was screened by his own defenseman. [6] This goal gave the U.S. a 4–3 lead with exactly 10 minutes to play in the contest [7]. Craig withstood another series of Soviet shots to finish the match, though the Soviets did not remove their goalkeeper for an extra attacker.[8] As the U.S. team tried to clear the zone (move the puck over the blue line, which they did with seven seconds remaining), the crowd began to count down the seconds left.[9] Sportscaster Al Michaels, who was calling the game on ABC along with former Montreal Canadiens goalie Ken Dryden, picked up on the countdown in his broadcast, and delivered his famous call:[10] Mark Pavelich (born February 28, 1958 in Eveleth, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... Eruzione tees up the go-ahead goal in the Miracle on Ice game against the Soviet Union. ... In hockey the slot is the area on the hockey rink directly ahead of the goaltender between the faceoff circles on each side. ... In ice hockey, a screen is when a player is obstructing the goaltenders view of the puck. ... An extra attacker in ice hockey is a forward or, less commonly, a defenceman who has been substituted in place of the goaltender. ... Alan Richard Michaels (born November 12, 1944) is an American television sportscaster. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... The Montreal Canadiens (French: ) are a professional mens hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Kenneth Wayne Ken Dryden, PC, MP, BA, LL.B (born August 8, 1947) is a Canadian politician, lawyer, businessman, author and retired National Hockey League goaltender. ...

...Eleven seconds, you've got ten seconds, the countdown going on right now! Morrow, up to Silk...five seconds left in the game...Do you believe in miracles? YES!!! Unbelieveable!!!

This victory was voted the greatest sports moment of the twentieth century by Sports Illustrated. [11] Ken Morrow (born October 17, 1956 in Flint, Michigan was American ice hockey defenseman. ... David Dave Silk (born January 1, 1958 in Scituate, Massachusetts). ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


The U.S. aftermath

Many people incorrectly recall that the U.S. won the gold medal that night. In fact, the medal round was a round-robin, not a single elimination format like it is today. Under Olympic rules at the time, the group game with Sweden was counted along with the medal round games versus the Soviet Union and Finland so it was mathematically possible for the U.S. to finish anywhere from 1st to 4th.[original research?] Needing to win to secure the gold medal, the U.S. team came back from a 2-1 third period deficit to defeat Finland (Hockey Hall of Famer Jari Kurri was a member of the Finnish team) 4–2. [12] At the time, the players ascended a podium to receive their medals and then lined up on the ice for the playing of the National Anthem, as the podium was only meant to accommodate one person.[citation needed] Only the team captains remained on the podium for the duration.[citation needed] After the completion of the anthem, Eruzione motioned for his teammates to join him on the podium.[citation needed] Today, the podiums are large enough to accommodate all of the players. Jari Pekka Kurri (born May 18, 1960, in Helsinki, Finland) is a retired Finnish professional ice hockey right winger. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...

The team jubilantly crowds the medal stand.
The team jubilantly crowds the medal stand.

The victory bolstered many U.S. citizens' feelings of national pride, which had been severely strained during the turbulent 1970s.[citation needed] The match versus the Soviets popularized the "U-S-A! U-S-A!" chant,[citation needed] which has been used by U.S. supporters at many international sports competitions since 1980.[citation needed] Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympics This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Screenshot from the ABC Sports broadcast of the 1980 Olympics This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... The U-S-A! cheer is a chant that was first yelled by fans during the 1980 Winter Olympics. ...


Of the 20 players on the U.S. team, 13 eventually played in the NHL. Five of them would go on to play over 500 NHL games:

Having already won the 1979 NCAA championship at the University of Minnesota, Broten became the only player to win a hockey championship at the collegiate, professional and Olympic level. Neal Broten (born November 29, 1959 in Roseau, Minnesota) was an American professional ice hockey player who played for the Minnesota North Stars, Dallas Stars, New Jersey Devils and Los Angeles Kings in the National Hockey League. ... The Minnesota North Stars were a professional ice hockey team in the National Hockey League between 1967 and 1993. ... The Dallas Stars are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Dallas, Texas and are best known for winning the Stanley Cup in 1999. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... The 1994-95 NHL season was the 78th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ...

  • Ken Morrow won a Stanley Cup in 1980 as a member of the New York Islanders, becoming the first hockey player to win an Olympic gold medal and the Cup in the same year. He went on to play 550 NHL games and win three more Cups, all with the Islanders.
  • Mike Ramsey played in 1070 games over 18 years. Fourteen of those years were spent with the Buffalo Sabres, for whom he was a five-time All-Star and served as team captain from 1990–92. In 2000 he became an assistant coach for the Minnesota Wild. [13]
  • Dave Christian spent 14 years in the NHL, the bulk of them for the Winnipeg Jets (for whom he served as team captain) and Washington Capitals.[citation needed] He ended his career with 773 points (340 goals, 443 assists) in 1,009 games and made the All-Star team in 1991.[14]
  • Mark Johnson bounced around the NHL for several years before finding a home in New Jersey, tallying 508 career points (203 goals, 305 assists) in 669 games over 11 seasons. [15] Like Christian, Ramsey, and Broten, he became an NHL All-Star (in 1984) and served as team captain with the Hartford Whalers. In 2002 Johnson became the coach of the University of Wisconsin Women's Hockey team, leading the team to consecutive National Championships in the 2005–2006 and 2006–2007 seasons.

One of Brooks' assistant coaches, Craig Patrick, went on to become a successful general manager in the NHL and is now in the Hockey Hall of Fame. Brooks himself would coach several NHL teams following the Olympics, with mixed results. Both Patrick and later Brooks would coach (and in Patrick's case, become GM of) the Pittsburgh Penguins. He would also return to the Olympics as coach of the 2002 team, winning the silver medal. Brooks died in a car crash in 2003 at the age of 66. The ice arena in Lake Placid is now named in his honor. Ken Morrow (born October 17, 1956 in Flint, Michigan was American ice hockey defenseman. ... The 1979-80 NHL season was the 63rd season of the National Hockey League. ... The New York Islanders are a professional ice hockey team based in Uniondale, a hamlet located on Long Island in Town of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York, United States. ... Michael Allan (Mike) Ramsey (born December 3, 1960 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is a retired American professional ice hockey defenceman who played 1070 regular season games in the NHL for the Buffalo Sabres, Pittsburgh Penguins and Detroit Red Wings between 1980 and 1997. ... The Buffalo Sabres is the best professional ice hockey team around. ... The Minnesota Wild is a professional mens ice hockey team based in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... Dave Christian (born May 13, 1959 in Warroad, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... The Winnipeg Jets were a professional ice hockey team based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Washington Capitals are a professional ice hockey team based in Washington, D.C.. They are members of the Southeast Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The 1990-91 NHL season was the 74th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... gvhbjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbnnnnnnnnnnntyguhjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkjbhnmj,,n,mrtfkfjotigkfffffff fxkfdkdf fdkmfdkfmkldf dfkfdidfMedia:Example. ... The 1983-84 NHL season was the 67th regular season of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Hartford Whalers were an American professional ice hockey team based in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Craig Patrick (born May 20, 1946 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American hockey player, coach and general manager, the son of Hall of Famer Lynn Patrick and the grandson of Lester Patrick. ... Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


Jim Craig appeared in 30 NHL games from 1980 through 1984. Most notably, team captain Mike Eruzione played his last high-level hockey game in the 1980 Olympics, as he felt that he had accomplished his hockey goals with the gold medal win. Eruzione tees up the go-ahead goal in the Miracle on Ice game against the Soviet Union. ...


Michaels was named "Sportscaster of the Year" in 1980 for his coverage of the event, and the team received Sports Illustrated magazine's "Sportsmen of the Year" award, as well as being named as Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press and ABC's Wide World of Sports. The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Since its inception in 1954, Sports Illustrated magazine has annually presented the Sportsman of the Year award to the athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement. ... In 1931, the first and most prestigious Athlete of the Year award in the United States was initiated by the Associated Press (AP). ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ...


In 2004, ESPN, as part of their 25th anniversary, declared the Miracle on Ice to be the top sports headline, moment, and game of the period 1979–2004. ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... On September 7, 2004, ESPN celebrated its 25th anniversary. ...


Soviet reaction

Though their immediate public reactions were generally sportsmanlike, the Soviet players' primary postgame emotion was despair,[citation needed] accentuated by coach Viktor Tikhonov's rage.[citation needed] There was also fear involved;[citation needed] a position on the national team was a high-status placement in Soviet society,[citation needed] affording a better lifestyle to the players in return for the perceived propaganda value of international sporting dominance.[citation needed] A loss to the U.S. team negated this goal.[citation needed] Though the game was on live television in the Soviet Union,[citation needed] it was played at 1:00 AM Moscow time.[citation needed] This afforded CPSU officials some ability to squelch news and discussion;[original research?] Pravda did not carry a game report or mention the match in its post-Olympic wrap-up,[citation needed] and the hockey players were quickly and quietly herded away from the arrival reception for Olympic athletes at Moscow's airport.[citation needed] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Victor Vasilevich Tikhonov (Russian: , born June 04, 1930) is a prominent Russian ice hockey player and coach. ... 1967 Chinese propaganda poster from the Cultural Revolution. ... The Communist Party of the Soviet Union ( Russian: Коммунисти́ческая Па́ртия Сове́тского Сою́за = КПСС) was the name used by the successors of the Bolshevik faction of the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party from 1952 to 1991, but the wording Communist Party was present in the partys name since 1918 when... For other uses, see Pravda (disambiguation). ...


Despite the loss, the USSR would remain the preeminent power in international hockey until the country's 1991 break-up. Throughout the 1980s, NHL teams continued to draft Soviet players in hopes of enticing them to eventually play professionally in North America,[citation needed] but the first would not be permitted to do so until 1988–89,[citation needed] when veteran Sergei Priakin joined the Calgary Flames.[citation needed] The following season, the Soviet Union allowed many of its veteran stars to play in the NHL, including 1980 Olympians Vyacheslav Fetisov, Alexei Kasatonov, Vladimir Krutov, Helmut Balderis, and Sergei Makarov.[citation needed] That same season, young star Alexander Mogilny defected to play for the Buffalo Sabres, as the Soviets did not allow younger players to emigrate.[citation needed] Soon thereafter, the collapse of the Soviet Union led to a flood of ex-Soviet stars in the NHL;[citation needed] since then, many of the NHL's top players have come from the former Soviet republics.[citation needed] The 1988-89 NHL season was the 72nd season of the National Hockey League. ... Sergei Pryakhin (born December 7, 1963 in Moscow, Russia) is a retired Russian ice hockey forward. ... The Calgary Flames are a professional ice hockey team based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and play out of the Pengrowth Saddledome. ... The 1989-90 NHL season was the 73rd regular season of the National Hockey League. ... Viacheslav (Slava) Alexandrovich Fetisov (Russian: Вячеслав (Слава) Александрович Фетисов, Vjačeslav (Slava) Aleksandrovič Fetisov; born April 20, 1958, in Moscow, USSR) is an ice hockey defenseman, considered one of the best defensemen of all time, a long-time captain for the Soviet Union national team. ... Alexei Kasatonov (Алексей Викторович Касатонов; born October 14, 1959 in Leningrad, USSR) is an ice hockey defenseman, a long-time member of the Soviet Union national team. ... Vladimir Krutov (Владимир Евгеньевич Крутов; born June 1, 1960 in Moscow, Soviet Union) is a former Russian hockey forward. ... Helmuts Balderis (born July 31, 1952 in Riga, Latvia, then USSR) is a retired Latvian ice hockey player. ... This article is about the ice hockey player. ... Alexander Mogilny (Александр Геннадиевич Могильный, Aleksandr Gennadijevič Mogilnyj) born on February 18, 1969, in Khabarovsk, USSR (now Russia) is a professional ice hockey player. ...


With the end of the Cold War and the fact that many players from that team went on to good careers in the NHL, more players opened up in interviews about the game.[citation needed] The general consensus was that the U.S deserved its hard fought win,[citation needed] and the Soviet players were stunned at the intensity of the U.S. team and their ability to keep playing all out no matter what the game situation.[citation needed]


Cultural references

A movie, Miracle on Ice, starring Karl Malden as Brooks and Steve Guttenberg as Craig, aired on television in 1981, and was released in theaters in 1989.[citation needed] It incorporates actual game footage and original commentary from the 1980 Winter Games.[citation needed] Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Steven Robert Guttenberg (born August 24, 1958) is an American film and television actor. ...


A second movie about the hockey victory called Miracle, starring Kurt Russell as Brooks, was released in 2004.[citation needed] Al Michaels recreated his commentary for most of the games.[citation needed] The final ten seconds, however, and his "Do you believe in miracles? YES!!!" call, were from the original broadcast and used in the film since the filmmakers felt that they could not ask him to recreate the emotion he felt at that moment.[citation needed] Miracle (2004) is an American biographical sports film about the United States mens hockey team, led by head coach, Herb Brooks, that won the gold medal in the 1980 Winter Olympics. ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... Alan Richard Michaels (born November 12, 1944) is an American television sportscaster. ...

The Olympic Center today.
The Olympic Center today.

In the X-Files episode "Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man," it is said that the Soviet Union lost because the Cigarette Smoking Man rigged the game by drugging the Soviet goaltender (Tretiak).[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 588 pixel Image in higher resolution (1912 × 1406 pixel, file size: 777 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 588 pixel Image in higher resolution (1912 × 1406 pixel, file size: 777 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Herb Brooks Arena is a 7,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Lake Placid, New York. ... The X-Files is an American Peabody and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on September 10, 1993, and ended on May 19, 2002. ... Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man is the seventh episode of the fourth season of television series The X-Files. ... Cancer man redirects here. ... Vladislav Tretiak This article is about the goaltender. ...


The Miracle on Ice features in the last episode of Peoples Century, "Fast Forward." to illustrate Soviet/US rivalries.[citation needed] Peoples Century is a television documentary series examining the 20th century. ...


The documentary film Do You Believe in Miracles?, narrated by Liev Schreiber, appeared on HBO in 2001.[citation needed] Liev Schreiber (born October 4, 1967) is a Tony Award-winning American actor. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ...


Team Rosters

United States

Pos. Name Age Hometown College
G *Jim Craig 21 North Easton, MA Boston U.
D *Ken Morrow 22 Flint, MI Bowling Green
D *Mike Ramsey 19 Minneapolis, MN Minnesota
C *Mark Johnson 21 Madison, WI Wisconsin
LW Mike Eruzione (C) 25 Winthrop, MA Boston U.
RW *Dave Silk 21 Scituate, MA Boston U.
D Bill Baker 22 Grand Rapids, MN Minnesota
C Neal Broten 20 Roseau, MN Minnesota
D Dave Christian 20 Warroad, MN North Dakota
RW Steve Christoff 21 Richfield, MN Minnesota
RW John Harrington 22 Virginia, MN Minnesota-Duluth
G Steve Janaszak 22 Saint Paul, MN Minnesota
LW *Rob McClanahan 22 Saint Paul, MN Minnesota
D Jack O'Callahan 22 Charlestown, MA Boston U.
C Mark Pavelich 21 Eveleth, MN Minnesota-Duluth
LW Buzz Schneider 25 Babbitt, MN Minnesota
RW Eric Strobel 21 Rochester, MN Minnesota
D Bob Suter 22 Madison, WI Wisconsin
LW Phil Verchota 22 Duluth, MN Minnesota
C Mark Wells 21 St. Clair Shores, MI Bowling Green

Soviet Union

Pos. Name Age Hometown
G *Vladislav Tretiak 27 Orudyevo, Moscow Oblast, Russia
D *Viacheslav Fetisov 21 Moscow, Russia
D *Alexei Kasatonov 20 Saint Petersburg, Russia
C *Vladimir Petrov 32 Krasnogorsk, Moscow Oblast, Russia
LW *Valeri Kharlamov 32 Moscow, Russia
RW *Boris Mikhailov (C) 35 Moscow, Russia
RW Helmuts Balderis 27 Riga, Latvia
D Zinetula Bilyaletdinov 24 Moscow, Russia
RW Aleksandr Golikov 27 Penza, Russia
LW Vladimir Krutov 19 Moscow, Russia
RW Yuri Lebedev 28 Moscow, Russia
RW Sergei Makarov 21 Chelyabinsk, Russia
C/RW Aleksandr Maltsev 30 Kirovo-Chepetsk, Russia
G Vladimir Myshkin 24 Kirovo-Chepetsk, Russia
D Vasili Pervukhin 24 Penza, Russia
LW Aleksandr Skvortsov 25 Nizhny Novgorod, Russia
D Sergei Starikov 21 Chelyabinsk, Russia
D Valeri Vasiliev 30 Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

* Starters Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... After his win in the final game of the 1980 Olympics, Craig searches the stands for his father. ...   Settled: 1694 â€“ Incorporated: 1725 Zip Code(s): 02356 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Ken Morrow (born October 17, 1956 in Flint, Michigan was American ice hockey defenseman. ... Nickname: Location of Flint within Genesee County, Michigan. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... gvhbjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbnnnnnnnnnnntyguhjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkjbhnmj,,n,mrtfkfjotigkfffffff fxkfdkdf fdkmfdkfmkldf dfkfdidfMedia:Example. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Eruzione tees up the go-ahead goal in the Miracle on Ice game against the Soviet Union. ... Jarome Iginla wears the C on his jersey as captain of the Calgary Flames. ...   Nickname: Winthrop-by-the-Sea Settled: 1635 â€“ Incorporated: 1852 Zip Code(s): 02152 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... David Dave Silk (born January 1, 1958 in Scituate, Massachusetts). ... Scituate, Massachusetts is a small seacoast town located in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod Bay midway between Boston and Plymouth. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Bill Baker (born November 29, 1956 in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, USA) is a retired American professional hockey defenceman who played 3 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Montreal Canadiens, Colorado Rockies, St. ... Grand Rapids is a city in Itasca County, Minnesota, United States. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Neal Broten (born November 29, 1959 in Roseau, Minnesota) was an American professional ice hockey player who played for the Minnesota North Stars, Dallas Stars, New Jersey Devils and Los Angeles Kings in the National Hockey League. ... Roseau is a city in Roseau County, Minnesota, USA. The population was 2,756 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Dave Christian (born May 13, 1959 in Warroad, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... Warroad is a city located in Roseau County, Minnesota, at the southwest corner of Lake of the Woods. ... The University of North Dakota (UND) is a comprehensive, public university in Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. UND is the largest and oldest university in the state of North Dakota. ... Steve Christoff (born January 23, 1958 in Richfield, Minnesota is a retired American professional ice hockey forward who played 248 regular season games in the NHL with the Minnesota North Stars, Calgary Flames, and Los Angeles Kings in 1980-84. ... location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin Founded 1850s Incorporated 1908  - Mayor Debbie Goettel (elected 2006) Area    - City 18. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... John Bah Harrington (born May 24, 1957) in Virginia, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... Virginia is a city located in St. ... The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) is a regional branch of the University of Minnesota System located in Duluth, Minnesota, USA. As Duluths public research university, UMD offers 12 bachelors degrees in 75 majors, graduate programs in 20 fields, a two-year program at the School of Medicine... Steve Janaszak (born January 7, 1959 in St. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Jack OCallahan (born July 24, 1957 in Charlestown, Massachusetts) is a retired professional ice hockey player who played 390 NHL regular season games between 1982 and 1989 for the Chicago Blackhawks and New Jersey Devils. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Mark Pavelich (born February 28, 1958 in Eveleth, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... Eveleth is a city located in St. ... The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) is a regional branch of the University of Minnesota System located in Duluth, Minnesota, USA. As Duluths public research university, UMD offers 12 bachelors degrees in 75 majors, graduate programs in 20 fields, a two-year program at the School of Medicine... William Buzz Schneider (born September 14, 1954 at Grand Rapids, Minnesota) is an American ice hockey player best remembered for his role on the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team that won the gold medal at Lake Placid. ... Babbitt is a city located in St. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Eric Strobel (born June 5, 1958) in Rochester, Minnesota was an American ice hockey forward. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Olmsted Founded 1854 Government  - Mayor Ardell Brede Area  - Total 39. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Bob Suter (born May 16, 1957 in Madison, Wisconsin was American ice hockey defenseman. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Phil Verchota (born December 28, 1956) in Duluth, Minnesota was American ice hockey forward. ... Duluth is the county seat of St. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Mark Wells (born September 18, 1957) in St. ... St. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Vladislav Tretiak This article is about the goaltender. ... Moscow Oblast (Russian: ) is a federal subject of Russia (an oblast) officially established on January 14, 1929. ... Viacheslav (Slava) Alexandrovich Fetisov (Russian: Вячеслав (Слава) Александрович Фетисов, Vjačeslav (Slava) Aleksandrovič Fetisov; born April 20, 1958, in Moscow, Soviet Union now Russia) is the current Minister of Sport in Russia, and a former ice hockey defenseman, considered one of the best defensemen of all time, a long-time captain for the Soviet... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronounciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 878. ... Alexei Kasatonov (Алексей Викторович Касатонов; born October 14, 1959 in Leningrad, USSR) is an ice hockey defenseman, a long-time member of the Soviet Union national team. ... Saint Petersburg  listen (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of... Vladimir Vladimirovich Petrov (Russian: ) (b. ... Krasnogorsk (Russian: ) is a town in Moscow Oblast, Russia, known for the Moscow Country Club Resort at Nakhabino. ... Valery Kharlamov (January 14, 1948 - August 27, 1981) was a star ice hockey player from the Soviet Union. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronounciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 878. ... Boris Mikhailov (born October 6, 1944 in Moscow) was a Soviet ice hockey right winger. ... Jarome Iginla wears the C on his jersey as captain of the Calgary Flames. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronounciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 878. ... Helmuts Balderis (born July 31, 1952 in Riga, Latvia, then USSR) is a retired Latvian ice hockey player. ... Riga (Latvian: RÄ«ga), the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of River Daugava, at 56°58′N 24°8′E. Riga is the largest city in the Baltic states and serves as a major cultural, educational, political, financial, commercial and industrial center... Zinetula Bilyaletdinov was a Russian hockey player. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronounciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 878. ... Aleksandr Golikov was a Russian hockey player. ... Penza (Пе́нза) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Penza Oblast in the Volga Federal District. ... Vladimir Krutov (Владимир Евгеньевич Крутов; born June 1, 1960 in Moscow, Soviet Union) is a former Russian hockey forward. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronounciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 878. ... Yuri Lebedev was a Russian hockey player. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronounciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 878. ... This article is about the ice hockey player. ... Chelyabinsk (Russian: ) is a Russian city just to the east of the Ural Mountains, on Miass River, at to . ... Aleksandr Maltsev (born April 20, 1949) was a Soviet ice hockey player. ... Kirovo-Chepetsk is a city in the Kirov Oblast, Russia. ... Vladimir Myshkin (born June 19, 1955 in Kirovo-Chepetsk, USSR) was a goaltender for the Soviet Unions national ice hockey team in the 1970s and 1980s. ... Kirovo-Chepetsk is a city in the Kirov Oblast, Russia. ... Vasili Pervukhin was a Russian hockey player. ... Penza (Пе́нза) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Penza Oblast in the Volga Federal District. ... Aleksandr Skvortsov was a Russian hockey player. ... Nizhny Novgorod (Russian: ), colloquially shortened as Nizhny, is the fourth largest city in Russia, ranking after Moscow, St. ... Sergei Starikov was a Russian hockey player. ... Chelyabinsk (Russian: ) is a Russian city just to the east of the Ural Mountains, on Miass River, at to . ... Valeri Vasiliev (born August 3, 1949 in Gorky, USSR) was a Russian ice hockey defenceman. ... Nizhny Novgorod (Russian: ), colloquially shortened as Nizhny, is the fourth largest city in Russia, ranking after Moscow, St. ...


Officials

U.S. vs. USSR

Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

References

The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... ... ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...

See also

At the 1980 Winter Olympics hosted in Lake Placid, New York, one Ice Hockey event was held: Mens Ice Hockey. ...

External links

Preceded by
Willie Stargell
Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year
1980 USA Men's Ice Hockey Team

1980
Succeeded by
John McEnroe
Preceded by
Midori Ito
Nagano 1998
Final Winter Olympic Torchbearer
1980 USA Men's Ice Hockey Team

Salt Lake City 2002
Succeeded by
Stefania Belmondo
Torino 2006
Wilver Dornell Willie Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed Pops in the later years of his career, was a professional baseball player who played his entire Major League career (1962-1982) with the Pittsburgh Pirates as an outfielder and first baseman. ... In 1931, the first and most prestigious Athlete of the Year award in the United States was initiated by the Associated Press (AP). ... John Patrick McEnroe Jr. ... Midori Ito ) (born August 13, 1969) is a former Japanese figure skater. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The Olympic Flame at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun is a symbol of the Olympic Games. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Stefania Belmondo (born January 13, 1969 in Vinadio, Cuneo) is a former Italian cross-country skier. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Since its inception in 1954, Sports Illustrated magazine has annually presented the Sportsman of the Year award to the athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement. ... Bannister was chosen as the first Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year for his accomplishments in 1954. ... John Joseph Johnny Podres (born September 30, 1932 in Witherbee, New York) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1953-55, 1957-67); Detroit Tigers (1966-67), and San Diego Padres (1969). ... Bobby Joe Morrow (born October 15, American athlete, winner of three Olympic gold medals in 1956. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Rafer Lewis Johnson (born August 18, 1935) is a former American decathlete. ... Ingemar Johansson (born 22 September 1932 -) is a Swedish former boxer and heavyweight champion of the world. ... This article is about the golfer. ... Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Terry Wayne Baker (born May 5, 1941 in Pine River, MN) is a former quarterback for the Oregon State University football team. ... Alvin Ray Pete Rozelle (March 1, 1926–December 6, 1996) was the commissioner of the National Football League (NFL) from January 1960 to November 1989, when he retired from office. ... Ken Venturi (born 1931 in San Francisco, California) was a prominent PGA Tour professional during the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun, on December 30, 1935, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American left-handed former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. ... James Ronald (Jim) Ryun (born April 29, 1947) is an American former track athlete and politician, who was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1997 to 2007, representing the 2nd District in Kansas. ... Carl Yastrzemskis number 8 was retired by the Boston Red Sox in 1989 Carl Michael Yaz Yastrzemski (pronounced ), i. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... For other persons named Thomas Seaver, see Thomas Seaver (disambiguation). ... Robert Gordon Bobby Orr, OC (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey defenseman, and is considered to be one of the greatest hockey players of all time. ... Lee Buck Trevino (born December 1, 1939) is an American professional golfer. ... Billie Jean Moffitt King (born November 22, 1943 in Long Beach, California) is a retired tennis player from the United States. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Sir John Young Stewart, OBE[2] (born 11 June 1939 in Milton, West Dunbartonshire), better known as Jackie, and nicknamed The Flying Scot, is a Scottish[3] former racing driver. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... Christine Marie Evert (born December 21, 1954) is a former World No. ... Steve Cauthen (born May 1, 1960 in Covington, Kentucky) is an American jockey. ... Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940), also known as The Golden Bear,[1] is widely regarded as the greatest professional golfer of all time, in large part because of his records in major championships. ... Terry Paxton Bradshaw (born September 2, 1948), is a former American football quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). ... Wilver Dornell Willie Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed Pops in the later years of his career, was a professional baseball player who played his entire Major League career (1962-1982) with the Pittsburgh Pirates as an outfielder and first baseman. ... Ray Charles Leonard (born May 17, 1956 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a retired professional boxer. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Mary Slaney (born Mary Teresa Decker August 4, 1958) is an American former track and field athlete, who holds seven American records in her sport. ... Edwin Corley Moses (born in Dayton, Ohio August 31, 1955) is an American track and field athlete who won gold medals in the 400-meter hurdles at the 1976 and 1984 Summer Olympics. ... Mary Lou Retton (born January 24, 1968 in Fairmont, West Virginia) is an American gymnast. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... Bob Bourne (born 21 June 1954 in Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan, Canada) is a retired professional ice hockey centre who played in the NHL between 1974 and 1988. ... Kipchoge (Kip) Keino (born January 17, 1940), chairman of the Kenyan Olympic Committee (KOC), is a retired Kenyan athlete and two-time Olympic gold medalist. ... Dale Bryan Murphy (b. ... Patty Sheehan (b October 27, 1956 Middlebury, Vermont) is an American professional golfer. ... Rory Darnell Sparrow (born June 12, 1958 in Suffolk, Virginia) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. He played collegiately at Villanova University. ... Reginald Williams (born September 19, 1954 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... Orël Leonard Hershiser IV (born September 16, 1958) is a former professional right-handed pitcher and is currently an analyst for Baseball Tonight on ESPN. In 1988, he won the Cy Young Award, the NLCS MVP and the World Series MVP with the L.A. Dodgers. ... Gregory James Greg LeMond (born June 26, 1961 in Lakewood, California) is a former professional road bicycle racer from the United States and a three time winner of the Tour de France. ... Joseph Clifford Joe Montana, Jr. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... Bonnie Kathleen Blair (born March 18, 1964 in Cornwall, New York) is a retired American speedskater. ... Johann Olav Koss (born 29 October 1968 in Drammen, Norway) is a former speed skater, considered to be one of the best in history. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 1 in (1. ... Dean Woods (born June 22, 1966) is an Australian cyclist from Wangaratta in regional Victoria known for his track cycling achievements at the Olympic Games and Commonwealth Games levels. ... Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963 in Pomona, California) is a former professional baseball player who played the majority of his major league career with the Oakland Athletics before finishing his career with the St. ... Samuel Sosa Peralta (born November 12, 1968 in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) is a designated hitter for the Texas Rangers of the American League. ... First International Italy 1–0 USA (Jesolo, Italy; 18 August 1985) Largest win USA 12–0 Mexico (Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 18 April 1991) USA 12–0 Martinique (Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 20 April 1991) Worst defeat USA 0–4 Brazil (Hangzhou, China; 27 September 2007) World Cup Appearances 5... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 1 in (1. ... Curtis Montague (Curt) Schilling (born November 14, 1966 in Anchorage, Alaska) is an American Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. ... For other people named Randy Johnson, see Randy Johnson (disambiguation) Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed the Big Unit, is a southpaw American starting pitcher who currently plays for Major League Baseballs Arizona Diamondbacks. ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965)) is a retired American NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... Timothy Tim Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976 in Christiansted, St. ... Location Fenway Park (Since 1912) Boston, Massachusetts (Since 1901) 2004 Information Owner(s) John Henry Tom Werner Larry Lucchino Manager(s) Terry Francona Local television NESN Local radio WEEI The Boston Red Sox 2004 season is the 103rd Major League Baseball season for the Boston Red Sox franchise. ... Thomas Edward Brady, Jr. ... Dwyane Tyrone Wade, Jr. ... Brett Hillbilly Favre (pronounced Farv, born on October 10, 1969 in Gulfport, Mississippi [1]) is an American football player, currently starting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). ... ABC Sports redirects here. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... MNF redirects here. ... ESPN Saturday Night Football is a weekly presentation of college football on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). ... NASCAR on ESPN is a series of NASCAR races that were broadcasted by ABC and the ESPN networks from the early 1960s until 2000. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Baseball Network was a short-lived television joint venture involving the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and Major League Baseball. ... Major League Baseball on ABCs Wide World of Sports. ... The NBA on ABC is a TV show that telecasts NBA games on ABC Sports since Christmas Day 2002. ... NBA Sunday Countdown, also known simply as NBA Countdown, is a weekly, thirty minute pregame show airing prior to each National Basketball Association (NBA) telecast on the American Broadcasting Company. ... NBA Inside Stuff is a television program that airs on NBA TV, featuring behind the scenes activities of NBA players. ... NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad is a program which airs on Saturday afternoons on ABC. The program details the behind-the-scenes activities of NBA players, coaches and officials, and serves as a replacement for NBA Inside Stuff. ... The NHL on ABC is a former TV show that televised National Hockey League games on the American Broadcasting Company and was produced by ABCs corporate sibling (under the Walt Disney Company umbrella) ESPN. // 1992-1994 Version From the 1992-1993 season to the 1993-1994 season, ABC televised... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... ABCs Wide World of Sports is a long-running sports anthology show on American television. ... Skier Alain Baxter competing in the gym tests Superstars is an all-around sports competition that pits elite athletes from different sports against one another in a series of athletic challenges resembling a decathlon. ... August 2006 is the eighth month of that year, and has yet to occur. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Observer | Miracle on ice (876 words)
The problem with miracles is that when you analyse them they seem, well, less miraculous.
On Friday 22 February 1980 a miracle took place during the winter Olympics at Lake Placid in upstate New York when a team of American college boys defeated the formidable Soviet Union, on their way to winning gold.
Any detailed examination of the 'miracle' needs Brooks's voice, but Coffey was denied that when the coach was killed in a car crash in August 2003.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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