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Encyclopedia > Minor Discworld characters

This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. Cover art of The Colour of Magic by Josh Kirby The Discworld is a series of thirty-four satirical fantasy novels and a number of shorter works by Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE is an English fantasy author (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England), best known for his Discworld series. ...

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71-Hour Ahmed

A Klatchian warrior who accompanies the Klatchian envoy Prince Khufurah on a diplomatic journey to Ankh-Morpork in the novel Jingo. He speaks with a heavy accent and has a penchant for chewing on cloves. Following an attempt on the prince's life by an unknown assassin, he is suspected of killing the Watch's prime suspect, provoking Vimes and other Watch members to pursue him back to Klatch. In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, Klatch is both a country and a continent. ... Jingo is a novel by Terry Pratchett, one of his phenomenally popular Discworld series. ...


Apart from belonging to a vicious but honorable warrior clan known as the D'regs, he is later revealed to be a Klatchian equivalent of a watchman on par with Vimes. It also turns out his obsessive clove-chewing and broken Morporkian are in fact a disguise meant to delude foreigners into falsely assuming he is nothing but an uncivilized barbarian.


He got his nickname after killing a man (guilty of poisoning a well, killing a number of villagers) one hour before the traditional D'reg three days of hospitality, during which even your greatest enemy should be shown respect, would have run out.


Anghammarad

Anghammarad is a minor character in the novel Going Postal. He is a golem, almost nineteen thousand years old, having been baked by the priests of Upsa in the Third Ning of the Shaving of the Goat. He was also given a voice. However, Upsa was destroyed by the explosion of Mount Shiputu. He then spent two centuries under a mountain of pumice, before it eroded away. He then became a messenger for the Fisherman Kings of the holy Ult. Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ... Golems in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series are derived from golems in Jewish mythology; early forms of a clay robot, supposedly awakened by a spell or priestly words to do peoples bidding. ... Specimen of highly porous pumice from Teide volcano on Tenerife, Canary Islands. ...


More recently, he delivered the decrees of King Het of Thut. That is, he delivered them until the land of Thut slid under the sea. He then spent nine thousand years in the deep ocean, before being netted by a fisherman. While having returned to civilization, he still carries the message warning Het that the sea goddess is angry, and hoped to deliver it (golems believe time is cyclical, and Anghammarad thought that if he waited long enough, he'd be able to get it right the second time around).


He worked for the Ankh-Morpork Post Office (in the honorary position of Extremely Senior Postman) before being destroyed when the building was burnt down. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ...


Achmed the Mad

Writer of the Necrotelecomnicon, which he wrote after drinking too much Klatchian Coffee. He is also the writer of Achmed the I Just Get These Headaches' Book Of Humorous Cat Stories (a title which contains the name by which he preferred to be known), which supposedly started his madness. This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ... This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ...


He is a parody of the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred, in the Cthulhu mythos of H. P. Lovecraft. Abdul Alhazred, or the Mad Arab, is a fictional character created by the horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. ... Cthulhu (alternate spellings: Tulu, Cthulu, Ktulu, and many others) is a fictional character in the Cthulhu mythos of H.P. Lovecraft[1]. Cthulhu often includes the title Great or Dread. ... H. P. Lovecraft Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy and horror fiction, noted for giving horror stories a science fiction framework. ...


Drum Billet

A wizard who starts the events of Equal Rites by bequeathing his staff to Eskarina Smith. He is later reincarnated as an apple tree, with fruit that goes "from stomach-turning sourness to wasp-filled rottenness overnight" (see Scumble). Later in the book he's left the life of a tree for the life of an ant living under Unseen University, though it was more than he could have hoped for. Equal Rites is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett. ... This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ... The Coat of Arms of Unseen University. ...


B'hrian Bloodaxe

The first Low King of the Dwarfs, and a great cultural hero. His life is told in the opera Bloodaxe and Ironhammer. He was the lover of Ironhammer, who forged the Scone of Stone (a reference to the Stone of Scone, the ancient throne upon which the Kings of Scotland were crowned). Ironhammer killed himself when falsely told of Bloodaxe's death. Bloodaxe was subsequently killed at the Battle of Koom Valley. Accorging to legend he killed 57 trolls there, and a loaf of Battle Bread that he supposedly wielded has become a cultural icon and is in the Dwarf Bread Museum in Ankh-Morpork. However, in Thud! it's revealed that he was trying to prevent the battle when a flash flood trapped him in a sinkhole. The Battle Bread found next to Bloodaxe's body casts doubt on the authenticity of the A-MDBM loaf, unless of course he carried more than one. Dwarfs in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels are similar to the Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, which they largely started out pastiching, and dwarfs/dwarves in other fantasy novels. ... The Stone of Scone, (pronounced scoon) also commonly known as the Stone of Destiny or the Coronation Stone (though the former name sometimes refers to Lia Fáil) is a block of sandstone historically kept at the now-ruined abbey in Scone, near Perth, Scotland. ... This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ... Trolls in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels, unlike the monstrous trolls of folklore and J.R.R. Tolkien, have been subverted into a moderately civilised race. ... Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, released in the United States of America and the United Kingdom on September 13, and it may have been released already in other countries, such as Norway [1] and Denmark. ...


Bloodaxe was first mentioned in Feet of Clay, and his full history was revealed in The Fifth Elephant and Thud!. His name is possibly based on Brian Bloodaxe, a computer game character from the 1980s. The character is also possibly based on Brian Boru, a 10th century Irish king. Feet of Clay is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett which parodies detective novels. ... The Fifth Elephant is the 24th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, scheduled to be released in October 2005. ... Brian Bloodaxe is a classic platform game written by Trevor Inns and released by The Edge in 1985. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Brick

Brick is a young troll who has a role in Thud!. He is described as being emaciated by troll standards, and having a texture and pattern to his skin that makes him resemble a brick wall (due to being made of "metamorphorical rock" and having been born in Ankh-Morpork). Samuel Vimes, upon seeing him, classified him as the loser's loser. Brick regularly used troll drugs bummed off of the few gutter trolls who didn't run him off when they saw him--and he knew how to make Scrape, a low-class troll drug. Eventually, Sergeant Detritus of the City Watch takes in Brick and seems to unofficially adopt him. Detritus was convinced of Brick's potential after Brick was found still conscious, and, what's more, still walking after having a few mugs of a potent troll beverage, the name of which translates to Big Hammer. Trolls in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels, unlike the monstrous trolls of folklore and J.R.R. Tolkien, have been subverted into a moderately civilised race. ... Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, released in the United States of America and the United Kingdom on September 13, and it may have been released already in other countries, such as Norway [1] and Denmark. ... Trolls in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels, unlike the monstrous trolls of folklore and J.R.R. Tolkien, have been subverted into a moderately civilised race. ... Sam Vimes is a fictional policeman from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Detritus is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ...


Brutha

Originally an Omnian novice in the Citadel of Kom, noted only for being a simple boy with an apparently perfect memory. Brutha was the main character in Small Gods, in which he found himself Chosen by the Great God Om, due to being the only person who really believed in him. He went on to become the Eighth Prophet of Om and Cenobiarch of Omnia, and transformed Omnianism into a religion of tolerance and understanding. He died 100 years later, although exactly when these 100 years occurred is a matter of some confusion. An Omnian is someone who practices a religion that appears on the Discworld, created by Terry Pratchett. ... This article is about the novel Small Gods; for the concept of Small Gods within the Discworld, see Discworld Gods Small Gods is a novel by Terry Pratchett, the thirteenth part of the popular Discworld series. ... The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Omnia is a fictional country in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ...


An example of Brutha's memory is given when he says that his earliest memory is that "there was a bright light. Then somebody hit me." referring to the slap a doctor gives a baby after it is born to make it breathe.


Brutha seems to be Terry Pratchett's idea of a genuine saint. In Roman Catholic doctrine, a Saint (rel. ...


Count Casanunda

A dwarf (though more noticeable than most because of his colossal powdered wig). The moral equivalent of Nanny Ogg. His visiting card says "World's second greatest lover. Finest swordsman. Outrageous liar. Stepladders repaired." He claims to be the Disc's Second Greatest Lover, usually noting, "I try harder" immediately afterwards. He also claims he performed a small service - although not that small - for Queen Agantia of Skund, for which he received his noble title. However, since Skund is a virtually uninhabited forest with no known rulers, his story lacks a certain credibility. Known for also being the fastest thing on the Disc, when in a nunnery (the second fastest thing on the Disc is the .303 bookworm). Appeared in Witches Abroad, Soul Music, Lords and Ladies and Reaper Man. Brief cameo in Carpe Jugulum where he reflects upon a fellow highwayman being killed by the Magpyrs. Notable line: "Kneel and deliver!" His name is a play on Casanova, although, as a dwarf, he obviously stands more "unda" than "ova" his conquests. Second greatest lover may also be a reference to him. Gytha Ogg (usually called Nanny Ogg) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Witches Abroad is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, originally published in 1991. ... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Lords and Ladies is the fourteenth Discworld book by Terry Pratchett. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the twenty third in the Discworld series. ... Giacomo Casanova (April 5, 1725 - June 4, 1798). ...


Imp y Celyn

A bard from the decidedly Cymric country of Llamedos. In Soul Music he was possessed by "Music with Rocks in" and became the Disc's greatest musician under the name Buddy in the Band with Rocks In along with Cliff and Glod, before dying in a cart crash (an admitted reference to Buddy Holly—Imp's name in fact translates as "bud of the holly"). The timeline in which this happened has, however been eradicated following Death's intervention, and he was last seen working in a fried fish stall in Quirm. He looks a bit Elvish. A bard is a poet or singer, in religious or feudal contexts. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... Llamedos is a fictitious country in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, mentioned most prominently in Soul Music. ... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Soul Music is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1994. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. ... Quirm is a fictional city in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ...


Conina

The daughter of Cohen the Barbarian and a temple dancer. From her mother she inherited gold-tinged skin, white-blond hair, a voice that can make "Good morning" sound like an invitation to bed, and a very good figure. From her father, she inherited sinews you could moor a ship to, muscles as solid as a plank, and reflexes like a snake on a hot tin roof (from relevant pieces of description in Sourcery). She also acquired from Cohen suitable heroic instincts (that is, strong urges to fight, kill, and steal) and an ability to use anything as a deadly weapon. These traits rather get in the way of the profession she really wants to have--hairdressing. Cohen the Barbarian is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Sourcery is the fifth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1988. ...


Sacharissa Cripslock

The daughter of an engraver (who possibly appeared in Maskerade, working for Goatberger) she became a reporter for the Ankh-Morpork Times, having originally arrived at the print works to complain about the invention of moveable type. Appears in The Truth and Going Postal. In the latter work she is married, presumably to William de Worde, although she still addresses herself as Miss Cripslock. Maskerade is a novel in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ... This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ...


Dios

High priest of Djelibeybi; largely responsible for its creation, its culture and its religion, not to mention its hundreds of pyramids. Rendered immortal by the pyramid in which he sleeps, Dios remained for hundreds of generations the self-appointed guardian of the traditions and values of his country, most of which he invented. He performed the rituals and rites to the gods so many times that, come their alotted hour, his mind would automatically go through them even if physically doing so was imposible. He believed he may be 7000 years old, though by the end of Pyramids his unhappy fate reveals he is actually far older than that, if indeed he could be said to have an age at all. It also raises the question of whether it was indeed Dios who created the pyramids, or the other way around. Djelibeybi is a fictional country on Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... This is about the polyhedron. ...


Duck Man

A companion of Foul Ole Ron, and likewise a reject from the Ankh-Morpork Beggars' Guild, the Duck Man seems to be a reasonably sane, well-mannered, and likeable fellow, dressed in expensive but rather old and tattered clothes. However, this is almost entirely mitigated by the fact that he has a live duck on his head. The Duck Man is apparently unaware of the duck, and whenever people bring up the subject, he always says something like "What duck?" Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels, there are almost 300 Guilds in the city of Ankh-Morpork. ...


Carcer Dun

The villain of Night Watch. Described by Vimes as "a stone-cold killer. With brains." A psychopathic killer, who seems to believe that nothing he does is really wrong (" 'Who? Me? What did I do?' "), but seems to be able to control his impulses sometimes ("There was one thing about Carcer. He wouldn't shoot you in the back if he thought there was reasonable chance of cutting your throat later."). Enjoys letting people's imaginations work (" 'I can see your house from up here!' "), and seems to feed on that moment of dawning comprehension when someone realizes what's coming. Carcer has many of Vimes's qualities, only in reverse--for example, a belief of how useful brass knuckles and blackjacks and coshes can be, and a decided lack of fighting fair. Carcer's last name was shown in a preview of Night Watch, but never revealed in the final version. Night Watch is the 27th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ... Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a personality disorder which is often characterised by antisocial and impulsive behaviour. ...


Drumknott

Secretary to Patrician Vetinari of Ankh-Morpork, following the death of Lupine Wonse. First appears in Feet of Clay. Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Feet of Clay is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett which parodies detective novels. ...


Commonly seen entering and leaving the presence of the Patrician bearing either paperwork or verbal information on the activities of other denizens of the city, or the Discworld in general, Drumknott seems not to think much about the political implications of the information he works with, believing in filing for its own sake. During The Truth he was seemingly attacked by the Patrician, and by the time of Going Postal was responsible for relaying the orders of the Patrician in assigning tasks to other clerks. The Discworld is the setting for all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ... This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ...


Princess Esmerelda Margaret Note Spelling of Lancre

Daughter of King Verence II and Magrat Garlick, Princess Esme made her appearance in Carpe Jugulum. Her unusual middle names are the result of a Lancre tradition that whatever the priest says at the naming ceremony is your name (Thus, Lancre once had a King My-God-He's-Heavy 1). Magrat owed her own name to a combination of this tradition and her mother's inability to spell "Margaret", and was determined it wouldn't happen again. Verence II of Lancre is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involve the witches of Lancre. ... Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the twenty third in the Discworld series. ... Lancre (pronounced Lanker) is a fictional country from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ...


Foul Ole Ron

Excessively seedy, momentously dirty, overpoweringly smelly and entirely incomprehensible, he lives in Ankh-Morpork as the best-known member of a group of beggars that not even the Beggar's Guild will have anything to do with. He owns the world's only Thinking Brain Dog Gaspode, and is a physical schizophrenic; his smell has become strong enough to not only melt earwax but to acquire a separate existence. In fact, it outclasses him, and is usually referred to in text as being almost another character entirely, who occasionally arrives ahead of Ron or opts to stick around for awhile after his departure. Along with Gaspode, his associates include Arnold Sideways, Altogether Andrews, Coffin Henry, and the Duck Man. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Gaspode is a small terrier-like dog featured in seven of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ...


He appears in Men At Arms, Soul Music, Feet of Clay, Hogfather and The Truth, and is referenced in several other novels. Men at Arms is the 15th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Feet of Clay is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett which parodies detective novels. ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ...


He is well known for his "catchphrase", "Bugrit, millennium hand an' shrimp...", which is the result of Pratchett feeding a random text generating program with a Chinese takeaway menu and the lyrics of Particle Man by They Might Be Giants. A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... As featured in Tiny Toon Adventures Particle Man is a song by the band They Might Be Giants. ... They Might Be Giants (commonly abbreviated to TMBG) is an American pop/rock duo consisting of John Linnell and John Flansburgh, collectively known as the two Johns or John and John. Known for their experimental pop music, they have been popular on college campuses and earned a reputation for intellectual...


J.H.C. Goatberger

Publisher in Ankh-Morpork. Books published by his company include The Joy of Snacks by A Lancre Witch and the Ankh-Morpork Almanack. He appears in Maskerade and is referred to in some of the "peripheral" Discworld books that are meant to be books from the Disc (e.g. Nanny Ogg's Cookbook). His name is a play on Johann Gutenberg. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Gytha Ogg (usually called Nanny Ogg) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Maskerade is a novel in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. ... Nanny Oggs Cookbook is a book of recipes and wisdom of the Discworld character Nanny Ogg by Terry Pratchett, Stephen Briggs and Tina Hannan. ... Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (c. ...


Tolliver Groat

One of the two remaining employees of the Ankh-Morpork Post Office prior to Moist von Lipwig being made Postmaster. A very old man in a cheap wig, Groat had spent most of his career in the post office as a Junior Postman, since until von Lipwig's arrival none of the other Postmasters appointed by Lord Vetinari had survived long enough to promote him. Groat doesn't trust doctors, which is perfectly understandable since there are very few reliable doctors in Ankh-Morpork. However, he instead treats himself with a variety of dubious "natural" home remedies, including concotions made with sulfur or arsenic, and a poultice made of bread pudding. He is a habitual speaker of the only known rhyming slang in the universe that does not actually rhyme. The Ankh-Morpork Post Office is featured in the book Going Postal, the most recent addition to British fantasy author Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of books. ... Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... General Name, Symbol, Number sulfur, S, 16 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16, 3, p Appearance lemon yellow Atomic mass 32. ... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ...


Stanley Howler

One of the two remaining employees of the Ankh-Morpork Post Office prior to Moist von Lipwig being made Postmaster. Raised by peas (no further explanation is given), Stanley has a tendency towards obsessive behaviour. He used to be one of the more obsessive of Ankh-Mopork's large number of pin collectors, to the point that all the other collectors though he was "a bit weird about pins". However, following the events of Going Postal, in which the destruction of his collection coincided with the invention of the postage stamp, he redirected his obsession to stamp collecting and philately. The Ankh-Morpork Post Office is featured in the book Going Postal, the most recent addition to British fantasy author Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of books. ... Binomial name Pisum sativum L. A pea is the small, edible round green bean which grows in a pod on the leguminous vine Pisum sativum. ... A pin is a device used for fastening objects or material together. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ... A selection of Hong Kong postal stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... Stamp collecting is the collecting of postage stamps and related objects, such as covers (envelopes or packages with stamps on them). ... Close examination of the Penny Red, left, reveals a 148 in the margin, indicating that it was printed with plate #148. ...


Stanley's surname was not revealed in the book, but is given in various peripheral material relating to Discworld stamps. It is a play on Stanley Gibbons. Stanley Gibbons Ltd is a London, UK based company specialising in trading postage stamps and related products. ...


Hodgesaargh

Castle falconer at Lancre, Hodgesaargh is not his actual name, but some misunderstanding has been caused due to his birds' habit of attacking him when people speak to him. i.e. "Hello, my name is Hodges...ARRRRRGH" Falconry (occasionally referred to as falconeering) is the art or sport involving raptors (birds of prey) to hunt or pursue game. ... Lancre (pronounced Lanker) is a fictional country from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ...


His ceremonial outfit of red and gold with a big floppy hat is usually supplemented with about three sticking plasters. One of the birds he breeds and trains is the wowhawk, or Lappet-faced Worrier, which is like a goshawk only more so - it prefers to walk everywhere and hates the sight of blood. Typical sticking plaster conditionnig Reverse of a sticking plaster Opened sticking plaster, showing the non-adhesive absorbent pad and adhesive A sticking plaster (called an adhesive bandage in the United States) is a small medical dressing, used for injuries not serious enough to require a bandage. ... Binomial name Accipiter gentilis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis; from OE. góshafuc goose-hawk) is a medium large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae which also includes many other diurnal raptors such as eagles, buzzards and harriers. ...


Hodgesaargh is based on a real-life keeper of birds of prey named Dave Hodges, who lives in Northamptonshire. He is also the author of The Arts of Falconrie and Hawking. Orders Accipitriformes     Cathartidae     Pandionidae     Accipitridae     Sagittariidae Falconiformes     Falconidae A bird of prey or raptor is a bird that hunts its food, especially one that preys on mammals or other birds. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ...


Princess Keli

Daughter of King Olerve the Bastard of the Sto Plains kingdom of Sto Lat, and the last person between the Duke of Sto Helit and the throne, she was saved from assassination by Mort. Became Queen Kelirihenna I, Lord of Sto Lat, Protector of the Eight Protectorates and Empress of the Long Thin Debated Piece Hubwards of Sto Kerrig. In Terry Pratchetts Discworld, Sto Plains is a rich country, full of silt and cabbage fields. ... Mort is a fictional character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ...


Queen Keli still ruled at the time of Soul Music, when she ejected the Band with Rocks In from the city by royal proclamation. Sto Lat still had a queen by the time of Going Postal, though she isn't mentioned by name. If it is her, she would be the first person on the Disc other than the Patrician to have her face on a stamp. Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Soul Music is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1994. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ... Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... A selection of Hong Kong postal stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ...


Laveolous

The Discworld equivalent of Odysseus. He was the finest military mind on the continent of Klatch. His genius consisted of realising that, if there has to be a war, the aim should be to defeat the enemy as quickly and with as little bloodshed as possible - a concept so breathtaking in its originality that few other military minds have been able to grasp it, and it shows what happens when you take the conduct of a war away from skilled soldiers. He was a hero of the Tsortean Wars, which he ended by bribing a cleaner to show him a secret passage into the citadel of Tsort. It is possible that he is the ancestor of Rincewind. Odysseus and the Sirens. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, Klatch is both a country and a continent. ... Tsort is a fictional place on Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Rincewind is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ...


Doctor Lawn

Dr John "Mossy" Lawn is a doctor in Ankh-Morpork. He first appeared in Night Watch, as a backstreet "pox doctor", offering medical assistance to "seamstresses". He had trained in Klatch, where he had learnt techniques other Morporkian surgeons distrusted, but which kept patients alive for longer than it took to pay the bill. He also gave free treatment to those who needed it, including those who had been tortured by the Cable Street Particulars. He is a quiet but sarcastic man, and almost unshockable. Night Watch is the 27th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, Klatch is both a country and a continent. ...


Following his successful delivery of Sam Junior, Samuel Vimes gave him a large area of land in the Goosegate area of the city. In Going Postal this is the Lady Sybil Free Hospital. Dr Lawn's preferred method of dealing with the nursing staff is to throw a handful of chocolates in one direction and run in the other as fast as possible. Sam Vimes is a fictional policeman from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ...


Lezek

A farmer in Sheepridge, in the Ramtops. The father of the title character in Mort. Reportedly dead by the time of Soul Music (by one who should know). The Ramtops are a fictional mountain range appearing in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Father with child A father is traditionally the male parent of a child. ... Mort is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett and also the name of its main character. ... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ...


Moist von Lipwig

A former conman, now Ankh-Morpork's Postmaster General. The main character in Going Postal. He was invited to take up his new position of his own free will by the Patrician (the offered alternatives being hanging or suicide, again of his own free will), and managed to revive the Post Office by applying the principles of the con to honest work. He wears a golden suit with a wingèd cap when on duty, and, without it, looks like someone you wouldn't really notice. He is in something approaching a relationship with Adora Belle Dearheart. As of January, 2006, he is set to star in the forthcoming novel Making Money. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ... Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Fundraising is the term referring to the process of soliciting and gathering money by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ...


The Magpyr family

A family of vampires who attempted to invade Lancre in Carpe Jugulum. They all parody vampirism in different ways: In Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels, the undead are seen less as monsters, and more as characters with unusual cultural quirks. ... Lancre (pronounced Lanker) is a fictional country from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the twenty third in the Discworld series. ... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythical or folkloric creatures, typically held to be the re-animated corpses of human beings and said to subsist on human and/or animal blood (hematophagy), often having unnatural powers, heightened bodily functions, and/or the ability to physically transform. ...

  • The Old Count, Count Magpyr's uncle. Very much a stereotyped cinematic vampire, it is no coincidence that his first name is Bela. He kept his castle full of drapes that could be cast aside and ironwork that could be shaped into religious symbols. Because it was so easy to kill him temporarily, no-one ever went to the effort of doing it permanently.
  • Count and Countess Magpyr see themselves as modern "vampyres" unshackled by superstition. They are partially unaffected by the traditional vampire weaknesses (due to psychological mithridatism), and keen to avoid stereotyping. They see taking blood from villagers as "The Arrangement"; just an unusual form of taxation.
  • Vlad Magpyr also sees himself as a modern vampyre, but has become another stereotype; the romantic Anne Rice-type vampire. He has a ponytail and wears fancy waistcoats.
  • Lacrimosa Magpyr embodies a reversal of "lifestyle vampires"; an actual vampire who wears bright clothes and stays up until noon. Some of her friends call themselves names like "Pam", file their teeth blunt and even drink... wine.
  • Magyrato, a briefly-mentioned ancestor. His portrait is unfinished, due to him attacking the artist halfway through. From what can be seen, he resembled Graf Orlok.

It is implied that older members of the family were closer to vampires in the original legends. As befits a family of their status and condition, they are served by an Igor (who frequently feels put upon by the less traditional Magpyrs). Bela Lugosi as Dracula United States stamp Béla Lugosi was the stage name of actor Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó (October 20, 1882–August 16, 1956). ... Mithridates VI of Pontus, (132 BC- 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of Romes most formidable and successful enemies. ... Anne Rice Anne Rice (born October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of horror/fantasy books. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Count Orlok from Nosferatu Graf Orlok (Count Orlok) is the character performed by Max Schreck in the silent movie Nosferatu. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythical or folkloric creatures, typically held to be the re-animated corpses of human beings and said to subsist on human and/or animal blood (hematophagy), often having unnatural powers, heightened bodily functions, and/or the ability to physically transform. ... Igor is a recurring set of characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ...


Modo

A dwarf, he is the gardener at Unseen University. He is a conscientious gardener, but its location on the campus of a major magical faculty means that his handiwork has a tendency to be disrupted by supernatural events. Modo believes in compost in much the same way that humans believe in gods (dwarves aren't religious, exactly). It is unknown what he puts in his compost but it certainly brings up the roses. His personal theory is that they want to get as far away from the compost as possible. His compost also, for one brief moment in Reaper Man, came alive, and it took a whole bottle of Wow-Wow sauce to stop it. Dwarfs in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels are similar to the Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, which they largely started out pastiching, and dwarfs/dwarves in other fantasy novels. ... The Coat of Arms of Unseen University. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Wow-Wow Sauce is a sauce, apparently created by Dr William Kitchiner in the early 19th century. ...


Nijel the Destroyer

Nijel the Destroyer, son of Harebut the Provision Merchant Mighty, is a would-be barbarian hero, appearing in Sourcery. Nijel met Rincewind in a snake pit and they escaped together. He fell in love with Conina at first sight, and she with him, and Pratchett's patented irony shows in their matching. He is a clerk who wants to be a Barbarian Hero and is currently half-way through a book on the subject, which includes a table of wandering monsters and tends to resemble a Dungeons & Dragons manual, while she is a Barbarian Heroine who wants to be a Hairdresser but can't due to her genes. In addition to the standard loincloth, Nijel wears woolen long underwear- his mother insisted Sourcery is the fifth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1988. ... Rincewind is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ... This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ... For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ...


Jason Ogg

Eldest son of Nanny Ogg. First mentioned in Wyrd Sisters. Like his father before him he holds the office of Lancre blacksmith, which brings with it the obligation to shoe anything, and the concommitant ability to shoe anything: he has shod an ant, a unicorn, and (at regular intervals and with specially reserved metal) Death's horse Binky. He is also the leader of the Lancre Morris Men, who treat Morris dancing as something between a contact sport and a martial art. He also knows the Horseman's Word, a secret to pacifying belligerent stallions he has to shoe (though as Granny Weatherwax discovered, the "Horseman's Word" involves threats to apply a large hammer with great force to certain parts of the stallion's anatomy). Gytha Ogg (usually called Nanny Ogg) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... This article is about the novel. ... Lancre (pronounced Lanker) is a fictional country from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Subfamilies Dorylomorph subfamilies Apomyrminae Cerapachyinae Dorylinae Ecitoninae Formicomorph subfamilies: Aneuretinae Dolichoderinae Formicinae - e. ... The gentle and pensive virgin has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 The unicorn is a legendary creature embodied like a horse, but slender and with a single — usually spiral — horn growing out of its forehead (whence its... Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Binky is Deaths steed in the Discworld series. ... A Morris dance is a form of folk dance. ... Esmerelda Weatherwax (usually called Granny Weatherwax) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Shawn Ogg

Youngest son of Nanny Ogg. First appears in Wyrd Sisters as a guard at Lancre Castle. Since then he has become Lancre's entire standing army (except when he's laying down), as well as the civil service and most of the palace staff. According to Nanny Ogg's Cookbook he has been granted the Order of the Lancrastian Empire. Gytha Ogg (usually called Nanny Ogg) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... This article is about the novel. ... Lancre (pronounced Lanker) is a fictional country from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Nanny Oggs Cookbook is a book of recipes and wisdom of the Discworld character Nanny Ogg by Terry Pratchett, Stephen Briggs and Tina Hannan. ...


Polly Perks

The main character in Monstrous Regiment. A Borogravian girl, of 17, who joined the army under the name Oliver Perks to rescue her brother Paul and save her family's inn. She chose her false name, Oliver, because it corresponded with the folksong, Sweet Polly Oliver, which is about a girl running off to join the army. As a member of the Cheesemongers, Private 'Ozzer' Perks serves with the colorful Sgt Jackrum, a reformed vampire of ambiguos gender named Maladict, a troll called Carborundum, an Igor, and a few even stranger people, who are, in fact, just humans. Monstrous Regiment is the 31st novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Borogravia is a fictional country in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ... Igor is a recurring set of characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ...


Mr. Pin

Mr. Pin (other names unknown) is a villain in the Discworld novel The Truth. He is the brains of the New Firm, his name for the criminal group consisting of himself and Mr. Tulip. In general Mr. Pin makes the plans and decides where they're going to go and what they're going to do, but he is open to suggestions from his partner. This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ...


Both men can become violent, but Mr. Tulip has a seemingly unlimited supply of it, which was one of the main characteristics that attracted him to Mr. Pin as a partner in crime.


Pteppic

King Pteppicymon XXVIII of Djelibeybi (lit. "Child of the Djel", the Disc's version of Egypt) is the main character in Pyramids. The first king to leave the kingdom, he was trained at the Ankh-Morpork Assassins' Guild. He passed his final exam by a fluke, having already decided he wasn't going to kill anyone. His cosmopolitan nature clashed with the hidebound traditions of the kingdom and the even more hidebound high priest Dios, and after saving Djelibeybi from destruction and shaking up its traditions, he abdicated. Djelibeybi is a fictional country on Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Pyramids is the seventh Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1989. ... The Assassins Guild described here exists on the fictional Discworld. ...


Ptraci

Queen Ptraci I of Djelibeybi. Pteppic's half-sister and successor. A former handmaiden, the Djelibeybian priests thought she would be easy to control. They turned out to be very wrong. Like her half-brother she is keen to get in some decent plumbing. Appears in Pyramids; by the end of the novel she is enthusiastically embracing many of the stranger regimens, such as bathing in ass's milk, favoured by Cleopatra. Pyramids is the seventh Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1989. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Pump 19

A golem who appeared in Going Postal. More commonly referred to as Mr. Pump, he received his name from his previous position, where he spent over two hundred years operating one of a series of underwater pumps. He has since entered the employ of the Patrician, who uses him as a parole officer. He has been extremely successful in this, as he can follow his target anywhere by tracking their Karmic signature, and golems never need to stop, or rest, or eat: as the Patrician put it "Four miles an hour - that's 672 miles a week . . ." Golems in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series are derived from golems in Jewish mythology; early forms of a clay robot, supposedly awakened by a spell or priestly words to do peoples bidding. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ... Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Quoth

A talking raven. He is seemingly an associate of the Death of Rats. His name derives from the famous line in the poem by the poet Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven ("Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore'.") except this raven "doesn't do the N word". He got his name because his previous owner, a wizard, had no sense of humour. At times he acts as steed and interpreter for the Death of Rats and he has a constant craving for eyeballs- a species characteristic (which, he recalls, resulted in an unfortunate end to ravens working under Blind Io, the king of the Discworld Gods, who has innumerable floating eyeballs which float around his head...quite tempting for a raven). He was originally one of the ravens from the Tower of Art. Species See text Many large black birds of the genus Corvus are called ravens. ... The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... This daguerreotype of Poe was taken less than a year before his death at the age of 40. ... This article is about the poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... The fictional 800-foot tower of Ankh-Morporks Unseen University, with a total of 8,888 steps up to the top (On the Disc the number 8 is very mystically significant). ...


He was first seen in the Discworld novel Soul Music, and since then has made appearances in all novels involving Susan Sto Helit. Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ...


Lord Rust

An Ankh-Morpork nobleman, whose full name is presumably Ronald (Ronnie) Rust. He first appears in Men At Arms, in which he is one of the nobles who doesn't take D'Eath seriously. In this novel he seems to have keen political instincts; it is stated that the Rusts have survived by not being romantic. Men at Arms is the 15th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ...


Lord Rust makes more sizeable appearances in Jingo and Night Watch, wherein he appears overly-bred and arrogant; a brief subsequent appearance in Monstrous Regiment suggests he still has some of the intelligence of his earlier portrayal. Lord Rust's most defining characteristic, along with his arrogance, is his unsurpassed military and strategic incompetence (or, at least, his ability to achieve goals only by simultaneously sustaining devastating losses), coupled with the inexplicable ability to be repeatedly chosen to command large armies and similar organisations. Jingo is a novel by Terry Pratchett, one of his phenomenally popular Discworld series. ... Night Watch is the 27th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ... Monstrous Regiment is the 31st novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Mr. Salzella

The Director of Music at the Ankh-Morpork Opera House in Maskerade, most notable for an absolute hatred of opera (although he was really as "infected" with operatic romanticism as everyone else in the place). He was embezzling money and murdering people who found out, blaming the murders on the Opera Ghost. He was finally killed in an extremely operatic battle with the Ghost. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Sydney Opera House: one of the worlds most recognizable opera houses and landmarks Opera refers to a dramatic art form, originating in Europe, in which the emotional content or primary entertainment is conveyed to the audience as much through music, both vocal and instrumental, as it is through the... Maskerade is a novel in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. ... Walter Plinge is a pseudonym, traditionally used in London theatres. ...


While the character is seemingly based loosely on Ambrose D'Arcy from the 1962 Hammer Horror version of The Phantom of the Opera, his name is based on Mozart's rival Antonio Salieri ("Salieri" means "seller of salt"): it is presumably intended to be pronounced "salt-seller" in the Italian fashion. Hammer horror refers to a series of gothic horror films produced from the late 1950s until the 1970s by the British film production company Hammer Film Productions Ltd. ... The title character as depicted by Lon Chaney (1883-1930) in the 1925 film depiction. ... Mozart drawing by Doris Stock, 1789 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (baptised as Joannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart; January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) is among the most significant and enduringly popular composers of European classical music. ... Antonio Salieri Antonio Salieri (August 18, 1750 – May 7, 1825), born in Legnago, Italy, was a composer and conductor, as well as one of the most important and famous musicians of his time. ...


Ella Saturday

The daughter of Baron Saturday of Genua and Mrs Erzulie Gogol. She appears in Witches Abroad as an attactive young woman with brown skin and blonde hair. Seemingly her entire life has been controlled by her fairy godmother, Lady Lilith de Tempscire, to ensure that she marries Lady Lilith's pawn, the Duc (actually a frog). She spends much of her time in the palace kitchens, apparently because she enjoys being helpful, rather than because she is mistreated. Because she helps lay the fires, the palace cook nicknamed her "Embers" (she is, of course, the Discworld version of Cinderella, although the full nickname "Emberella", while never explicity written, is referred to as sounding "like something you'd put up in the rain"). At the end of Witches Abroad, she became the Baroness of Genua. Genua is a fictional city from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involve the witches of Lancre. ... Witches Abroad is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, originally published in 1991. ... In fairy tales, a fairy godmother is a fairy or person with magical powers who acts as a mentor or parent to someone. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involve the witches of Lancre. ... The Frog Prince (de:Der Froschprinz) is a fairy tale, popularized by the Grimm Brothers written version, of a spoiled princess who reluctantly befriends a frog, who magically transforms into a handsome prince. ... Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon For other uses, see Cinderella (disambiguation). ... An umbrella is a device used for temporary shade or shelter from precipitation. ...


The Selachii family

A noble family in Ankh-Morpork, featured in several of the books. They are known for being assassins, and are traditional rivals of the Venturi. They are named after the Selachimorpha as a play on the Sharks in West Side Story Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... The Assassins Guild described here exists on the fictional Discworld. ... Orders Carcharhiniformes Heterodontiformes Hexanchiformes Lamniformes Orectolobiformes Pristiophoriformes Squaliformes Squatiniformes Sharks are a group (superorder Selachimorpha) of fish, with a full cartilaginous skeleton, a streamlined body plan, with normally 5, but up to 7 (depending on species) gill slits along the side of, or beginning slightly behind, the head (in some... The original poster for the motion picture. ...


"Esk" Eskarina Smith

The main character in Equal Rites, where she became the Unseen University's first (and only) female graduate. Esk was last seen inventing a new kind of magic based on not using it at all, in the company of wunderkind wizard Simon. Although she was the pivotal character in Equal Rites, she has never been seen or mentioned again. Equal Rites is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett. ... The Coat of Arms of Unseen University. ... Equal Rites is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett. ...


The Smoking GNU

A trio of clacks hackers, so far seen only in Going Postal, consisting of "Mad Al, Sane Alex, and Adrian who says he's not mad but can't prove it." They are instrumental in pulling the Grand Trunk Company out from under Reacher Gilt. The clacks in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels is a network of semaphore towers stretching along the Sto Plains, into the Ramtops and across the Unnamed Continent to Genua. ... A hacker is a person who creates and modifies computer software and computer hardware, including computer programming, administration, and security-related items. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, OK. This article is about the violent social phenomenon. ...


Their name is a reference to talk of a "smoking gun" in some conspiracy theories, and as such they parallel The Lone Gunmen from The X-Files. Also likely to be related to the open-source "GNU" operating systems, also popular amongst modern-day hackers. The Lone Gunmen were a trio of fictional characters who had recurring roles on The X-Files and also starred in a short-lived spin-off; The Lone Gunmen. ... The X-Files was a popular American television series created by Chris Carter. ... GNU (pronounced ) is a free software operating system. ...


Wallace Sonky

An Ankh-Morpork tradesman, owner of Sonky's Rubber Goods, and maker of Sonky's Preventatives (a type of condom). His "sonkies", as they are generally known, sell for a penny a packet. Without them, the housing problem in Ankh-Morpork would be even more pressing. A condom sealed in typical packaging A condom is a device, usually made of latex or more recently polyurethane, that is used during sexual intercourse to reduce the risk of pregnancy and/or some sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) such as gonorrhea, syphilis and HIV. Condoms are also often used to...


He is killed in The Fifth Elephant. He is known to have had a brother in Überwald. The Fifth Elephant is the 24th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... In Terry Pratchetts fictional Discworld universe, Ãœberwald is a region located in near the foot of the Ramtops, farther from Ankh-Morpork than Lancre is. ...


William Scuggins

When Samuel Vimes was in his youth, William Scuggins was the child that was always tormented. He was mentioned briefly in Feet of Clay with the following description of how he was treated: Sam Vimes is a fictional policeman from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Feet of Clay is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett which parodies detective novels. ...


He'd been pretty good at [hopscotch]. Of course, they played it by the Ankh-Morpork rules. Instead of kicking a stone they kicked William Scuggins.


Findthee Swing

Captain Findthee Swing is the head of the Unmentionables in the Ankh-Morpork of the past in Night Watch. He is described as a thin, balding man dressed in a long, old-fashioned black coat with large pockets, and supports himself on an opera cane (which is in reality a swordstick). This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ... Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Night Watch is the 27th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ... A swordstick is a cane incorporating a concealed blade. ...


He always carries with him a large set of calipers and a steel ruler, with which he measures the facial characteristics of people he meets in order to determine their personal traits (See physiognomy). He moves and speaks in anerratic, jumpy fashion, in bursts... and sputters ratherthan a continuous flowof movement or sound. Physiognomy (Gk. ...


He is killed by Vimes during the fire at the Unmentionables' headquarters.


The name Captain Swing has long been associated with civil unrest, being the pseudonym of the (possibly mythical) leader of the Swing Riots. Captain Swing was the name appended to some (but not many) of the threatening letters during the agricultural riots of 1830. ... The Swing Riots were an uprising by the rural workers of the arable south and east of England in 1830. ...


General Tacticus

General Tacticus was a soldier of the Ankh-Morpork Empire proclaimed to be the greatest general of all time. In fact, on the Discworld the word 'tactics' was derived from his name. Though he is dead at the time of the events contained in the series, his legacy lives on. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ...


He is an amalgamation of various historic characters, including General George Patton, Alexander the Great, Marcus Aurelius and Julius Caesar, which latter can be seen in the title of his autobiography, VENI VIDI VICI: A Soldier's Life. "Veni Vidi Vici" - "I came, I saw, I conquered" is arguably the most famous thing Julius Caesar ever said and "A Soldier's Life" seems to be a popular title for a number of military biographies and autobiographies. Tacticus' name, as well as being a pun on 'tactics', suggests the Roman historian Tacitus. Much of the advice in the autobiography reflects Sun Tzu's The Art of War, as well as comments made by Patton. General George Smith Patton Jr. ... Alexander the Great (in Greek , transliterated Megas Alexandros) (July 356 BC – June 11, 323 BC), King of Macedon (336–323 BC), is considered one of the most successful military commanders in world history, conquering most of the world known to the ancient Greeks before his death. ... Marcus Aurelius Imperator Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (April 26, 121 – March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death. ... Gaius Julius Caesar (IPA: Classical Latin: IMP•C•IVLIVS•CAESAR•DIVVS1), July 12, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius (or: Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... Sun Tzu (孫子 also commonly written in pinyin: Sūn Zǐ) was the author of The Art of War, an influential ancient Chinese book on military strategy (for the most part not dealing directly with tactics). ... A modern edition of The Art of War translated into English by Samuel B. Griffith. ...


Tacticus conquered a large area of the Discworld, both around the base city of Ankh-Morpork and well into the southern continent of Klatch. At one point, the far-flung city of Genua, having run out of royalty of their own, asked Ankh-Morpork for a Duke. Tacticus was made a Duke and sent there. Immediately upon becoming a Genuan citizen, he evaluated the military threats posed by other nations, and declared war on Ankh-Morpork. In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, Klatch is both a country and a continent. ... Genua is a fictional city from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ...


When Vimes got a copy of Tacticus' autobiography from the Librarian, he formulated a very Vimes-like opinion as to why history did not particularly like Tacticus (because he didn't get a huge number of his men killed out of his own arrogance and incompetence). Snippets of Tacticus advice turns up in various Discworld chronicles, and it can be gathered that he was a very realistic general (The section of his autobiography entitled "What to Do When One Army Occupies a Well-Fortified and Superior Ground and the Other Does Not" begins with the sentence "Endeavour to be the one inside.")


Tawneee

Tawneee (pronounced with each "e" as a separate syllable) is an exotic dancer, introduced in Thud! Tawneee is, in fact, merely her stage name; her real name is Betty. She is Nobby Nobbs's girlfriend for most of the book; they met when Nobby caught her eye while slipping an IOU into her garter belt. Despite her profession, she is as humble as a caterpillar, and has about as much brains. She was completely innocent about sex, and was completely unaware that her job could be considered "acting like a floozy"; in the end, Angua and Sally explain the facts of, well, everything. Meanwhile, Nobby considers letting her down gently because she didn't know her way around a kitchen. The letter E is the fifth letter in the Latin alphabet. ... For the book or movie Striptease see Striptease (book) and Striptease (movie) A striptease is a performance, usually a dance, in which the performer gradually removes their clothing for the purposes of sexually arousing the audience, usually performed in nightclubs. ... Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, released in the United States of America and the United Kingdom on September 13, and it may have been released already in other countries, such as Norway [1] and Denmark. ... Cecil Wormsborough St. ... IOU, a cellular phone service provided by Vodafone New Zealand. ... Look up Sex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Delphine Angua von Ãœberwald is a character from the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... Coat of arms of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch. ...


Mr. Tulip

Mr. Tulip (other names unknown) is a character who features in the novel The Truth. This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ...


Mr Tulip is something of a contradiction, at once a remorseless killer and an art lover. He is differentiated from a common criminal by his habit of removing priceless works of art from houses before committing arson, and he recognises great art works all over Ankh Morpork, being an instinctive connoisseur of the arts. He also suffers a mild speech impediment, causing him to often insert "-ing" mid-sentence. One major problem with Mr. Tulip is not that he has a drugs habit as such, but that he wants to have a drug habit, having a tendency to desire anything sold in little bags. Unfortunately for this desire, in a city where on any street any number of Discworld drugs are available, he would unerringly find the one man who was selling oven cleaner or calcium carbonate. His primary skill in the New Firm (himself and Mr. Pin) is his literally unlimited supply of anger. He has in fact turned mindless violence into an art form. This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ...


He is the sidekick of Mr. Pin, and though an instinctive killer, recognises Mr. Pin's cognitive skills, and leaves the thinking to him. Unlike Mr Pin, he has the possibility of redemption, and so at the end of the novel he is re-incarnated as a woodworm: the only woodworm to say 'this is -ing good wood!'


The Venturi family

A noble family in Ankh-Morpork, featured in several of the books. They are traditional rivals of the Selachii. They are named after the Venturi, as a play on the Jets in West Side Story. Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The original poster for the motion picture. ...


Vincent the Invulnerable

Committed "suicide" (by Ankh-Morpork's extremely lax standards, i.e. "walking alone in the Shades at night is suicide, asking for a short in a dwarf bar is suicide") by walking into the Mended Drum and announcing that he was called "Vincent the Invulnerable." Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Dwarfs in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels are similar to the Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, which they largely started out pastiching, and dwarfs/dwarves in other fantasy novels. ...


Vorbis

In Small Gods, deacon Vorbis is the head of the Quisition, and later (for a very brief time) the Cenobiarch of Omnia. He's a frightening character, bald by design, with completely dark eyes. This article is about the novel Small Gods; for the concept of Small Gods within the Discworld, see Discworld Gods Small Gods is a novel by Terry Pratchett, the thirteenth part of the popular Discworld series. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... Representation of an Auto de fe, (1475). ... Omnia is a fictional country in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... Baldness (formally alopecia) is the state of lacking hair where it usually would grow, especially on the head. ... Usually considered in the context of the applied arts, engineering, architecture, and other such creative endeavours, design is used as both a noun and a verb. ... Darkness is the absence of light. ... This article refers to the sight organ. ...


Vorbis' character combines a strange mix of apparently religious mania with a fervent desire to spread the Word/Empire across all the Disc. The character of Vorbis is one that may interest any reader interested in questions regarding institutional religion, heresy, and the direct communication between God and Man. Vorbis has a reputation for being a man touched by destiny (and perhaps something else) and as being one of the most devout Omnians in the Empire ('Vorbis could humble himself in prayer in a way that made the posturings of power-mad emperors look subservient') yet in the end the reader finds that the only voice Vorbis has been listening to is his own. Strange is a British television drama series, produced by the independent production company Big Bear Productions for the BBC, aired on the BBC One channel. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... Desire can refer to: Desire (album), a Bob Dylan album. ... A word is a unit of language that carries meaning and consists of one or more morphemes which are linked more or less tightly together. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Religion, sometimes used interchangeably with faith, is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine, and the practices and institutions associated with such belief. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Communication is the process of exchanging information, usually via a common protocol. ... Michelangelos depiction of God in the painting Creation of the Sun and Moon in the Sistine Chapel Krishna, the eighth incarnation of Vishnu, one of the manifestations of the ultimate reality or God in Hinduism This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Photograph of a nude man by Wilhelm von Gloeden, ca. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Photograph of a nude man by Wilhelm von Gloeden, ca. ... Destiny or fate refers to the inevitable course of events. ... Look up devout in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Omnia is a fictional country in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Humility is the state of being humble. ... Maria Magdalene in prayer. ... Emperor is also a Norwegian black metal band; see Emperor (band). ...


The Vorbis audio codec is named after this character. Vorbis is an open and free lossy audio compression (codec) project headed by the Xiph. ...


Galder Weatherwax

Cousin of Granny Weatherwax, Galder is the Chancellor in The Light Fantastic, and a real wizard traditionalist. In The Light Fantastic, he is referred to as Chancellor, but Ridcully upgrades him to Archchancellor in Lords and Ladies when he chats to Granny Weatherwax. Esmerelda Weatherwax (usually called Granny Weatherwax) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... It has been suggested that Mageborn be merged into this article or section. ... The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... Lords and Ladies can be: Lords and ladies (arum maculatum), a flowering plant. ...


Lupine Wonse

Former childhood friend to Samuel Vimes and later secretary to Lord Vetinari. As the Grand Master of the Elucidated Brethren of the Ebon Night, he summoned a dragon intending it to be killed by a king, whom he would then control. This failed and he found himself personal assistant to the Dragon King. Following a confrontation with the City Watch, he was killed by a metaphor, or possibly the ground, after then-Constable Carrot Ironfoundersson literally "threw the book at him" and send him stumbling over a ledge. Sam Vimes is a fictional policeman from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Saint George versus the dragon, Gustave Moreau, c. ... Coat of arms of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch. ... Carrot Ironfoundersson is a corporal in, and later captain of, the Ankh-Morpork City Watch, of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ...


William de Worde

A professional scribe who in The Truth became the editor of the Disc's first newspaper, The Ankh-Morpork Times. He has an obsessive dislike of lying, which he has learned to work around in the name of journalism. In self-imposed exile from his background of wealthy noblehood, William works hard (and with varying degrees of success) to cast off the influence of his father, Lord de Worde, an arrogant racist and speciesist bully. This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ...


William also appears in Monstrous Regiment, reporting on the war in Borogravia, and is mentioned in Thud. His name is probably a play on the first two printers in England; William Caxton and Wynkyn de Worde. Monstrous Regiment is the 31st novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Borogravia is a fictional country in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ... A printer can be: Someone who operates a printing press, and prints books. ... William Caxton (c. ... Wynkyn de Worde, born in Alsace, was the successor to William Caxton in his English printing business, taking over and running Caxtons press after his death. ...


See also

The Discworld
Characters:

Albert - Angua - Carrot Ironfoundersson - Cohen the Barbarian - Fred Colon - Death - Detritus - Cut-Me-Own-Throat Dibbler - Gaspode - Greebo - Igor - Bloody Stupid Johnson - Leonard of Quirm - The Librarian - Lu-Tze - The Luggage - Mort - C.W.St J. Nobbs - Susan Sto Helit - Rincewind - Twoflower - Havelock Vetinari - Samuel Vimes - The Witches - Ysabell - Discworld gods - more... The Order of Wen the Eternally Surprised, better known as the History Monks, and also sometimes referred to as the Men In Saffron (see Men in Black) and No Such Monastery (see NSA), is a highly secretive religious organisation in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, based in the Monastery... The Coat of Arms of Unseen University. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involve the witches of Lancre. ... The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Coat of arms of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch. ... The Discworld is the setting for all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ... Albert is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels, first appearing in Mort Albert, known as Alberto Malich when he founded the Unseen University, tried to perform the Rite of AshkEnte backwards in order to gain immortality. ... Delphine Angua von Ãœberwald is a character from the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... Carrot Ironfoundersson is a corporal in, and later captain of, the Ankh-Morpork City Watch, of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Cohen the Barbarian is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Fred Colon is a fictional character in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Detritus is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Cut Me Own Throat (C.M.O.T) Dibbler is one of the numerous bit part characters that enrich the world of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Gaspode is a small terrier-like dog featured in seven of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Greebo is a character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld books. ... Igor is a recurring set of characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ... Johnson, Bergholt Stuttley, known as Bloody Stupid Johnson, is a landscape gardener and inventor on the Discworld (a fictional world created by author Terry Pratchett), and is mentioned in a number of books. ... Leonard of Quirm is a fictional character in the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. ... The Librarian of Unseen University is one of the most popular characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Lu-Tze is a character in the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. ... The Luggage appears in some of the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. ... Mort is a fictional character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Cecil Wormsborough St. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... Rincewind is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ... Twoflower is a fictional character featuring in some of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Sam Vimes is a fictional policeman from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involve the witches of Lancre. ... Ysabell is a fictional character who lives on Terry Pratchetts fictional Discworld. ... The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...

Locations:

Ankh-Morpork - Agatean Empire - Borogravia - Death's Domain - Dungeon Dimensions - Ephebe - Genua - Klatch - Lancre - Muntab - Quirm - Sto Lat - Überwald - Unseen University - XXXX - more... Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... The Agatean Empire is a fictitous country that occupies the Counterweight Continent of Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Borogravia is a fictional country in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels. ... Deaths Domain is a fictional dimension in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, the Dungeon Dimensions are the endless wastelands outside of space and time. ... Ephebe is one of the countries of the Discworld, a fictional world created by Terry Pratchett in a series of novels of the same name. ... Genua is a fictional city from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, Klatch is both a country and a continent. ... Lancre (pronounced Lanker) is a fictional country from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Muntab is a fictional country in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Quirm is a fictional city in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Sto Lat is a fictional town in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... In Terry Pratchetts fictional Discworld universe, Ãœberwald is a region located in near the foot of the Ramtops, farther from Ankh-Morpork than Lancre is. ... The Coat of Arms of Unseen University. ... XXXX or FourEcks (previously known as Terror Incognita) is the name of the Australia-like continent seen in the Discworld novel The Last Continent by Terry Pratchett. ... This is a list of fictional locations in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...

Other:

Calendar - City Watch - Clacks - Guilds - Magic - Post Office - Stealth Chess - Minor Discworld concepts The Discworld calendar was first defined in a footnote in The Colour of Magic, and has been expanded upon in later novels and the Discworld Almanack (2004). ... Coat of arms of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch. ... The clacks in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels is a network of semaphore towers stretching along the Sto Plains, into the Ramtops and across the Unnamed Continent to Genua. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels, there are almost 300 Guilds in the city of Ankh-Morpork. ... The Discworld in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels runs on magic. ... The Ankh-Morpork Post Office is featured in the book Going Postal, the most recent addition to British fantasy author Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of books. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction, this article may require cleanup. ... This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Discworld: PIB PC Game Review (822 words)
The characters are entertaining and very well played, as one would expect from such talent.
There are a number of characters in the game, and you'll need to talk with all of them.
I understand that the newer releases don't have nearly the number of problems, and most of the problems were minor.
Diceless Characters (11150 words)
Intelligence indicates the mental abilities of a character: how quickly he or she learns, the speed at which he or she can solve logical puzzles, the ability to memorize, etc. How wisely the character uses these abilities is (of course) a matter for the player's intelligence.
A character with Subhuman Strength would have difficulty moving his own limbs, a character with Subhuman Endurance would be so sickly as to be bedridden, a character with Subhuman Dexterity would have difficulty grasping a pen, and a character with Subhuman Intelligence would be generally incapable of abstract thought.
Every character is assumed to have an Average Knowledge of his or her home World and an Average Skill in his or her birth language.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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