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Encyclopedia > Minnesota
State of Minnesota
Flag of Minnesota State seal of Minnesota
Flag of Minnesota Seal
Nickname(s): North Star State,
Land of 10,000 Lakes, The Gopher State
Motto(s): L'Étoile du Nord (French: The Star of the North)
Capital Saint Paul
Largest city Minneapolis
Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
Area  Ranked 12th in the US
 - Total 87,014 sq mi
(225,365 km²)
 - Width 250 miles (400 km)
 - Length 400 miles (645 km)
 - % water 8.4
 - Latitude 43° 30′ N to 49° 23′ N
 - Longitude 89° 29′ W to 97° 14′ W
Population  Ranked 21st in the US
 - Total 4,919,479
 - Density 61.80/sq mi 
23.86/km² (31st in the US)
 - Median income  $55,914 (5th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Eagle Mountain[1]
2,301 ft  (701 m)
 - Mean 1,198 ft  (365 m)
 - Lowest point Lake Superior[1]
602 ft  (183 m)
Admission to Union  May 11, 1858 (32nd)
Governor Tim Pawlenty (R)
Lieutenant Governor Carol Molnau (R)
U.S. Senators Norm Coleman (R)
Amy Klobuchar (DFL)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations MN US-MN
Website www.state.mn.us
Minnesota welcome sign

Minnesota  (pronounced /ˌmɪnɨˈsoʊtə/)[2] is a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States. The 12th-largest state by area in the U.S., it is the 21st most populous, with just over five million residents. Minnesota was carved out of the eastern half of the Minnesota Territory and admitted to the Union as the 32nd state on May 11, 1858. The state is known as the "Land of 10,000 Lakes"; those lakes and the other waters for which the state is named, together with state and national forests and parks, offer residents and tourists a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities. Image File history File links Flag_of_Minnesota. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Current flag of Minnesota The flag of Minnesota consists of the state seal on a royal blue background with gold fringe. ... The Great Seal of the State of Minnesota is the insignia that the secretary of state affixes to government papers and documents to make them official. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Great Seal of Minnesota with the state motto. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_MN.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Minnesota ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Minneapolis-Saint Paul is the most populous urban area in the state of Minnesota, United States, and is composed of 188 cities and townships. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Eagle Mountain is the highest point in Minnesota, at 2301 feet (701 m), located in Cook County at 47° 53′ 51″ N 90° 33′ 36″ W Categories: Mountains of the United States ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Timothy James (Tim) Pawlenty (born November 27, 1960) is an American politician from the Republican Party. ... GOP redirects here. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Carol Molnau (b. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... See Norman Jay Coleman for the former secretary of Agriculture. ... GOP redirects here. ... Amy Jean Klobuchar (pronounced KLOH-buh-shar) (born May 25, 1960) is the junior United States Senator from Minnesota. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) was created on April 15, 1944 when the Minnesota Democratic Party and Farmer-Labor Party merged to create the DFL. Hubert H. Humphrey was instrumental in this merger. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... // These are tables of congressional delegations from Minnesota to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2304 × 3072 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2304 × 3072 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links En-us-Minnesota. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Minnesota Territory was an organized territory of the United States from March 3, 1849 to May 11, 1858, when Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd state. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Lake Clearwater, Ontario, Canada A lake is a large body of water, usually fresh water, surrounded by land. ...


Nearly 60% of Minnesota's residents live in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area known as the Twin Cities, the center of transportation, business, and industry, and home to an internationally known arts community. The remainder of the state, often referred to as "Greater Minnesota" or "Outstate Minnesota", consists of western prairies now given over to intensive agriculture; eastern deciduous forests, also heavily farmed and settled; and the less populated northern boreal forest. The state's image of being populated by whites of Nordic and German descent has some truth, but diversity is increasing; substantial influxes of African, Asian, and Latin American immigrants have joined the descendants of European immigrants and of the original Native American inhabitants. Minneapolis-Saint Paul is the most populous urban area in the state of Minnesota, United States, and is composed of 188 cities and townships. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the movement of people or objects, see transport. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... The U.S. state of Minnesota can be divided into regions in a variety of ways. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... Bales of hay on a farm near Ames, Iowa A farm is the basic unit in agriculture. ... For other uses, see Taiga (disambiguation). ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... The Nordic countries (Greenland not shown) The Nordic countries is a term used collectively for five countries in Northern Europe. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... European American is a term for an American of European descent, who are usually referred as White or Caucasian. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


The extremes of the climate contrast with the moderation of Minnesota’s people. The state is known for its moderate-to- progressive politics and social policies, its civic involvement, and high voter turnout. It ranks among the healthiest states by a number of measures, and has one of the most highly educated and literate populations. “Moderates” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Voters lining up outside a Baghdad polling station during the 2005 Iraqi election. ... Literacy is the ability to use text to communicate across space and time. ...

Contents

Etymology

The word Minnesota comes from the Dakota language name for the Minnesota River: Mnisota. The root Mni (also spelled mini or minne) means, "water". Mnisota can be translated as sky-tinted water or somewhat clouded water.[3][4] Native Americans demonstrated the name to early settlers by dropping milk into water and calling it mnisota.[3] Many locations in the state have similar names, such as Minnehaha Falls ("waterfall"), Minneiska ("white water"), Minnetonka ("big water"), Minnetrista ("crooked water"), and Minneapolis, which is a combination of mni and polis, the Greek word for "city."[5] Lakota or Lakhota (as it is also commonly spelled) is the largest of the five major dialects of the Sioux language. ... The Mendota Bridge crossing the Minnesota River, just above its mouth View of the Minnesota River from Memorial Park; southeast of Granite Falls, MN. The Minnesota River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Minnehaha Falls Minnehaha Creek is a short tributary of the Mississippi River located in Hennepin County, Minnesota that extends from Lake Minnetonka in the west and flows east for 22 miles (35 km). ... Minneiska is a city located in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Lake Minnetonka is a 14,000 acre lake in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Minnetrista is a city located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ...


Geography

Minnesota, showing roads and major bodies of water
Minnesota, showing roads and major bodies of water

Minnesota is the northernmost state outside of Alaska; its isolated Northwest Angle in Lake of the Woods is the only part of the 48 contiguous states lying north of the 49th Parallel. Minnesota is in the U.S. region known as the Upper Midwest. The state shares a Lake Superior water border with Michigan and Wisconsin on the northeast; the remainder of the eastern border is with Wisconsin. Iowa is to the south, North Dakota and South Dakota are west, and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Manitoba are north. With 87,014 square miles (225,365 km²), or approximately 2.25% of the United States,[6] Minnesota is the 12th largest state.[7] File links The following pages link to this file: Minnesota Categories: National Atlas images | Minnesota maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: Minnesota Categories: National Atlas images | Minnesota maps ... The Northwest Angle (the purple portion) in Minnesota, bordering Manitoba, Ontario, and Lake of the Woods The Northwest Angle viewed from space The Northwest Angle, known simply as the Angle by locals, and coterminous with Angle Township, is a small part of northern Lake of the Woods County, Minnesota that... Lake of the Woods from space, May 1998 Lake of the Woods. ... The continental United States is a term referring to the United States situated on the North American continent. ... “49th parallel” redirects here. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797...


Geology and terrain

Main article: Geology of Minnesota
See also: List of lakes in Minnesota and List of Minnesota rivers
Tilted beds of the Middle Precambrian Thompson Formation in Jay Cooke State Park.
Tilted beds of the Middle Precambrian Thompson Formation in Jay Cooke State Park.[8]

Minnesota contains some of the oldest rocks found on earth, gneisses some 3.6 billion years old, or 80% as old as the planet.[8][9] About 2.7 billion years ago, basaltic lava poured out of cracks in the floor of the primordial ocean; the remains of this volcanic rock formed the Canadian Shield in northeast Minnesota.[8][10] The roots of these volcanic mountains and the action of Precambrian seas formed the Iron Range of northern Minnesota. Following a period of volcanism 1.1 billion years ago, Minnesota's geological activity has been more subdued, with no volcanism or mountain formation, but with repeated incursions of the sea which left behind multiple strata of sedimentary rock.[8] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of lakes in Minnesota. ... This is a list of rivers in the state of Minnesota in the United States This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2926 KB) Picture of the St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2926 KB) Picture of the St. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... Jay Cooke State Park is a Minnesota State Park located about ten miles southwest of Duluth, Minnesota, just outside of the small town of Thomson, Minnesota. ... Gneiss Gneiss (IPA: ) is a common and widely distributed type of rock formed by high-grade regional metamorphic processes from preexisting formations that were originally either igneous or sedimentary rocks, which most commonly forms on ancient seabeds. ... For the cities, see Basalt, Colorado and Basalt, Idaho. ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Landform. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... The Iron Range and Arrowhead are overlapping regions that make up the northeastern section of Minnesota in the United States. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ...


In more recent times, massive ice sheets at least one kilometer thick ravaged the landscape of the state and sculpted its current terrain.[8] The Wisconsin glaciation left 12,000 years ago.[8] These glaciers covered all of Minnesota except the far southeast, an area characterized by steep hills and streams that cut into the bedrock. This area is known as the Driftless Zone for its absence of glacial drift.[11] Much of the remainder of the state outside of the northeast has 50 feet (15 m) or more of glacial till left behind as the last glaciers retreated. 13,000 years ago gigantic Lake Agassiz formed in the northwest; the lake's outflow, the glacial River Warren, carved the valley of the Minnesota River, and its bottom created the fertile lands of the Red River valley.[8] Minnesota is geologically quiet today; it experiences earthquakes infrequently, and most of them are minor.[12] Northern Hemisphere glaciation during the last ice ages. ... The Wisconsin (in North America), Devensian (in the British Isles), Midlandian (in Ireland), Würm (in the Alps), and Weichsel (in northern central Europe) glaciations are the most recent glaciations of the Pleistocene epoch, which ended around 10,000 BCE. The general glacial advance began about 70,000 BCE, and... Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ... // The Coulee Region, as it is colloquially known (officially designated the Driftless Area by the USGS and popularly referred to as the Driftless Zone, or Driftless Region since the 1980s) is an area of about 20,000 square miles (52,000 km²) in western Wisconsin, northeastern Iowa, southeastern Minnesota, and... Categories: Geology stubs | Glaciology | Sedimentary rocks ... A map of the extent of Lake Agassiz Lake Agassiz was an immense lake—bigger than all of the present-day Great Lakes combined—in the center of North America, which was fed by glacial runoff at the end of the last ice age. ... Glacial River Warren or River Warren is the name of a prehistoric river which drained Lake Agassiz in central North America between 11,700 and 9,400 years ago. ... The Mendota Bridge crossing the Minnesota River, just above its mouth View of the Minnesota River from Memorial Park; southeast of Granite Falls, MN. The Minnesota River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... The Red River drainage basin, with the Red River highlighted The Red River in Greater Grand Forks, as viewed from the Grand Forks side of the river The Red River in Fargo-Moorhead, as viewed from the Fargo side of the river For other things named Red River, see the... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ...

The state's high point is Eagle Mountain at 2,301 feet (701 m), which is only 13 miles (20.9 km) away from the low of 602 feet (183 m) at the shore of Lake Superior. [13][10] Notwithstanding dramatic local differences in elevation, much of the state is a gently rolling peneplain.[8] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1476x975, 286 KB) From the Great Lakes Image Collection North Shore Palisade Head area Lake Superior, Minnesota File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Minnesota North Shore (Lake... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1476x975, 286 KB) From the Great Lakes Image Collection North Shore Palisade Head area Lake Superior, Minnesota File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Minnesota North Shore (Lake... Palisade Head cliffs on Lake Superior, view northeast toward Shovel Point Palisade Head is a large rock formation on the North Shore of Lake Superior in Minnesota. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... Rhyolite Rhyolite is an igneous, volcanic (extrusive) rock, of felsic composition, with aphanitic to porphyritic texture. ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Eagle Mountain is the highest point in Minnesota, at 2301 feet (701 m), located in Cook County at 47° 53′ 51″ N 90° 33′ 36″ W Categories: Mountains of the United States ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Canisteo River Valley from Pinnacle State Park The distant peaks at the same elevation represent the remnants of a peneplain that was uplifted to form the Allegheny Plateau, which is a dissected plateau in southwestern NY. In this area, the sharp relief that is seen on some of the Allegheny...


Two continental divides meet in the northeastern part of Minnesota in rural Hibbing, forming a triple watershed. Precipitation can follow the Mississippi River south to the Gulf of Mexico, the St. Lawrence Seaway east to the Atlantic Ocean, or the Hudson Bay watershed to the Arctic Ocean.[14] A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of... Hibbing is a city in St. ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... The Eisenhower Locks in Massena, NY. The St. ... This is a list of watercourses draining into Hudson Bay and thus making up the Hudson Bay watershed. ...


The state's nickname, The Land of 10,000 Lakes, is no exaggeration; there are 11,842 lakes over 10 acres (.04 km²) in size.[15] The Minnesota portion of Lake Superior is the largest at 962,700 acres (3,896 km²) and deepest (at 1,290 ft, 393 m) body of water in the state.[15] Minnesota has 6,564 natural rivers and streams that cumulatively flow for 69,000 miles (111,000 km).[15] The Mississippi River begins its journey from its headwaters at Lake Itasca and crosses the Iowa border 680 miles (1,094 km) downstream.[15] It is joined by the Minnesota River at Fort Snelling, by the St. Croix River near Hastings, by the Chippewa River at Wabasha, and by many smaller streams. The Red River, in the bed of glacial Lake Agassiz, drains the northwest part of the state northward toward Canada's Hudson Bay. Approximately 10.6 million acres (42,900 km²) of wetlands are contained within Minnesota's borders, the most of any state except Alaska.[16] This article is about the unit of measurement. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The headwaters of a river are small streams that create it. ... Lake Itasca is a small glacial lake, approximately 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Mendota Bridge crossing the Minnesota River, just above its mouth View of the Minnesota River from Memorial Park; southeast of Granite Falls, MN. The Minnesota River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... Fort Snellings round tower A view of the grounds of Fort Snelling taken from the round tower Fort Snelling is a former military fortification located at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... The St. ... Hastings is a city in Minnesota at the confluence of the Mississippi and St. ... The Chippewa River, in Wisconsin, flows approximately 183 miles (294 km) through west-central and northwestern Wisconsin. ... Wabasha is a city located in Wabasha County, Minnesota. ... The Red River drainage basin, with the Red River highlighted The Red River in Greater Grand Forks, as viewed from the Grand Forks side of the river The Red River in Fargo-Moorhead, as viewed from the Fargo side of the river For other things named Red River, see the... New York Harbor, the outflow for Hudson River, is sometimes called Hudsons Bay. Hudson Bay, Canada. ...


Flora and fauna

Main article: Ecology of Minnesota
A groundhog seen in Minneapolis, along the banks of the Mississippi River
A groundhog seen in Minneapolis, along the banks of the Mississippi River

Three of North America's biomes converge in Minnesota: prairie grasslands in the southwestern and western parts of the state, the Big Woods deciduous forest of the southeast and east-central, and the northern boreal forest.[citation needed] The northern coniferous forests are a vast wilderness of pine and spruce trees mixed with patchy stands of birch and poplar. Much of Minnesota's northern forest has been logged, leaving only a few patches of old growth forest today in areas such as in the Chippewa National Forest and the Superior National Forest where the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness has some 400,000 acres (1,600 km²) of unlogged land.[17] Although logging continues, regrowth keeps about one third of the state forested.[18] Nearly all of Minnesota's prairies and oak savannas have been destroyed or fragmented because of farming, grazing, logging, and suburban development.[19] Deciduous forest Boreal forest A groundhog seen in Minneapolis, along the banks of the Mississippi River Bison on the prairie Common White-tailed deer The Ecology of Minnesota covers many plant and animal species. ... Image File history File links Groundhog-Standing2. ... Image File history File links Groundhog-Standing2. ... For other uses see groundhog (disambiguation) and woodchuck (disambiguation) Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The groundhog (Marmota monax), also known as the woodchuck, land beaver, bunnydog, or whistlepig, is a rodent of the family Sciuridae, belonging to the group of large ground squirrels known as marmots. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... North American redirects here. ... A biome is a climate and geographical area of ecologically similar communities of plants, animals, and soil organisms, often referred to as ecosystems. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Big Woods refers to a type of temperate hardwood forest found in south-central Minnesota. ... Deciduous means temporary or tending to fall off (deriving from the Latin word decidere, to fall off). ... For other uses, see Taiga (disambiguation). ... Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... Species About 35; see text. ... Species Many species; see text and classification Birch is the name of any tree of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae, closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... Old growth forest, also called primary forest, ancient forest, virgin forest, primeval forest, frontier forest or (in the UK) Ancient Woodland, is an area of forest that has attained great age and so exhibits unique biological features. ... Chippewa National Forest is a National Forest located in northcentral Minnesota in the counties of Beltrami, Cass, and Itasca. ... Superior National Forest is a National_Forest located in Northeastern Minnesota between the U.S.-Canadian Border and Lake Superior. ... Canoes on Saganaga Lake The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW or BWCA, sometimes simply the bee-dub) is a 1. ...


While loss of habitat has affected native animals such as the pine marten, elk, and bison,[20] others like whitetail deer and bobcat thrive. The state has the nation's largest population of timber wolves outside Alaska,[citation needed] and supports healthy populations of black bear and moose. Located on the Mississippi Flyway, Minnesota hosts migratory waterfowl such as geese and ducks, and game birds such as grouse, pheasants, and turkeys. It is home to birds of prey including the bald eagle, red-tailed hawk, and snowy owl. The lakes teem with the sport fish such as walleye, bass, muskellunge, and northern pike, and streams in the southeast are populated by brook, brown, and rainbow trout. Binomial name Martes americana (Turton, 1806) The American Marten (Martes americana) is a North American marten sometimes also called the Pine Marten, even though it is a separate species from the European Pine Marten. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... ... For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... The Mississippi Flyway is a bird migration route that generally follows the Mississippi River in the United States and Mackenzie River in Canada. ... Other uses: Goose (disambiguation) Genera Anser Branta Chen Cereopsis † see also: Swan, Duck Anatidae Goose (plural geese) is the general English name for a considerable number of birds, belonging to the family Anatidae. ... The word duck was also used as slang for the WWII amphibious vehicle called a DUKW. It is also a cricketing term denoting a batsman being dismissed with a score of zero; see golden duck. ... Genera Tetrao Lagopus Falcipennis Centrocercus Bonasa Dendrapagus Tympanuchus Grouse are from the order Galliformes which inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the northern hemisphere. ... Genera Ithaginis Catreus Rheinartia Crossoptilon Lophura Argusianus Pucrasia Syrmaticus Chrysolophus Phasianus † See also partridge, quail Pheasants are a group of large birds from the order Galliformes. ... Species Meleagris gallopavo Meleagris ocellata A turkey is either of two species of large birds in the gamebird family with fan-shaped tails and wattled necks. ... Orders Accipitriformes     Cathartidae     Pandionidae     Accipitridae     Sagittariidae Falconiformes     Falconidae A bird of prey or raptor is a bird that hunts its food, especially one that preys on mammals or other birds. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America... Binomial name (Gmelin, 1788) Synonyms Buteo borealis Buteo broealis (lapsus) The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a medium-sized bird of prey, one of three species colloquially known in the United States as the chickenhawk. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Strix scandiaca Linnaeus, 1758 Nyctea scandiaca Stephens, 1826 The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. ... Binomial name (Mitchill, 1818) Subspecies S. v. ... Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Bass (IPA /bæs/) is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Muskellunge or muskie or musky (Esox masquinongy) are large, relatively rare freshwater fish of North America. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The northern pike (known as the pike in Britain), Esox lucius, is a species of carnivorous fish of the genus Esox (the pikes). ... This article is about the species of fish. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Morphs Salmo trutta morpha trutta Salmo trutta morpha fario Salmo trutta morpha lacustris The brown trout (Salmo trutta morpha fario and morpha lacustris) and the sea trout ( morpha trutta) are fish of the same species. ... It has been suggested that Steelhead be merged into this article or section. ...


Climate

Main article: Climate of Minnesota
A summertime view of the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus
A summertime view of the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus

Minnesota endures temperature extremes characteristic of its continental climate; with cold winters and hot summers, the record high and low span 174 degrees Fahrenheit (96.6 °C).[21] Meteorological events include rain, snow, blizzards, thunderstorms, hail, derechos, tornadoes, and high-velocity straight-line winds. The growing season varies from 90 days per year in the Iron Range to 160 days in southeast Minnesota near the Mississippi River, and mean average temperatures range from 36 °F (2 °C) to 49 °F (9 °C).[22] Average summer dew points range from about 58 °F (14.4 °C) in the south to about 48 °F (8.9 °C) in the north.[22][23] Depending on location, average annual precipitation ranges from 19 in (48.3 cm) to 35 in (88.9 cm), and droughts occur every 10 to 50 years.[22] Minnesota is a state in the Upper Midwestern portion of the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Weather observations being taken in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1890. ... Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... This article is about precipitation. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... A derecho is a widespread and long-lived, violent convectively induced windstorm that is associated with a fast-moving band of severe thunderstorms usually taking the form of a bow echo. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... The curl phase soon after an intense microburst impacted the surface Downburst damages in a straight line. ... The Iron Range and Arrowhead are overlapping regions that make up the northeastern section of Minnesota in the United States. ... The dew point (or dewpoint) is the temperature which a given parcel of air must be cooled, at constant barometric pressure, for water vapor to condense into water. ...

Protected lands

Minnesota's first state park, Itasca State Park, was established in 1891, and is the source of the Mississippi River.[24] Today Minnesota has 72 state parks and recreation areas, 58 state forests covering about four million acres (16,000 km²), and numerous state wildlife preserves, all managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. There are 5.5 million acres (22,000 km²) in the Chippewa and Superior National Forests. The Superior National Forest in the northeast contains the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, which encompasses over a million acres (4,000 km²) and a thousand lakes. To its west is Voyageurs National Park. The Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MNRRA), is a 72 miles (116 km) long corridor along the Mississippi River through the Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area connecting a variety of sites of historic, cultural, and geologic interest.[25] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,592 × 1,944 pixels, file size: 899 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This media has no description, and may be lacking other information. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,592 × 1,944 pixels, file size: 899 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This media has no description, and may be lacking other information. ... Canoes on Saganaga Lake The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW or BWCA, sometimes simply the bee-dub) is a 1. ... The source of the Mississippi River on the edge of Lake Itasca Itasca State Park is a state park in Minnesota, United States, and contains the headwaters of the Mississippi River. ... River Wey near its source at Farringdon, Hampshire Headstream is the origin of water flow that initiates the subject watercourse. ... This is a list of Minnesota state parks. ... http://www. ... The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is the agency of the state of Minnesota charged with maintaining natural areas such as state parks, state forests and recreation areas. ... Chippewa National Forest is a National Forest located in northcentral Minnesota in the counties of Beltrami, Cass, and Itasca. ... Superior National Forest is a National_Forest located in Northeastern Minnesota between the U.S.-Canadian Border and Lake Superior. ... Canoes on Saganaga Lake The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW or BWCA, sometimes simply the bee-dub) is a 1. ... Established in 1975, Voyageurs National Park is a United States National Park in northern Minnesota near the town of International Falls. ... The Mississippi National River and Recreation Area links no less than 8 sites in Minneapolis / St. ...


History

Main article: History of Minnesota
Map of Minnesota Territory 1849–1858
Map of Minnesota Territory 1849–1858

Before European settlement, Minnesota was populated by the Anishinaabe, the Dakota, and other Native Americans. The first Europeans were French fur traders that arrived in the 1600s. Late that century, the Ojibwe Indians migrated westward to Minnesota, causing tensions with the Sioux.[26] Explorers such as Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut, Father Louis Hennepin, Jonathan Carver, Henry Schoolcraft, and Joseph Nicollet, among others, mapped out the state. The history of Minnesota concerns the state of Minnesota that forms part of the United States of America. ... Image File history File links Minnesotaterritory. ... Image File history File links Minnesotaterritory. ... Minnesota Territory was an organized territory of the United States from March 3, 1849 to May 11, 1858, when Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd state. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut (c. ... A painting of Father Louis Hennepin discovering Saint Anthony Falls. ... Jonathan Carver Jonathan Carver (1710-1780) was an explorer of the North American continent. ... Henry Schoolcraft Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (March 28, 1793–December 10, 1864) was an American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist, noted for his early studies of Native American cultures, as well as for his discovery in 1832 of the source of the Mississippi River. ... Joseph Nicolas Nicollet (July 24, 1786–September 11, 1843), also known as Jean-Nicolas Nicollet, was a French geographer and mathematician known for mapping the Upper Mississippi River basin during the 1830s. ...


The portion of the state east of the Mississippi River became a part of the United States at the end of the American Revolutionary War, when the Second Treaty of Paris was signed. Land west of the Mississippi River was acquired with the Louisiana Purchase, although a portion of the Red River Valley was disputed until the Treaty of 1818.[27] In 1805, Zebulon Pike bargained with Native Americans to acquire land at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers. The construction of Fort Snelling followed between 1819 and 1825.[28] Its soldiers built a grist mill and a sawmill at Saint Anthony Falls, the first of the water-powered industries around which the city of Minneapolis later grew. Meanwhile, squatters, government officials, and tourists had settled near the fort. In 1839, the Army forced them to move downriver, and they settled in the area that became St. Paul.[29] Minnesota Territory was formed on March 3, 1849. Thousands of people had come to build farms and cut timber, and Minnesota became the 32nd U.S. state on May 11, 1858. For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... This article is about military actions only. ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... The Louisiana Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane) was the acquisition by the United States of America of 828,000 square miles (2,140,000 km²) of French territory (Louisiana) in 1803. ... The Red River Valley is a region in central North America that is drained by the Red River of the North. ... The Convention respecting fisheries, boundary, and the restoration of slaves between the United States and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, also known as the London Convention, Anglo-American Convention of 1818, Convention of 1818, or simply the Treaty of 1818, was a treaty signed in 1818 between... Zebulon Pike Jr. ... Confluence of Rhine and Mosel at Koblenz In geography, a confluence describes the point where two rivers meet and become one, usually when a tributary joins a more major river. ... The Mendota Bridge crossing the Minnesota River, just above its mouth View of the Minnesota River from Memorial Park; southeast of Granite Falls, MN. The Minnesota River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Fort Snelling is a former military fortification located at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... A grist mill is a place where grains are ground into flour. ... For the 1922 film starring Oliver Hardy, see The Sawmill. ... Aerial view of Saint Anthony Falls with the upper dam; there is also a lower dam. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ... Minnesota Territory was an organized territory of the United States from March 3, 1849 to May 11, 1858, when Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd state. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Farm (disambiguation). ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction or wood... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Fort Snelling played a pivotal role in Minnesota's history and in the development of the cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul.
Fort Snelling played a pivotal role in Minnesota's history and in the development of the cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul.

Treaties between whites and the Dakota and Ojibwe gradually forced the natives off their lands and onto smaller reservations. As conditions deteriorated for the Dakota, tensions rose, leading to the Dakota War of 1862. The result of the six-week war was the execution of 38 Dakota—the largest mass execution in United States history—and the exile of most of the rest of the Dakota to the Crow Creek Reservation in Nebraska.[27]
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 57 KB)I took this photo of Fort Snellings round tower, the one surviving piece of the original fort, in June of 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 57 KB)I took this photo of Fort Snellings round tower, the one surviving piece of the original fort, in June of 2004. ... Fort Snelling is a former military fortification located at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Phelpsmill_ottertailcounty. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Phelpsmill_ottertailcounty. ... Phelps Mill is a flour mill in Otter Tail County, Minnesota on the Otter Tail River. ... Otter Tail County is a county located in the state of Minnesota. ... Chief Taoyateduta, known as Chief Little Crow Settlers escaping the violence. ... The Crow Creek Indian Reservation is located in parts of Buffalo, Hughes, and Hyde counties on the east bank of the Missouri River in central South Dakota in the United States. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ...


Logging and farming were mainstays of Minnesota's early economy. The sawmills at Saint Anthony Falls, and logging centers like Marine on St. Croix, Stillwater, and Winona, processed high volumes of lumber. These cities were situated on rivers that were ideal for transportation.[27] Later, Saint Anthony Falls was tapped to provide power for flour mills. Innovations by Minneapolis millers led to the production of Minnesota "patent" flour, which commanded almost double the price of "bakers" or "clear" flour, which it replaced.[30] By 1900, Minnesota mills, led by Pillsbury and the Washburn-Crosby Company (a forerunner of General Mills), were grinding 14.1% of the nation's grain.[31] Marine on St. ... A Stillwater city limit sign Stillwater is a city located in Washington County, Minnesota (coordinates, 45. ... Winona is the county seat of Winona County6. ... Gristmill with water wheel, Skyline Drive, VA, 1938 A gristmill is a building where grain is ground into flour. ... Pillsbury is a brand name used by Minneapolis-based General Mills and the The J. M. Smucker Company. ... General Mills (NYSE: GIS) is a Fortune 500 corporation, mainly concerned with food products, which is headquartered in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. ...


The state's iron-mining industry was established with the discovery of iron in the Vermilion Range and the Mesabi Range in the 1880s, and in the Cuyuna Range in the early 1900s. The ore was shipped by rail to Two Harbors and Duluth, then loaded onto ships and transported eastward over the Great Lakes.[27] General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... The Vermilion Range exists between Tower and Ely, Minnesota, and contains significant deposits of iron ore. ... The Mesabi Iron Range is a vast deposit of iron ore and the largest of four major iron ranges in the region collectively known as the Iron Range of Minnesota. ... The Cuyuna Range is to the southwest of the Mesabi Range, largely within Crow Wing County, Minnesota. ... Two Harbors is a city located in Lake County, Minnesota. ... Location in St. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


Industrial development and the rise of manufacturing caused the population to shift gradually from rural areas to cities during the early 1900s. Nevertheless, farming remained prevalent. Minnesota's economy was hard-hit by the Great Depression, resulting in lower prices for farmers, layoffs among iron miners, and labor unrest. Compounding the adversity, western Minnesota and the Dakotas were hit by drought from 1931 to 1935. New Deal programs provided some economic turnaround. The Civilian Conservation Corps and other programs around the state established some jobs for Indians on their reservations, and the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 provided the tribes with a mechanism of self-government. This provided natives a greater voice within the state, and promoted more respect for tribal customs because religious ceremonies and native languages were no longer suppressed.[28] For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months, or years, when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... This article is about the policy program of US President Franklin D Roosevelt. ... CCC workers on road construction, Camp Euclid, Ohio 1936 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a work relief program for young men from unemployed families, established on March 19, 1933 by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934, also known as the Wheeler-Howard Act or informally, the Indian New Deal, was a U.S. federal legislation which secured certain rights to Native Americans, including Alaska Natives. ...


After World War II, industrial development quickened. New technology increased farm productivity through automation of feedlots for hogs and cattle, machine milking at dairy farms, and raising chickens in large buildings. Planting became more specialized with hybridization of corn and wheat, and the use of farm machinery such as tractors and combines became the norm. University of Minnesota professor Norman Borlaug contributed to these developments as part of the Green Revolution.[28] Suburban development accelerated due to increased postwar housing demand and convenient transportation. Increased mobility, in turn, enabled more specialized jobs.[28] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Beef cattle on a feedlot in the Texas Panhandle A feedlot or feedyard is a type of concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) (also known as factory farming) which is used for finishing livestock, notably beef cattle, prior to slaughter. ... This article is about a biological term. ... A CLAAS Caterpillar LEXION Combine. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Norman Ernest Borlaug (born March 25, 1914) is an American agricultural scientist, humanitarian, Nobel laureate, and has been called the father of the Green Revolution. ... The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ...


Minnesota became a center of technology after the war. Engineering Research Associates was formed in 1946 to develop computers for the United States Navy. It later merged with Remington Rand, and then became Sperry Rand. William Norris left Sperry in 1957 to form Control Data Corporation (CDC).[32] Cray Research was formed when Seymour Cray left CDC to form his own company. Medical device maker Medtronic also started business in the Twin Cities in 1949. Engineering Research Associates, commonly known as ERA, was a pioneering computer firm from the 1950s. ... USN redirects here. ... A Remington Rand branded typewriter Remington Rand was an early American computer manufacturer, best known as the original maker of the UNIVAC I, and now part of Unisys. ... The American company Univac began as the business computer division of Remington Rand formed by the purchase of the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation (EMCC) in 1950. ... William Norris (b. ... Control Data Corporation (CDC), was one of the pioneering supercomputer firms. ... For other uses, see Cray (disambiguation). ... Seymour Roger Cray (September 28, 1925 â€“ October 5, 1996) was a U.S. electrical engineer and supercomputer architect who founded the company Cray Research. ... Medtronic, Inc. ...


On August 1, 2007, Minnesota had the international spotlight cast on it when the I-35W bridge spanning the Mississippi river collapsed, killing 13. The I-35W Mississippi River bridge was an eight-lane, 1,907 feet (581 m) steel truss arch bridge that carried Interstate 35W across the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. ...


Cities and towns

See also: List of cities in Minnesota and List of townships in Minnesota

Saint Paul, located in east-central Minnesota along the banks of the Mississippi River, has been Minnesota's capital city since 1849, first as capital of the Territory of Minnesota, and then as state capital since 1858. List of cities in Minnesota, arranged in alphabetical order. ... Please see:- List of townships in Minnesota (A-M) List of townships in Minnesota (N-Z) See also List of cities in Minnesota List of Minnesota counties External links and sources Census 2000 Gazetteer Minnesota Association of Townships National Association of Towns and Townships Categories: | | ... Image File history File links OwatonnaBank. ... Image File history File links OwatonnaBank. ... Owatonnas classic bank West elevation detail The National Farmers Bank of Owatonna, Minnesota is a bank building designed by Louis Sullivan with decorative elements by George Elmslie. ... The Owatonna Power Plant is a city landmark. ... Louis Henri Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... map of Minnesota Territory Minnesota Territory Centennial U.S. postage stamp Minnesota Territory was an organized territory of the United States from March 3, 1849 to May 11, 1858, when Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd state. ...


Saint Paul is adjacent to Minnesota's most populous city, Minneapolis; they and their suburbs are known collectively as the Twin Cities metropolitan area, the 16th largest metropolitan area in the United States and home to about 60% of the state's population (as of April 2005).[33][34] The remainder of the state is known as "Greater Minnesota" or "Outstate Minnesota". Minneapolis redirects here. ... A map of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The U.S. state of Minnesota can be divided into regions in a variety of ways. ...


Minnesota has 17 cities with populations above fifty thousand (based on 2005 estimates). In descending order they are Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Rochester, Duluth, Bloomington, Plymouth, Brooklyn Park, Eagan, Coon Rapids, St. Cloud, Burnsville, Eden Prairie, Maple Grove, Woodbury, Blaine, Lakeville, and Minnetonka.[34] Of these listed, only Rochester, Duluth, and St. Cloud are outside the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Minneapolis redirects here. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Olmsted Founded 1854 Government  - Mayor Ardell Brede Area  - Total 39. ... Location in St. ... location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin Founded 1843 Incorporated 1858 Mayor Gene Winstead Area    - City 99. ... Plymouth is a city located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... Location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: , Country State County Hennepin Founded 1850s Incorporated 1954 Government  - Mayor Steve Lampi Area  - City 26. ... Location in Dakota County and the state of Minnesota. ... Coon Rapids is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. ... Red River cart at Saint Cloud St. ... Burnsville is a city located in Dakota County, Minnesota. ... Location in Hennepin County Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin County founded 1858 incorporated 1960s Government  - Mayor Phil Young Area  - City  35. ... Maple Grove is a city located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... Location in Washington County and the state of Minnesota. ... Blaine is a city in the state of Minnesota. ... Lakeville is a city located along Interstate 35 in Dakota County, Minnesota. ... Location in Hennepin County Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin County Founded 1850s Incorporated 1956  - Mayor Jan Callison Area    - City  28. ...


Minnesota's population continues to grow, primarily in the urban centers. The populations of metropolitan Sherburne and Scott Counties doubled between 1980 and 2000, while 40 of the state's 87 counties lost residents over the same decades.[35] Sherburne County is a county located in the state of Minnesota. ... Scott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ...


Demographics

A map of Minnesota's population density.

A diverse crowd in downtown Minneapolis 2000 Census The Census Bureau estimates that Minnesotas population was 5,167,101 in 2006, making it the 21st most populous state in the United States. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 548 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (806 × 882 pixel, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: image/png) BASED ON: Image:Minnesota population mao. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 548 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (806 × 882 pixel, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: image/png) BASED ON: Image:Minnesota population mao. ...

Population

From fewer than 6,100 people in 1850, Minnesota's population grew to over 1.75 million by 1900. Each of the next six decades saw a 15% rise in population, reaching 3.41 million in 1960. Growth then slowed, rising 11% to 3.8 million in 1970, and an average of 9% over the next three decades to 4.91 million in the 2000 census.[35] As of July 1, 2007, the state's population was estimated at 5,197,621 by the U.S. Census Bureau.[36] The rate of population change, and age and gender distributions, approximate the national average. Minnesota's growing minority groups, however, still form a significantly smaller proportion of the population than in the nation as a whole.[37] The center of population of Minnesota is located in Hennepin County, in the city of Rogers.[38] is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Hennepin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Minnesota, named in honor of the 17th-century French explorer Father Louis Hennepin. ... Rogers is a city located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ...


Race and ancestry

Over 75% of Minnesota's residents are of Western European descent, with the largest reported ancestries being German (39%), Norwegian (17.2%), Irish (11.9%), and Swedish (9.6%).[39] As of 2005, 6.3% of residents were foreign-born, compared to 12.4% for the nation.[39][40] The state has had the reputation of being relatively homogeneous, but that is changing. The Hispanic population of Minnesota is increasing rapidly,[41] and recent immigrants have come from all over the world, including Hmong,[42] Somalis, Vietnamese, Indians and emigrants from the former Soviet bloc. Western Europe is distinguished from Central Europe and Eastern Europe by differences of history and culture rather than by geography. ... A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Language(s) Hmong/Mong Religion(s) Shamanism, Buddhism, Christianity, others The terms Hmong (pronounced ) and Mong () both refer to an Asian ethnic group in the mountainous regions of southern China. ... During the Cold War, the Eastern Bloc (or Soviet Bloc) comprised the following Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Albania (until the early 1960s, see below), the Soviet Union, and Czechoslovakia. ...

The French Renaissance style Cathedral of St. Paul in the city of St. Paul.
The French Renaissance style Cathedral of St. Paul in the city of St. Paul.

The state's racial composition in 2005 was:[43] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x710, 383 KB) Taken from Selby Av side; 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x710, 383 KB) Taken from Selby Av side; 2006. ... French Renaissance architecture is the style of architecture which was imported from Italy during the early 16th century and developed in the light of local architectural traditions. ... Dome of the Cathedral of Saint Paul The Cathedral of Saint Paul is a Roman Catholic cathedral in the city of St Paul, Minnesota. ...

  • 86.3% White (non-Hispanic);
  • 4.1% Black (non-Hispanic);
  • 3.6% Hispanic, a category that includes people of many races;
  • 3.4% Asian/Pacific Islander;
  • 1.1% Native American/Alaskan Native;
  • 1.5% mixed race;
  • 1.8% other races.

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Actress Halle Berry was born to a white mother and a black father The terms multiracial and mixed-race describe people whose parents are not the same race. ...

Religion

Although Christianity dominates the religious persuasion of residents, there is a long history of non-Christian faith. German-Jewish pioneers formed Saint Paul's first synagogue in 1856,[28] and there are now appreciable numbers of adherents to Islam, Buddhism, and other traditions. But Protestantism is adhered to by the majority of Minnesotans, and Roman Catholics are the largest single denomination. A 2008 survey by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life showed that 32% of Minnesotans were affiliated with Protestant traditions, 21% with Evangelical Protestants, 28% with Roman Catholic, 1% each with Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist, and Black Protestant traditions, smaller amounts for other faiths, and 13% unaffiliated.[44] This is broadly consistent with the results of the 2001 American Religious Identification Survey, which also gives detail on percentages of many individual denominations.[45] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In the United States, the Mainline churches are those Protestant denominations with moderate theologies which attempt to be open to new ideas and societal changes without abandoning what they consider to be the historical basis of the Christian faith. ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Minnesota

Once primarily a producer of raw materials, Minnesota's economy has transformed in the last 200 years to emphasize finished products and services. Perhaps the most significant characteristic of the economy is its diversity; the relative outputs of its business sectors closely match the United States as a whole.[46] The economy of Minnesota had a gross domestic product of $234 billion in 2005.[47] Thirty-six of the United States' top 1,000 publicly traded companies (by revenue in 2006) are headquartered in Minnesota,[48] including Target, UnitedHealth Group, 3M, Medtronic, General Mills, U.S. Bancorp, and Best Buy. The second-largest privately owned U.S. company, Cargill, is headquartered in Wayzata.[49] The per capita income in 2005 was $37,290, the tenth-highest in the nation.[50] The three-year median household income from 2002-2004 was $55,914, ranking fifth in the U.S. and first among the 36 states not on the Atlantic coast.[51] Minnesota's state budget is currently facing a $935 million deficit.[52][53] The Minnesota state quarter The economy of Minnesota produced 234 billion dollars of gross domestic product in 2005. ... GDP redirects here. ... This article is about the United States retail company. ... UnitedHealth Group Incorporated NYSE: UNH is a managed health care company. ... 3M Company (NYSE: MMM), formerly Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company until 2002, is an American corporation with a worldwide presence. ... Medtronic, Inc. ... General Mills (NYSE: GIS) is a Fortune 500 corporation, mainly concerned with food products, which is headquartered in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. ... It has been suggested that Firstar Corporation be merged into this article or section. ... For the defunct chain of catalog showrooms, see Best Products. ... Cargill, Incorporated is a privately held, multinational corporation, and is based in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... Location in Hennepin County Coordinates: , Country State County Hennepin County Founded 1850s Incorporated 1883 Government  - Mayor Andrew Humphrey Area  - City 3. ... The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... The median household income is commonly used to provide data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more. ...


Industry and commerce

The IDS Tower, designed by Philip Johnson and the state's second tallest building, reflecting César Pelli's Art Deco-style Wells Fargo Center
The IDS Tower, designed by Philip Johnson and the state's second tallest building, reflecting César Pelli's Art Deco-style Wells Fargo Center

Minnesota's earliest industries were fur trading and agriculture; the city of Minneapolis grew around the flour mills powered by St. Anthony Falls. Although less than 1% of the population is employed in the agricultural sector,[54] it remains a major part of the state's economy, ranking 6th in the nation in the value of products sold.[55] The state is the U.S.'s largest producer of sugar beets, sweet corn, and green peas for processing, and farm-raised turkeys.[56] Forestry remains strong, including logging, pulpwood processing and paper production, and forest products manufacturing. Minnesota was famous for its soft-ore mines, which produced a significant portion of the world's iron ore for over a century. Although the high-grade ore is now depleted, taconite mining continues, using processes developed locally to save the industry. In 2004, the state produced 75% of the country's usable iron ore.[56] The mining boom created the port of Duluth which continues to be important for shipping ore, coal, and agricultural products. The manufacturing sector now includes technology and biomedical firms in addition to the older food processors and heavy industry. The nation's first indoor shopping mall was Edina's Southdale Center and its largest is Bloomington's Mall of America. Image:IDS reflecting Wells Fargo. ... Image:IDS reflecting Wells Fargo. ... IDS Center Categories: Buildings and structures stubs | Minneapolis skyscrapers | Minneapolis, Minnesota | Minnesota landmarks ... 1933 Portrait of Philip Johnson by Carl Van Vechten Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an influential American architect. ... muu Cesar Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted Argentine architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Wells Fargo Center, formerly known as Norwest Center, is the third-tallest building in Minneapolis, Minnesota after 225 South Sixth and the IDS Center tower. ... Gristmill with water wheel, Skyline Drive, VA, 1938 A gristmill is a building where grain is ground into flour. ... Aerial view of Saint Anthony Falls with the upper dam Saint Anthony Falls, or the Falls of Saint Anthony, located near downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, was the only waterfall on the Mississippi River until it was replaced by a series of dams in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Two sugar beets - the one on the left has been cultivated to be smoother than the traditional beet, so that it traps less soil. ... Husked sweetcorn Sweet corn (Zea mays var. ... Binomial name Pisum sativum L. A pea is the small, edible round green bean which grows in a pod on the leguminous vine Pisum sativum. ... Species Meleagris gallopavo Meleagris ocellata A turkey is either of two species of large birds in the gamebird family with fan-shaped tails and wattled necks. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... Logging is the process in which trees are cut down usually as part of a timber harvest which is good for the environment. ... Pulpwood refers to timber stocks that are cut in order to make wood pulp for paper production. ... This heap of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production. ... Taconite is an iron-bearing, high-silica, flint-like rock. ... Location in St. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: , Country State County Hennepin Founded 1860s Incorporated 1888 Government  - Mayor James Hovland Area  - City  16. ... Inside the Southdale Center Southdale Center, commonly known as just Southdale, was the first fully-enclosed and completely climate-controlled shopping mall in the United States. ... location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin Founded 1843 Incorporated 1858 Mayor Gene Winstead Area    - City 99. ... Mall of America (also MOA, MoA, or the Megamall) is a shopping mall located in the Twin Cities suburb of Bloomington, Minnesota. ...


Energy use and production

The state produces ethanol fuel and is the first to mandate its use, a 10% mix (E10) since 1997,[57] and a 20% mix (E20) in 2013.[58] There are more than 310 service stations supplying E85 fuel.[59] A 2% biodiesel blend has been required in diesel fuel since 2005. As of December 2006 the state was the country's fourth-largest producer of wind power, with 895 megawatts installed and another 200 megawatts planned, much of it on the windy Buffalo Ridge in the southwest part of the state.[60] Information on pump, California. ... Ethanol (ethyl alcohol) and methanol (methyl alcohol) are two types of alcohol fuels. ... Logo used in the United States for E85 fuel Not to be confused with European route E85, a motorway in Europe. ... This article is about transesterified lipids. ... This article is about the fuel. ... An example of a wind turbine. ... The megawatt (symbol: MW) is a unit for measuring power corresponding to one million (106) watts. ... Buffalo Ridge is a large expanse of rolling hills in the southeastern part of the larger Coteau des Prairies, and is the second highest point in Minnesota standing 1,995 feet (608 m) above sea level. ...


State taxes

Minnesota has a slightly progressive income tax structure; the three brackets of state income tax rates are 5.35%, 7.05% and 7.85%.[61] Minnesota is ranked as the 6th highest in the nation for per capita total state taxes.[62] The sales tax in Minnesota is 6.5%, but there is no sales tax on clothing, prescription medications, some services, or food items for home consumption.[63] The state legislature may allow municipalities to institute local sales taxes and special local taxes, such as the 0.5% supplemental sales tax in Minneapolis.[64] Excise taxes are levied on alcohol, tobacco, and motor fuel. The state imposes a use tax on items purchased elsewhere but used within Minnesota.[63] Owners of real property in Minnesota pay property tax to their county, municipality, school district, and special taxing districts.
A progressive tax, or graduated tax, is a tax that is larger as a percentage of income for those with larger incomes. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... A baby wearing many items of winter clothing: headband, cap, fur-lined coat, shawl and sweater. ... Look up prescription in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A medication is a drug or substance taken to reduce symptoms or cure an illness or medical condition. ... This article is about a term used in economics. ... The Minnesota State Legislature is the legislative branch of government in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        Excise tax, sometimes called an excise duty, is a type of... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


Culture

Fine and performing arts

Minnesota's major fine art museums include the Weisman Art Museum, the Walker Art Center, and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and the Minnesota Orchestra are full-time professional musical ensembles that perform concerts and offer educational programs to the community. Attendance at theatrical, musical, and comedy events in the area is strong, which may be attributed to the cold winters, the large population of post-secondary students, and a generally vibrant economy.[citation needed] The Guthrie Theater moved into a new building in 2006, boasting three stages and overlooking the Mississippi River. In the U.S., the Twin Cities' number of theater seats per capita ranks behind only New York City;[65] with some 2.3 million theater tickets sold annually.[66] The Minnesota Fringe Festival is an annual celebration of theatre, dance, improvisation, puppetry, kids' shows, visual art, and musicals. The summer festival consists of over 800 performances over 11 days in Minneapolis, and is the largest non-juried performing arts festival in the United States.[67] Image File history File linksMetadata Mpls_arts. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mpls_arts. ... The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is an art museum located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... McKim, Mead, and White was a prominent architectural firm in the eastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century. ... Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... The Weisman The Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art located on the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus in Minneapolis, Minnesota has been a teaching museum for the university since 1934. ... One of the most celebrated art museums in the country, the Walker Art Center is known for commissioning and presenting innovative contemporary art; fostering the cross-pollination of the visual, performing, and media arts; and engaging diverse audiences in the excitement of the creative process. ... The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is an art museum located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO), based in St. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra that was founded in 1903 by Emil Oberhoffer as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... The Guthrie Theater is a venue for staging plays in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Minnesota Fringe Festival is a theatre and performing arts festival held in Minneapolis, Minnesota every summer, usually during the first two weeks in August. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... A puppeteer is a person who manipulates a puppet or marionette, either by the use of strings, wires or their hands, for a stage production or film. ... Many times, the term art is used to refer to the visual arts. ...

Literature

The rigors and rewards of pioneer life on the prairie were the subject of Giants in the Earth by Ole Rolvaag and of the Little House series of children's books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Small-town life was savaged by Sinclair Lewis in the novel Main Street, and more gently and affectionately satirized by Garrison Keillor in his tales of Lake Wobegon. St. Paul native F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote of the social insecurities and aspirations of the young city in stories such as Winter Dreams and The Ice Palace (published in Flappers and Philosophers). Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous epic poem The Song of Hiawatha was inspired by Minnesota and many places and bodies of water in the state are named in the poem. For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Ole Edvart Rølvaag Ole Edvart Rølvaag (spelled Rolvaag in the United States) (April 22, 1876 - November 5, 1931) was a Norwegian-American writer and professor, well known for his writings on the immigrant experience. ... The Little House Little House is a group of young men from Washington, NC. Often known as simply LH, their influence in the community is more than exemplary. ... Laura Ingalls Wilder (February 7, 1867 – February 10, 1957) was an American author. ... Sinclair Lewis Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 — January 10, 1951) was an American novelist and playwright. ... Main Street book cover The satirical novel Main Street by Sinclair Lewis was published in 1920. ... Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942 in Anoka, Minnesota) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Winter Dreams is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald that first appeared in the Metropolitan Magazine in December 1922, and was collected in All The Sad Young Men in 1926. ... Flappers and Philosophers was the first collection of short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published in 1920. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... Statue of Hiawatha carrying Minnehaha at Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


Entertainment

First Avenue nightclub, the heart of Minnesota's music community.
First Avenue nightclub, the heart of Minnesota's music community.[10]
Main article: Music of Minnesota

Minnesotan musicians of many genres include soul star Prince, harmony singers The Andrews Sisters, rockabilly star Eddie Cochran, folk musician Bob Dylan, garage rock band The Castaways, pop songwriters Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Jonny Lang, and Soul Asylum. Minnesota has also produced cult favorites such as Hüsker Dü and The Replacements.[10] Image File history File links w:First Avenue nightclub in w:Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Image File history File links w:First Avenue nightclub in w:Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis First Avenue and 7th Street Entry are a cornerstone of the Midwest music scene, and serve as an historic landmark of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The music of Minnesota has played a role in the historical and cultural development of Minnesota. ... The Artist redirects here. ... The Andrews Sisters on the cover of the reissue collection From left to right: Maxene, Patty, and LaVerne. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Raymond Edward Eddie Cochran (October 2, 1938[1]–April 17, 1960[2]) was an American rock and roll musician and an important influence on popular music during the late 1950s, early 1960s, and beyond. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The Castaways were an American garage rock band from The Twin Cities in Minnesota. ... Jimmy Jam (born James Harris III in Minneapolis, Minnesota on June 6, 1959) and Terry Lewis (born November 21, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) are an R&B and pop songwriting and record production team. ... Jonny Lang (born Jon Gordon Langseth, Jr. ... Soul Asylum is an alternative rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1983. ... This article is about the rock band called Hüsker Dü. For other uses, see Husker Du. ... For other uses, see The Replacements (disambiguation). ...


Minnesotans have made significant contributions to comedy, theater, and film. Ole and Lena jokes are best appreciated when delivered in the accent of Scandinavian Americans. Garrison Keillor is known around the country for resurrecting old-style radio comedy with A Prairie Home Companion, which has aired since the 1970s.[10] Local television had the satirical show The Bedtime Nooz in the 1960s, while area natives Lizz Winstead and Craig Kilborn helped create the increasingly influential Daily Show decades later. Actors from the state include Eddie Albert, Judy Garland, Jessica Lange, and Winona Ryder. Joel and Ethan Coen, Terry Gilliam and Mike Todd contributed to the art of film, and others brought the offbeat cult shows Mystery Science Theater 3000 and Let's Bowl to national cable from the Twin Cities. Ole and Lena are characters persistent in jokes by Scandinavian-Americans, dominantly in the Upper Midwest region of the U.S., particularly in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota where Lutherans are common. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942 in Anoka, Minnesota) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. ... Radio comedy, or comedic radio programming, is a radio broadcast that may involve sitcom elements, sketches, and many other forms of comedy found on other mediums. ... This article is about the radio show. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... Lizz Winstead (born August 5, 1961) is a Minnesota-born comedian who was co-creator of The Daily Show along with Madeleine Smithberg, and served as head writer. ... Craig Kilborn (born August 24, 1962) is an American comedian and former talk show host. ... The Daily Show is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... Edward Albert Heimberger (April 22, 1906 – May 26, 2005) was a popular Oscar and Emmy Award-nominated American stage, film, character actor, gardener, and humanitarian activist, perhaps best known for playing Bing Edwards in the Brother Rat films, or for his role in the 1960s television comedy Green Acres. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Jessica Phyllis Lange (born April 20, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Winona Laura Horowitz[1] (born October 29, 1971), better known under her professional name Winona Ryder, is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Joel and Ethan Coen at Cannes 2001 Joel and Ethan Coen, commonly known as The Coen Brothers have written and directed numerous successful films, such as comedies O Brother Where Art Thou, Raising Arizona and The Big Lebowski, as well as darker film noir dramas such as Fargo, Millers... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Michael Todd (real name Avrom Hirsch Goldbogen) (June 22, 1907 or 19091 - March 22, 1958) was an American film producer who is best known for his production of Around the World in Eighty Days 1956, which won an Academy Award for Best Picture. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Cult television, like cult figures, cult film and cult radio, attracts a band of aficionados or appreciators, known as a cult following, devoted to a specific television series or fictional universe. ... Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... The Lets Bowl Cast (L-R): Lisa Bartholomew, Rich Kronfeld, Steve Sedahl, Drew Jansen, & Amanda Brewer. ... Cable TV redirects here. ...


Popular culture

Main article: Culture of Minnesota
A youth fiddle performance at the Minnesota State Fair.
A youth fiddle performance at the Minnesota State Fair.

Stereotypical Minnesotan traits include manners known as "Minnesota nice," Lutheranism, a strong sense of community and shared culture, and a distinctive Upper Midwestern accent sprinkled with Scandinavian-sounding words such as uff da. Potlucks, usually with a variety of hotdish casseroles, are popular at community functions, especially church activities. Minnesota's Scandinavian heritage makes lutefisk a traditional holiday dish. Movies like Fargo, Drop Dead Gorgeous, Grumpy Old Men and Grumpier Old Men, the radio show A Prairie Home Companion and the book How to Talk Minnesotan lampoon (and celebrate) Minnesotan culture, speech and mannerisms. The Culture of Minnesota is a subculture of the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 300 KB) taken by William Wesen at the MN State Fair, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 300 KB) taken by William Wesen at the MN State Fair, 2006. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... The Minnesota State Fair is the state fair of the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... Look up Minnesota nice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with North American regional phonology. ... Uff da is an exclamation of Norwegian origin that is relatively common in the Upper Midwestern states of the United States, meaning roughly drats, oops! or ouch! especially if the ouch! is an empathetic one. ... An assortment of food dishes at a church potluck. ... Tater Tot Hotdish Hotdish is any of a variety of casserole dishes popular in the Midwest of the United States and especially the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin. ... Lutefisk (on the upper left side of the plate) as served in a Norwegian restaurant, with potatoes, mashed peas, and bacon. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... For other uses, see Drop Dead Gorgeous (disambiguation). ... Grumpy Old Men was: The title of a 1993 movie, Grumpy Old Men The title of a 2000s BBC2 television show, Grumpy Old Men This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Grumpier Old Men is a 1995 Warner Bros. ... Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... This article is about the radio show. ... How to Talk Minnesotan is a book lampooning stereotypical Minnesotan speech and mannerisms written by Howard Mohr, a former writer for A Prairie Home Companion. ...


The Minnesota State Fair, advertised as The Great Minnesota Get-Together, is an icon of state culture. In a state of 5.1 million people, there were nearly 1.7 million visitors to the fair in 2006.[68] The fair covers the variety of life in Minnesota, including fine art, science, agriculture, food preparation, 4H displays, music, the midway, and corporate merchandising. It is known for its displays of seed art, butter sculptures of dairy princesses, the birthing barn, and dozens of varieties of food on a stick, such as Pronto Pups, cheese curds, and deep fried candy bars. On a smaller scale, these attractions are also offered at the state's many county fairs. The Minnesota State Fair is the state fair of the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The 4-H youth organization, now administered by the United States Department of Agriculture Cooperative Extension System, was founded in 1904 by G.C. Adams in Newton CountyGeorgia and now serves over 1. ... A midway at a fair (commonly an American fair such as a county or state fair) is the location where amusement park rides, entertainment and fast food booths are concentrated. ... Crop art or seed art is a visual art created by fixing vegetable matter, especially seeds, to a background. ... For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... Audrey Mohr, 2006 Princess Kay of the Milky Way Princess Kay of the Milky Way is the title awarded to the winner of the state-wide Minnesota Dairy Princess Program, an annual pageant competition organized by the Midwest Dairy Association. ... Pronto Pup is a brand of corn dog sold at the Minnesota State Fair and at other fairs throughout the country. ... A bowl of Wisconsin cheese curds Cheese curds are the fresh curds of cheddar cheese. ...


Other large annual festivals include the Saint Paul Winter Carnival, Minneapolis' Aquatennial and Mill City Music Festival, Moondance Jam in Walker, and Detroit Lakes' 10,000 Lakes Festival and WE Fest. The 2004 Ice Palace // In 1885 a New York reporter wrote that Saint Paul was another Siberia, unfit for human habitation in winter. ... The Minneapolis Aquatennial is an annual event held in the U.S. city of Minneapolis, Minnesota, since 1940 celebrating the citys famous lakes, rivers, and streams. ... Moondance Jam is an annual classic rock festival held in mid-July in the Leech Lake/Chippewa National Forest Area near Walker, Minnesota. ... Location in Minnesota Country State County Becker County Government  - Mayor Larry Buboltz Area  - City  12. ... The 10,000 Lakes Festival (abbreviated as 10KLF) is an annual three-day music festival in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, at the Soo Pass Ranch. ...


Health and education

Health

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester.
The Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

The people of Minnesota have a high rate of participation in outdoor activities; the state is ranked first in the percentage of residents who engage in regular exercise.[69] Minnesotans have the nation's lowest premature death rate, third-lowest infant mortality rate,[70][71] and the second-longest life expectancies.[72] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 91% of Minnesotans have health insurance, more than in any other state.[73] These and other measures have led one group to rank Minnesota as the second-healthiest state in the nation, and another to rank it fourth.[74][75] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2424x1211, 557 KB) Photo I took today north of the Mayo Clinic main campus in Rochester, Minnesota. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2424x1211, 557 KB) Photo I took today north of the Mayo Clinic main campus in Rochester, Minnesota. ... is the death of infants in the first year of life. ...


On 1 October 2007, Minnesota became the 17th state to enact a statewide smoking ban in restaurants and bars with the enactment of Freedom to Breathe Act of 2007.[76] is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Freedom to Breathe Act of 2007 is a piece of Minnesota legislation that restricts the act of smoking tobacco products in public places. ...


Medical care is provided by a comprehensive network of hospitals and clinics, headed by two institutions with international reputations. The University of Minnesota Medical School is a highly rated teaching institution that has made a number of breakthroughs in treatment, and its research activities contribute significantly to the state's growing biotechnology industry.[77] The Mayo Clinic, a world-renowned medical practice, is based in Rochester. Mayo and the University are partners in the Minnesota Partnership for Biotechnology and Medical Genomics, a state-funded program that conducts research into cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, heart health, obesity, and other areas.[78] // Background The University of Minnesota Medical School is a combination of two campuses. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Main campus in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Olmsted Founded 1854 Government  - Mayor Ardell Brede Area  - Total 39. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Alzheimers disease (AD) or primary dementia of Alzheimers type is an incurable, degenerative neuropsychiatric disease which results in a pervasive loss of first mental, then physical functioning due to the deterioration of brain tissue. ... Coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease (CAD), ischaemic heart disease, atherosclerotic heart disease, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries that supply the myocardium (the muscle of the heart) with oxygen and nutrients. ...


Education

See also: List of colleges and universities in Minnesota, List of high schools in Minnesota, and List of school districts in Minnesota
The Richardsonian Romanesque Pillsbury Hall (1889) is one of the oldest buildings on the University of Minnesota Minneapolis campus.
The Richardsonian Romanesque Pillsbury Hall (1889) is one of the oldest buildings on the University of Minnesota Minneapolis campus.

One of the first acts of the Minnesota Legislature when it opened in 1858 was the creation of a normal school at Winona. More recently, the state ranked 13th on the 2006–2007 Morgan Quitno Smartest State Award, and is first in the percentage of residents with at least a high school diploma.[79][80] With an 84% graduation rate, Minnesota ranks 5th in the nation in high school graduation[81] and Minnesota students earn the highest average score in the nation on the ACT exam.[82] While Minnesota has chosen not to implement school vouchers,[83] it is home to the first charter school.[84] It has been suggested that Minnesota#Colleges_and_Universities be merged into this article or section. ... // This is a list of high schools in the state of Minnesota. ... This is a complete listing of school districts in the State of Minnesota. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 486 KB) Pillsbury Hall at the w:University of Minnesota in w:Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 486 KB) Pillsbury Hall at the w:University of Minnesota in w:Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Richardsonian Romanesque has both French and Spanish Romanesque characteristics, like the First Presbyterian Church in Detroit, Michigan by architechs George D. Mason and Zachariah Rice in 1891 Richardsonian Romanesque is a style of American architecture named after architect Henry Hobson Richardson, whose masterpiece is Trinity Church, Boston in Massachusetts. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... Winona is the county seat of Winona County6. ... Morgan Quitno Press is an research and publishing company based out of Lawrence, Kansas. ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ... A school voucher, also called an education voucher, is a certificate by which parents are given the ability to pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school (UK state school) to which they were assigned. ... Charter schools are publicly funded elementary or secondary schools in the United States which have been freed from some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools, in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each charter school...


The state supports a network of public universities and colleges, currently comprised of 32 institutions in the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System, and five major campuses of the University of Minnesota. It is also home to more than 20 private colleges and universities, four of which rank among the top 100 liberal arts colleges, according to U.S. News and World Report.[85] For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System (MnSCU) comprises 32 state-supported technical colleges, community colleges and state universities in Minnesota. ... The University of Minnesota is a large university with several campuses spread throughout the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Transportation

Transportation in Minnesota is overseen by the Minnesota Department of Transportation. Principal transportation corridors radiate from the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area and Duluth. The major Interstate highways are I-35, I-90, and I-94, with I-35 and I-94 passing through the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, and I-90 going east-west along the southern edge of the state.[86] In 2006, a constitutional amendment was passed that required sales and use taxes on motor vehicles to fund transportation, with at least 40% dedicated to public transit.[87] There are nearly two dozen rail corridors in Minnesota, most of which go through Minneapolis-St. Paul or Duluth.[88] There is water transportation along the Mississippi River system and from the ports of Lake Superior.[89] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x853, 821 KB) Summary Nick Zlonis, aerial lift bridge, Duluth, Superior, harbor, canal Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x853, 821 KB) Summary Nick Zlonis, aerial lift bridge, Duluth, Superior, harbor, canal Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Aerial Bridge in 1907 The Aerial Lift Bridge (earlier known as the Aerial Bridge or Aerial Ferry Bridge) is a major landmark in the port city of Duluth, Minnesota. ... Location in St. ... The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT, pronounced min-dot) oversees transportation by land, water, and air in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... A map of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 35 Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35) is a north–south interstate highway in the central United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 90 Interstate 90 (abbreviated I-90) is the longest interstate highway in the United States at nearly 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). ... Interstate 94 (abbreviated I-94) is the northernmost east-west interstate highway, connecting the Great Lakes and Intermountain regions of the United States. ... Amend redirects here. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... railroads redirects here. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ...

A Hiawatha Line vehicle in Minneapolis
A Hiawatha Line vehicle in Minneapolis

Minnesota's principal airport is Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP), the headquarters and major passenger and freight hub for Northwest Airlines and Sun Country Airlines. Most other domestic carriers serve the airport. Large commercial jet service is provided at Duluth and Rochester, with scheduled commuter service to six smaller cities via Northwest Airlines subsidiary Mesaba Airlines.[90][91] Download high resolution version (850x554, 88 KB)Hiawatha Line light-rail vehicle #111 near Cedar/Riverside station. ... Download high resolution version (850x554, 88 KB)Hiawatha Line light-rail vehicle #111 near Cedar/Riverside station. ... The Hiawatha Line is a 12-mile (19-kilometer) light-rail corridor in Hennepin County, Minnesota that extends from downtown Minneapolis to the southern suburb of Bloomington, connecting to the Minneapolis-St. ... Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport, by far the largest and busiest airport in the state of Minnesota, straddles the southern border of the cities of Saint Paul and Minneapolis. ... Northwest Airlines, Inc. ... Sun Country Airlines is an American low-cost airline headquartered in the Minneapolis-St. ... Mesaba Airlines (IATA: XJ, ICAO: MES, and Callsign: Mesaba) [1] is an American regional airline based in Eagan, Minnesota. ...


Amtrak's Empire Builder runs through Minnesota, making stops at Midway Station in St. Paul and five other stations.[92] Intercity bus service is provided by Greyhound, Jefferson Lines, and Coach USA. Public transit in Minnesota is currently limited to bus systems in the larger cities and the Hiawatha Line light rail corridor in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Empire Builder is a train route operated by Amtrak in the Midwestern and Northwestern United States. ... Midway Station is the Amtrak train station in Saint Paul, Minnesota, so named because it is roughly halfway between the downtowns of St. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest intercity common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2200 destinations in the United States. ... Jefferson Lines is an intercity bus transportation provider based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Coach USA MCI D4500 #8794 (owned by New Jersey Transit) in Nanuet, New York, in standard Coach USA livery. ... Autobus redirects here. ... The Hiawatha Line is a 12-mile (19-kilometer) light-rail corridor in Hennepin County, Minnesota that extends from downtown Minneapolis to the southern suburb of Bloomington, connecting to the Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...


Law and government

As with the federal government of the United States, power in Minnesota is divided into three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial.[93]


Executive

See also: List of Governors of Minnesota and Minnesota gubernatorial election, 2006

The executive branch is headed by the governor. The current governor is Tim Pawlenty, a Republican whose first term began January 6, 2003, and who was narrowly re-elected in 2006. The current Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota is Carol Molnau, who was also the head of the Minnesota Department of Transportation until the Senate refused to confirm her appointment in February 2008[94]. The offices of governor and lieutenant governor have four-year terms. The governor has a cabinet consisting of the leaders of various state government agencies, called commissioners. The other elected constitutional offices are secretary of state, attorney general, and state auditor. This is a list of Governors for Minnesota: Territorial Governors State Governors See also Governor of Minnesota Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota List of Lieutenant Governors of Minnesota References The Governors Office and History, accessed February 12, 2004. ... The 2006 Minnesota gubernatorial election took place on November 7, 2006. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the states executive branch. ... Timothy James (Tim) Pawlenty (born November 27, 1960) is an American politician from the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party of Minnesota is the Minnesota branch of the United States Republican Party. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lieutenant Governors of Minnesota 1858-1860 William Holcombe Dem 1860-1863 Ignatius Donnelly Dem 1863-1864 Henry Adoniram Swift Rep 1864-1866 Charles D. Sherwood Rep 1866-1870 Thomas H. Armstrong Rep 1870-1874 William H. Yale Rep 1874-1876 Alphonso Barto Rep 1876-1880 James B. Wakefield Rep 1880... Carol Molnau (b. ... The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT, pronounced min-dot) oversees transportation by land, water, and air in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... This article is about the governmental body. ... Minnesotas secretaries of state Territory Charles K. Smith 1849-1851 Alexander Wilkin 1851-1853 Joseph T. Rosser 1853-1857 Charles L. Chase 1857-1858 State Francis Baasen 1858-1860 James H. Baker 1860-1862 David Blakeley 1862-1868 Henry C. Rogers 1868-1870 Hans Mattson 1870-1872 Samuel P... Minnesotas Attorney Generals Territory Lorenzo A. Babcock 1849-1853 Lafayette Emmett 1853-1858 State Charles H. Berry 1858-1860 Gordon E. Cole 1860-1866 William J. Colville 1866-1868 Francis R. E. Cornell 1868-1874 George P. Wilson 1874-1880 Charles M. Start 1880-1881 William J. Hahn 1881... Minnesota state Auditor Territory 1849-1852 Jonathan E. McKusick 1852-1853 Abraham Van Vorhees 1853-1854 Scorates Nelson 1854-1858 Julius Georgii State 1858-1861 William F. Dunbar 1861-1873 Charles McIlrath 1873-1882 Orlan P. Whitcomb 1882-1891 William W. Braden 1891-1895 Adolph Biermann 1895-1903 Robert C...

The Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul, designed by Cass Gilbert.
The Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul, designed by Cass Gilbert.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1984x1282, 415 KB) en:Minnesota State Capitol, photo taken on June 22, 2005 by User:Mulad. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1984x1282, 415 KB) en:Minnesota State Capitol, photo taken on June 22, 2005 by User:Mulad. ... Minnesota State Capitol at Night The Minnesota State Capitol is located in Minnesotas capital city, Saint Paul, and houses the Minnesota Senate, Minnesota House of Representatives, the Office of the Attorney General and the Office of the Governor. ... The Woolworth Building in New York City was the worlds tallest building when it was built in 1913. ...

Legislative

The Minnesota Legislature is a bicameral body consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The state has 67 districts, each covering about 60,000 people. Each district has one senator and two representatives (each district being divided into A and B sections). Senators serve for four years and representatives for two years. In the November 2006 election, the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) gained 19 house seats, giving them control of the House of Representatives by 85–49. The Senate is also controlled by the DFL. In early 2008, the DFL picked up an additional seat in a special election to expand their majority to 45–22. The DFL now controls a veto-proof majority in the Senate. The Minnesota State Legislature is the legislative branch of government in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Minnesota Senate is the upper house in the Minnesota Legislature. ... The Minnesota House of Representatives is the lower house in the Minnesota State Legislature. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) was created on April 15, 1944 when the Minnesota Democratic Party and Farmer-Labor Party merged to create the DFL. Hubert H. Humphrey was instrumental in this merger. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Judicial

Minnesota's court system has three levels. Most cases start in the district courts, which are courts of general jurisdiction. There are 272 district court judges in ten judicial districts. Appeals from the trial courts and challenges to certain governmental decisions are heard by the Minnesota Court of Appeals, consisting of sixteen judges who typically sit in three-judge panels. The seven-justice Minnesota Supreme Court hears all appeals from the Tax Court, the Worker's Compensation Court, first-degree murder convictions, and discretionary appeals from the Court of Appeals; it also has original jurisdiction over election disputes.[95] District courts are a category of courts which exists in several nations. ... The Minnesota Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Minnesota and consists of seven members. ... Certiorari (pronunciation: sər-sh(ē-)ə-ˈrer-ē, -ˈrär-ē, -ˈra-rē) is a legal term in Roman, English and American law referring to a type of writ seeking judicial review. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...


Two specialized courts within administrative agencies have been established: the Workers' Compensation Court of Appeals, and the Tax Court, which deals with non-criminal tax cases.


Regional

Below the city and county levels of government found in the United States, Minnesota has other entities that provide governmental oversight and planning. Some actions in the Twin Cities metropolitan area are coordinated by the Metropolitan Council, and many lakes and rivers are overseen by watershed districts and soil and water conservation districts. The Metropolitan Council is the regional governmental agency (also known as a regional planning organization, see Metropolitan planning organization) in Minnesota serving the Twin Cities seven-county metropolitan area (see Minneapolis-St. ... Watershed districts are special government entities in the U.S. state of Minnesota that monitor and regulate the use of water in watersheds surrounding various lakes and rivers in the state. ... Conservation districts are government entities that help control the use of land and water in U.S. states and insular areas. ...


There are seven Anishinaabe reservations and four Dakota communities in Minnesota. These communities are self-governing.[96] Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... A Sioux in traditional dress including war bonnet, circa 1908. ...


Federal

See also: Minnesota United States Senate election, 2006 and United States House elections, 2006#Minnesota

Minnesota's two United States senators are Republican Norm Coleman and Democrat Amy Klobuchar. The state has eight congressional districts; they are represented by Tim Walz (1st district), John Kline (2nd), Jim Ramstad (3rd), Betty McCollum (4th), Keith Ellison (5th), Michele Bachmann (6th), Collin Peterson (7th), and James Oberstar (8th). Candidates Mark Kennedy, Amy Klobuchar and Robert Fitzgerald debate on Novemeber 5, 2006 The 2006 Minnesota U.S. Senate election took place on November 7, 2006. ... President Bush meets with Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer (then House Minority Leader and Minority Whip, respectively) at the Oval Office in the White House. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... See Norman Jay Coleman for the former secretary of Agriculture. ... Amy Jean Klobuchar (pronounced KLOH-buh-shar) (born May 25, 1960) is the junior United States Senator from Minnesota. ... Minnesota currently has 8 congressional districts. ... Timothy J. Walz (born April 6, 1964) is an American politician. ... Minnesotas First Congressional District extends across southern Minnesota from the border with South Dakota to the border of Wisconsin. ... John Paul Kline (born September 6, 1947 in Allentown, Pennsylvania) is an American politician. ... Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District spans the width of the entire southern metro area and contains all of Carver, Scott, Le Sueur, Goodhue and Rice Counties. ... James M. Ramstad (born May 6, 1946) is a United States politician from the state of Minnesota. ... Minnesotas 3rd Congressional District is one of the most affluent in the state, encompassing the suburbs of Hennepin County to the north, west, and south of Minneapolis. ... Betty C. McCollum (born July 12, 1954) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). ... Minnesotas 4th Congressional District includes all of St. ... Keith Maurice Ellison (born August 4, 1963) is an American lawyer and politician who became the first Muslim[1][2] to be elected to the United States Congress when he won the vacant seat for Minnesotas 5th congressional district in the House of Representatives, one of eight congressional districts... Minnesotas Fifth Congressional District is a small congressional district in eastern Minnesota. ... Michele Bachmann (born Michele Marie Amble on April 6, 1956) is the Republican Representative of Minnesotas 6th congressional district, one of eight congressional districts in Minnesota. ... Minnesotas Sixth Congressional District includes most or all of Benton, Sherburne, Stearns, Wright, Anoka, and Washington counties. ... Collin Clark Peterson (born June 29, 1944), is an American politician. ... Minnesotas 7th congressional district covers almost all of the western side of Minnesota except for the far south, which is Minnesotas 1st congressional district. ... Oberstar speaks at a rally for farms James Louis Oberstar (born September 10, 1934), is a United States politician. ... Minnesotas 8th congressional district covers the northeastern part of Minnesota, and is currently represented by Jim Oberstar. ...


Federal court cases are heard in the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, which holds court in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Duluth, and Fergus Falls. Appeals are heard by the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals based in St. Louis, Missouri and St. Paul. The main courthouse in Minneapolis The United States District Court for the District of Minnesota is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the state of Minnesota. ... Fergus Falls is a city located in Otter Tail County, Minnesota. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: Eastern and Western Districts of Arkansas Northern and Southern Districts of Iowa District of Minnesota Eastern and Western Districts of Missouri District of Nebraska District of... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Minnesota
See also: List of political parties in Minnesota, United States Congressional Delegations from Minnesota, and Minnesota Congressional Districts

Minnesota is known for a politically active citizenry, and populism has been a longstanding force among the state's political parties. Minnesota has a consistently high voter turnout, due in part to its liberal voter registration laws. In the 2004 U.S. presidential election, 77.2% of eligible Minnesotans voted—the most of any U.S. state—versus the national average of 60.93%.[97] Previously unregistered voters can register on election day at their polls with evidence of residency. Minnesota is known for a politically active citizenry, with populism being a longstanding force among the states political parties. ... The following is a list of Minnesotas political parties: Current major parties Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party Independence Party of Minnesota Republican Party of Minnesota Green Party of Minnesota Other current state parties Constitution Party of Minnesota Historic parties (now defunct or disbanded) Minnesota Farmer-Labor Party Categories: Lists... // These are tables of congressional delegations from Minnesota to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Minnesota currently has 8 congressional districts. ... Image File history File links Official White House portrait of Humphrey. ... Image File history File links Official White House portrait of Humphrey. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Voters lining up outside a Baghdad polling station during the 2005 Iraqi election. ... Voter registration is the shit in some democracies for citizens to check in with some central registry before being allowed to vote in elections. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... For the current (upcoming) federal elections, see United States general elections, 2007. ... A polling station situated inside a suburban library in the north of Cambridge during the United Kingdom general election, 2005. ...


In 1922, three and a half years after women earned the vote in Minnesota, four women were elected to the Minnesota State House. Only two of those women, Hannah Kempfer and Mabeth Hurd Paige remained in office for more than one term. Rep. Kempfer served from Ottertail County until 1940, and Rep. Paige served from Hennepin County until 1942. In 1975 Nancy Brataas, a pro-choice Republican from Rochester, Minnesota was the first woman elected to the Minnesota State Senate. In 1994, Republican candidate Judi Dutcher was the first woman elected State Auditor. Hennepin County is a county located in the state of Minnesota, named in honor of the 17th-century French explorer Louis Hennepin. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Olmsted Founded 1854 Government  - Mayor Ardell Brede Area  - Total 39. ... The Minnesota Senate is the upper house in the Minnesota State Legislature. ...


In the 2004 United States presidential election, Minnesota was an important battleground swing state. The last time Minnesota had been a key swing state was in the 1972 United States presidential election. As a result President George W. Bush made eight unprecedented campaign visits to Minnesota, visiting St. Louis Park, Eden Prairie and Edina, Minnesota. For the film of the same name, see Swing State (film). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... St. ... Eden Prairie is a city located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: , Country State County Hennepin Founded 1860s Incorporated 1888 Government  - Mayor James Hovland Area  - City  16. ...


Hubert Humphrey brought national attention to the state with his address at the 1948 Democratic National Convention. Eugene McCarthy's anti-war stance and popularity before the 1968 Democratic National Convention likely convinced Lyndon B. Johnson to drop out of the presidential election. Minnesotans have consistently cast their Electoral College votes for Democratic presidential candidates since 1976, longer than any other state. Minnesota is the only state in the nation to have never voted for Ronald Reagan. For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... The 1968 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at International Amphitheatre in Chicago, Illinois, from August 26 to August 29, 1968, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. presidential election. ... LBJ redirects here. ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... Reagan redirects here. ...


Both the Democratic and Republican parties have major party status in Minnesota, however, its state-level "Democratic" party is actually a separate party, officially known as the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). Formed out of a 1944 alliance of the Minnesota Democratic and Farmer-Labor parties, the DFL now serves as a de-facto proxy to the federal Democratic Party, and its distinction from the Democratic Party, while still official, is now a functional technicality. The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


The state has had active third party movements. The Reform Party, now the Independence Party, was able to elect former mayor of Brooklyn Park and professional wrestler Jesse Ventura to the governorship in 1998. The Independence Party has received enough support to keep major party status. The Green Party, while no longer having major party status, has a large presence in municipal government,[98] notably in Minneapolis and Duluth, where it competes directly with the DFL party for local offices. Official "Major party" status in Minnesota (which grants state funding for elections) is reserved to parties, which receive 5% or more of the state's general vote in the U.S. Presidential election. Status is revised every four years. The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 under the belief that Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital... The Independence Party of Minnesota (often abbreviated MNIP, IP or IPM), formerly the Reform Party of Minnesota, is the third largest political party in Minnesota, behind the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) and Republican Party. ... Location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates: , Country State County Hennepin Founded 1850s Incorporated 1954 Government  - Mayor Steve Lampi Area  - City 26. ... ... Jesse Ventura (born July 15, 1951), also known as The Body, The Star, and The Governing Body, is an American politician, retired professional wrestler, Navy UDT veteran, actor, and former radio and television talk show host. ... Results Accumulated and Provided by the Office of the Secretary of State - Election Division GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR 4055 prcts of 4055 reporting or 100. ... The Independence Party of Minnesota (often abbreviated MNIP, IP or IPM), formerly the Reform Party of Minnesota, is the third largest political party in Minnesota, behind the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) and Republican Party. ... The Green Party of Minnesota is a political party with liberal and environmental policies. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... Location in St. ...


Senator Norm Coleman (R-M) was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2002, defeating former Vice President and former U.S. Senator Walter Mondale (D-MN), who entered the race as the Democratic candidate after Senator Paul Wellstone died in a plane crash on October 25, 2002. Before his election to the U.S. Senate, Senator Coleman was the mayor of Saint Paul, Minnesota from 1994 to 2002 and served 17 years with the Minnesota Attorney General Office, holding the positions of Chief Prosecutor and Solicitor General of the State of Minnesota. In 1996, after becoming increasingly frustrated with the Democratic Party, Coleman joined the Republican Party, which more closely matched his values. In his 1997 mayoral campaign for re-election as a Republican, Coleman received 59 percent of the vote. See Norman Jay Coleman for the former secretary of Agriculture. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ...


The state's U.S. Senate seats have generally been split since the early 1990s, and in the 108th and 109th Congresses, Minnesota's congressional delegation was split, with four representatives and one senator from each party. In the 2006 mid-term election, Democrats were elected to all state offices except for governor and lieutenant governor, where Republicans Tim Pawlenty and Carol Molnau narrowly won re-election. The DFL also posted double-digit gains in both houses of the legislature, elected Amy Klobuchar to the U.S. Senate, and increased the party's U.S. House caucus by one. Keith Ellison (DFL) was elected as the first African American U.S. Representative from Minnesota as well as the first Muslim elected to Congress nationwide. At the same time Michele Bachmann became the third woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Minnesota and the first Republican woman to represent the state on Capitol Hill.[99] Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... Timothy James (Tim) Pawlenty (born November 27, 1960) is an American politician from the Republican Party. ... Carol Molnau (b. ... Amy Jean Klobuchar (pronounced KLOH-buh-shar) (born May 25, 1960) is the junior United States Senator from Minnesota. ... Keith Maurice Ellison (born August 4, 1963) is an American lawyer and politician who became the first Muslim[1][2] to be elected to the United States Congress when he won the vacant seat for Minnesotas 5th congressional district in the House of Representatives, one of eight congressional districts... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Michele Bachmann (born Michele Marie Amble on April 6, 1956) is the Republican Representative of Minnesotas 6th congressional district, one of eight congressional districts in Minnesota. ... The Republican Party of Minnesota is the Minnesota branch of the United States Republican Party. ... Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ...


Media

The Twin Cities area is the 15th largest media market in the United States as ranked by Nielsen Media Research. The state's other top markets are Fargo-Moorhead (118th nationally), Duluth-Superior (137th), Rochester-Mason City-Austin (152nd), and Mankato (200th).[100] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... KSTP is the call sign used for a set of television and radio stations with studios in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... Fargo-Moorhead (F-M) is the name of the metropolitan area composed of Fargo, North Dakota, Moorhead, Minnesota, and surrounding cities. ... The Twin Ports of Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin are located at the western part of Lake Superior (the westernmost of North Americas Great Lakes). ... “Mankato” redirects here. ...


Broadcast television in Minnesota and the Upper Midwest started on April 27, 1948, when KSTP-TV began broadcasting.[101] Hubbard Broadcasting Corporation, which owns KSTP, is now the only locally owned television company in Minnesota. There are currently 39 analog broadcast stations and 23 digital channels broadcast over Minnesota. Terrestrial television (also known as over-the-air, OTA or broadcast television) was the traditional method of television broadcast signal delivery prior to the advent of cable and satellite television. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... KSTP-TV Channel 5 (50 digital) is the ABC affiliate for the Twin Cities. ... Hubbard Broadcasting Corporation is a broadcasting company based in St. ... This is a list of broadcast television stations (by channel number) serving cities in the state of Minnesota. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new...


The Twin Cities metro area has the state's two largest newspapers: the Star Tribune in Minneapolis and the Saint Paul Pioneer Press. Other weekly and monthly publications (most of which are fully supported by advertising) are also available. The most prominent of these is the alternative weekly City Pages, with competitor The Rake offering a free monthly. The Star Tribune is the largest newspaper in Minnesota and is published seven days each week in an edition for the Minneapolis-St. ... The traces its history back to both the Minnesota Pioneer, Minnesotas first daily newspaper (which was founded in 1849), and the (which was launched in 1868). ... // Advert redirects here. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... City Pages is an alternative weekly newspaper serving the Minneapolis-St. ...


Two of the largest public radio networks, Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) and Public Radio International (PRI), are based in the state. MPR has the largest audience of any regional public radio network in the nation, broadcasting on 37 radio stations.[102] PRI weekly provides more than 400 hours of programming to almost 800 affiliates.[103] The state's oldest radio station, KUOM-AM, was launched in 1922 and is among the 10 oldest radio stations in the United States. The University of Minnesota owned station is still on the air, and since 1993 broadcasts a college rock format. Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... Public Radio International (PRI) is a Minneapolis-based American public radio organization, with locations in Boston, New York, and London. ... 770 Radio K (KUOM), Real College Radio, is a college radio station operated by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. ... // The title of Oldest Radio Station is a controversial one, but can be assumed from several in Europe (particularly of England and Germany), and in the United States and Canada. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ...


Sports and recreation

Organized sports

Main article: Sports in Minnesota

Minnesota has professional men's teams in all major sports. The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome is home to the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League, and to the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball, winners of the 1987 and 1991 World Series. The Minnesota Timberwolves of the National Basketball Association play in the Target Center. The National Hockey League's Minnesota Wild team reached 300 consecutive sold-out games in St. Paul's Xcel Energy Center on January 16, 2008.[104] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 214 KB) A faceoff between the University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux and the Saint Cloud State University Huskies during the 2006 WCHA Final Five at the Xcel Energy Center. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 214 KB) A faceoff between the University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux and the Saint Cloud State University Huskies during the 2006 WCHA Final Five at the Xcel Energy Center. ... A closeup of an official about to drop the puck A typical faceoff at centre ice A faceoff is the method used to begin play in ice hockey. ... The University of North Dakota (UND) is a comprehensive, public university in Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. UND is the largest and oldest university in the state of North Dakota. ... Logo of the North Dakota Fighting Sioux The North Dakota Fighting Sioux is the name of the athletic teams of the University of North Dakota (UND) which is located in the city of Grand Forks, North Dakota, in the United States. ... St. ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ... The Xcel Energy Center as it appeared during the 2004 NHL All-Star Weekend. ... Sports in Minnesota include professional teams in all major sports, Olympic Games contenders and medalists, especially in the Winter Olympics, collegiate teams in major and small-school conferences and associations, and active amateur teams and individual sports. ... The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, often simply called The Metrodome, is a domed sports stadium in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC Central (1970-2001) NFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Purple, Gold, White Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Viktor the Viking, Ragnar Personnel Owner Zygi Wilf General... NFL redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... Major Leagues redirects here. ... 1987 World Series Logo The 1987 World Series was played from October 17 to October 25, 1987 between the Minnesota Twins and the St. ... Dates October 19, 1991–October 27, 1991 MVP Jack Morris (Minnesota) Television network CBS Announcers Jack Buck, Tim McCarver Umpires Don Denkinger (AL), Harry Wendelstedt (NL), Drew Coble (AL), Terry Tata (NL), Rick Reed (AL), Ed Montague (NL) The 1991 World Series was played between the Minnesota Twins (95-67... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Target Center The Target Center is an arena in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota sponsored by Target Corporation that is home to the National Basketball Associations Minnesota Timberwolves and Womens National Basketball Associations Minnesota Lynx. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Minnesota Wild is a professional mens ice hockey team based in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... The Xcel Energy Center as it appeared during the 2004 NHL All-Star Weekend. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Minor league baseball is represented both by major league-sponsored teams and independent teams such as the popular St. Paul Saints. For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The St. ...


Professional women's sports include the Minnesota Lynx of the Women's National Basketball Association, the Minnesota Vixen of the Women's Professional Football League, and the Minnesota Whitecaps of the National Women's Hockey League. The Minnesota Lynx are a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota and play their home games at the Target Center. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... Minnesota Vixen a professional womens football team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota that plays in the WPFL. The team has existed since the late 1990s. ... The Womens Professional Football League (WPFL) is the original and longest operating womens professional American football league in the United States. ... Minnesota Whitecaps is a professional womens ice hockey team that plays in the Minneapolis-St. ... The National Womens Hockey League (NWHL) is the highest level of womens ice hockey in the world. ...


The Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I school, with sports teams competing in either the Big Ten Conference or the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. Four additional schools in the state compete in NCAA Division I ice hockey: the University of Minnesota Duluth, St. Cloud State University, Bemidji State University, and Minnesota State University Mankato. There are ten NCAA Division II colleges represented by the North Central Conference and the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference in Minnesota, and sixteen NCAA Division III colleges represented by the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and Upper Midwest Athletic Conference.[105] This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Minnesota Golden Gophers are the college sports team for the University of Minnesota. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ... The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) is a regional branch of the University of Minnesota System located in Duluth, Minnesota, USA. As Duluths public research university, UMD offers 12 bachelors degrees in 75 majors, graduate programs in 20 fields, a two-year program at the School of Medicine... St. ... Bemidji State University is a public Minnesota state university in Bemidji, Minnesota on the shores of Lake Bemidji. ... Minnesota State University Mankato is a four year university and part of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) located in Mankato, Minnesota, USA. The school currently has an enrollment of approximately 14,000 students and 600 full time faculty members. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... The North Central Conference is a College Athletic Conference which operates in the north central United States. ... The Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference is a College Athletic Conference which operates in the midwestern United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ... The Upper Midwest Athletic Conference (or UMAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NAIA. Formed in 1972 as the Twin Rivers Conference, the UMAC assumed its current name in the early 1980’s. ...


Winter Olympic Games medalists from the state include eleven of the twenty members of the gold medal 1980 ice hockey team (coached by Minnesota native Herb Brooks) and the bronze medalist U.S. men's curling team in the 2006 Winter Olympics. Swimmer Tom Malchow won an Olympic gold medal in the 2000 Summer games and a silver medal in 1996. An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... U.S. captain Mike Eruzione(left) celebrates with Bill Baker (center) moments after scoring the decisive goal against the Soviet Union. ... Image:Miracle on Ice -colin healy. ... Curling at the 2006 Winter Olympics was held in the town of Pinerolo, Italy from February 13 to February 24. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Thomas (Tom) Malchow (born August 18, 1976) is a swimmer from the United States, who won a gold medal at the 2000 Summer Olympics and a silver medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ...


Grandma's Marathon is run every summer along the scenic North Shore of Lake Superior, and the Twin Cities Marathon winds around lakes and the Mississippi River during the peak of the fall color season. Grandmas Marathon is an annual road race held in late spring in Duluth, Minnesota, in the United States. ... Split Rock Lighthouse on North Shore of Lake Superior The North Shore of Lake Superior runs from Duluth, Minnesota, United States, at the southwestern end of the lake to Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, in the north to Sault Ste. ... The Twin Cities Marathon (TCM) is an annual marathon in the Minneapolis-St. ... During the autumn months, many deciduous trees experience a bright color change in their leaves before the leaves fall. ...


Outdoor recreation

Fishing in Lake Calhoun in Minneapolis.
Fishing in Lake Calhoun in Minneapolis.

Minnesotans participate in high levels of physical activity,[106] and many of these activities are outdoors. The strong interest of Minnesotans in environmentalism has been attributed to the popularity of these pursuits.[107] Image File history File linksMetadata Lake_Calhoun_MN.jpg Summary w:Lake Calhoun, Minnesota. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Lake_Calhoun_MN.jpg Summary w:Lake Calhoun, Minnesota. ... Two fishermen cast off the dock of Lake Calhoun at dusk, with the Minneapolis skyline in the background. ... The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ...


In the warmer months, these activities often involve water. Weekend and longer trips to family cabins on Minnesota's numerous lakes are a way of life for many residents. Activities include water sports such as water skiing, which originated in the state,[108] boating, canoeing, and fishing. More than 36% of Minnesotans fish, second only to Alaska.[109] 19th century Cottages in the small hamlet of Crafton, Buckinghamshire For other uses, see Cottage (disambiguation). ... Water sport most commonly refers to a sport which is played in the water. ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... // Boating, the leisurely activity of traveling by boat typically refers to the recreational use of boats whether power boats, sail boats, or yachts (large vessels), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing. ... Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ...


Fishing does not cease when the lakes freeze; ice fishing has been around since the arrival of early Scandinavian immigrants.[110] Minnesotans have learned to embrace their long, harsh winters in ice sports such as skating, hockey, curling, and broomball, and snow sports such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling.[111] Ice fishing in the Finnish Miljoonapilkki fishing competition. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is travelling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... A game of broomball begins with a face-off Broomball is a popular recreational ice sport originating in Canada and played around the world. ... Tartu Marathon 2006 cross-country ski race in Estonia. ... For other uses, see Snowshoe (disambiguation). ... A snowmobile tour at Yellowstone National Park. ...


State and national forests and the 72 state parks are used year-round for hunting, camping, and hiking. There are almost 20,000 miles (32,000 km) of snowmobile trails statewide.[112] Minnesota has more miles of bike trails than any other state,[113] and a growing network of hiking trails, including the 235-mile (378 km) Superior Hiking Trail in the northeast.[114] Many hiking and bike trails are used for cross-country skiing during the winter. This article is about a community of trees. ... This is a list of Minnesota state parks. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Car camping is camping in a tent, but nearby the car for easier access and for supply storage. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... “Footpath” redirects here. ... The Superior Hiking Trail is a 205-mile long distance hiking trail along the rocky ridgeline above Lake Superior in northeastern Minnesota. ...


State symbols

The Common Loon

Minnesota's state symbols represent its history, diverse landscapes, and its people's love of the outdoors. The Common Loon, as state bird, is Minnesota's best-known symbol. Its distinctive cry is heard during the summer months in the northern part of the state, and on occasion the loon can be found as far south as the lakes of Minneapolis.[115] These are lists of U.S. state insignia as designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures List of U.S. state amphibians List of U.S. state beverages List of U.S. state birds List of U.S. state butterflies List of U.S. state colors List of U... Great northern diver, from Dutch wikipedia (uploaded there by User Jcwf) nl:Afbeelding:Loon2kl. ... Great northern diver, from Dutch wikipedia (uploaded there by User Jcwf) nl:Afbeelding:Loon2kl. ... Binomial name Gavia immer (Brunnich, 1764) The Great Northern Diver, known in North America as the Common Loon (Gavia immer), is a large member of the loon, or diver, family. ...


State symbols:[116]

  • State bird: Common Loon
  • State butterfly: Monarch
  • State drink: Milk
  • State fish: Walleye
  • State flower: Pink and white lady slipper
  • State fruit: Honeycrisp apple, which was developed at the University of Minnesota; and was adopted as part of a school project on how a bill becomes law.
  • State gemstone: Lake Superior agate
  • State grain: Wild rice
  • Territory Motto (actual): Quo sursum velo videre ("I cover to see what is above" is the closest translation)
  • Territory Motto (intended): Quae sursum volo videre ("I wish to see what is above")
  • State motto: L'Étoile du Nord ("The Star of the North")
  • State muffin: Blueberry
  • State mushroom: Morel
  • State photograph: Grace
  • State song: "Hail! Minnesota"
  • State tree: Norway Pine, also known as Red Pine
  • Nicknames:
    • "Land of 10,000 Lakes"
    • "North Star State"
    • "Gopher State"
    • "Land of Sky-Blue Waters"
    • "Bread and Butter State"
    • "State of Hockey"

Binomial name Gavia immer (Brunnich, 1764) The Great Northern Diver, known in North America as the Common Loon (Gavia immer), is a large member of the loon, or diver, family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The butterfly species Danaus plexippus is commonly known as the Monarch butterfly. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Binomial name (Mitchill, 1818) Subspecies S. v. ... Binomial name Cypripedium reginae The showy lady slipper (Cypripedium reginae), also known as the pink-and-white lady slipper or the queens lady slipper, is a rare orchid found in eastern North America, mainly in the Canadian province of Ontario and Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Wisconsin in the... Honeycrispâ„¢ (Malus domestica Honeycrisp) is a modern cultivar of apple developed in Minnesota by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities at its Horticultural Research Center. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Species Zizania aquatica Zizania latifolia Zizania palustris Zizania texana Zizania aquatica L. Hitchc. ... Great Seal of Minnesota with the state motto. ... Blueberry Muffin is also the name of a breakfast cereal made by General Mills. ... Species Morchella angusticeps Morchella conica Morchella costata Morchella crassipes Morchella elata Morchella esculenta Morchella gigas Morchella semilibera Morchella spongiola Morchella spongiola var. ... Grace is a 1918 photograph by Eric Enstrom. ... Hail! Minnesota (also simply called Minnesota in early years) is the state song of Minnesota, and a variation is used as a school song of the University of Minnesota. ... Binomial name Pinus resinosa The Red Pine (Pinus resinosa), is a North American pine, occurring from Newfoundland west to southeast Manitoba, and south to northern Illinois and Pennsylvania, with a small outlying population in the Appalachian Mountains in West Virginia. ...

See also

The United States Census Bureau has defined 2 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 7 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 18 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of Minnesota. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-06.
  2. ^ Minnesota - Definitions from Dictionary.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-04.
  3. ^ a b Minnesota State. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  4. ^ Minnesota definition. Dictionary.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-06.
  5. ^ Minnehaha Creek. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved on 2006-10-12.
  6. ^ Facts and figures. infoplease.com (2007). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  7. ^ Land and Water Area of States, 2000. Information Please (2007). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i Ojakangas, Richard W.; Charles L. Matsch (1982). Minnesota's Geology, Illus. Dan Breedy, Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 0-8166-0953-5. 
  9. ^ Geologic Time: Age of the Earth. United States Geological Survey (October 9, 1997). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  10. ^ a b c d e Breining, Greg (December 2005). Compass American Guides: Minnesota, 3rd Edition, 3rd, Compass American Guides. ISBN 1-4000-1484-0. 
  11. ^ Natural history - Minnesota's geology. Minnesota DNR (2008). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  12. ^ Table Showing Minnesota Earthquakes. University of Minnesota, Morris. Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  13. ^ 118 km SW of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. Topographic map. U.S.G.S via terraserver.microsoft.com (1964-07-01). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  14. ^ Continental Divides in North Dakota and North America. National Atlas (2007-10-02). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  15. ^ a b c d Lakes, rivers & wetlands. MN Facts. Minnesota DNR (2008). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  16. ^ Seeley, Mark (2006). Minnesota Weather Almanac. Minnesota Historical Society press. ISBN 0-87351-554-4. 
  17. ^ Heinselman, Miron (1996). The Boundary Waters Wilderness Ecosystem. Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 0-8166-2805-X. 
  18. ^ Bewer, Tim (2004). Moon Handbooks Minnesota, First edition, Avalon Travel Publishing. ISBN 1-56691-482-5. 
  19. ^ Upper Midwest forest-savanna transition (NA0415). Terrestrial Ecoregions. World Wildlife Fund (2001). Retrieved on 2008-04-14.
  20. ^ Bison disappeared in the mid 1800s; the last bison was reported in southwest Minnesota in 1879. Moyle, J. B. (1965). Big Game in Minnesota, Technical Bulletin, no. 9. Minnesota Department of Conservation, Division of Game and Fish, Section of Research and Planning, p. 172.  As referenced in Anfinson, Scott F. (1997). Southwestern Minnesota Archaeology. St. Paul, Minnesota: Minnesota Historical Society, p. 20. ISBN 0-87351-355-X. 
  21. ^ Minnesota climate extremes. University of Minnesota. Retrieved on 2006-11-10.
  22. ^ a b c Climate of Minnesota. National Weather Service Forecast Office. Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
  23. ^ 104 Years of Twin Cities Dew Point Temperature Records: 1902–2006. Minnesota Climatology Office (March 7, 2006). Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  24. ^ Itasca State Park. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved on 2006-11-13.
  25. ^ Places To Go. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. Retrieved on 2008-03-07.
  26. ^ TimePieces. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  27. ^ a b c d Lass, William E. [1977] (1998). Minnesota: A History, 2nd, New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0-393-04628-1. 
  28. ^ a b c d e Gilman, Rhoda R. (1991-07-01). The Story of Minnesota's Past. St. Paul, Minnesota: Minnesota Historical Society Press. ISBN 0-87351-267-7. 
  29. ^ Historic Fort Snelling. Minnesota Historical Society Press. Retrieved on 2006-07-06.
  30. ^ Hazen, Theodore R.. New Process Milling of 1850–70. Pond Lily Mill Restorations. Retrieved on 2007-05-11.
  31. ^ Danbom, David B. (Spring 2003). "Flour Power: The Significance of Flour Milling at the Falls". Minnesota History 58 (5): 271–285. 
  32. ^ Engineering Research Associates Records 1946–1959. Hagley Museum and Library. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
  33. ^ Population in Metropolitan Statistical Areas Ranked by 2000 Census (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  34. ^ a b Population Estimates. Minnesota Demographic Center. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  35. ^ a b Environmental Information Report, App. D Socioeconomic Information (PDF). Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (2003-05-30). Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  36. ^ Table 1: Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007 (NST-EST2007-01). Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau (December 27, 2007). Retrieved on 2008-02-12.
  37. ^ Minnesota QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
  38. ^ statecenters. U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Retrieved on 2006-11-21.
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  41. ^ Minnesota Population Projections by Race and Hispanic Origin (PDF). Minnesota Department of Administration (2004). Retrieved on 2006-08-14.
  42. ^ Modern Language Ass'n List of Hmong Language speakers by State using 2000 census data. Modern Language Association (2004). Retrieved on 2007-03-28.
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  44. ^ Religious Composition of Minnesota. Maps, U.S. Religious Landscape Survey. Pew Research Center (2008-02-25). Retrieved on 2008-02-26.
  45. ^ American Religious Identification Survey. Exhibit 15. The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Retrieved on 2006-11-24.
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  47. ^ Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by State. U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (2006-10-26). Retrieved on 2006-11-13.
  48. ^ FORTUNE 500 2006: States. CNN Money. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  49. ^ Hoover's via Yahoo! Finance (2007). Cargill, Incorporated Company Profile. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
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  51. ^ United States and States - R2001. Median Household Income. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  52. ^ Debt now, debt later: Minnesota's declining economy wreaks havoc on state budget
  53. ^ State faces 935 million questions on deficit
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  55. ^ Census of Agriculture, Minnesota State Profile. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  56. ^ a b Wealth of Resources. Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
  57. ^ Ethanol Producer Magazine. Ethanol Producer Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
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  59. ^ The complete list of Minnesota E85 fuel Sites. Minnesota Department of Commerce. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
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  61. ^ Minnesota income tax rates for 2005/2006. Minnesota Department of Revenue. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
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  63. ^ a b Minnesota Sales and Use Tax Instruction Book, Minnesota Department of Revenue, December 2007, <http://taxes.state.mn.us/taxes/sales/instructions/st_bk07.pdf>. Retrieved on 24 February 2008 .
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  65. ^ Gopher Express. Coffman Info Desk. Regents of the University of Minnesota (2006-10-12). Retrieved on 2007-05-06.
  66. ^ Royce, Graydon Royce. "New Guthrie casts a huge shadow over theater scene", Minneapolis Star-Tribune via SavetheGuthrie.org, 2006-04-01. Retrieved on 2007-05-06. 
  67. ^ How to fringe. Fresh Art Delivered Daily. Minnesota Fringe Festival (2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-22.
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  85. ^ "America's Best Colleges 2008: Liberal Arts Colleges: Top Schools", USNews.com, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-11-25. 
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  116. ^ Minnesota State Symbols. Minnesota State Legislature. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fodors (pronounced ) is the worlds largest publisher of English language travel and tourism information, and the first relatively professional producer of travel guidebooks. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Minnesota Historical Society is a Minnesota instutution dedicated to preserving the history of the state. ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Minnesota Historical Society is a Minnesota instutution dedicated to preserving the history of the state. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT, pronounced min-dot) oversees transportation by land, water, and air in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT, pronounced min-dot) oversees transportation by land, water, and air in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT, pronounced min-dot) oversees transportation by land, water, and air in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Coordinates: 46° N 94° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - Minnesota - Encyclopedia Article (1369 words)
Fort Snelling, located at the confluence of the Minnesota River and the Mississippi River, was one of the earliest U.S. military presences in the state.
Joins the US Minnesota was designated a territory on March 3, 1849, but that territory was not coextensive with the present state, since the territory included what later became the territory of Dakota, and later still became the states of North Dakota and South Dakota.
Minnesota is home to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCA), as well as a number of state and county parks, most notably Itasca State Park, the source of the Mississippi River.
Minnesota - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4755 words)
Minnesota is in the sub-region known as the Upper Midwest.
Minnesota is exposed to blizzards during its long winter, and thunderstorms the rest of the year.
Minnesota is known for active yet quirky politics, with populism being a longstanding force among all of the state's political parties.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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