FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Japan)

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan (外務省; gaimu-sho) is one of the ministries of the Japanese government. The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the member of the Cabinet in charge of the Ministry.


The ministry is due to the second term of the third article of the National Government Organization Law [1] (http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/constitution_and_government/the_national_goverment_low.html), and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Establishment Law establishes the ministry. According to the law, its chief is a minister of the cabinet, and "its mission is to aim at improvement of the profits of Japan and Japanese nationals, while contributing to maintenance of peaceful and safe international society, and, through an active and eager meansure, both to implement good international environment and to keep and develop harmonic foreign relationships."


See also

External links

  • Official website (http://www.mofa.go.jp/)
Ministries of Japan
Cabinet Office (National Public Safety Commission | Defense Agency)
Internal Affairs | Justice | Foreign Affairs | Finance | Education | Health | Agriculture | Economy | Land | Environment

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Japan) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (786 words)
The ministry is due to the second term of the third article of the National Government Organization Law [1], and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Establishment Law establishes the ministry.
Diplomacy in postwar Japan was not a monopoly of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
The vital importance of foreign affairs expanded to affect virtually every aspect of national life in postwar Japan, and the multiplicity of agencies involved in external affairs continued to be a source of confusion and inefficiency in the formulation of foreign policy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m