FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Minas Tirith
Place from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Minas Tirith (Tower of Guard)
Other names Minas Anor (Tower of the Setting Sun)
White City
City of Kings
Description Seat of the Kings of Gondor and later their Stewards
Constructed by Anárion
Realm(s) Gondor
 Anórien
Lord Kings and Stewards of Gondor
Type Fortified City
Lifespan Built S.A. 3320

Minas Tirith (IPA: ['minæs 'tɪɹiθ]), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. It is often referred to as the White City and the City of Kings. The Rohirrim sometimes translated this into their own language as Mundburg. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... This is a list of Kings of Gondor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... Anárion is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, born S.A. 3219 and killed S.A. 3440 (lived 221 years). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Anórien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... This is a list of Kings of Gondor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ... In the fictional world of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien, Rohirric is the language of the Rohirrim of Rohan. ...

Contents

Description

Minas Tirith was built on a hill right against the face of Mount Mindolluin, facing east towards the Pelennor Fields and Osgiliath. Mindolluin or Mount Mindolluin, in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, is a fictional mountain in Middle-earth, easternmost peak of the Ered Nimrais (White Mountains), below and to the east of which stands the city of Minas Tirith. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ...


The city was divided into seven levels, each 100 feet (30.5 m) high and surrounded by a white wall. The outer face of the seventh wall, the lowest, was made of black stone, the same material used in Orthanc; it was vulnerable only to earthquakes capable of rending the ground where it stood.[1] Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ...


In each wall there was a gate which connected the levels. A spur of rock, the summit of which was level with the city's uppermost tier, jutted out from the hill in an easterly direction, dividing all but the first level into two. Within the seventh wall was the Citadel with the White Tower of Ecthelion, (where the Seeing Stone of Minas Anor rested) which was 300 feet (91.4 m) high, so that its pinnacle was one thousand feet above the plain. On the saddle between the city and Mindolluin was Rath Dínen (The Silent Street), where the ornate tombs of the Kings of Gondor and their Stewards were built. The Tower of Ecthelion by John Howe The Tower of Ecthelion is a fictional building in the Lord of the Rings saga. ... A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In a range of hills, or especially of mountains, a pass (also gap, notch, col, saddle, bwlch or bealach) is a lower point that allows easier access through the range. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth legendarium, the Rath Dínen (Sindarin for Silent Street) is the pathway between the city of Minas Tirith and Mindolluin in Gondor. ... This is a list of Kings of Gondor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ...


Map #40 in Barbara Strachey's Journeys of Frodo is a plan of Minas Tirith. Pages 138&139 in Karen Wynn Fonstad's revised The Atlas of Middle-earth is another plan of Minas Tirith. They are at variance with each other, as the only authoritative maps by Tolkien are just sketches. The Lord of the Rings by Barbara Strachey (ISBN 0049120166, 1981) is an atlas based on the fictional realm of Middle-earth, which traces the journeys undertaken by the characters in Tolkiens epic. ... Karen Wynn Fonstad is the author of several atlases of fictional worlds, including: Pern, basis for the Dragon Riders stories by Anne McCaffrey The Atlas of Pern (1984, ISBN 0345314344) The Land, basis for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson The Atlas of the Land (1985, ISBN... The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad is an atlas of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth. ...

History

Early history

Originally known as Minas Anor, the "Tower of the Sun", Minas Tirith was built in S.A. 3320 by Anárion, brother of Isildur and second son of Elendil, High King of Arnor. Ostoher rebuilt the city in T.A. 420 as a summer residence, and it became the capital of Gondor in T.A. 1640, when King Tarondor moved the King's House from Osgiliath following the Great Plague, which devastated the population of that city. The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Anárion is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, born S.A. 3219 and killed S.A. 3440 (lived 221 years). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... This is a list of kings of Arnor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Ostoher is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, Tarondor was the twenty-seventh King of Gondor. ...


In 2002, the White City's companion city, Minas Ithil, Tower of the Moon (Moontower), on the borders of Mordor, was captured by the Nazgûl and renamed Minas Morgul, Tower of Sorcery (Dead City, accursed tower). Minas Anor was renamed Minas Tirith, meaning "Tower of Guard", to indicate that since the fall of Minas Ithil, Minas Tirith assumed the role of guarding Gondor against Mordor's forces. For the next thousand years, the two cities were in a stalemate, neither able to topple the other. With the rebuilding of the Dark Tower and the open return of Sauron, the forces of Mordor gathered their strength to topple Minas Tirith in the upcoming War of the Ring. Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... Nazgûl ilustration. ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel...


Minas Morgul was eventually taken over and destroyed by the armies of Gondor and Rohan, under command of Aragorn and Éomer, after the defeat of Saurons army at Minas Tirith.

The War of the Ring

Minas Tirith at Dawn by Ted Nasmith

During the War of the Ring (T.A. 3018–3019), Minas Tirith is said to have had less than half of the population which could have dwelt there at ease. Image File history File linksMetadata NasmithMinasTirith. ... Image File history File linksMetadata NasmithMinasTirith. ... Ted Nasmith Ted Nasmith is a Canadian artist, illustrator and architectural renderer. ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... For other uses, see The Third Age. ...

Rammas Echor

In the latter part of the Third Age, Minas Tirith and its lands were surrounded by the Rammas Echor, a fortified wall encircling the Pelennor Fields and meeting up with Osgiliath, where the Causeway Forts were built on the west bank of the Anduin and garrisoned, though Osgiliath itself remained in ruins. This outwall was built by Ecthelion II but fell into disrepair after his death, only to be repaired in the year leading up to the War. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ... Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Ecthelion II is, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the twenty-fifth Ruling Steward of Gondor. ...


His successor Denethor II ordered Osgiliath and the Rammas to be defended, despite the advice of the council who wanted to retreat back to Minas Tirith and hold out from there. As told in The Return of the King, the Rammas proved an ineffective defence due to the overwhelming Orc legions of Mordor, who penetrated the wall and laid siege to the city before the Battle of the Pelennor Fields. This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... This Tolkien article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe perspective. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...

Siege

Faramir and the garrison were unable to hold Osgiliath and the Causeway Forts against the overwhelming forces of Mordor and was driven back with heavy loss. Leading the rearguard against the onslaught, he was wounded and nearly slain but the cavalry charge of Prince Imrahil of Dol Amroth and Gandalf saved him and the counter-attack allowed the rest of Gondor's soldiers to reach the safety of the city. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Imrahil was the twenty-second Prince of Dol Amroth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Dol Amroth is a fictional place being a princedom which forms part of the kingdom of Gondor. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...


Minas Tirith was besieged by troops of Mordor, the Easterlings and the Haradrim, and the land fell under the Great Darkness generated by Mordor. Significant damage was done to the first circle of the city but the Enemy was unable to break through the wall - except in one place. The gate of the city was broken by a combination of the battering ram Grond and the Witch-king's sorcery. However, the Witch-king was halted at the entrance by Gandalf. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Easterlings were Men who lived in the east of Middle-earth, and were enemies of the Free Peoples. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth the Haradrim or Southrons are a race of Men from The Lord of the Rings. ... Grond Grond (called the Hammer of the Underworld) is the name of two fictional weapons from the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as Lord of the Nazgûl or the Black Captain, is a fictional character in the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


The timely arrival of the Rohirrim led by King Théoden forced the armies of Mordor to face the newcomers instead of assaulting the city. The resulting Battle of the Pelennor Fields took place on March 15, 3019 in the fields surrounding the city. Despite heavy losses, Minas Tirith itself was not seriously threatened again and the battle was won by Gondor and its allies from Rohan. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The banner of Rohan, as rendered in Peter Jacksons movies; the sun is an embellishment on the books description of a white horse upon green. Rohan (from Sindarin Rochand), is a fictional realm in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy era of Middle-earth. ...

Aftermath

On May 1, 3019 King Elessar's coronation took place on the plain outside Minas Tirith, he then entered the city as King. Elessar The name of the legendary green elvish jewel with healing powers, The Elessar, according to one version of the story by Tolkien was made for Galadriel by Celebrimbor, long before he made the Rings of Power. ...


Minas Tirith is known to have stood firm well into the Fourth Age. Gimli the Dwarf and some of Durin's folk used mithril, a nigh-indestructable metal, to replace the gates that had been broken in the War of the Ring. It remained the chief city of Gondor, as it is not known whether Osgiliath was ever rebuilt. Minas Ithil, however, was destroyed by Elessar, King of Gondor, soon after the War of the Ring. This article also concerns the later Ages of Middle-earth, after the Third Age The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are fictional time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Durins folk is the most important folk of Dwarves. ... Mithril is a fictional metal from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe. ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Ithil is a fictional fortress in the world of Middle Earth. ... Elessar The name of the legendary green elvish jewel with healing powers, The Elessar, according to one version of the story by Tolkien was made for Galadriel by Celebrimbor, long before he made the Rings of Power. ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel...


The eagle who brings the news of Sauron's defeat to Minas Tirith refers to the city as the Tower of Anor. The eagle might have been speaking poetically, but as Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age in The Silmarillion says, the city is referred to Minas Anor again after Sauron's overthrow. However, in the abandoned sequel The New Shadow, which takes place during the time of Elessar's son Eldarion, the city was named Minas Tirith. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age is the fifth and last part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... The Peoples of Middle-earth is the 12th and final volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien from the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Eldarion Telcontar is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...

Portrayal in adaptations

Gandalf approaching Minas Tirith in the film The Return of the King by Peter Jackson
Gandalf approaching Minas Tirith in the film The Return of the King by Peter Jackson

Tolkien's description of the physical layout of Minas Tirith is followed relatively faithfully in Peter Jackson's film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Jackson interpreting the top of the rock as flattened and paved. In the films Minas Tirith is the location for the coronation of Aragorn. Image File history File linksMetadata Roturn_King-Minas_Tirith. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Roturn_King-Minas_Tirith. ... Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a three-time Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA winning New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novels... Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a three-time Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA winning New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novels... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Portions of Minas Tirith were constructed as full-scale sets, and the whole city as a very large, highly detailed miniature or "bigature" by Weta Workshop. A remarkably detailed three-dimensional digital model, for CGI shots, along with the whole of its surrounding environment including the Pelennor Fields and Mindolluin (but not the Rammas Echor, which was visually omitted from the films, despite being mentioned in the dialogue, where Théoden gave the order to the Rohirrim beginning "When we get through the Wall..." quoted directly from the book.) was created by Weta Digital. Bigature was Weta Workshops nickname for the very large filming miniature models used in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy, including some of the films central pieces, including the fortress of Helms Deep, the elven harbour of Grey Havens, the white city of Minas Tirith and... Weta Workshop is a physical effects company based in Miramar, New Zealand, producing effects for television and film. ... Computer-generated imagery (CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ... Weta Digital is a digital visual effects company based in Wellington, New Zealand, an offshoot of the Weta Workshop physical effects company. ...


The height of Minas Tirith in the films could be estimated to be almost 1,700 feet (518 m). In the non-canon New Line book The Lord of the Rings Weapons and Warfare, the seventh level is identified as a quarter of a mile high, 1,320 feet (402 m) above the plain, and the Tower of Ecthelion was 300 feet (91 m) tall, all height was 1620 feet (493 m).


These numbers nonwithstanding, The Atlas of Middle-earth actually projects Minas Tirith to be much, much larger than what was shown in the film. Fonstad estimates a diameter of 3100 feet for the First Circle of the City alone; the cinematic Minas Tirith appears as large as a castle-town. In the novel, the outer walls of Minas Tirith are virtually indestructible like the similar black surface of the Orthanc, as they were built by the Dúnedain before their craft waned in exile, and it was said that only an earthquake or similar seismic convulsion could cause significant damage, so the Enemy did not waste shot upon it. In the Jackson films, the outer walls took a significant beating due to Mordor's catapults and siege towers. The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad is an atlas of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth. ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were a fictional race of Men descended from the Númenóreans that survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. ...


In the films, the towers of Minas Tirith are equipped with trebuchets. However, this kind of siege engine is not specifically mentioned in the book. Trebuchet at Château des Baux, France. ...


According to the Making Of featurettes on the Extended Edition DVDs, the appearance and structure of the city was based upon the Mont Saint-Michel, France, along with St Michael's Mount, Cornwall. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... St. ...

References

  1. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Siege of Gondor". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Minas Anor / Minas Tirith (2631 words)
Minas Anor - the Tower of the Sun - was established as a stronghold by Anarion, son of Elendil, and over time it became the greatest city in Gondor.
During the War of the Ring, Sauron's forces besieged Minas Tirith and the Battle of the Pelennor Fields was fought outside its walls.
Minas Tirith was located in the region of Anorien in northern Gondor.
Minas Tirith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1029 words)
Originally known as Minas Anor (the "Tower of the Sun"), it was built in II 3320 by Anárion, brother of Isildur and second son of Elendil, High King of Arnor.
In III 2002, the White City's companion tower, Minas Ithil (Tower of the Moon), on the borders of Mordor, was captured by the Nazgûl and renamed Minas Morgul (Tower of Dark Sorcery).
Minas Tirith was surrounded by the Rammas Echor, a fortified wall encircling the Pelennor Fields.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m