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Encyclopedia > Millsaps College

Millsaps College

Image File history File links Millsapscrest. ...

Motto "Ad Excellentiam"
Established 1890
Type liberal arts college
Endowment USD $86,102,000 [1]
President Frances Lucas
Faculty 92 full-time
Students 1,146
Undergraduates 1,086
Postgraduates 60
Location Jackson, Mississippi, United States
Campus Urban, 103 acres (417,000 m²)
Mascot The Millsaps Major
Affiliations Methodist
Website http://www.millsaps.edu/

Millsaps College is a private liberal arts college in Jackson, Mississippi, supported by the United Methodist Church. The college was founded by a Confederate veteran, Major Reuben Webster Millsaps in 1889-90 by the donation of the college's land and $50,000. Dr. William Belton Murrah was the college's first president, and Bishop Charles Betts Galloway of the United Methodist Church organized the college's early fundraising efforts. Both men now have halls named in their honor. Major Millsaps and his wife are interred in a tomb near the center of campus. President Dr. Frances Lucas was named to her position in 2000. She's the 10th Millsaps President, and the first female in that office. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... : Crossroads of the South : The city of Grace and Benevolence United States Mississippi Hinds, (very small portions in Madison and Rankin) 106. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Private schools are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public funds. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... : Crossroads of the South : The city of Grace and Benevolence United States Mississippi Hinds, (very small portions in Madison and Rankin) 106. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Rueben Webster Millsaps was born on May 30, 1833 in Pleasant Valley in Copiah County, Mississippi. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... William Belton Murrah (1852-1925)[1] was an American Bishop in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, elected in 1910. ... Charles Betts Galloway was an American Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, elected in 1886. ... Dr. Frances Lucas (born 1957) is the current president of Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. ...

Contents

Academics

Despite its religious affiliation, the curriculum is secular. The writing-intensive core curriculum requires each student to compile an acceptable portfolio of written work before completion of the sophomore year. Candidates for an undergraduate degree must also pass oral and written comprehensive exams in their major field of study. These exams last up to three hours, and may cover any required or elective course offered by the major department. Unacceptable performance on comprehensive exams will prevent a candidate from receiving a degree, even if all course work has been completed. "Comps" are usually associated with graduate degree requirements, so their inclusion at the undergraduate level is a source of pride (and possibly pressure) for Millsaps students. This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Millsaps offers B.S., B.A., B.B.A., M.B.A. and MAcc degrees and corresponding programs. Millsaps sends large numbers of graduates to graduate schools, law school, and medical school. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Big Brain Academy The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) is a bachelors degree in business studies. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution or part of such an institution that teaches medicine. ...


The current undergraduate population is around 1100 students on a 103 acre (417,000 m²) campus near downtown Jackson, Mississippi. The student to faculty ratio is 12:1 with an average class size around 15 students. Millsaps offers 28 academic majors from 19 academic departments. Approximately 99% of the professors on the tenure track have the highest degree in their field. The college offers research partnerships for undergraduate students, and a variety of Study Abroad programs. Millsaps reports that 45% of their student body comes from outside Mississippi; a large portion of out-of-state students are from neighboring Louisiana. The college also offers a Continuing Education program and the Community Enrichment Series for adults in the Jackson area. An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... : Crossroads of the South : The city of Grace and Benevolence United States Mississippi Hinds, (very small portions in Madison and Rankin) 106. ... Look up tenure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Continuing education is an all encompassing term within a broad spectrum of post-secondary learning activities and programs. ...


Campus

The Millsaps campus is close to downtown Jackson. It is bordered by Woodrow Wilson Avenue to the north, North State Street to the east, West Street to the west, and Marshall Street to the south.


The center of campus is dominated by "The Bowl", where many events occur, including Homecoming activities, concerts, the Multicultural Festival, and Commencement. Adjacent to the Bowl is the Campbell College Center, renovated in 2000, which contains the campus bookstore, post office, cafeteria, and Student Life offices. This central section of campus also holds the Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Olin Science Hall, Sullivan-Harrell Hall, and the Millsaps-Wilson Library. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


The north part of campus includes the Hall Activities Center (commonly called "the HAC"), the sports fields, and the freshman dormitories. On the far northwestern corner is James Observatory, the oldest building on campus. Operational since 1901, the observatory underwent major renovations in 1980. Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Upperclassmen dormitories are located on the south side of campus, with Fraternity Row and the Christian Center. Originally constructed as a memorial to students and graduates who died in service during World War II, the Christian Center houses an auditorium and the departments of Performing Arts, History and Religious Studies.


Between the Christian Center and Murrah Hall, which houses the Else School of Management, is the tomb of Major Millsaps and the "M" Bench, erected by the classes of 1926, 1927, and 1928. The Nicholson Garden was added to improve the aesthetics of this area. Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Statistics (as of 2005)

Enrollment: 1,064
Average GPA: 3.52
Average SAT: 1183
Average ACT: 26
Student to Faculty Ratio: 12:1


Rankings and Distinctions

Millsaps was ranked as number 81 on U.S. News & World Report's list of "Best Liberal Arts Colleges". The magazine featured Millsaps, Harvard, Amherst, and Duke among 17 schools that stress writing in all aspects of academics. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


The 2007 Princeton Review ranked Millsaps as number 14 in "Class Discussions Encouraged", and number 3 in "Administration". The Princeton Review of 2007 also ranked Millsaps' Else School of Business number 8, above Harvard, for "Best Professors".[1] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Millsaps was one of 40 schools in Loren Pope's Colleges That Change Lives. Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...


The 2008 Princeton Review Best 290 Business Schools names Millsaps' Else School of Business as one of the nation's top business schools and ranked Millsaps number 3 for "Best Classroom Experience".[1]


Athletics

The school's sports teams are known as the Majors, and their colors are purple and white. They participate in the NCAA's Division III and the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference. This is an incomplete list of U.S. college nicknames. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member institutions are located in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas. ...


Men may participate in baseball, basketball, cheerleading, football, soccer, tennis, golf, and cross country. Women's sports include basketball, cheerleading, dance team, softball, soccer, tennis, golf, cross country, and volleyball.


The Majors had a fierce football and basketball rivalry with Mississippi College in nearby Clinton through the 1950s before competition was suspended after an infamous student brawl at a basketball game. Campus legend says the brawl was sparked by the alleged theft of the body of Millsaps founder Major Millsaps by Mississippi College students. The rivalry was considered by many as the best in Mississippi, featuring a prank by Mississippi College students who painted "TO HELL WITH MILSAPS" (sic) on the Millsaps Observatory. The football rivalry resumed in 2000 as the "Backyard Brawl", with games at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium. The rivalry took a one-year hiatus in 2005 but resumed in 2006. Mississippi College, also known as MC, is a private Christian university located in Clinton, Mississippi. ... : Mount Salus (original name) : History • Pride • Progress United States Mississippi Hinds 24. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Veterans Memorial Stadium. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Millsaps won the 2006 Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference football championship and claimed their first SCAC football title since 1996. The conference title earned them an automatic bid to the Division III playoffs, an achievement that the Majors had not accomplished since 1975. The Majors are led by former Alabama head coach, Mike DuBose. Mike DuBose (born January 5, 1953, in Opp, Alabama) is a former college football player and the current head coach of Millsaps College. ...


Millsaps was the summer training camp home for NFL's New Orleans Saints in 2006 and 2007. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Organizations

The school is home to six different fraternities: Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Order, Kappa Sigma, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Pi Kappa Alpha, and Lambda Chi Alpha; as well as six sororities: Delta Delta Delta, Kappa Delta, Phi Mu, Chi Omega, Alpha Kappa Alpha, and Delta Sigma Theta. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is the first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Notable Alumni

Christopher Lee Nutter (born May 2, 1970) is the author of The Way Out: The Gay Man’s Guide to Freedom, No Matter if You’re in Denial, Closeted, Half In, Half Out, Just Out, or Been Around the Block (HCI Press, May 2006). ... Claude William Passeau (April 9, 1909 - August 30, 2003) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Michael Beck (born John Michael Beck Taylor on February 4, 1949) is an American actor. ... Roy Clyde Clark (born July 24, 1920) is a retired American Bishop of the United Methodist Church, elected in 1980. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination. ... Ellen Gilchrist (born February 20, 1935) was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi. ... Alan Hunter was one of the original five video jockeys (VJs) on MTV. He currently heads the production company Hunter Films, which he formed with his brother Hugh. ... David Herbert Donald (b. ... Clay Foster Lee, Jr. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Louis Hugh Wilson (born 1920) was a U.S. Marine Corps general. ... The UKs Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft A marine corps (from French corps de marine) is a branch of a nations armed forces incorporating Marines, intended to be capable of mounting amphibious assaults using infantry, armour, aircraft, and watercraft. ... Tate Reeves (Born 1975) is the State Treasurer of the Mississippi. ... Lewis Nordan (1938) is a novelist and short-story writer. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ... Lisa DAmour is a playwright, performer, and former Carnival Queen from New Orleans who currently resides in New York. ... The Jackson Free Press is an alternative weekly newspaper in Jackson, Mississippi founded in 2002 by Mississippi native Donna Ladd, author and technology expert Todd Stauffer and a group of young Jacksonians wanting a progressive voice in the state. ...

Important Dates in Millsaps History

  • 1890 - Major Reuben Webster Millsaps founds the college with a personal gift of $50,000.
  • 1901 - Millsaps builds the first golf course in Mississippi.
  • 1902 - Mary Letitia Holloman becomes the first female graduate of Millsaps.
  • 1914 - Old Main, one of the first buildings on campus, burns and is replaced by Murrah Hall.
  • 1916 - Major Millsaps dies and is buried on campus.
  • 1943 - Johnny Carson attends Millsaps for V-12 naval officer training, entertaining his comrades with a magic and humor act.
  • 1965 - Millsaps becomes the first all-white college in Mississippi to voluntarily desegregate[3].
  • 1967 - Robert Kennedy speaks at the college about obligations of young Americans to give back to their country.
  • 1989 - Millsaps becomes the first school in Mississippi to have a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa honorary.

Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Suzhou (Simplified Chinese: 苏州; Traditional Chinese: 蘇州; pinyin: Sūzhōu; Wade-Giles: Su-chou; sometimes seen transliterated as Su-chow, Suchow, or Soochow) is one of the most famous cities in China. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles (200 km) northeast of Jackson and 23 miles (37 km) west of Columbus. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... The V-12 Navy College Training Program was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II. Between July 1, 1943 and June 30, 1946, over 125,000 men were enrolled in the V-12 program in 131 colleges and universities in... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Louis Hugh Wilson (born 1920) was a U.S. Marine Corps general. ... Brandon is stupid. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Combatants United States Japan Commanders Roy S. Geiger, Takeshi Takashima, Hideyoshi Obata Strength 2 divisions 18,500 Casualties 3,000 killed, 7,122 wounded 18,000+ killed, 485 POWs The Battle of Guam was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Guam... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Official Habitat for Humanity logo Habitat for Humanity is an international, Christian, non-governmental, non-profit organization devoted to building quality, low-cost, affordable housing. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...

List of Presidents of Millsaps

  • William Belton Murrah - 1890-1910
  • David Carlisle Hull - 1910-1912
  • Dr. Alexander Farrar Watkins - 1912-1923
  • Dr. David Martin Key - 1923-1938
  • Dr. Marion Lofton Smith - 1938-1952
  • Dr. Homer Ellis Finger, Jr. - 1952-1964
  • Dr. Benjamin Barnes Graves - 1965-1970
  • Dr. Edward McDaniel Collins, Jr. - 1970-1978
  • Dr. George Marion Harmon - 1978-2000
  • Dr. Frances Lucas - 2000-current

William Belton Murrah (1852-1925)[1] was an American Bishop in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, elected in 1910. ... Homer Ellis Finger, Jr. ... Dr. Frances Lucas (born 1957) is the current president of Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Millsaps College named one of nation's top business schools", The Clarion-Ledger, 2007-10-9. Retrieved on 2007-10-9. 
  2. ^ Kristof, Nicholas (11 March 2007). Win a Trip, and See a Different World. Retrieved on [[16 March 2007]].
  3. ^ Millsaps College. Millsaps timeline. Retrieved on 28 August 2006.

The Clarion-Ledger is the daily newspaper in Jackson, Mississippi. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Millsaps College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1128 words)
Millsaps College is a private liberal arts college in Jackson, Mississippi, supported by the United Methodist Church.
The college was founded by a Confederate veteran, Major Reuben Webster Millsaps in 1889-90 by the donation of the college's land and $50,000.
Millsaps reports that 45% of their student body comes from outside Mississippi; a large portion of the out-of-state students are from neighboring Louisiana.
Liberal arts college - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (489 words)
Liberal arts colleges usually focus on tertiary education leading to a bachelor's degree in a program designed to be completed in four years' worth of study, though some include post-graduate programs.
Some institutions referred to as "liberal arts colleges" are distinguished from universities not so much by a difference in kind, but a difference in size, taking the form of small universities, complete with subsidiary schools dedicated to a particular specialized course of study and offering a limited set of graduate degrees.
Mary's College of Maryland, (3) New College of Florida, (4) University of Minnesota, Morris, and (5) University of North Carolina at Asheville.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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