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Encyclopedia > Mills College

Mills College

Image File history File linksMetadata Mills_Logo. ...

Motto una destinatio, viae diversae
(One destination, many paths)
Established Young Ladies' Seminary, 1852
Mills Seminary, 1866
Mills Seminary-College, 1877
Mills College, 1885
Type Private
President Janet L. Holmgren
Faculty 194
Students 1,410
Undergraduates 927
Postgraduates 483
Location Oakland, California, USA
Endowment $202 million (August 2006)
Website www.mills.edu


Founded in 1852 and established in Oakland, California, in 1871, Mills College is an independent liberal arts woman's college, with graduate programs for women and men. As the first woman's college west of the Rockies, Mills is one of the oldest institutions of higher education for women in the United States. The College was initially founded in Benicia as the Young Ladies' Seminary under the leadership of Mary Atkins, a graduate of Oberlin College. In 1866, Susan Tolman Mills and her husband Cyrus Mills bought the school and moved it to Oakland. Mills received its charter in 1885 and introduced graduate degrees in 1921. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Oakland, founded in 1852, is the eighth-largest city in California[1] and the county seat of Alameda County. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A Web site (or colloquially, Website) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP... Oakland, founded in 1852, is the eighth-largest city in California[1] and the county seat of Alameda County. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of NPS) View of Colorado Rockies. ... Benicia is a city located in Solano County, California. ... Oberlin College is a small, selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... Susan Tolman Mills (1825 - 1912) was the co-founder and first president of Mills College. ...


Mills holds the distinction of being the first women’s college to offer a computer science major (1974) and 4+1 MBA degree (2001), and was among the first liberal arts colleges to offer a modern dance degree (1941). Mills is also home to the Institute for Civic Leadership, the Center for Contemporary Music (called the San Francisco Tape Music Center until 1967), and the Women’s Leadership Institute. Mills opened the first laboratory school for aspiring teachers west of the Mississippi, which was founded in 1926 and is known as the Children’s School. Computer scaence, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... Modern dance is a dance form developed in the early 20th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Mills offers more than 40 undergraduate majors (both BA and BS degrees) and 23 graduate degree and certificate programs. Mills women compete in six intercollegiate sports—cross country, rowing, soccer, swimming, tennis, and volleyball—as members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III. The Minnesota State High school Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Rowing refers to several forms of physical activity: For rowing boats in general, see Watercraft rowing. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...

Contents

College Mission

Built in 1871, Mills Hall originally housed the entire College.
Built in 1871, Mills Hall originally housed the entire College.

Mills is an independent liberal arts college for women with graduate programs for women and men. The College educates students to think critically and communicate responsibly and effectively, to accept the challenges of their creative visions, and to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to effect thoughtful changes in a global, multicultural society. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 2. ...


Mills encourages openness to experimentation in the context of established academic disciplines. Programs are designed to reflect the importance of global issues, provide an understanding of the natural world, and enhance opportunities for women in their developing roles throughout society. The curriculum combines traditional liberal arts with new educational initiatives that recognize the value of cultural, racial, and ethnic diversity.


Inspired by a teaching philosophy that grows out of its longstanding dedication to women’s education, Mills provides a dynamic learning environment that encourages intellectual exploration. The faculty of nationally and internationally respected scholars and artists is dedicated to developing the strengths of every student, preparing them for lifelong intellectual, personal, and professional growth.


Location

Location


Located in the foothills of Oakland, California, on the east shore of the San Francisco Bay, Mills offers students access to the diverse metropolitan centers that make up the greater Bay Area. The campus is heavily accented with Mediterranean-style buildings, many designed by architectural innovator Julia Morgan. Paths and streams wind their way through tree groves and meadows that pervade the 135-acre wooded campus. Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in hilly areas at the base of a mountain range. ... Oakland is the name of several places in the United States of America: Oakland, Alabama Oakland, California (The best-known city with this name) Oakland, Florida Oakland, Maine Oakland, Maryland Oakland, Michigan Oakland, Missouri Oakland, Nebraska Oakland, New Jersey Oakland, Oklahoma Oakland, Oregon Oakland, Pennsylvania Oakland, Rhode Island Oakland, Tennessee... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Julia Morgan (January 20, 1872–February 2, 1957) was an American architect. ...


Outside the campus gates, students have access to the Bay Area with Berkeley, San Francisco, Napa, and Silicon Valley nearby. Drawing energy from the College’s location, Mills students connect with centers of learning, business, and technology; pursue research and internship opportunities; and explore the Bay Area’s many sources of cultural, social, and recreational enrichment. Bay Area is a common term to refer to a metropolitan area situated around a bay. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Places: Napa, California Napa County, California Napa Valley College Other: NAPA - National Automotive Parts Association NAPA - National Asphalt Pavement Association Categories: Disambiguation ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. ...


History

Founded in 1852 as the Young Ladies’ Seminary in Benicia, California, Mills College boasts a rich history as a leader in women’s education. Mills was founded the same year California was admitted to statehood and the city of Oakland was established. The University of California and Stanford had yet to exist, and miners, farmers, and merchants wanted to educate their daughters without sending them on the perilous journey to East Coast schools. Benicia is a city located in Solano County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Oakland is the name of several places in the United States of America: Oakland, Alabama Oakland, California (The best-known city with this name) Oakland, Florida Oakland, Maine Oakland, Maryland Oakland, Michigan Oakland, Missouri Oakland, Nebraska Oakland, New Jersey Oakland, Oklahoma Oakland, Oregon Oakland, Pennsylvania Oakland, Rhode Island Oakland, Tennessee... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ...


The Young Ladies’ Seminary was established by nine citizens in what was then the state capitol, and it gained a strong reputation under the direction of Oberlin graduate Mary Atkins. With a vision of equal education and opportunity for women, missionaries Cyrus and Susan Mills bought the Seminary in 1865 for $5,000, renamed it Mills College, and moved it to its current 135-acre oasis. At the time, Oakland was a bustling metropolis of 10,000. The name Oberlin can refer to: a town, Oberlin, Ohio the college in that town, Oberlin College the conservatory in that town, Oberlin Conservatory Oberlin, Louisiana Oberlin, Kansas Persons named Oberlin Jean Frederic Oberlin, priest Jeremie Jacques Oberlin, archaelogist Urs Oberlin, poet This is a disambiguation page — a navigational...

Toyon Meadow
Toyon Meadow

The student body quickly grew, with students of diverse faiths and backgrounds enrolled from many states and countries. Beginning as one of only a half dozen institutions for the higher education of women, Mills has become the oldest women’s college west of the Rockies. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1048x699, 690 KB) Mills College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1048x699, 690 KB) Mills College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of NPS) View of Colorado Rockies. ...


Over the decades, Mills “firsts” have been numerous: the first women's college west of the Rockies (1885), the first laboratory school west of the Mississippi for aspiring teachers (1926), and the first women’s college to offer a computer science major (1974) and a 4+1 MBA degree (2001). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Computer scaence, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ...


Always a leader in the arts, Mills was among the first liberal arts colleges to offer a modern dance degree (1941), and it became the national center for modern dance outside New York City. The Center for Contemporary Music, dedicated in 1967, is a preeminent center for electronic music. Modern dance is a dance form developed in the early 20th century. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ...


Many of the world’s foremost artists, politicians, and scholars have taught, lectured, and performed at Mills, including Gertrude Stein, Mark Twain, Darius Milhaud, Alfred Neumeyer, John Cage, and Isabel Allende. Mills continues to draw people interested in experimentation, leadership, social responsibility, and creativity—the hallmarks of a 21st century Mills education. Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 29, 1946) was an American writer and catalyst in the development of modern art and literature, who spent most of her life in France. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ... Darius Milhaud Darius Milhaud (IPA: ) (September 4, 1892 – June 22, 1974) was a French composer and teacher. ... For Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... For the Chilean politician and daughter of Salvador Allende, see Isabel Allende Bussi. ...


On May 3, 1990, the Trustees of Mills announced that they had voted to admit male students. [1] This decision led to a two-week student and staff strike, accompanied by numerous displays of non-violent protests by the students. [2], [3] At one point, nearly 300 students blockaded the administrative offices and boycotted classes. [4] On May 18, the Trustees met again to reconsider the decision, [5] leading finally to a reversal of the vote. [6] MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence) can be both a political strategy or moral philosophy that rejects the use of violence in efforts to attain social or political change. ...


Enrollment and academics

Mills students
Mills students

In 2006–07, Mills enrolled a total of 1,410 students, 66 percent of whom are undergraduates. More than 80 percent of students are from California, and more than half of undergraduate students live on campus. Thirty-six states are represented, and international students enrolled from 18 different countries. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1800x1200, 1708 KB) Mills College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1800x1200, 1708 KB) Mills College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


For undergraduates, Mills offers the bachelor of arts (BA) degree in American studies; anthropology and sociology; art (history and studio); biochemistry and molecular biology; biology; biopsychology; business economics; chemistry; child development; comparative literature; computer science; dance; economics; English (literature and creative writing); environmental science; environmental studies; ethnic studies; French and Francophone studies; government; history; intermedia arts; international relations; Latin American studies; literary and cultural studies; mathematics; music; philosophy; political, legal, and economic analysis; psychology; public policy; sociology; Spanish and Spanish American studies; and women’s studies. A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... Anthropology is the study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section should be merged with biological psychology Psychobiology, also called biopsychology, is the scientific study of mental functioning and behavior in relation to other biological processes, or put another way, of the effects of cognition, emotions, and experience on animal physiology. ... Bachelor of Business Economics-BBE B.A (Hons) Business Economics is 3 years graduation course. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (conglomeration of center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Comparative literature (sometimes abbreviated Comp. ... Computer scaence, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... jus like my ass For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Environmental studies is the systematic study of human interaction with their environment. ... Ethnic studies is an academic discipline dedicated to the study of ethnic minorities. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... This article is about law in society. ... Financial analysis refers to an assessment of the viability, stability and profitability of a business, sub-business or project. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is an academic/ applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ... With stylus and tablet, an upper-class Pompeiian, Sappho, demonstrates her privilege: literacy Womens studies is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to topics concerning women, feminism, gender, and politics. ...


Mills offers the bachelor of science (BS) degree in biochemistry and molecular biology, biology, biopsychology, chemistry, and environmental science. Mills also provides the first two years of courses leading to a bachelor of science in nursing degree from Samuel Merritt College. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section should be merged with biological psychology Psychobiology, also called biopsychology, is the scientific study of mental functioning and behavior in relation to other biological processes, or put another way, of the effects of cognition, emotions, and experience on animal physiology. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (conglomeration of center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Samuel Merritt College, originally founded in 1909 as a hospital school of nursing, is a fully accredited health sciences institution located in Oakland, California. ...


Students can also choose to create their own major, working with three faculty advisers to plan an individual program that draws courses from across the curriculum and creates an integrated and unique educational experience.


Mills offers six dual-degree programs that enable undergraduates with clear career goals in certain fields to streamline their college and graduate school programs. These include the 4+1 BA/MBA Business Administration Program, the 4+1 BA/MPP Public Policy Program, the 4+1 BA/MA Infant Mental Health Program, the 4+1 BA/MA Interdisciplinary Computer Science Program, the 3+2 BA/BS Engineering Program, and the integrated 4+1 BA/MA Mathematics Program. Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... MPP or M.P.P. may refer to: Member of Provincial Parliament in Ontario. ...


Graduate programs at Mills College are widely recognized as among the best, and each is renowned in its own right, having earned national and international acclaim. Mills awarded its first master’s degrees in 1921, and today typically enrolls about 500 graduate men and women each year. Areas of study include art, business, computer science, dance, education, English, music, pre-med, and public policy. The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Computer scaence, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... jus like my ass For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A pre-medical degree (often shortened to pre-med) is one preparing for medical school. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ...


Rankings

In 2006, Mills received the following recognitions:


• Named one of the top three California colleges to consider by the New York Times The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


• Ranked among the top 100 liberal arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


• Ranked among the top 20 most diverse liberal arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


• Named one of the Best 361 Colleges by the Princeton Review The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


• Ranked 31 among colleges for African Americans by Black Enterprise magazine


• Ranked 36 among top liberal arts colleges by Washington Monthly The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ...


Campus

Richards Road.
Richards Road.

The campus, which is a compact 135 acres in the Oakland foothills, also includes the historic Campanile (1904), designed by Julia Morgan of Hearst Castle fame, and is the first concrete reinforced structure west of the Mississippi. Architects of the time laughed at Morgan and told her it would not last the next Bay Area earthquake, but it stood tall through the 1906 and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes without a crack or scratch. The only thing that has been repaired on the clock tower is the clock mechanism itself. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (466x704, 467 KB) Mills College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (466x704, 467 KB) Mills College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Julia Morgan (January 20, 1872–February 2, 1957) was an American architect. ... The Hearst Castle facade is patterned after a Spanish cathedral. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989 in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 pm local time and measured 7. ...


Music


The Music Program at Mills is noted for being at the forefront of experimental music study and composition. Well-known composer Luciano Berio was on the music faculty of Mills in 1962-1964, and in 1966 Pauline Oliveros became the first director of the Tape Music Center (later the Center for Contemporary Music), where she composed her electronic works Alien Bog and Beautiful Soop. Morton Subotnick, later a member of the faculty, received his master's degree from Mills, studying composition with Leon Kirchner and Darius Milhaud. Laurie Anderson, Dave Brubeck, Phil Lesh, and Steve Reich attended the program, as well as the famous synthesizer designer Donald Buchla. Terry Riley taught at Mills starting in the early 1970s. Avant-garde jazz pioneer Anthony Braxton has taught at Mills on an intermittent basis since the 1970s. Lou Harrison, Pandit Pran Nath, Iannis Xenakis, Alvin Curran, Anthony Braxton, Gordon Mumma, Frederic Rzewski, Fred Frith, and many others have all taught music at Mills. Luciano Berio (October 24, 1925 – May 27, 2003) was an Italian composer. ... Pauline Oliveros (born 1932 in Houston, Texas) is an accordionist and composer who currently resides in Kingston, New York. ... Morton Subotnick (born April 13, 1933) is an American composer of electronic music, best known for his Silver Apples of the Moon, the first electronic work commissioned by a record company, Nonesuch, and composed on the Buchla modular synthesizer which he helped to design. ... Leon Kirchner (born January 24, 1919 in Brooklyn, NY) is an American composer of classical music. ... Darius Milhaud Darius Milhaud (IPA: ) (September 4, 1892 – June 22, 1974) was a French composer and teacher. ... Laurie Anderson (born Laura Phillips Anderson, on June 5, 1947, in Glen Ellyn, Illinois) is an American experimental performance artist and musician. ... Dave Brubeck in 1954 David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... Phillip Chapman Lesh (born March 15, 1940 in Berkeley, California) is a musician and founding member of the rock band, Grateful Dead; he played bass guitar in that group throughout their entire 30-year career. ... Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... Terry Riley – (Portrait by Betty Freeman) Terry Riley (born 24 June 1935) is an American composer associated with the minimalist school. ... Anthony Braxton (born June 4, 1945) is an American composer, multi-reedist and pianist. ... Lou Silver Harrison (May 14, 1917 - February 2, 2003) was an American composer. ... Pandit Pran Nath (1918–1996) was an esteemed Hindustani music vocalist and teacher of the Kirana Gharana who placed emphasis on the alap section of a raga performance. ... Iannis Xenakis Iannis Xenakis (Ιάννης Ξενάκης) (May 29, 1922 Brăila – February 4, 2001 Paris) was a Greek composer and architect who spent much of his life in Paris. ... Composer Alvin Curran (born 13 December 1938 in Providence, Rhode Island) is the co-founder, with Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of Musica Elettronica Viva, and a former student of Elliott Carter. ... Anthony Braxton (born June 4, 1945) is an American composer, multi-reedist and pianist. ... Gordon Mumma (March 30, 1935, in Framingham, Massachusetts) is a composer. ... Frederic Anthony Rzewski (born April 13, 1938) is an American composer and virtuoso pianist. ... Fred Frith performing at the Moers Jazz Festival, 1 June 1998. ...


For more than 40 years, the Center for Contemporary Music (CCM) has been at the forefront of developments emphasizing experimental methods in contemporary music and its allied arts and sciences. CCM maintains a variety of electronic equipment, instruments and studios, provides instruction and technical assistance, and archives audio recordings. The Center also performs a wide variety of community services in the arts, including public concerts and lecture series, informational and technical assistance, and artist residencies. Maggi Payne and Chris Brown are presently co-directors of CCM. Payne is a composer, performer, interdisciplinary artist, and recording engineer. Brown is an instrument builder, a pianist, and a composer. Maggi Payne (b. ... Chris Brown may refer to: Chris Brown (young jazz musician and orchestral) (1993-Present) Chris Brown (baseball player) (1961-2006) Chris Brown (American football) (born 1981) Chris Brown (footballer) (born 1984), English Chris Brown (soccer) (born 1977), American Chris Brown (basketball) (born 1977), Canadian/British Chris Brown (musician), Canadian Chris...


Art Museum


Open to the public, the Mills College Art Museum is home to an amazing collection of more then 8,000 works of art—the largest permanent collection of any liberal arts college on the West Coast. The collection includes old masters and modern American and European prints and drawings; Asian textiles; Japanese, Ancient American, and modern ceramics; and California regionalist paintings. In 2005, Dr. William K. Ehrenfeld donated a collection of more than 800 pieces of African art, primarily from West Africa with an emphasis on art of the Yoruba.  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... The Yoruba (Yorùbá in Yoruba orthography) are a large ethno-linguistic group or ethnic nation in West Africa. ...


Works from the permanent collection—including pieces by Pablo Picasso, Diego Rivera, Winslow Homer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Henri Matisse, and Auguste Renoir—are displayed with an ever-changing series of special exhibitions that are designed to provoke, inspire, and even amuse. Students have a one-of-a-kind opportunity to get involved in every aspect of the museum’s work: archival research, editing, photography, design, and installations. Undergraduates train to become curators and put together over six exhibitions with art from the collection. Every year art students also take on the management of the Senior and MFA exhibitions. Pablo Ruiz Picasso (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was a Spanish painter and sculptor. ... Diego Rivera (December 8, 1886 – November 24, 1957), (full name Diego María de la Concepción Juan Nepomuceno Estanislao de la Rivera y Barrientos Acosta y Rodríguez) was a Mexican painter and muralist born in Guanajuato City, Guanajuato. ... Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (July 15, 1606 - October 4, 1669) is generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history, and the most important United Provinces (Netherlands) painter of the seventeenth century. ... Henri Matisse (December 31, 1869 – November 3, 1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draughtsmanship. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841 _ December 3, 1919) was a preeminent French painter. ...


Natural Sciences Building


In spring 2007, Mills will open its new 26,000-square-foot Natural Sciences Building. The facility features four new teaching laboratories, five new classrooms, a computer room for students, and centralized science faculty offices. Up-to-date instrumentation and leading-edge computing resources will support the academic programs. The addition will become the first building on the Mills campus to meet rigorous national standards as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) “green building.” 7 World Trade Center, considered New York Citys first green office tower by gaining gold status in the US Green Building Councils LEED program. ...


Children’s School


Founded in 1926 on the Mills College campus, the Children's School is the oldest laboratory school west of the Mississippi River. From its inception, the School has had the dual mission of providing quality education for both children and adults. A member of the East Bay Independent Schools Association, the Children’s School is open to the children of Mills students, faculty, and staff as well as the general public. The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest named river in North America, with a length of 2320 miles (3733 km) from Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico. ...


Since 2000 the Children's School has been housed in the Education Complex of the campus. The state-of-the-art facility includes an infant/toddler program, two preschool programs offering several scheduling options, and a kindergarten through fifth grade elementary school, each with age-appropriate playgrounds and structures.


Undergraduate students majoring or minoring in child development, as well as graduate education students, have the unique opportunity of using the classroom for research and study under the guidance of master teachers with graduate degrees, professional credentials, and years of experience.


Also housed on campus are the English First International Language School, the Julia Morgan School for Girls (independent of the College), a Greek theatre, and many other attractions. Its main route of entry, Richards Road, is included in The 100 Most Beautiful Streets of America. Julia Morgan School for Girls is a private all-girls school in Oakland, California. ...


Campus Community

With 10 different on-campus living options, including traditional residence halls, a housing cooperative, family housing, and apartment living, students at Mills have a wide range of housing to choose from. In the Mediterranean-inspired residence halls, students enjoy single rooms, the occasional California sleeping porch, and common areas outfitted with antique furniture and grand pianos.


There are more than 40 organizations and clubs for students to join, such as the Black Women’s Collective, Philosophy Club, Book Arts and Zine Club, and the Native American Sisterhood Alliance. Some groups meet to share a hobby or interest, while others are motivated to inspire change. If students can’t find a club that appeals to them, they can simply start their own.


Throughout the academic year, there are many events to attend on campus, many of which are open to the public. Events range from art exhibitions, concerts, and dance performances to swim meets, readings, forums, lectures, and conferences. With the College’s intimate size and setting, students have opportunities to help arrange events and meet guest speakers.


As a place of ideas and expression, the College attracts speakers from around the world. Adding to the legacy of such notable past speakers as Ansel Adams and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., recent visitors to Mills have included Senator Barbara Boxer, Isabel Allende, Sally Ride, and Marian Wright Edelman. The Tetons - Snake River (1942) by Ansel Adams Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer, best known for his black and white photographs of Californias Yosemite Valley. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... For the Chilean politician and daughter of Salvador Allende, see Isabel Allende Bussi. ... Sally Kristen Ride (born May 26, 1951) is an American former astronaut who in 1983 became the first American woman to reach outer space. ... Marian Wright Edelman (born June 6, 1939) is the president and founder of the Childrens Defense Fund. ...


Athletics

Mills students compete in six intercollegiate sports—cross country, rowing, soccer, swimming, tennis, and volleyball—as members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). The Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation (APER) Department is housed in Haas Pavilion. The Director of Athletics is Themy Adachi. Students may also participate in recreational activity courses for credit or take advantage of the on-campus fitness facilities and off-campus activity excursions. US Armed Forces cross country meet Cross-country running is a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain before other teams. ... Rowing refers to several forms of physical activity: For rowing boats in general, see Watercraft rowing. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ...


Presidents

• Janet L. Holmgren —–- 1991–present


• Virginia Smith —–- 1990–91 (Acting President)


• Mary S. Metz —–- (President Emerita; at Mills 1981–1990)


Barbara M. White —–- 1976–1980 Barbara M. White is a former president of Mills College. ...


• Robert Wert —–- 1967–1976


• C. Easton Rothwell —–- 1959–1967


Lynn Townsend White, Jr. —–- 1943–1958 Lynn Townsend White, Jr. ...


• Aurelia Henry Reinhardt —–- 1916–1943


• Hettie Belle Ege —–- 1914–16 (Dean and Acting President)


• Luella Carson —–- 1909–1914


Susan Tolman Mills —–- (1890–1909) Susan Tolman Mills (1825 - 1912) was the co-founder and first president of Mills College. ...


• Charles Carroll Stratton —–- 1887–1890


• Homer Sprague —–- 1885–87


• Cyrus Mills —–- 1865–1884 (as Mills Seminary until 1877, when the College received its charter)


• Mary Atkins —–- 1855–1865 (Principal of Young Ladies’ Seminary)


Notable faculty, past and present

Robert Ashley (born March 28, 1930) is a contemporary composer, best known for his operas and other theatrical works. ... Arthur Berger (May 15, 1912 in New York City –- October 7, 2003 in Boston, Massachusetts) was a composer who has been described as a New Mannerist. ... Luciano Berio (October 24, 1925 – May 27, 2003) was an Italian composer. ... Chris Brown (b. ... Dave Brubeck in 1954 David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... For Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... Composer Alvin Curran (born 13 December 1938 in Providence, Rhode Island) is the co-founder, with Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of Musica Elettronica Viva, and a former student of Elliott Carter. ... Fred Frith performing at the Moers Jazz Festival, 1 June 1998. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Barbara Lee Barbara Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the 9th District of California (map). ... Darius Milhaud Darius Milhaud (IPA: ) (September 4, 1892 – June 22, 1974) was a French composer and teacher. ... Diana Farnham OHehir is a writer of prose and poetry from northern California. ... Pauline Oliveros (born 1932 in Houston, Texas) is an accordionist and composer who currently resides in Kingston, New York. ... Maggi Payne (b. ... Terry Riley – (Portrait by Betty Freeman) Terry Riley (born 24 June 1935) is an American composer associated with the minimalist school. ... David Rosenboom (born September 9, 1947 in Fairfield, Iowa) is an American composer and pioneer in the use of neurofeedback. ... David Dean Rusk (February 9, 1909 – December 20, 1994) was the United States Secretary of State from 1961 to 1969 under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. ...

Notable alumnae and alumni

Laurie Anderson (born Laura Phillips Anderson, on June 5, 1947, in Glen Ellyn, Illinois) is an American experimental performance artist and musician. ... Renel Brooks-Moon, known popularly simply as Renel, is the main announcer at AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants. ... Chris Brown (b. ... Trisha Brown (25 November 1936, Aberdeen, Washington, U.S.) is a postmodernist American choreographer and dancer. ... Dave Brubeck in 1954 David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... Sharon Cheslow is an American musician, composer and artist. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Kevin Blechdom, born Kristin Erickson, is an experimental electronic musician from San Francisco, California. ... March Fong Eu March Fong Eu (江月桂, pinyin: Jiāng Yuègùi) (born 1922 in Oakdale, California) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... April Catherine Glaspie (born April 26, 1942), American diplomat, is best-known for her role in the events leading up to the Gulf War of 1991. ... Ariel Gore Ariel Gore (born June 25, 1970, in Carmel, California) is the author of several nonfiction books and a novel. ... Pianist Barbara Higbie (b. ... Marcie Jones [1973- ] is a journalist, consultant and author who lives in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Blevin Blectum (born Bevin Kelley) is a innovative electronic musician. ... Barbara Lee Barbara Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the 9th District of California (map). ... Miya Masaoka (born 1958) is a musician and composer who performs on the Japanese zither-like instrument the koto, often augmenting it with string preparations and electronic triggers (as in her Koto Monster, where additional laser beam strings hover over the koto). ... Amy X Neuburg (b. ... Joanna Newsom (born January 18, 1982) is an American harpist, pianist, harpsichordist, singer and songwriter from Nevada City, California. ... Thoraya Ahmed Obaid is the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund. ... Maggi Payne (b. ... Dixy Lee Ray Dixy Lee Ray (September 3, 1914- January 2, 1994) was the seventeenth governor of Washington State, U.S.A. and the first woman to hold that position (for one term, from 1977 until 1981). ... This article deals with the U.S. state. ... Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dana Vespoli (born on 22 September 1972 in the San Francisco Bay Area, California) is an American pornographic actress. ... Jade Snow Wong (黃玉雪, pinyin: Huáng Yùxuě) was born in 1922 in San Francisco. ...

See Also

Mills College Honorary Degree Recipients 1902 - Emma Wixom Palmer 1902 - Louis Lisser 1903 - Jane Cordelia Tolman 1920 - Lucinda Wyman Prince 1923 - Melville Best Anderson 1923 - Ina Donna Coolbrith 1923 - Lou Henry Hoover 1923 - Bernard Ralph Maybeck 1923 - John Henry Nash 1925 - Norman Frank Coleman 1925 - Clara Bradley Bardette 1925 - William Frederic Bade 1925 - William Andrews...


Trivia

The mansarded structure Mills Hall, which provided homes for faculty and students as well as classrooms and dining halls is now a California Historical Landmark (#849) and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places (NPS-71000132). Mansard in architecture refers to a style of hip roof characterized by two slopes on each of its four sides with the lower slope being steeper than the upper slope. ... California Historical Landmarks (CHLs) are buildings, structures, sites, or places in the state of California that have been determined to have statewide historical significance by meeting at least one of the criteria listed below: approved for designation by the County Board of Supervisors or the City/Town Council in whose... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


The college was mentioned as the choice of Gilmore Girls character Madeline Lynn before she graduated, though she transferred to New Orleans' Tulane University in a subsequent episode because she missed her friend Louise Grant. Gilmore Girls is an hour-long American television drama/comedy that began in October 5, 2000. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Points of interest

The William Joseph McInnes Botanic Garden and Campus Arboretum is located at the corner of Seminary Avenue and McArthur Boulevard, on the campus of Mills College in Oakland, California, USA. See also List of botanical gardens in the United States Categories: US geography stubs | California botanical gardens ...

References

  • Mills College Mission & History
  • Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993 (2nd edition).

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History at Smith College. ...

External links

  • Mills College official website
  • Photo tour of Mills College
  • Virtual tour of Mills College
  • Mills College newsroom
  • Mills College student newspaper
  • "Off the Beaten Path" -- Mills College named one of three California colleges to consider by the New York Times

  Results from FactBites:
 
CaliforniaColleges.edu - Campus Facts - All California Colleges (453 words)
Mills is committed to creating an intellectual experience second to none, in an environment that values creativity and social justice.
The College’s mission is to graduate women who write clearly, think critically and logically in a variety of contexts, work in collaboration with others, and possess technical competence in a computerized world.
While the colleges and universities are able to update the Campus Facts information at any time and this section, thereby, has the potential to offer the most accurate and up-to-date information available, the information is not independently validated, and no party associated with this website can accept responsibility for its accuracy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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