FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Millard Fillmore
Millard Fillmore
Millard Fillmore

In office
July 9, 1850 – March 4, 1853
Preceded by Zachary Taylor
Succeeded by Franklin Pierce

In office
March 4, 1849 – July 9, 1850
President Zachary Taylor
Preceded by George M. Dallas
Succeeded by William R. King

Born January 7, 1800(1800-01-07)
Summerhill, New York
Died March 08, 1874 (aged 74)
Buffalo, New York
Nationality Flag of the United States United States
Political party Anti-Masonic, Whig, American
Spouse Abigail Powers Fillmore (1st wife)
Caroline Carmichael McIntosh Fillmore (2nd wife)
Occupation Lawyer
Religion Unitarian
Signature

Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold that office. He succeeded from the Vice Presidency on the death of President Zachary Taylor, who died of unknown reasons, becoming the second U.S. President to assume the office in this manner. Fillmore was never elected President; after serving out Taylor's term, he failed to gain the nomination for the Presidency of the Whigs in the 1852 presidential election, and, four years later, in the 1856 presidential election, he again failed to win election as President as the Know Nothing Party and Whig candidate. File links The following pages link to this file: Millard Fillmore User talk:Simplicius Categories: U.S. history images ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ... George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792–December 31, 1864) was a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania and the 11th Vice President, serving under James K. Polk. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Summerhill is a town located in Cayuga County, New York. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Abigail Powers Fillmore (March 13, 1798 - March 30, 1853), wife of Millard Fillmore, was First Lady of the United States from 1850 to 1853. ... Caroline Carmichael McIntosh Fillmore (1813-1881) was the second wife of thirteenth U.S. President Millard Fillmore. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the U.S. President with a similar name, see Millard Fillmore. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Fillmore was born in a log cabin in Summerhill, New York, to Nathaniel and Phoebe Millard Fillmore, as the second of nine children and the eldest son.[1] Though a Unitarian in later life,[2] Fillmore was descended from Scottish Presbyterians on his father's side and English dissenters on his mother's. He was first apprenticed to a fuller to learn the cloth-making trade. He also served as a home guard in the New York militia for some time. He struggled to obtain an education under frontier conditions, attending New Hope Academy for six months. For other uses, see Log cabin (disambiguation). ... Summerhill is a town located in Cayuga County, New York. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Fulling is a step in clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (paricularly wool) to get rid of oils, dirt, and other impurities. ... New York Guard MPs on post in New York City. ... New Hope Academy is an academically-oriented private school, fully certified by the Maryland State Department of Education, which includes a four-year high school, grades K-8, and a fully licensed preschool program for ages 3-5 years. ...


He fell in love with [Abigail Fillmore], whom he later married on February 26, 1826. The couple had two children, Millard Powers Fillmore and Mary Abigail Fillmore. Later, Fillmore bought out his apprenticeship and moved to Buffalo, New York, to continue his studies. He was admitted to the bar in 1823 and began his law practice in East Aurora. In 1834, he formed a law partnership, Fillmore and Hall (becoming Fillmore, Hall and Haven in 1836), with his good friend Nathan K. Hall (who would later serve in his cabinet as Postmaster General). [3] It would become one of western New York's most prestigious firms.[4] In 1848, he founded the private University of Buffalo, which today is the public State University of New York at Buffalo (UB, University at Buffalo), the largest school in the New York state university system. is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Mary Abigail Fillmore (born 1832 in Buffalo, New York; died 1854 in East Aurora, New York) was the daughter of President Millard Fillmore and Abigail Powers, and was the White House Hostess from 1850 to 1853 due to her mothers broken ankle. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Another Aurora is a village in Cayuga County in the Finger Lakes Region. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nathan Kelsey Hall (March 28, 1810–March 2, 1874) was an American politician who served in the U.S. House of Representatives and as U.S. Postmaster General. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... This article is about the state. ... University at Buffalo The University at Buffalo, formerly known as the State University of New York at Buffalo, is located in Buffalo, New York, USA, and is one of the four university centers operated by the State University of New York. ...


Politics

Engraving of Millard Fillmore
Engraving of Millard Fillmore

In 1828, Fillmore was elected to the New York State Assembly on the Anti-Masonic ticket, serving for one term, from 1829 to 1831. He was later elected as a Whig (having followed his mentor Thurlow Weed into the party) to the 23rd Congress in 1832, serving from 1833 to 1835. He was re-elected in 1836 to the 25th Congress, to the 26th and to the 27th Congresses and serving from in total from 1833 to 1843, declining to be a candidate for re-nomination in 1842. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 523 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (692 × 793 pixel, file size: 60 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 523 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (692 × 793 pixel, file size: 60 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The chamber of the New York State Assembly. ... The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Thurlow Weed Thurlow Weed (November 15, 1797-November 22, 1882), was a New York political boss. ... Twenty-third United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Twenty-fifth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Twenty-sixth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Twenty-seventh United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In Congress, he opposed the entrance of Texas as a slave territory. He came in second place in the bid for Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1841. He served as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee from 1841 to 1843 and was an author of the Tariff of 1842, as well as two other bills that President John Tyler vetoed. Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The free and slave states as of 1861, with free states in blue and slave states in red. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Tariff of 1842, or Black Tariff as it became known, was a protectionist tariff schedule adopted in the United States to reverse the effects of the Compromise Tariff of 1833. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Tyler, Jr. ...


After leaving Congress, Fillmore was the unsuccessful Whig candidate for Governor of New York in 1844. He served as New York State Comptroller from 1847 to 1849. As state comptroller, he revised New York's banking system, making it a model for the future National Banking System. The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Jan. ... 1979 - 1993 Republican Edward Regan 1993 - 2003 Democrat Carl McCall 2003 - present Democrat Alan Hevesi Category: ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Vice Presidency

At the Whig national convention in 1848, the nomination of Gen. Zachary Taylor for president angered the supporters of Henry Clay as well as the opponents of slavery extension into the territory gained by the Mexican War. A group of practical Whig politicians nominated Fillmore for vice president, believing that he would heal party wounds and help the ticket carry New York state. Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... ...

Taylor/Fillmore campaign poster
Taylor/Fillmore campaign poster

Having worked his way up through the Whig Party in New York, Fillmore was selected as Taylor's running mate. (It was thought that the obscure, self-made candidate from New York would complement Taylor, a slave-holding military man from the south.) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A running mate is a person running for a subordinate position on a joint ticket during an election. ... This article is about the state. ...


Fillmore was also selected in part to block New York state machine boss Thurlow Weed from receiving the vice presidential nomination (and his front man William H. Seward from receiving a position in Taylor's cabinet). Weed ultimately got Seward elected to the senate. This competition between Seward and Fillmore led to Seward's becoming a more vocal part of cabinet meetings and having more of a voice than Fillmore in advising the administration. The battle would continue even after Taylor's death. Thurlow Weed Thurlow Weed (November 15, 1797-November 22, 1882), was a New York political boss. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ...


Taylor and Fillmore disagreed on the slavery issue in the new western territories taken from Mexico in the Mexican-American War. Taylor wanted the new states to be free states, while Fillmore supported slavery in those states as a means of appeasing the South. In his own words: "God knows that I detest slavery, but it is an existing evil ... and we must endure it and give it such protection as is guaranteed by the Constitution." Slave redirects here. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000...


Fillmore presided over the Senate during the months of nerve-wracking debates over the Compromise of 1850. During one debate, Senator Henry S. Foote of Mississippi pulled a pistol on Senator Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri. Fillmore made no public comment on the merits of the compromise proposals, but a few days before President Taylor's death, Fillmore suggested to the president that, should there be a tie vote on Henry Clay's bill, he would vote in favor of the North. Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... Henry Stuart Foote (February 28, 1804 - May 19, 1880) was a United States Senator from Mississippi from 1847 to 1852 and Governor of Mississippi from 1852 to 1854. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Thomas Hart Benton (March 14, 1782–April 10, 1858), nicknamed Old Bullion, was an American Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


Presidency 1850–1853

Policies

Official White House portrait of Millard Fillmore
Official White House portrait of Millard Fillmore

Fillmore ascended to the presidency upon the sudden and unexpected death of President Taylor in July 1850. The change in leadership also signaled an abrupt political shift in the administration, as Fillmore removed Taylor's entire cabinet, replacing them with individuals known to be favorable to the Compromise efforts. Fillmore signaled this shift by appointing Daniel Webster as his Secretary of State. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ...


As president, Fillmore dealt with increasing party divisions within the Whig party; party harmony became one of his primary objectives. He tried to unite the party by pointing out the differences between the Whigs and the Democrats (by proposing tariff reforms that negatively reflected on the Democratic Party). Another primary objective of Fillmore was to preserve the Union from the intensifying slavery debate. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Henry Clay's proposed bill to admit California to the Union still aroused all the violent arguments for and against the extension of slavery without any progress toward settling the major issues (the South continued to threaten secession). Fillmore recognized that Clay's plan was the best way to end the sectional crisis (California free state, harsher fugitive slave law, abolish slave trade in DC). Clay, exhausted, left Washington to recuperate, passing leadership to Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois. At this critical juncture, President Fillmore announced his support of the Compromise of 1850. Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ...


On August 6, 1850, he sent a message to Congress recommending that Texas be paid to abandon its claims to part of New Mexico. This helped shift a critical number of northern Whigs in Congress away from their insistence upon the Wilmot Proviso-—the stipulation that all land gained by the Mexican War must be closed to slavery. is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... The Wilmot Proviso was introduced on August 8, 1846 in the House of Representatives as a rider on a $2 million appropriations bill intended for the final negotiations to resolve the Mexican-American War. ...


Douglas's effective strategy in Congress combined with Fillmore's pressure gave impetus to the Compromise movement. Breaking up Clay's single legislative package, Douglas presented five separate bills to the Senate:

  • Admit California as a free state.
  • Settle the Texas boundary and compensate the state for lost lands.
  • Grant territorial status to New Mexico.
  • Place federal officers at the disposal of slaveholders seeking escapees—the Fugitive Slave Act.
  • Abolish the slave trade in the District of Columbia.

Each measure obtained a majority, and, by September 20, President Fillmore had signed them into law. Webster wrote, "I can now sleep of nights." It has been suggested that Fugitive slave laws be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Portrait of Millard Fillmore
Portrait of Millard Fillmore

Whigs on both sides refused to accept the finality of Fillmore's law (which led to more party division, and a loss of numerous elections), which forced Northern Whigs to say "God Save us from Whig Vice Presidents." Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (779x909, 59 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (779x909, 59 KB) http://hdl. ...


Fillmore's greatest difficulty with the fugitive slave law was how to enforce it without seeming to show favor towards Southern Whigs. His solution was to appease both northern and southern Whigs by calling for the enforcement of the fugitive slave law in the North, and enforcing in the South a law forbidding involvement in Cuba (for the sole purpose of adding it as a slave state).


Another issue that presented itself during Fillmore's presidency was the arrival of Louis Kossuth (exiled leader of a failed Hungarian revolution). Kossuth wanted the United States to abandon its non-intervention policies when it came to European affairs and recognize Hungary’s independence. The problem came with the enormous support Kossuth received from German-American immigrants to the United States (who were essential in the re-election of both Whigs and Democrats). Fillmore refused to change American policy, and decided to remain neutral despite the political implications that neutrality would produce. Lajos (Louis) Kossuth (September 19, 1802 - March 20, 1894), was a Hungarian lawyer, journalist, politician and for a time was regent. ...


Another important legacy of Fillmore's administration was the sending of Commodore Matthew C. Perry to open Japan to Western trade, though Perry did not reach Japan until Franklin Pierce had replaced Fillmore as president. Commodore is a rank of the United States Navy with a somewhat complicated history. ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ...


Administration and cabinet

The Fillmore Cabinet
OFFICE NAME TERM
President Millard Fillmore 1850 – 1853
Vice President None 1850 – 1853
Secretary of State Daniel Webster 1850 – 1852
Edward Everett 1852 – 1853
Secretary of Treasury Thomas Corwin 1850 – 1853
Secretary of War Charles M. Conrad 1850 – 1853
Attorney General John J. Crittenden 1850 – 1853
Postmaster General Nathan K. Hall 1850 – 1852
Samuel D. Hubbard 1852 – 1853
Secretary of the Navy William A. Graham 1850 – 1852
John P. Kennedy 1852 – 1853
Secretary of the Interior Thomas M. T. McKennan 1850
Alexander H. H. Stuart 1850 – 1853


Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Thomas Corwin, also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy (July 29, 1794 – December 18, 1865) was a politician from the state of Ohio who served as a prosecuting attorney, a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, United States House of Representatives, and United States Senate, and as... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Charles Magill Conrad (December 24, 1804–February 11, 1878) was an American political figure. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Nathan Kelsey Hall (March 28, 1810–March 2, 1874) was an American politician who served in the U.S. House of Representatives and as U.S. Postmaster General. ... Samuel Dickinson Hubbard (1799 – 1855) was the second postmaster general under American President Millard_Fillmore. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... William Alexander Graham (September 5, 1804–August 11, 1875) was a United States Senator from North Carolina from 1840 to 1843 and Governor of North Carolina from 1845 to 1849. ... John Pendleton Kennedy (October 25, 1795 – August 18, 1870) served as United States Secretary of the Navy from July 26, 1852 to March 4, 1853, during the administration of President Millard Fillmore, and as a Congressman from the fourth district of Maryland. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Thomas McKean Thompson McKennan (March 31, 1794–July 9, 1852) was a U.S. politician. ... Alexander Hugh Holmes Stuart (1807 - 1891) was a U.S. political figure. ...

Supreme Court appointments

Fillmore appointed the following Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States: Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the...

Benjamin Robbins Curtis (4 November 1809 _ 15 September 1874) was an American attorney and United States Supreme Court Justice. ...

States admitted to the Union

Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...

Legacy

Some northern Whigs remained irreconcilable, refusing to forgive Fillmore for having signed the Fugitive Slave Act. They helped deprive him of the Presidential nomination in 1852. Within a few years it was apparent that although the Compromise had been intended to settle the slavery controversy, it served rather as an uneasy sectional truce. An April 24, 1851 poster warning colored people in Boston about policemen acting as slave catchers. ...


Because the Whig party was so deeply divided, and the two leading candidates for the Whig party (Webster and Fillmore) refused to combine to secure the nomination, Winfield Scott received it. Because both the north and the south refused to unite behind Scott, he won only 4 of 31 states, and lost the election to Franklin Pierce. For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ...


After Fillmore's defeat the Whig party continued its downward spiral with further party division coming at the hands of the Kansas Nebraska Act, and the emergence of the Know Nothing party.


Later life

Statue of Fillmore outside City Hall in downtown Buffalo, New York.
Statue of Fillmore outside City Hall in downtown Buffalo, New York.

Fillmore was one of the founders of the University of Buffalo. The school was chartered by an act of the New York State Legislature on May 11, 1846, and at first was only a medical school.[1] Fillmore was the first Chancellor, a position he maintained while both Vice President and President. Upon completing his presidency, Fillmore returned to Buffalo, where he continued to serve as chancellor. Download high resolution version (500x727, 87 KB)Statue of Millard Fillmore outside City Hall in downtown Buffalo, New York (taken Sept. ... Download high resolution version (500x727, 87 KB)Statue of Millard Fillmore outside City Hall in downtown Buffalo, New York (taken Sept. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... University at Buffalo, The State University of New York (UB) (also known as SUNY Buffalo) is a coeducational public research university, which has multiple campuses located in Buffalo and Amherst, New York, USA. Offering 84 bachelors, 184 masters and 78 doctoral degrees, it is the largest and most... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ...


After the death of his daughter Mary, Fillmore went abroad. While touring Europe in 1855, Fillmore was offered an honorary Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) degree by the University of Oxford. Fillmore turned down the honor, explaining that he had neither the "literary nor scientific attainment" to justify the degree.[2] He is also quoted as having explained that he "lacked the benefit of a classical education" and could not, therefore, understand the Latin text of the diploma, then joking that he believed "no man should accept a degree he cannot read."[3] Mary Abigail Fillmore (born 1832 in Buffalo, New York; died 1854 in East Aurora, New York) was the daughter of President Millard Fillmore and Abigail Powers, and was the White House Hostess from 1850 to 1853 due to her mothers broken ankle. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... Some universities, such as the University of Oxford, award Doctor of Civil Law (DCL) degrees instead of Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) degrees. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Diploma from Mexico City College, 1948 (in Latin) A diploma (from Greek δίπλωµα diploma) is a certificate or deed issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that testifies that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, or confers an academic degree. ...

Fillmore/Donelson campaign poster.

By 1856, Fillmore's Whig Party had ceased to exist, having fallen apart due to dissension over the slavery issue, and especially the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. Fillmore refused to join the new Republican Party, where many former Whigs, including Abraham Lincoln, had found refuge. Instead, Fillmore joined the anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic American Party, the political organ of the Know-Nothing movement. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x1988, 538 KB) 1856 US political poster for American (Known Nothing) party; Source: scanned from paper copy This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x1988, 538 KB) 1856 US political poster for American (Known Nothing) party; Source: scanned from paper copy This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... This 1854 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... A political party by the name of the American Party has existed several times in the United States: The ante-bellum American Party grew out of the Know-Nothing movement and was based on Nativism. ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ...


He ran in the election of 1856 as the party's candidate, attempting to win a non-consecutive second term as President (a feat accomplished only once in American politics, by Grover Cleveland). His running mate was Andrew Jackson Donelson, nephew of former president Andrew Jackson. Fillmore and Donelson finished third, carrying only the state of Maryland and its eight electoral votes; but he won 21.6% of the popular vote, one of the best showings ever by a Presidential third-party candidate. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799–1871) was a diplomat and candidate for the Vice Presidency. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


On February 10, 1858, after the death of his first wife, Fillmore married Caroline McIntosh, a wealthy widow. Their combined wealth allowed them to purchase a big house in Buffalo, New York. The house became the center of hospitality for visitors, until her health began to decline in the 1860s. is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Caroline Carmichael McIntosh Fillmore (1813-1881) was the second wife of thirteenth U.S. President Millard Fillmore. ...


Throughout the Civil War, Fillmore opposed President Lincoln and during Reconstruction supported President Johnson. He commanded a corps of home guards during the Civil War. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an army composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ...


He died at 11:10 p.m. on March 8, 1874, of the after-effects of a stroke. His last words were alleged to be, upon being fed some soup, "the nourishment is palatable." On January 7 each year, a ceremony is held at his grave site in the Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo. is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo was founded in 1849. ...


Notable presidential facts

For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... 1864 National Union Party candidate and U.S. President-elect Abraham Lincoln 1864 National Union Party candidate and U.S. Vice President-elect Andrew Johnson U.S. Postmaster General, Montgomery Blair. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Radical Republicans were certain Republicans in Congress and other federal and state leaders during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras in U.S. history. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... An indentured servant (also called a bonded laborer) is a labourer unde from the employer in exchange for an extension to the period of their indenture, which could thereby continue indefinitely. ... Fulling is a step in clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to get rid of oils, dirt, and other impurities. ...

Places named after Fillmore

Fillmore Glen State Park is located adjacent to the Village of Moravia in Cayuga County, New York. ... Fillmore County is a county located in the state of Minnesota. ... Fillmore County is a county located in the state of Nebraska. ... Fillmore is a city located in Millard County, Utah. ... Millard County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ...

References in popular culture

  • In an article in Mad Magazine in the late 1950s appears the phrase: "Who in heck was Millard Fillmore anyhow?"
  • The 80s sitcom Head of the Class took place at the fictional "Millard Fillmore High School".
  • ESPN anchor Neil Everett often makes references to Millard Fillmore while hosting Sportscenter.
  • The comic strip Mallard Fillmore is named after the president.
  • In 2007, George Pendle wrote The Remarkable Millard Fillmore, a fake biography based on real events that happened in Fillmore's life. Pendle mixes such imagined events as Fillmore fighting at the Battle of the Alamo with equally improbable, but actually true events, such as the fact that Fillmore's great-grandfather, John Fillmore, was abducted by pirates, organized a mutiny aboard the pirate ship, and killed the pirate captain, before sailing the ship back into Boston harbor.
  • In one episode in American Dragon, the statue of Millard Fillmore was shown to the parents in a parent-teacher meeting by Professor Rokwood.
  • In an episode of Johnny Bravo, Johnny (in a partially delirious state) speaks to a statue of Millard Filmore.
  • In his book Dave Barry Slept Here, Dave Barry lists the most notable achievement of the Fillmore administration as "The Earth did not crash into the Sun."

Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Head of the Class was an American sitcom that ran from 1986 to 1991 on the ABC television network. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Neil Everett Morfitt now known as Neil Everett, is a sportscaster for the ESPN cable network. ... This article is about the American ESPN show. ... For the U.S. President with a similar name, see Millard Fillmore. ... George Pendle (born 1976) is a British author and journalist. ... Combatants Republic of Mexico Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón William Travis† Jim Bowie† Davy Crockett† Strength 6,000 in attack (1,800 in assault-see below) 183 to 250 Casualties 370 to 600 total 70 to 200... American Dragon can refer to: Bryan Danielson, a professional wrestler. ... Johnny Bravo is an American animated television series created by Van Partible. ... For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ...

Trivia

Millard Fillmore postage stamp

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... 1938 u. ... 1938 u. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... A bathtub A bathtub (AmE) or bath (BrE) is a plumbing fixture used for bathing. ... i still feel like being nice H.L. Mencken who: journalist, satirist, social critic, cynic, and freethinker, what: most influential American writers of the early 20th century. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The New York Evening Mail was an American daily newspaper published in New York City. ... On December 28, 1917, an article titled A Neglected Anniversary by H.L. Mencken was published in the New York Evening Mail. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Classical education as understood and taught in the Middle Ages of Western culture is roughly based on the ancient Greek concept of Paideia. ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... Some universities, such as the University of Oxford, award Doctor of Civil Law (DCL) degrees instead of Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) degrees. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...

References

  1. ^ Millard Fillmore.
  2. ^ Deacon, F. Jay (1999). "Transcendentalists, Abolitionism, and the Unitarian Association". UUA Collegium Lectures. Retrieved on 2006-12-28. 
  3. ^ Fillmore, Millard; Severance, Frank H. (1907). Millard Fillmore Papers. Buffalo Historical Society. 
  4. ^ a b Paletta, Lu Ann; Worth, Fred L (1988). The World Almanac of Presidential Facts. World Almanac Books. ISBN 0345348885. 
  • Holt, Michael F. "Millard Fillmore”. The American Presidency. Ed.Alan Brinkley,Davis Dyer.2004.145-151.

Deusen, Van Glydon. "The American Presidency". Encyclopedia Americana. Accessed 9, May 2007. http://ap.grolier.com/article?assetid=0156400-00&templatename=/article/article.html Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Gannaway Brownlow William Gannaway Brownlow (August 29, 1805 – April 29, 1877) was Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and a Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Millard Fillmore
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Millard Fillmore
Political offices
Preceded by
John W. Jones
Chairman of the United States House
Ways and Means Committee

1841 – 1843
Succeeded by
James I. McKay
Preceded by
Azariah C. Flagg
New York State Comptroller
1847 – 1849
Succeeded by
Washington Hunt
Preceded by
George M. Dallas
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1849¹ – July 9, 1850²
Succeeded by
William R. King
Preceded by
Zachary Taylor
President of the United States
July 9, 1850³ – March 4, 1853
Succeeded by
Franklin Pierce
United States House of Representatives
New district Member from New York's
32nd congressional district

March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1835
Succeeded by
Thomas C. Love
Preceded by
Thomas C. Love
Member from New York's
32nd congressional district

March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1843
Succeeded by
William A. Moseley
Party political offices
Preceded by
Theodore Frelinghuysen
Whig Party vice presidential candidate
1848
Succeeded by
William A. Graham
Preceded by
Winfield Scott
Whig Party presidential candidate
1856
Succeeded by
John Bell
New political party American Party presidential candidate
1856
Party disbanded
Honorary titles
Preceded by
James Buchanan
Oldest U.S. President still living
June 1, 1868 – March 8, 1874
Succeeded by
Andrew Johnson
Notes & References
1. Although Fillmore's term started on March 4, he did not take the oath of office until March 5.
2. President Zachary Taylor died on July 9.
3. Fillmore took the oath of office on July 10.
Persondata
NAME Fillmore, Millard
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION 13th President of the United States, 12th Vice President of the United States
DATE OF BIRTH January 7, 1800
PLACE OF BIRTH Summerhill, New York
DATE OF DEATH March 8, 1874
PLACE OF DEATH Buffalo, New York

  Results from FactBites:
 
Millard Fillmore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1186 words)
Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nation's highest office.
Fillmore was never elected President in his own right; after serving out Taylor's term he was not nominated for the Presidency by the Whigs in the 1852 Presidential election, and in 1856 he failed to win election as President as the Know Nothing Party candidate.
Fillmore was born in poverty to Nathaniel Fillmore and Phoebe Millard Fillmore in Summerhill, New York as the second of eight children and the eldest son.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m