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Encyclopedia > Military law

Military law is a distinct legal system to which members of armed forces are subject. Most countries have special additional laws, and often a legal system, which are applicable to members of their military but not usually to civilians. Military law deals with issues such as; procedures for military discipline, what is (and what isn't) a lawful command, obligations for service personnel. The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ...


Military law can also be imposed on the civilian population instead of normal civil laws. In this instance it may be called martial law, and is often declared in times of emergency, war, or civil unrest. Most countries have restrictions on when martial law can be declared, and how long it can remain. Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ...


Declaration of martial or military law is sometimes used by dictatorships, especially military dictatorships, to enforce their rule. A military dictatorship is a form of government wherein the political power resides with the military; it is similar but not identical to a stratocracy, a state ruled directly by the military. ...

Contents

United Kingdom

The Armed Forces Act 2006 will replace the separate Service Discipline Acts as the system of law under which the Armed Forces operate by 2008. The Armed Forces Act harmonises Service law and as a result produces a tri-Service system that ensures consistency and parity when dealing with service personnel. One motivating factor behind the changes in the legislation combining discipline acts across the armed forces is the the trend towards tri-service operations and defence organisations. On 8 November 2006 a new Armed Forces Act received Royal Assent in the United Kingdom, and by the end of 2008 will replace the separate Service Discipline Acts as the system of law under which the Armed Forces operate. ...


United States

Military law in the United States is controlled by the Uniform Code of Military Justice (Title 10 United States Code, Chapter 47) and implemented by the Manual for Courts-Martial, an Executive order issued by the President of the United States in his capacity as Commander-in-Chief of the United States armed forces. The Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is the foundation of military law in the United States. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ... The Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM) is the official guide to the conduct of Courts-Martial in the United States. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...


Many of the military's top lawyers worry that George W. Bush's plan to define standards of prisoner treatment could violate treaty obligations and deprive U.S. troops of rights if they are captured.[1] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2006/9/11/142704.shtml?s=us Sen. Frist: Trials for Gitmo Terror Suspects]

See also


 
 

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