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Encyclopedia > Military Police Corps (Israel)
Military Police soldiers

The military police of the Israel Defense Forces (Hebrew: חיל המשטרה הצבאית, Heil HaMishtara HaTzvayit) is the Israeli military police. The military police serves the Human Resources Directorate in the IDF, although it falls under a different command during an emergency situation (such as war). The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Gendarmerie be merged into this article or section. ... The Israeli Human Resources Directorate is the Israel Defense Forces body that coordinates and assembles activities related to the control over human resources and its placement. ...


The military police has attracted a negative image over the years due to it being responsible for putting many Israeli soldiers in jail for various misconducts, but this image is thought to be recovering, especially as of 2004 when the police started to check Palestinians at checkpoints (a position most Israelis consider vital for the state's security).


The military police is also known for having one of the strictest levels of discipline in the IDF. It is also one of the first corps to allow women to perform equal duties to men, and the first corps to have a combat-certified woman.


In the Israel Defense Forces, it is responsible for the following:

  • Enforcing the discipline and proper image of Israeli soldiers, especially new military laws that come into being
  • Guarding Israeli military prisons, both those with Israeli and Palestinian prisoners
  • Checking Palestinians for weapons and explosives, and sometimes their intentions at checkpoints
This responsibility was passed to the military police in 2004, before which it was taken up by other corps.

Contents

History

Israeli military police women stand in formation during an honor cordon ceremony for US Secretary of Defense, Robert Gates in Tel Aviv

The Israeli Military Police was founded in 1936, as a Jewish youth paramilitary organization called Notrim. It was legal under British Mandate law, unlike its many counterparts such as the Haganah. Its original purpose was to defend and police Jewish yishuv localities during the 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine. In 1937, the organization was given permission to expand, due to lack of British manpower allocated for defending Jewish villages in Palestine. The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Robert Michael Gates, Ph. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... The Notrim (Guards) were a Jewish Police Force set up by the British in the British Mandate of Palestine in 1936. ... Flag Britain unilaterally closed the territory east of the Jordan River (Transjordan) to Jewish settlement and organized Transjordan as an autonomous state in 1923. ... Haganah Poster (1940s) The Haganah (Hebrew: The Defense, ×”×”×’× ×”) was a Jewish paramilitary organization in what was then the British Mandate of Palestine from 1920 to 1948. ... Yishuv is a Hebrew word meaning settlement. ... The 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine was an uprising during the British mandate by Palestinian Arabs in Palestine which lasted from 1936 to 1939. ...


During World War II, HaNotrim became part of the Jewish Brigades, where it grew and became more known among the Palestinian Jewish public. Many new recruits joined the organization, where they went through a filtering process where it was decided what unit they were to be placed in. In 1944, an order was given by the Haganah to create its own military police, and the task was given to a captain in the Jewish Brigades named Daniel Lifshitz (later Danny Magen). Lifshitz trained recruits at a British training base near Cairo, Egypt. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Jewish Brigade recruitment poster: For Salvation and Vengeance! A recruitment drive poster for the Jewish Brigade: Soldiers of 1915-1918: to the flag! {Figure in background represents the Jewish Legion of World War I} The Jewish Brigade was a fighting unit in the British Army composed of volunteers from the... Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ...


During Israel's fight for independence between 1945 and 47, the Jewish leadership created the Military Police out of the organization, which became a small contingent of four units (Disciplinary Military Police, Traffic Supervision Military Police, Investigations Military Police, and the Prison Division), each proficient in its respective field. The first military police course took place during Israel's founding and the military police immediately joined the effort to fight the invading Arab forces. Military police troops participated in Operation Yoav, Operation Ovda, and others. Overall however, the military police concentrated on creating road signs and guiding troop movement. Operation Yoav (also called Operation Ten Plagues or Operation Yoav) was an Israeli military operation carried out between October 15 - 22, 1948 in the Negev Desert in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. ... Operation Ovda was an operation conducted by the Israel Defense Forces during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, from March 5 to March 10, 1949. ...


In 1949, the name of the military police was changed from Military Police Service (Sherut Mishtara Tzvayit) to Military Police Corps (Heil HaMishtara HaTzvayit) and a symbol was created for the new corps. The military police symbol consists of a shield and five flame tongues which, according to the creators, represent the five unbreakable truths of the military police:

  • Purity of the arm
  • Purity of arms
  • Purity of heart
  • Purity of action
  • Purity of the eye

Interestingly, the military police pin, or hamatzon, has only four flame tongues, likely due to the designers not knowing about the original meaning of the symbol. A sixth flame tongue is sometimes added to specific unit insignia, symbolizing the purity of scale.


A dog trainer unit was founded in the military police and used dogs to detect explosives and injured and dead bodies. Despite its many successes, it was disbanded in 1954 due to a lack of funding. Today, a similar unit is operated by the Israel Border Police. The Israel Border Police (Hebrew: משמר הגבול, Mishmar HaGvul) is the combat branch of the Israeli Police. ...


During the Suez Crisis of 1956, military police troops operated near the front lines, putting road signs in the Sinai Peninsula. For the first time, the issue of POWs was brought up and the military police built prisons in Nitzanim in the south, and Atlit in the north, to contain the 5500 or so prisoners or war captured during the Suez War. As a result, Israel's only military prison at the time, Prison Four, suffered neglection and it was decided to build another prison (Prison Six) near Atlit. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA 2... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 For other uses of the word Sinai, please see: Sinai (disambiguation). ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Atlit is a small sea side village in Israel near Haifa. ... Like any military prison, the Israeli version is a prison for guarding soldiers who committed crimes during their service. ...


In the Six-Day War, military policemen were placed in every major Israeli road intersection and guided military traffic. Some MPs were integrated into combat units and fought on the front lines. Notably, a military police contingent was tasked with guarding the conquered Gaza's commercial centers, which were plundered during the war. The prison service wing was responsible for guarding Egyptian prisoners of war captured in the Sinai Peninsula. Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Saudi Arabia Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ...


In the Yom Kippur War, the military police greatly assisted in the chaos of the surprise attack on Israel, guiding reserve reinforcements to their intended destinations. Certain military police units fought on the front lines. The investigations department of the military police was tasked with finding Israeli MIAs, numbering about 900 at the time. Combatants Israel Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Iraq Aided By Saudi Arabia Pakistan Cuba Uganda Libya, Commanders Moshe Dayan, David Elazar, Ariel Sharon, Shmuel Gonen, Benjamin Peled, Israel Tal, Rehavam Zeevi, Aharon Yariv, Yitzhak Hofi, Rafael Eitan, Abraham Adan, Yanush Ben Gal Saad El Shazly, Ahmad Ismail Ali, Hosni Mubarak, Mohammed Aly... MIA is a three-letter acronym that is most commonly used to designate a combatant who is Missing In Action, and has not yet returned or otherwise been accounted for as either dead (KIA) or a prisoner of war (POW). ...


The military police was involved in various ways in Operation Peace for Galilee. It was stationed at a base in Tyre (mainly with Israel Border Police troops), which was subject to two explosions. Many MPs were killed during both, which became known as the Type Catastrophe and the Type Catastrophe B. Combatants Israel South Lebanon Army LF (nominally neutral) PLO Syria Amal LCP Commanders Menachem Begin (Prime Minister) Ariel Sharon, (Ministry of Defence) Rafael Eitan, (CoS) Yasser Arafat Strength 76,000 37,000 Casualties 670 17,825 The 1982 Lebanon War (Hebrew: , Milkhemet Levanon), (Arabic: ), called by Israel the Operation Peace... The Israel Border Police (Hebrew: משמר הגבול, Mishmar HaGvul) is the combat branch of the Israeli Police. ...


In 2005, one of the elite military police units, Sahlav, was disbanded because its role was no longer needed in the military police, and because its troops refused to identify with the military police during Israel's unilateral disengagement from the Gaza Strip. The Sahlav Company still exists by name and guards checkpoints as part of the Taoz Battalion in the security examinations sector. Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all...


Training

In the Israeli Military Police, recruits must complete the Extended Rifleman 02 basic training, which is 6 weeks long, making it one of the easiest basic training programs in the IDF. It is however one of the most difficult types of basic training that is considered non-combat (See also: Tironut). Recruits must also pass a test in law enforcement (after 2-4 days worth of lessons) in order to finish basic training. Military police recruit training puts a special emphasis on discipline. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Tironut is the Hebrew name for the recruit training of the Israel Defense Forces. ...


All military police recruits are trained in a base called Bahad 13 (Bsis Hadrakha 13, lit. Training Base 13), which is part of the larger Area 21 (a.k.a. Camp Mota Gur), near Netanya. Bahad 13 was originally established in Tzrifin, from where it moved to a location near Nablus in 1969, shortly after the Six-Day War. It was relocated to Camp Mota Gur in 1995. Early morning in Netanya, Israel Netanya (Hebrew: נְתַנְיָה, Standard Hebrew Nətanya) is a city in the Center District of Israel and is the capital of the Sharon plain. ... Tzrifin is an area in Gush Dan (Dan Region) in central Israel, located on the eastern side of Rishon LeZion and bordered to the east by Beer Yaaqov. ... Map of the West Bank, with Nablus in the center north. ...


At the end of the training, recruits swear themselves in at the Western Wall in Jerusalem, which is considered extremely prestigious in the IDF. Those who finish basic training must take a course in order to be able to take up their respective positions, which usually takes place in Bahad 13 as well. Western Wall by night “Wailing Wall” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


After three of the courses, the soldier is given the rank of corporal (rabat), making military police one of the easiest corps to progress in (in terms of rank) as an enlisted soldier. Formerly, each recruit also took a 1-month course in law enforcement and received the rank of Private First Class (turai rishon) at the end, a rank which has been discontinued. US Military In the U.S. Army, Private First Class is the third lowest enlisted rank, just above Private and below Corporal or Specialist. ...


Sectors

The military police has a multitude of sectors (migzarim), which carry out the responsibilities highlighted above.


Law enforcement

A van for transferring prisoners (Hebrew slang: zinzana), used by the Yamlat's transfer company

The law enforcement (Shitur) sector is responsible for enforcing the discipline and proper image of soldiers, and road patrols to insure proper driving by the IDF soldiers. Road patrols may include the use of state of the art speed measurement equipment, or simply checking the driver's license and authorized use of military vehicles. Soldiers in this unit often wear a combination cap instead of the standard blue beret. Gen. ...


The law enforcement sector follows the principle of A Choice in Life, which says no to traffic accidents, narcotics, alcohol, suicide and improper use of weapons.


There is a special law enforcement unit called HaMahlaka LeItur UMa'atzar (abbreviated to לאו"ם, Le'om), meaning The Division for Identification and Arrest, which is responsible for catching deserters (generally, those AWOL for over 45 days). The unit is not officially separate and belongs to the regular law enforcement units, spread out across the various bases. The unit employs an intelligence system, while military detectives (balashim) operate in the field, by employing the gathered intelligence and posing as civilians in order to catch deserters.[1] For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ...


Another special unit is the Yamlat (Yehida Meyuhedet LeFikuah Ta'avura - Special Unit for Traffic Supervision), founded in 1980, which is the main law enforcement unit. It has a company responsible for transferring prisoners between jails and detention centers.


Prison service

See also: Israeli military prison

The prison service (Kli'a) sectors guards Israeli military prisons. It is divided into two: the service responsible for guarding prisons and detention centers with Israeli prisoners, and the service responsible for guarding Ofer prison, containing Palestinian detainees. Each of the two sub-sectors has a unique training course. The actual jailors, or jail instructors, in this branch wear a green lace, as they are considered IDF commanders for all intents and purposes. Like any military prison, the Israeli version is a prison for guarding soldiers who committed crimes during their service. ...

  • Jail instructors (Madrikhei Kluim or Madakim) are responsible for instructing Israeli prisoners (soldiers who committed crimes or infractions), making sure they don't escape, and rehabilitating as many as possible.
  • Intelligence collectors (Rakazei Modi'in or Ramanim) are responsible for working with collaborators within jails to find out information about potential suicides, rebellions, etc. within the jails.

The prison service sector started out as the Prison Division (Hebrew: מחלקת בתי הסוהר, Mahleket Batei HaSohar) until it became a separate sector in 1974. It was originally responsible for maintaining the provisional military prison in Tel Aviv, until Prison Four was built. Various services were introduced into the sector with time, such as education in 1977 and gahelet in the 2000s, as programs for rehabilitation. Additionally, the Prison Six revolt in 1997 revolutionized the IDF's approach to military prisons, and many new measures were introduced, in order to improve the conditions of prisoners and jailors alike, as well as make it harder for prisoners to escape and stage further revolts.


When the military police was responsible for jails containing Palestinian detainees (until 2006), there were two additional subsectors:

  • Palestinan detainees jailors (Metaplei Atzurei HaShetahim or M. Atzhashim) are mostly responsible for making sure that the prisoners do not escape.
  • Force 100 (Koah 100) is a combat unit responsible for suppressing uprisings by both Israeli and Palestinian prisoners. The unit consists of less than 100 soldiers and is used only in extreme cases of violence and prison rebellions.[1]

Investigation

The Criminal Investigations Division (Mishtara Tzvait Hokeret or Metzah) is a unit in the IDF responsible for all criminal investigations inside the IDF. The unit primarily deals with the use of drugs in the army, and theft of and dealing in army weapons. Other investigations include corruption, sexual harassment and assault, suicides, killings and abuse of civilian Palestinan population, and treason. The unit also deals with traffic accidents involving military vehicles.


The investigations division has a special secret unit called Yamlam (Yehida Merkazit LeHakirot Meyuhadot, lit. Central Unit for Special Investigations), founded in 1983, which conducts high profile investigations. Some are done together with the Israel Police and the Shabak. Israeli Police logo The Israel Police (משטרת ישראל Mishteret Yisrael) is a civilian force in the State of Israel. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not include all significant viewpoints. ...


The investigations division was originally made up of poorly trained soldiers who relied solely on military law, which was not always realistic and up to date. They operated mainly in Tel Aviv and dealt with theft and smuggling charges. The military police command saw the importance of the investigations division and decided that only high school or higher graduates (at that time, most soldiers had not finished 12 years of high school) should be taken into the division, and their training was conducted by the much more professional Israel Police. Slowly, the investigations division became a professional sector and is now considered one of the most prestigious sectors in the Israeli Military Police. Israeli Police logo The Israel Police (משטרת ישראל Mishteret Yisrael) is a civilian force in the State of Israel. ...


Security Examination

Security examinators (Me'avhenim Bithoni'im or Ma'ab, a.k.a. Ma'avarim) is a sector founded in 2004, although the decision was its founding was laid down on January 13, 2003. Its soldiers check Palestinians at Israel Defense Forces checkpoints. It is currently expanding rapidly, with a new training base being built especially for it. It is considered a combat support unit with medium risk. It is considered a low-level unit within the corps, but is much more respected by other corps. January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An Israel Defense Forces checkpoint, usually called an Israeli checkpoint (Hebrew: מחסום, machsom), is a barrier put forth by the Israel Defense Forces to enhance the security of Israel and prevent those who wish to harm it from entering the country. ... In the United States Army, Combat Support is a military term which refers to units which provide fire support and operational assistance to combat elements. ...


The first security examination course at Bahad 13 took place in November 2003. The course lasts four weeks plus a week of basic Arabic lessons.


The sector is divided into two battalions - Erez, which mostly monitors checkpoints around Jerusalem, and Ta'oz, which belongs to the Central Command. The Erez battalion lists three companies; Pluga Alef, Pluga Bet and Pluga Gimel. The Ta'oz battalion lists five companies: Eyal, Gilbo'a, Maccabim, Reihan, Sahlav and Shomron.


The headquarters of ma'avarim, which were built in April 2004, are located at Camp Mota Gur, near Bahad 13.


The ma'avarim shoulder insignia was unveiled in a ceremony in July 2004. The two hands on it symbolize the striving for co-existence between the two sides. The eye represents the constant watch for those who wish to harm this co-existence.


Insignia

The military police pin, called Chamatzon or Hamatzon

The Israeli Military Police wears a blue beret and its symbol is a flame. On the beret, the flame is surrounded with the a banner-like curve, which says Heil HaMishtara HaTzvayit (military police force). This curve is also present on most military police shoulder symbols. The military police pin image consists of blue bricks and the letters Mem and Tzadik (Mishtara Tzvayit, i.e. Military Police). Image File history File links Hamatzon. ...


The shoulder insignia varies based on the soldier's position, although it is always on a blue and red background (See Shoulder insignia below).


The ceremonial dress of the Israeli Military Police is a regular uniform, with a white police hat, a brassard with the letters Mem and Tzadik on the left arm, and a white belt.


This dress is also worn on duty, mostly by MPs preforming discipline patrols in public places (train and bus stations, entrances to large bases, etc.), or by MPs in jails.


Most military policemen also wear a blue and red aiguillette, although some wear a green aiguillette (indicates a commander). The aiguillette is worn over the left shoulder, and attached to the left shirt pocket. An aiguillette is an ornamental braided cord worn on uniforms. ...


Training

The shoulder insignia of the Israeli Military Police headquarters

Recruits in the military police, as all IDF recruits, wear shoulder tags to indicate their platoon. There are two companies in each round of recruits - a male company (Pashatz - Plugat Shotrim Tzvai'im) and a female company (Plugat Shotrot). The males wear single-colored bands (orange, red, yellow, green, black or blue), while the females wear dual-colored bands (e.g. red and white, blue and green). Image File history File linksMetadata Military_police. ...


The male company's symbol is a dragon, while that of the female company is a lioness' head. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) Distribution of Lions in Africa Synonyms Felis leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the genus Panthera. ...


As of February 2006, the male and female recruits form just one company, although each platoon has recruits of only one sex; commanders however are of both sexes.


During professional training (course), soldiers wear dual-colored bands, depending on the course.


Shoulder insignia

Most units or major bases in the military police have their own shoulder insignia:

  • Bahad 13 - a book with a sword and flame. This is worn by the personnel at the Bahad 13 base as well as all soldiers who take a professional course at Bahad 13.
  • Me'avhenim Bithoni'im - an eye with two hands and a flame. This is worn by all personnel in the Me'avhenim Bithoni'im, a unit which checks Palestinians at Israeli checkpoints.
Me'avhenim Bithoni'im shoulder insignia (central command).
  • Kli'a - the hamatzon's brick background with a book and a flame. Worn by all personnel in military jails.
  • Investigations (Metzah) - an eye with weighing scales, a magnifying glass and a key. Worn by all policemen in the investigations department.
  • Mekamtzar - a regular flame on a red and blue background. Worn by all personnel working in the Mekamtzar (military police command headquarters). Also worn by Yamlat soldiers.
  • Northern command - the symbol of the northern command (a deer) on a red and blue background. Worn by military policemen (law enforcers) in the northern command.
  • Central command - the symbol of the central command (a lion) on a red and blue background. Worn by military policemen (law enforcers) in the central command.
  • Southern command - the symbol of the southern command (a fox) on a red and blue background. Worn by military policemen (law enforcers) in the southern command.

Image File history File links Maavarim. ... Image File history File links Maavarim. ...

Equipment

Vehicles

Patrol cars

Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor of the United States Federal Protective Service. ... Renault Mégane pre-1999 Renault Mégane Convertible (with 1999-2002 front grille) Renault Mégane CC The Renault Mégane is a small family car produced by the French automaker Renault since 1995. ... The Ford E-Series, formerly named and also known as the Econoline or Club Wagon, is a line of full-size vans (both cargo and passenger) and truck chassis from the Ford Motor Company. ...

Prisoner conveyance

Navistar International Corporation (Pink Sheets: NAVZ) is the parent company of International Truck and Engine Corporation. ...

Former vehicles

The Renault 5 was a supermini produced by the French manufacturer Renault in two generations between 1972 and 1996. ... The Peugeot 205 is a supermini produced by the French Car manufacturer Peugeot between 1983 and 1996. ... Daihatsu Applause promotional brochure, highliting its unusual liftback body The Daihatsu Applause was a compact car manufactured by the Japanese automaker Daihatsu from 1989 to 2000. ... The Ford Transit is a range of panel vans, minibuses and pickup trucks, produced by the Ford Motor Company in Europe. ...

Bases

Each sector of the military police (i.e. law enforcement, investigations, etc.) has a number of bases throughout the country. The name of the base is followed by the larger base in which it is located (if any) in parentheses.

Tel HaShomer is an area in Gush Dan (Dan Region) in Israel. ...

Training

Kfar Yona (Hebrew: כפר יונה) is a town (local council) in the Sharon Subdistrict in the Center District of Israel. ...

Law enforcement

General Staff

  • Military Police General Staff (128) (Camp Rabin), Tel Aviv

Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ...

Northern command

  • Northern Command (390) headquarters (Camp Jalame), Haifa
  • Military Police Golan Heights (Camp Filon), Golan Heights
  • Military Police Amakim (Camp Shimshon)
  • Military Police Haifa (Camp Jalame), Haifa

This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The Golan Heights (Hebrew: Ramat HaGolan, Arabic: Habat al-ūlān) or Golan is a plateau on the border of Israel, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria. ...

Central command

  • Central Command (391) headquarters (Camp Anatot), Jerusalem
  • Central Command (391) unit commander's office (Camp Yadin), Tzrifin
  • Military Police Dan (Camp Yaakov Dori), Tel HaShomer
  • Military Police HaSharon (Camp Mota Gur), near Kfar Yona
  • Military Police Jerusalem (Camp Anatot), Jerusalem
  • Military Police Yoav (Camp Bar Lev), near Kiryat Mal'akhi

For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Tzrifin is an area in Gush Dan (Dan Region) in central Israel, located on the eastern side of Rishon LeZion and bordered to the east by Beer Yaaqov. ... Tel HaShomer is an area in Gush Dan (Dan Region) in Israel. ... Tel HaShomer is an area in Gush Dan (Dan Region) in Israel. ... Kiryat Malakhi (Hebrew: קִרְיַת מַלְאָכִי, also transliterated Kiryat Malachi or Qiryat Malakhi) is a city in the Southern District in Israel. ...

Southern command

Hebrew   (Standard) Bəʼer ŠévaÊ» Arabic بِئْرْ اَلْسَبْعْ ( ) Name Meaning Well of the Oath(see also) Government City Also Spelled Beer Sheva (officially) District South Population 185,500 (Metro 531,000) (2005) Jurisdiction 54,000 dunams (54 km²) Mayor Yaacov Turner Beersheba (Hebrew romanization Beer Sheva), the largest city in the... Hebrew אילת Founded in 1951 Government City (from 1959) District South Population 45,800 (2006) Jurisdiction 80,000 dunams (80 km²) Mayor Meir Yitzhak Halevi North Beach, Eilat, from southwest. ... The Israeli Home Front Command is a relatively recent Israel Defense Forces regional command, created in February 1992 following the Gulf War, which was the first war since the 1948 Arab-Israeli War where the Home Front faced a significant threat. ... Ofaqim (אופקים; unofficially also spelled Ofakim) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ...

Yamlat

  • Yamlat Tzrifin (Camp Yadin), Tzrifin

Investigations (Metzah)

Northern Command

Biranit is an agricultural settlement in the country of Israel. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The Golan Heights (Hebrew: Ramat HaGolan, Arabic: Habat al-ūlān) or Golan is a plateau on the border of Israel, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria. ...

Central Command

  • Metzah Center (Camp Yadin), Tzrifin
  • Metzah Dan (Camp Yadin), Tzrifin
  • Central Unit (Hebrew: ימ"ר מרכז, Yamar Merkaz)
  • Metzah Jerusalem (Camp Anatot), Jerusalem
  • Metzah Sharon VeShomron, Kfar Yona
  • Metzah Yoav (Camp Yoav), Qiryat Mal'akhi

Tzrifin is an area in Gush Dan (Dan Region) in central Israel, located on the eastern side of Rishon LeZion and bordered to the east by Beer Yaaqov. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Kfar Yona (Hebrew: כפר יונה) is a town (local council) in the Sharon Subdistrict in the Center District of Israel. ... Qiryat Malakhi (קִרְיַת מַלְאָכִי ; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Malachi) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ...

Southern Command

  • Metzah Arava, Arava
  • Metzah Be'er Sheva (Camp Nathan), Be'er Sheva
  • Metzah South, Be'er Sheva
  • Metzah Urim, near Ofaqim

Cloudbreak over Wadi Araba, Jordan. ... Hebrew   (Standard) Bəʼer ŠévaÊ» Arabic بِئْرْ اَلْسَبْعْ ( ) Name Meaning Well of the Oath(see also) Government City Also Spelled Beer Sheva (officially) District South Population 185,500 (Metro 531,000) (2005) Jurisdiction 54,000 dunams (54 km²) Mayor Yaacov Turner Beersheba (Hebrew romanization Beer Sheva), the largest city in the... Ofaqim (אופקים; unofficially also spelled Ofakim) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ...

Central Unit for Special Investigations

  • Yamlam

Prison service

  • Prison Four - Detention Base 394 (Camp Yadin), Tzrifin
  • Prison Six - Detention Base 396, Atlit

Atlit is a small sea side village in Israel near Haifa. ...

Leadership

The Israeli Military Police is headed by the Kamtzar (Ktzin Mishtara Tzvayit Rashi), lit. Chief Military Police Officer. The Kamtzar and most of the other military police leadership operate in the Mekamtzar (Chief Military Police Officer Headquarters).


The Chief Military Police Officer position was established in 1950 and a rank of colonel designated to it. The first official holder of the position was Yosef Pressman. In 1974, the rank of Brigadier General was designated to the position, and then Chief MP Officer Colonel Zalman Verdi was promoted to this rank. A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ...


List of Chief Military Police Officers

  • Lieutenant-Colonel Danny Magen (1948-50)
  • Colonel Yosef Pressman (1950-51)
  • Colonel Baruch Yitzhar (1951-54)
  • Colonel Tzvi-Shimon Shfir (1954-60)
  • Colonel Raphael Verdi (1960-62) - later Major-General
  • Colonel Israel Karmi (1962-71)
  • Brigadier General Zalman Verdi (1971-76)
  • Brigadier General Benjamin Inbar (1976-1977)
  • Brigadier General Baruch Arabel (1977-80)
  • Brigadier General Chaim Granit (1980-82)
  • Brigadier General Meir Geva (1982-85)
  • Brigadier General Amir Elimelekh (1985-89)
  • Brigadier General Shalom Ben Moshe (1989-91)
  • Brigadier General Mordechai Birn (November 22, 1991 - March 16, 1995)
  • Brigadier General Nir-Am Goldbroom (March 16, 1995 - July 30, 1998)
  • Brigadier General Yoram Tzachor (1998-2002)
  • Brigadier General Miki Bar'el (2002-05)
  • Brigadier General Ronny Benny (2005-)

... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... July 30 is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

References

  1. ^ Law enforcement in the military police (Hebrew). Retrieved on 2007-05-26.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • The Military Police by Zvi Harel

External links

  • Military police website (Hebrew)
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