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Encyclopedia > Miles Davis
Miles Davis

Background information
Birth name Miles Dewey Davis III
Born May 26, 1926(1926-05-26)
Alton, Illinois, USA
Died September 28, 1991 (aged 65)
Santa Monica, California, USA
Genre(s) Bebop, cool jazz, modal jazz, hard bop, third stream, jazz-funk, jazz fusion
Occupation(s) Bandleader, composer, trumpeter
Instrument(s) Trumpet, flugelhorn, keyboard
Years active 1944–1991
Associated
acts
Miles Davis Quintet
Website www.milesdavis.com

Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. A trumpeter, bandleader and composer, Davis was at the forefront of almost every major development in jazz from World War II to the 1990s. He played on various early bebop records and recorded one of the first cool jazz records. He was partially responsible for the development of modal jazz, and jazz fusion arose from his work with other musicians in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Image File history File links Milesdavis3. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historic Alton Home Alton is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles north of St. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica is a coastal city located in Los Angeles County, California USA, by the Pacific Ocean, south of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, west of Westwood, Los Angeles, and north of Venice. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... CD reissue of Daviss 1957 LP Birth of the Cool, collecting much of his 1949 to 1950 work. ... Modal jazz is jazz played using musical modes rather than chord progressions. ... Hard bop is an extension of bebop (bop) music which incorporates influences from rhythm and blues, gospel music, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing. ... Third Stream music is a term coined in 1957 by Gunther Schuller to describe a musical genre which is a synthesis of classical music and jazz. ... Jazz-funk is a sub-genre of jazz music characterized by a strong back beat, electrified sounds. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... A standard 3-valved Bb flugelhorn. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... The Miles Davis Quintet was a bebop-oriented jazz quintet formed in 1955 by bandleader and trumpet player Miles Davis. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... CD reissue of Daviss 1957 LP Birth of the Cool, collecting much of his 1949 to 1950 work. ... Modal jazz is jazz played using musical modes rather than chord progressions. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ...


Davis belongs to the great tradition of jazz trumpeters from the Southern United States that started with Buddy Bolden and ran through Joe "King" Oliver, Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge and Dizzy Gillespie. His greatest achievement as a musician, however, was to move beyond being regarded as a distinctive and influential stylist on his own instrument and to shape whole styles and ways of making music through the work of his bands, in which many of the most important jazz musicians of the second half of the Twentieth Century made their names. Charles Buddy Bolden (September 6, 1877–November 4, 1931) was a cornetist and the first New Orleans jazz musician to come to prominence and also credited as the founder of jazz. ... Joe King Oliver, (December 19, 1885 – April 10, 1938) was a bandleader and jazz cornet player. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Roy David Eldridge (January 30, 1911 – February 6, 1989) was a jazz trumpet player in the Swing era. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ...


Davis was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 13, 2006. He has also been inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame, and the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The St. ... The Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame is a non-profit organization founded in 1977 to promote greater awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of big band and jazz music.[1] The organization has inducted more than 200 individuals into its Hall of Fame, maintains an extensive biographical database, and aspires...

Contents

Biography

Early life (1926 to 1944)

Miles Dewey Davis was born to a relatively affluent family in Alton, Illinois. His father, Miles Henry Davis, was a dentist, and in 1927 the family moved to East St. Louis. They also owned a substantial ranch, and Davis learned to ride horses as a boy. One of his horses was named Angelo Minny. Historic Alton Home Alton is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles north of St. ... Miles Henry Davis (March 1, 1900—19?) was a prominent dentist and father of jazz legend Miles Davis. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... East St. ...


Davis' mother, Cleota Henry, wanted her son to learn the piano — she was a capable blues pianist, but kept this hidden from her son. Miles' musical studies began at 13, when his father gave him a new trumpet and arranged lessons with local trumpeter Elwood Buchanan. Davis later suggested that his father's instrument choice was made largely to irk his wife, who disliked the sound that the trumpet produced. Against the fashion of the time, Buchanan stressed the importance of playing without vibrato, and Davis would carry his clear signature tone throughout his career. Buchanan was credited with slapping Davis' knuckles with a ruler every time that he started using heavy vibrato.[citation needed] Davis once remarked on the importance of this signature sound, saying, “I prefer a round sound with no attitude in it, like a round voice with not too much tremolo and not too much bass. Just right in the middle. If I can’t get that sound I can’t play anything.” [1] A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Mentor to Miles Davis, Elwood Buchanan went against the times by recommending to his students that they play without vibrato. ... Vibrato is a musical effect where the pitch or frequency of a note or sound is quickly and repeatedly raised and lowered over a small distance for the duration of that note or sound. ... Tremolo is a musical term with two meanings: A rapid repetition of the same note, a rapid variation in the amplitude of a single note, or an alternation between two or more notes. ... In popular music a bassline, also bass line, is an instrumental part, or line, which is in the bass or lowest range and thus lower than the other parts and part of the rhythm section. ...


Clark Terry was another important early influence and friend of Davis'. By the age of 16, Davis was a member of the musician's union and working professionally when not at school. At 17, he spent a year playing in bandleader Eddie Randle's "Blue Devils". During this time, Sonny Stitt tried to persuade him to join the Tiny Bradshaw band then passing through town, but Davis' mother insisted that he finish his final year of high school. Clark Terry performs with the Great Lakes Navy Band Jazz Ensemble Clark Terry (born December 14, 1920 in St. ... Sonny Stitt, a quintessential bop saxophonist. ... Myron (Tiny) Bradshaw (1905 – 1958) was an American jazz and rhythm and blues bandleader, singer, composer, pianist, and drummer from Youngstown, Ohio. ...


In 1944, the Billy Eckstine band visited St. Louis. Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker were members of the band, and Davis was taken on as third trumpet for a couple of weeks because of the illness of Buddy Anderson. When Eckstine's band left Davis behind to complete the tour, the trumpeter's parents were still keen for him to continue formal academic studies. Billy Eckstine (8 July 1914 – 8 March 1993), born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as William Clarence Eckstein. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ...


Bebop and the Birth of the Cool (1944 to 1955)

RVG series CD reissue of Davis's 1957 LP Birth of the Cool, collecting much of his 1949 to 1950 work.
RVG series CD reissue of Davis's 1957 LP Birth of the Cool, collecting much of his 1949 to 1950 work.

In 1944, Davis moved to New York City, ostensibly to take up a scholarship at the Juilliard School of Music, but he neglected his studies and sought out Charlie Parker instead. His first recordings were made in 1945 with blues singer Rubberlegg Williams and tenor saxophonist Herbie Fields, and in the autumn he became a member of Parker's unofficial quintet, appearing on many of Parker's seminal bebop recordings for the Savoy and Dial labels. Davis' style on trumpet was already distinctive by this point, but as a soloist he lacked the confidence and virtuosity of his mentors, and was known to play throttled notes, and to sometimes stumble during his solos. Image File history File links Birth_of_the_Cool. ... Image File history File links Birth_of_the_Cool. ... Rudy Van Gelder (born November 2, 1924 in Jersey City, New Jersey) is a recording engineer specialising in jazz. ... Birth of the Cool is an album which collects the twelve sides recorded by the Miles Davis nonet (featuring Gerry Mulligan, Lee Konitz and others) for Capitol Records in 1949 and 1950. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... Herbie Fields (born May 24, 1919 in Asbury Park, New Jersey (or possibly -Elizabeth). ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... Savoy Records the name of two record labels, one in the United States of America, and the other in the United Kingdom. ... Dial Records has been the name of more than one record company. ...


By 1948, he had served his apprenticeship as a sideman, both on stage and record, and was beginning to blossom as a solo artist. Davis began to work with a nonet that featured then-unusual instrumentation such as the French horn and tuba. The nonet featured a young Gerry Mulligan and Lee Konitz. After some gigs at New York's Royal Roost, Davis was signed by Capitol Records. The nonet released several singles in 1949 and 1950, featuring arrangements by Gil Evans, Gerry Mulligan and John Lewis. This began his collaboration with Evans, with whom he would collaborate on many of his major works over the next 20 years. The sides saw only limited release until 1957, when 11 of the 12 were released as the album Birth of the Cool (more recent issues collect all 12 sides). In 1949, he visited Europe for the first time and performed at that year's Paris Jazz Festival in May. In music, a nonet is a composition which requires nine musicians for a performance, or a musical group that consists of nine people. ... For other uses, see Horn. ... For other uses, see Tuba (disambiguation). ... Gerald Joseph Gerry Mulligan (April 6, 1927 – January 20, 1996) was an American jazz musician, composer and arranger best known for his baritone saxophone playing. ... Lee Konitz (born 1927 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American jazz composer and saxophone player. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Gil Evans (13 May 1912 in Toronto Canada – 20 March 1988 in Cuernavaca, Mexico) was a jazz pianist, arranger, composer, and bandleader, active in the United States. ... Gerald Joseph Gerry Mulligan (April 6, 1927 – January 20, 1996) was an American jazz musician, composer and arranger best known for his baritone saxophone playing. ... John Aaron Lewis (3 May 1920 – 29 March 2001) was an American jazz pianist and composer best known as the musical director of the Modern Jazz Quartet. ... Birth of the Cool is an album which collects the twelve sides recorded by the Miles Davis nonet (featuring Gerry Mulligan, Lee Konitz and others) for Capitol Records in 1949 and 1950. ...


Between 1950 and 1955, Davis mainly recorded as a leader for Prestige and Blue Note records in a variety of small group settings. Sidemen included Sonny Rollins, John Lewis, Kenny Clarke, Jackie McLean, Art Blakey, Horace Silver, Thelonious Monk, J. J. Johnson, Percy Heath, Milt Jackson and Charles Mingus. Davis was influenced at around this time by pianist Ahmad Jamal, whose sparse style contrasted with the "busy" sound of bebop. Prestige Records was a record label founded in 1949 by Bob Weinstock (October 2, 1928–January 14, 2006). ... In jazz and blues notes added to the major scale for expressive quality, loosely defined by musicians to be an alteration to a scale or chord that makes it sound like the blues. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... John Aaron Lewis (3 May 1920 – 29 March 2001) was an American jazz pianist and composer best known as the musical director of the Modern Jazz Quartet. ... Kenny Clarke (born January 9, 1914 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania-died January 26, 1985 in Paris, France) was a jazz drummer and an early innovator of the bebop style of drumming. ... John Lenwood (Jackie) McLean (born May 17, 1932) is an American jazz alto saxophonist and educator, born in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver, born on September 2, 1928 in Norwalk, Connecticut) is a famous jazz pianist and composer born to a Cape Verdean father (of mixed Portuguese-black descent) and a mother of Irish and African descent. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... J. J. Johnson, in about the mid-1960s J. J. Johnson (born James Louis Johnson) in Indianapolis, Indiana, (January 22, 1924 - elements of both classical and jazz music. ... Percy Heath, (April 30, 1923 – April 28, 2005), was a jazz musician, most famous for his 40+ years as the double bass player for the Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ). ... Milton (Milt) Jackson (January 1, 1923 – October 9, 1999) was an American jazz vibraphonist and one of the most important figures in the hard bop style. ... Charles Mingus (April 22, 1922 – January 5, 1979) was an American jazz bassist, composer, bandleader, and occasional pianist. ... Ahmad Jamal in 1994 Ahmad Jamal (born Frederick Russell Jones on July 2, 1930)[1] is a highly-regarded American jazz pianist. ...


Playing in the jazz clubs of New York, Davis was in frequent contact with people who used and sold drugs. By 1950, like many of his contemporaries, he had developed a heroin addiction. In the winter of 1953-1954, he returned to East St. Louis and locked himself in a guest room in his father's farm for seven days until the drug was fully out of his system. For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see addicted. ...


After overcoming his heroin addiction, Davis made a series of important recordings for Prestige in 1954, later collected on albums including Bags' Groove, Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants and Walkin'. At this time, he started to use the Harmon mute to darken and subdue the timbre of his trumpet. This muted trumpet tone was to be associated with Davis for the rest of his career. Bags Groove is an album recorded in 1954 by Miles Davis, for Prestige Records. ... Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants is an album recorded by Miles Davis, for Prestige Records. ... Walkin is an album recorded on 3 April and 29 April 1954 by a group led by Miles Davis, for Prestige Records. ... see also Guitar Mute A mute is a device which alters the timbre and/or reduces the volume of a musical instrument. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ...


In July 1955, he played a legendary solo on Thelonius Monk's "'Round Midnight" at the Newport Jazz Festival. This performance thrust Davis back into the jazz spotlight, leading to George Avakian signing Davis to Columbia and the formation of his first quintet. Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917–February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer known for his unique improvisational style and many contributions to the standard jazz repertoire. ... Round Midnight is a 1944 song by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... The Newport Jazz Festival is a music festival held every August in Newport, Rhode Island. ... George Avakian (born Armavir, Russia, March 15, 1919) is an Armenian-American record producer and executive known particularly for his work with Columbia Records, and his production of albums by Miles Davis and other notable jazz musicians. ...


First Great Quintet and Sextet (1955 to 1958)

Main article: Miles Davis Quintet

In 1955, Davis formed the first incarnation of the Miles Davis Quintet. This band featured John Coltrane (tenor saxophone), Red Garland (piano), Paul Chambers (double bass) and Philly Joe Jones (drums). Eschewing the rhythmic and harmonic complexity of the then-prevalent bebop, Davis was allowed the space to play long, legato, and essentially melodic lines in which he would begin to explore modal music. The Miles Davis Quintet was a bebop-oriented jazz quintet formed in 1955 by bandleader and trumpet player Miles Davis. ... “Coltrane” redirects here. ... The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... William Red Garland (1923–1984) was an American jazz pianist whose complex block-chord style influenced many forthcoming pianists in the jazz idiom. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Paul Laurence Dunbar Chambers, Jr. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... Joseph Rudolph (Philly Joe) Jones (July 15, 1923 – August 30, 1985) was an American jazz drummer. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... In musical notation legato indicates that musical notes are played smoothly. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about modes as used in music. ...

Davis's 1958 album Milestones.
Davis's 1958 album Milestones.

The first recordings of this group were made for Columbia Records in 1955, released on 'Round About Midnight. Davis was still under contract to Prestige, but had an agreement that he could make recordings for subsequent releases using his new label. His final recordings for Prestige were the product of two days of recording in 1956, released as Relaxin' with the Miles Davis Quintet, Steamin' with the Miles Davis Quintet, Workin' with the Miles Davis Quintet and Cookin' with the Miles Davis Quintet. Image File history File links Milestonescover. ... Image File history File links Milestonescover. ... Milestones is an album recorded in February and March 1958 by Miles Davis. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... -1... Relaxin with the Miles Davis Quintet is an album recorded in 1956 by Miles Davis. ... Steamin with the Miles Davis Quintet is an album recorded in 1956 by Miles Davis. ... Workin with the Miles Davis Quintet is an album recorded in 1956 by Miles Davis. ... Cookin with the Miles Davis Quintet is an album recorded in 1956 by Miles Davis. ...


The quintet was never stable, however; several of the other members used heroin, and the Miles Davis Quintet disbanded in early 1957.


That year, Davis traveled to France to compose the score to Louis Malle's Ascenseur pour l'Échafaud. He recorded the entire soundtrack with the aid of French session musicians Barney Wilen, Pierre Michelot and René Urtreger, and American drummer Kenny Clarke. Louis Malle (October 30, 1932 – November 23, 1995) was an Academy Award nominated French film director, working in both French and English. ... Ascenseur pour lÉchafaud is an album by jazz musician Miles Davis. ... Barney Wilen (born March 4, 1937 in Nice; died May 25, 1996 in Paris) was a jazz saxophonist from France who played tenor saxophone. ... Pierre Michelot (March 3, 1928-July 2, 2005) was a French jazz bass player. ... René Urtreger began his studies of piano at the age of four and in its adolescence deepened them in the Conservatory of Classical Music and was oriented toward the jazz acting in a small Parisian club, the Sullyt d Auteil with an orchestra of students directed by Hubert Damisch, and... Kenny Clarke (born January 9, 1914 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania-died January 26, 1985 in Paris, France) was a jazz drummer and an early innovator of the bebop style of drumming. ...


In 1958, the quintet reformed as a sextet, with the addition of Julian "Cannonball" Adderley on alto saxophone, and recorded Milestones. Cannonball Adderley, 1960 Julian Edwin Cannonball Adderley (September 15, 1928 - August 8, 1975), originally from Tampa, Florida, was a jazz alto saxophonist of the small combo era of the 1950s and 1960s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Milestones is an album recorded in February and March 1958 by Miles Davis. ...


Recordings with Gil Evans (1957 to 1963)

Davis's 1960 album Sketches of Spain.
Davis's 1960 album Sketches of Spain.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Davis recorded a series of albums with Gil Evans, often playing flugelhorn as well as trumpet. The first, Miles Ahead (1957), showcased his playing with a jazz big band and a horn section beautifully arranged by Evans. Tunes included Dave Brubeck's "The Duke", as well as Léo Delibes' "The Maids Of Cadiz", the first piece of European classical music Davis had recorded. Another important feature of the album was the innovative use of editing to join the tracks together, turning each side of the album into a seamless piece of music. Image File history File links Sketches_of_Spain_-_Miles_Davis. ... Image File history File links Sketches_of_Spain_-_Miles_Davis. ... Sketches of Spain was a 1960 album by Miles Davis, pairing him again with arranger and composer Gil Evans. ... Gil Evans (13 May 1912 in Toronto Canada – 20 March 1988 in Cuernavaca, Mexico) was a jazz pianist, arranger, composer, and bandleader, active in the United States. ... A standard 3-valved Bb flugelhorn. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... Miles Ahead is a cool jazz album by Miles Davis released in May of 1957. ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from the early 1930s until the late 1940s, although there are many big-bands around nowadays. ... David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... Maestro Clément Philibert Léo Delibes, Paris, circa 1885 (Clément Philibert) Léo Delibes (February 21, 1836 – January 16, 1891) was a French composer of Romantic music. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ...


In 1958, Davis and Evans recorded Porgy and Bess, an arrangement of pieces from George Gershwin's opera of the same name. Davis named the album one of his own favorites. Porgy and Bess is a 1958 album by jazz musician Miles Davis which he and Gil Evans arranged from George Gershwins opera Porgy and Bess. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ...


Sketches of Spain (1959-1960) featured tunes by contemporary Spanish composer Joaquin Rodrigo and also Manuel de Falla, as well as Gil Evans originals with a Spanish theme. Miles Davis at Carnegie Hall (1961) includes Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez, along with other songs recorded at a concert with an orchestra under Evans' direction. Sketches of Spain was a 1960 album by Miles Davis, pairing him again with arranger and composer Gil Evans. ... Joaquín Rodrigo (22 November 1901 – 6 July 1999) was a Spanish composer, and virtuoso pianist, of classical music. ... Manuel de Falla y Matheu (November 23, 1876 – November 14, 1946) was a Spanish composer of classical music. ... The Concierto de Aranjuez is a composition for classical guitar and orchestra of the Spanish composer Joaquín Rodrigo. ...


Sessions in 1962 resulted in the album Quiet Nights, a short collection of bossa nova tunes which was released against the wishes of both artists. That was the last time that the two created a full album again. Davis once noted that ". . . my best friend is Gil Evans".[2] Album cover Quiet Nights is an album recorded in 1962 and 1963 by Miles Davis and Gil Evans. ... For other uses, see Bossa nova (disambiguation). ...


Kind of Blue (1959 to 1964)

Cover artwork for Davis' most famous album, Kind of Blue
Cover artwork for Davis' most famous album, Kind of Blue

After recording Milestones, Garland and Jones were replaced by Bill Evans and Jimmy Cobb. Evans departed late in 1958, replaced by Wynton Kelly. Miles Davis Kind of Blue album cover This is an album cover. ... Miles Davis Kind of Blue album cover This is an album cover. ... Kind of Blue is a jazz album by musician Miles Davis, released on August 17, 1959. ... William John Evans (better known as Bill Evans) (August 16, 1929 – September 15, 1980) was an American jazz pianist and one of the most famous of the 20th century; he remains one of the major influences on post-1950s jazz piano. ... Jimmy Cobb (born January 20, 1929 in Washington D.C.) is an American jazz drummer. ... Wynton Kelly (1931–1971) was an American jazz pianist, born in Jamaica. ...


In March and April 1959, Davis re-entered the studio with his working sextet and Bill Evans to record what is widely considered his magnum opus, Kind of Blue. The album was planned around Evans' piano style. It was also influenced by concepts that Evans had learned while working with George Russell on the earliest recordings of modal jazz and passed on to the sextet. Kelly only played on "Freddie Freeloader", and was not present at the April session. "So What" and "All Blues" had been played by the sextet at performances prior to the recording sessions, but for the other three compositions, Davis and Evans prepared skeletal harmonic frameworks which the other musicians saw for the first time on the day of recording, in order to generate an improvisational approach. The resulting album has proven to be a huge influence on other musicians. According to the RIAA, Kind of Blue is the best-selling jazz album of all time. Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ... Kind of Blue is a jazz album by musician Miles Davis, released on August 17, 1959. ... George Allen Russell (born June 23, 1923) is an American jazz composer and theorist. ... Modal jazz is jazz played using musical modes rather than chord progressions. ... So What is the first track on the 1959 Miles Davis album Kind of Blue. ... All Blues is a jazz composition by Miles Davis first appearing on the influential 1959 album Kind Of Blue. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... The RIAA Logo. ...


The same year, while taking a break outside the famous Birdland nightclub in New York City, Davis was beaten by the New York police and subsequently arrested. Believing the assault to have been racially motivated (it is said he was beaten by a single policeman who was angered by Davis being with a white woman), he attempted to pursue the case in the courts, before eventually dropping the proceedings. Birdland is a jazz club started in New York City in 1949. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) was created in 1845 and currently is the largest municipal police force in the world with primary responsibilities in law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ...


Davis convinced Coltrane to play with the group on one final European tour in the spring of 1960. Coltrane then departed to form his classic quartet, although he returned for some of the tracks on the 1961 album Someday My Prince Will Come. Davis tried various replacement saxophonists, including Sonny Stitt and Hank Mobley. The quintet with Hank Mobley was recorded in the studio and on several live engagements at Carnegie Hall and the Black Hawk jazz club in San Francisco. Stitt's playing with the group is found on both a recording made in Olympia, Paris (where Davis and Coltrane had played a few months before) and the Live in Stockholm album. Someday My Prince Will Come is an album recorded in March 1961 by Miles Davis. ... Sonny Stitt, a quintessential bop saxophonist. ... Henry (Hank) Mobley (July 7, 1930 – May 30, 1986) was an American hard bop and soul jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Black Hawk, circa 1961, as seen on the cover of Miles Davis In Person, Friday Night at the Black Hawk The Black Hawk was a legendary San Francisco nightclub hosting a spectacular range of jazz talents during its heyday in the 1950s and 1960s. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Olympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympía or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


In 1963, Davis' long-time rhythm section of Kelly, Chambers and Cobb departed. He quickly got to work putting together a new group, including tenor saxophonist George Coleman and bassist Ron Carter. Davis, Coleman, Carter, and a few other musicians recorded half an album in the spring of 1963. A few weeks later, drummer Tony Williams and pianist Herbie Hancock joined the group, and soon thereafter Davis, Coleman and the rhythm section recorded the rest of Seven Steps to Heaven. The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... George Coleman (born March 8, 1935 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American jazz saxophonist, known chiefly for his work with Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock in the 1960s. ... Ron Carter (born May 4, 1937, Ferndale, Michigan) is an American jazz bassist. ... Tony Williams (December 12, 1945 – February 23, 1997) was an African American jazz drummer. ... Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... Seven Steps to Heaven is an album recorded in 1963 by Miles Davis. ...


The rhythm section clicked very quickly with each other and the horns; the group's rapid evolution can be traced through the aforementioned studio album, In Europe (July 1963), My Funny Valentine, and Four and More (both February 1964). The group played essentially the same repertoire of bebop and standards that earlier Davis bands did, but tackled them with increasing structural and rhythmic freedom and (in the case of the up-tempo material) breakneck speed. My Funny Valentine is a 1964 live album by Miles Davis, featuring his second great quintet. It was recorded at a concert at the Lincoln Center, New York, on February 12, 1964. ...


Coleman left in the spring of 1964, to be replaced by avant-garde saxophonist Sam Rivers, on the suggestion of Tony Williams. Rivers remained in the group only briefly, but was recorded live with the quintet in Japan; the group can be heard on In Tokyo (July 1964). A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... For the bass guitarist named Sam Rivers, see Sam Rivers (bass guitarist) or Limp Bizkit. ...


By the end of the summer, Davis had convinced Wayne Shorter to quit Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. Shorter became the principal composer of Davis' quintet, and some of his compositions of this era ("Footprints", "Nefertiti") are now standards. While on tour in Europe, the group quickly made their first official recording, Miles in Berlin (Fall 1964). On return to the United States later that year, Davis (at the urging of Jackie DeShannon) was instrumental in getting The Byrds signed to Columbia Records. Wayne Shorter (born August 25, 1933) is an American jazz composer and saxophonist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Jackie DeShannon, real name Sharon Lee Myers, (born August 21, 1944) is an American singer/songwriter with a string of hit song credits from the 1960s onwards. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


Second Great Quintet (1964 to 1968)

By the time of E.S.P. (1965) Davis' lineup consisted of Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter (bass) and Tony Williams (drums). This lineup, the last of his acoustic bands, is often known as "the second great quintet." E.S.P. is an album recorded in January 1965 by the Miles Davis quintet. ... Wayne Shorter (born August 25, 1933) is an American jazz composer and saxophonist. ... Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... Ron Carter (born May 4, 1937, Ferndale, Michigan) is an American jazz bassist. ... Tony Williams (December 12, 1945 – February 23, 1997) was an African American jazz drummer. ...


A two-night Chicago gig in late 1965 is captured on The Complete Live at The Plugged Nickel 1965, released in 1995. Unlike the group's studio albums, the live engagement shows the group still playing primarily standards and bebop tunes. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... In late December 1965, recordings were made of two nights of performances by the Miles Davis quintet, at the Plugged Nickel club in Chicago. ...


This was followed by a series of studio recordings: Miles Smiles (1966), Sorcerer (1967), Nefertiti (1967), Miles in the Sky (1968) and Filles de Kilimanjaro (1968). The quintet's approach to improvisation came to be known as "time no changes" or "freebop", because they abandoned the chord-change-based approach of bebop for a modal approach. Through Nefertiti, the studio recordings consisted primarily of originals composed by Shorter, and to a lesser degree of compositions by the other sidemen. In 1967, the group began to play their live concerts in continuous sets, with each tune flowing into the next and only the melody indicating any sort of demarcation; Davis' bands would continue to perform in this way until his retirement in 1975. Album cover Miles Smiles is an album recorded in October 1966 by the Miles Davis quintet. ... Sorcerer is an album recorded in May 1967 by the Miles Davis quintet. ... Nefertiti is an album recorded in June and July 1967 by the Miles Davis quintet. ... Miles in the Sky is an album recorded in January and May 1968 by the Miles Davis quintet. ... Filles de Kilimanjaro (French: Girls of Kilimanjaro) is a jazz album by Miles Davis. ... A chord progression (also chord sequence and harmonic progression or sequence), as its name implies, is a series of chords played in order. ... Retirement is the point where a person stops employment completely. ...


Miles in the Sky and Filles de Kilimanjaro, on which electric bass, electric piano and guitar were tentatively introduced on some tracks, pointed the way to the subsequent fusion phase in Davis' output. Davis also began experimenting with more rock-oriented rhythms on these records. By the time the second half of Filles de Kilimanjaro had been recorded, Dave Holland and Chick Corea had replaced Carter and Hancock in the working band, though both Carter and Hancock would occasionally contribute to future recording sessions. Davis soon began to take over the compositional duties of his sidemen. A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... An electric piano (e-piano) is an electric musical instrument whose popularity started in the late 1960s, was at its greatest during the 1970s and still is big today. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Dave Holland (born October 1, 1946) is a jazz bassist and composer. ... Armando Anthony Chick Corea (born June 12, 1941) is a multiple Grammy Award winning American jazz pianist/keyboardist and composer. ...


1969 Miles: Festiva de Juan Pins is the earliest available live recording [1] of Davis' band's playing live sets in a continuous sets fashion. (However, it has only had a European and Japanese release.)


Electric Miles (1968 to 1975)

Davis' first jazz fusion album, In a Silent Way (1969).
Davis' first jazz fusion album, In a Silent Way (1969).

Davis' influences included late 1960s acid rock and funk artists such as Sly and the Family Stone, James Brown and Jimi Hendrix. This transition required that Davis and his band adapt to electric instruments in both live performances and the studio. Image File history File links Miles-davis-in-a-silent-way. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... In a Silent Way is a 1969 album by jazz trumpeter Miles Davis. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs; especially LSD.[1] by using lyrics that describe dreams and refer to drug use using bizarre sounds created by altering the instruments and vocals with electronic effects such as heavy distortion... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Sly & the Family Stone were an American rock band from San Francisco, California. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... An Electric Musical Instrument (which, in the broadest sense, includes both electrically amplified acoustic instruments and electronic musical instruments) is one in which a loudspeaker is used as the main sound generator. ...


By the time In a Silent Way had been recorded in February 1969, Davis had augmented his standard quintet with additional players. Hancock and Joe Zawinul were brought in to assist Corea on electric keyboards, and guitarist John McLaughlin made the first of his many appearances. By this point, Shorter was also doubling on soprano saxophone. After recording this album, Williams left to form his group Lifetime and was replaced by Jack DeJohnette. Joe Zawinul live with The Zawinul Syndicate (Freiburg/Germany, 2007) Josef Erich Zawinul (born July 7, 1932 in Vienna, Austria, died September 11, 2007 in Vienna) was a jazz keyboardist and composer. ... An electronic keyboard. ... John McLaughlin John McLaughlin (aka pinyon)(born January 4, 1942), also Mahavishnu John McLaughlin, is a jazz fusion guitar player from Doncaster, Yorkshire in England. ... The Tony Williams Lifetime was a jazz-rock fusion group led by jazz drummer Tony Williams. ... Jack DeJohnette (b. ...


A recently surfaced and ultra-rare improvisation entitled "Moonloop" has jazz enthusiasts stirring. It was recorded in late 1969 and subsequently lost for many years. It was rumored that Miles had considered the release of this improvisation, but the masters were unsuitable for reproduction. The Miles Davis "Moonloop", now in a collector's hands, will see release in the next few years as the tapes are remastered.


Six months later, an even larger group of musicians, including Jack DeJohnette, Airto Moreira and Bennie Maupin recorded the double LP Bitches Brew. These two records were among the first fusions of jazz and rock that were commercially successful, and built on the groundwork laid by Charles Lloyd, Larry Coryell, and many others who pioneered a genre that would become known simply as "Jazz-rock fusion". Jack DeJohnette (b. ... Airto Moreira (born August 5, 1941) is a Brazilian Jazz percussionist and musician. ... Bennie Maupin (born 8/29/1946) is a Detroit jazz multireedist. ... Bitches Brew is an album recorded by American jazz trumpeter Miles Davis in 1969. ... Jazz fusion (sometimes referred to simply as fusion) is a musical genre that loosely encompasses the merging of jazz with other styles, particularly rock, funk, R&B, and world music. ...


During this period, Davis toured with the "lost quintet" of Shorter, Corea, Holland and DeJohnette. The group's repertoire included material from Bitches Brew, In a Silent Way, the 1960s quintet albums, and an occasional standard.


In 1972, Davis was introduced to the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen by young arranger and cellist, and later Grammy award winner, Paul Buckmaster, leading to a period of new creative exploration for Davis. Biographer J.K.Chambers wrote that "The effect of Davis's study of Stockhausen could not be repressed for long. ... Davis's own 'space music,' shows Stockhausen's influence compositionally."[3] His recordings and performances during this period were described as "space music" by fans, by music critic Leonard Feather, and by Buckmaster who stated: "a lot of mood changes - heavy, dark, intense - definitely space music." [4] Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century. ... Paul Buckmaster is an artist, arranger, and composer. ... Leonard Geoffrey Feather (13 September 1914– 22 September 1994) was a British-born jazz pianist, composer, and producer who was best known for his music journalism and other writing. ...


Both Bitches Brew and In a Silent Way feature "extended" (more than 20 minutes each) compositions that were never actually "played straight through" by the musicians in the studio. Instead, Davis and producer Teo Macero selected musical motifs of various lengths from recorded extended improvisations and edited them together into a musical whole which only exists in the recorded version. Bitches Brew made use of such electronic effects as multi-tracking, tape loops and other editing techniques. Both records, especially Bitches Brew, proved to be huge sellers. Teo Macero (Born October 30, 1925) is a jazz saxophonist and record producer. ... In literature, a motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance. ... The Tascam 85 16B analogue tape recorder can record 16 tracks of audio on 1 inch (2. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ...

Bitches Brew (1969), Davis' first gold album.
Bitches Brew (1969), Davis' first gold album.

Starting with Bitches Brew, Davis' albums began to often feature cover art much more in line with psychedelic art or black power movements than that of his earlier albums. He took significant cuts in his usual performing fees in order to open for rock groups like the Steve Miller Band, the Grateful Dead and Santana. Several live albums were recorded during the early 1970s at such performances: It's About That Time (March 1970), Black Beauty (April 1970) and At Fillmore (June 1970). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bitches Brew is an album recorded by American jazz trumpeter Miles Davis in 1969. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... Example of book cover art. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... The Steve Miller Band (1967-present) is a Blues & Classic Rock band, led by rock singer, Steve Miller on guitar and lead vocals. ... This article is about the band. ... Carlos Augusto Alves Santana (born July 20, 1947), is a Grammy Award-winning Mexican-born American Latin rock musician and guitarist. ...


By the time of Live-Evil in December 1970, Davis' ensemble had transformed into a much more funk-oriented group. Davis began experimenting with wah-wah effects on his horn. The ensemble with Gary Bartz, Keith Jarrett and Michael Henderson, often referred to as the "Cellar Door band" (the live portions of Live-Evil were recorded at a club by that name), never recorded in the studio, but is documented in the six CD Box Set The Cellar Door Sessions, which was recorded over four nights in December 1970. Seventh release by Manchester indie rock group, James. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1970, Davis contributed extensively to the soundtrack of a documentary about the African-American boxer Jack Johnson. Himself a devotee of boxing, Davis drew parallels between Johnson, whose career had been defined by the fruitless search for a Great White Hope to dethrone him, and Davis' own career, in which he felt the establishment had prevented him from receiving the acclaim and rewards that were due him. The resulting album, 1971's A Tribute to Jack Johnson, contained two long pieces that utilized musicians (some of whom were not credited on the record) including guitarists John McLaughlin and Sonny Sharrock, and drummer Billy Cobham. In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. ... Great White Hope, sometimes plain great white hope, may refer to several things: It originally referred to James J. Jeffries (1875-1953), a white boxer who came out of retirement in 1910 in an attempt to dislodge the first black world boxing heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson. ... A Tribute to Jack Johnson is an album recorded in April 1970 by Miles Davis. ... John McLaughlin John McLaughlin (aka pinyon)(born January 4, 1942), also Mahavishnu John McLaughlin, is a jazz fusion guitar player from Doncaster, Yorkshire in England. ... Warren Harding Sharrock (August 27, 1940 – May 25, 1994) was an American jazz guitarist. ... Billy Cobham performing on Réunion in October 2006. ...


As Davis stated in his autobiography, he wanted to make music for the young African-American audience. On The Corner (1972) blended funk elements with the traditional jazz styles he had played his entire career. The album was highlighted by the appearance of saxophonist Carlos Garnett. The record provoked fierce disparagement from many critics, with one British critic noting: "I love Miles, but this is where I get off." In his autobiography, Davis stated that this criticism was made because no critic could categorize this music and complained that the album was promoted by the "traditional" jazz radio stations. On the Corner is an album recorded in June and September 1972 by Miles Davis. ... Carlos Garnett is a Panamanian-American jazz saxophonist. ...


After recording On the Corner, Davis put together a new band, with only Michael Henderson, Carlos Garnett and percussionist Mtume returning from the previous band. It included guitarist Reggie Lucas, tabla player Badal Roy, sitarist Khalil Balakrishna and drummer Al Foster. It was unusual in that none of the sidemen were major jazz instrumentalists; as a result, the music emphasized rhythmic density and shifting textures instead of individual solos. This group, which recorded in the Philharmonic Hall for the album In Concert (1972), was unsatisfactory to Davis. Through the first half of 1973, he dropped the tabla and sitar, took over keyboard duties, and added guitarist Pete Cosey. The Davis/Cosey/Lucas/Henderson/Mtume/Foster ensemble would remain virtually intact over the next two years. Initially, Dave Liebman played saxophones and flute with the band. In 1974, he was replaced by Sonny Fortune. Michael Henderson (July 7, 1951-present) is a bassist and vocalist best known for his work with Miles Davis in the early 1970s, providing a deep funky groove to early fusion albums such as A Tribute to Jack Johnson, Pangaea (album), and Live-Evil. ... Carlos Garnett is a Panamanian-American jazz saxophonist. ... Funk/Soul group Mtume (pronounced Em-Too-May) was founded by percussionist James Mtume, who previously had played with Miles Davis in the 1970s. ... Reggie Lucas, is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. ... Badal Roy (born Amerendra Roy Choudhury in Bangladesh, 1945) is a tabla player and percussionist known for his work in jazz, cross-cultural music, and experimental music. ... Al Foster (born Jan 18, 1944 in Richmond, Virginia) is a jazz drummer best known for his long stint as Miles Daviss drummer, from the mid-1970s to mid-1980s, and for being Daviss closest friend and confidant during his late-70s retirement. ... , Avery Fisher Hall in Lincoln Center. ... A typical set of Tabla. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Pete Cosey is an African-American guitarist most famous for playing with Miles Davis band between 1973 and 1975. ... Dave Liebman (born in 1946) is an American tenor saxophonist and flautist. ... Sonny Fortune, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1939, is an American jazz player, alto saxophonist, and flutist. ...


Big Fun (1974) was a double album containing four long jams, recorded between 1969 and 1972. Similarly, Get Up With It (1975) collected recordings from the previous five years. Get Up With It included "He Loved Him Madly", a tribute to Duke Ellington, as well as one of Davis' most lauded pieces from this era, "Calypso Frelimo". This was his last studio album of the 1970s. Big Fun is a double album recorded between 1969 and 1972 by Miles Davis. ... Get Up With It is an album collecting tracks recorded between 1970 and 1974 by Miles Davis. ...


In 1974 and 1975, Columbia recorded three double-LP live Davis albums: Dark Magus, Agharta and Pangaea. Dark Magus is a 1974 New York concert; the latter two are recordings of consecutive concerts from the same February 1975 day in Osaka, Japan. At the time, only Agharta was available in the US; Pangaea and Dark Magus were initially released only by CBS/Sony Japan. All three feature at least two electric guitarists (Reggie Lucas and Pete Cosey, deploying an array of post-Hendrix electronic distortion devices; Dominique Gaumont is a third guitarist on Dark Magus), electric bass, drums, reeds, and Davis on electric trumpet and organ. These albums were the last he was to record for five years. Troubled by osteoarthritis (which led to a hip replacement operation in 1976, the first of several), depression, bursitis, ulcers and a renewed dependence on alcohol and drugs (primarily heroin), Davis' performances were routinely panned throughout late 1974 and early 1975. By the time the group reached Japan in February 1975, Davis was teetering on a physical breakdown and required copious amounts of vodka and cocaine to complete his engagements. Agharta is an album recorded by jazz trumpeter Miles Davis in 1975. ... Pangaea is an album recorded by jazz trumpeter Miles Davis in 1975. ... Osaka )   is a city in Japan, located at the mouth of the Yodo River on Osaka Bay, in the Kansai region of the main island of HonshÅ«. The city is the capital of Osaka Prefecture. ... For other uses, see Distortion (disambiguation). ... Osteoarthritis / Osteoarthrosis (OA, also known as degenerative arthritis, degenerative joint disease, arthrosis or in more colloquial terms wear and tear), is a condition in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by wearing of the cartilage that covers and acts as a cushion inside joints. ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... Bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae, or small sacs of synovial fluid, in the body. ... An ulcer (from Latin ulcus) is an open sore of the skin, eyes or mucous membrane, often caused by an initial abrasion and generally maintained by an inflammation and/or an infection. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Vodka bottling machine, Shatskaya Vodka Shatsk, Russia Vodka (Polish: wódka, Russian: водка) is one of the worlds most popular distilled beverages. ...


Immediately thereafter, Davis withdrew almost completely from the public eye for five years. As Gil Evans said, "His organism is tired. And after all the music he's contributed for 35 years, he needs a rest." [citation needed]


Davis characterized this period in his memoirs as a colorful time when wealthy white women lavished him with sex and drugs. In reality, he had become completely dependent upon heroin, spending nearly all of his time propped up on a couch in his apartment watching television, leaving only to score more drugs. In 1976, Rolling Stone reported rumors of his imminent demise. Although he stopped practicing trumpet on a regular basis, Davis continued to compose intermittently and made three attempts at recording during his exile from performing; these sessions (one with the assistance of Paul Buckmaster and Gil Evans, who left after not receiving promised compensation) bore little fruit and remain unreleased. This article is about the magazine. ...


In 1979, he placed in the yearly Top 10 trumpeter poll of Down Beat magazine. Columbia continued to issue compilation albums and records of unreleased vault material to fulfill contractual obligations. Down Beat is an American magazine devoted to jazz. ... A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ...


During his period of inactivity, Davis saw the fusion music that he had spearheaded over the past decade firmly enter into the mainstream. When he emerged from retirement, Davis' musical antecedents would be in the realm of New Wave rock, and in particular the stylings of Prince. The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ...


Last Decade (1981 to 1991)

By 1979, Davis had rekindled his relationship with actress Cicely Tyson. With Tyson, Davis would overcome his drug addiction and regain his enthusiasm for music. As he had not played trumpet for the better part of three years, regaining his famed embouchure proved to be particularly arduous. While recording The Man With The Horn (sessions were spread sporadically over 1979-1981), Davis played mostly wah-wah with a younger, larger band. Cicely Tyson (born December 19, 1933) is an Emmy Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ... The embouchure is the use of facial muscles and the shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece of a wind instrument. ... Miles Davis come-back albumn, featuring Mike Stern and others. ...


The initial large band was eventually abandoned in favor of a smaller combo featuring saxophonist Bill Evans and bass player Marcus Miller, both of whom would be among Davis' most regular collaborators throughout the decade. He married Tyson in 1981; they would divorce in 1988. The Man With The Horn was finally released in 1981 and received a poor critical reception despite selling fairly well. In May, the new band played two dates as part of the Newport Jazz Festival. The concerts, as well as the live recording We Want Miles from the ensuing tour, received positive reviews. Bill Evans is an American jazz saxophonist. ... Marcus Miller (born June 14, 1959 in New York) is a jazz musician, composer and producer, perhaps best known as a bass guitarist with Miles Davis, Luther Vandross and David Sanborn. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... The Newport Jazz Festival is a music festival held every August in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Album Cover We Want Miles is double album recorded by jazz trumpeter Miles Davis in 1981, produced by Teo Macero and released by CBS in 1982. ...


By late 1982, Davis' band included French percussionnist Mino Cinelu and guitarist John Scofield, with whom he worked closely on the album Star People. In mid-1983, while working on the tracks for Decoy, an album mixing soul music and electronica that was released in 1984, Davis brought in producer, composer and keyboardist Robert Irving III, who had earlier collaborated with Davis on The Man With the Horn. With a seven-piece band, including Scofield, Evans, keyboardist and music director Irving, drummer Al Foster and bassist Darryl Jones (later of The Rolling Stones), Davis played a series of European gigs to positive receptions. While in Europe, he took part in the recording of Aura, an orchestral tribute to Davis composed by Danish trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. Mino Cinelu is a French musician, born in Saint-Cloud near Paris, in 1957. ... John Scofield (born December 26, 1951 in Dayton, Ohio)[1] is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who played and eventually collaborated with Miles Davis, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, and other important artists. ... An album by Miles Davis. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... Robert Irving III, (1953) American pianist, composer, arranger and music educator A native of Chicago, Irving was one of a group of young Chicago musicians that in the late 70s and early 80s formed the nucleus of Miles Daviss recording and touring bands. ... Al Foster (born Jan 18, 1944 in Richmond, Virginia) is a jazz drummer best known for his long stint as Miles Daviss drummer, from the mid-1970s to mid-1980s, and for being Daviss closest friend and confidant during his late-70s retirement. ... Darryl Jones (born December 11, 1961), also known as The Munch, is an American bassist, highly regarded in both jazz and rock music. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Aura is a concept album by Miles Davis. ... Cover of To Whom It May Concern: Greatest. Sony Music A/S, 2005 Palle Mikkelborg (born March 6, 1941) is a Danish jazz trumpeter, composer, arranger and record producer. ...


You're Under Arrest, Davis' next album, was released in 1985 and included another brief stylistic detour. Included on the album were his interpretations of Cyndi Lauper's ballad "Time After Time", and "Human Nature" from Michael Jackson. Davis noted that many of today's accepted jazz standards were in fact pop songs from Broadway theatre, and that he was simply updating the "standards" repertoire with new material. Front cover artwork Youre Under Arrest is a 1985 album recorded by Miles Davis that saw Miles mix pop tunes with political statements about racism, pollution and war. ... Cynthia Ann Stephanie Cyndi Lauper (born June 22, 1953) is an American Grammy Award-winning singer and Emmy Award-winning film, television and theatre actress. ... Time After Time was a single by singer Cyndi Lauper, the second from her Shes So Unusual album, and it reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 charts on June 9, 1984. ... Thriller track listing Billie Jean (6) Human Nature (7) P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing) (8) Human Nature is a single released by Michael Jackson from his 1982 hit album, Thriller. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ...


You're Under Arrest also proved to be Davis' final album for Columbia. Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis publicly dismissed Davis' more recent fusion recordings as not being "'true' jazz", comments Davis initially shrugged off, calling Marsalis "a nice young man, only confused". This changed after Marsalis appeared, unannounced, onstage in the midst of a Davis performance. Marsalis whispered into Davis' ear that "someone" had told him to do so; Davis replied by physically throwing him off the stage. Wynton Learson Marsalis (b. ...


Davis grew irritated at Columbia's delay releasing Aura and, perhaps, was also jealous of the unusually large publicity budget the label had granted Marsalis. The breaking point in the label/artist relationship appears to have come when a Columbia jazz producer requested Davis place a good-will birthday call to Marsalis. Davis signed with Warner Brothers shortly thereafter. Warner Bros. ...


Davis collaborated with a number of figures from the British new wave movement during this period, including Scritti Politti.[5] At the invitation of producer Bill Laswell Davis recorded some trumpet parts during sessions for Public Image Ltd.'s Album album, according to Public Image's John Lydon in the liner notes of their Plastic Box box set. In Lydon's words, however, "strangely enough, we didn't use (his contributions)." (Also according to Lydon in the Plastic Box notes, Davis favorably compared Lydon's singing voice to his trumpet sound.)[6] The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... Scritti Politti are a Welsh musical band. ... Bill Laswell (born February 12, 1955 in Salem, Illinois and raised in Albion, Michigan) is an American bassist, producer and record label owner. ... Public Image Ltd. ... Album (also known as Compact Disc or Cassette depending on the format it is released in) is an album by Public Image Ltd, released on February 3rd, 1986. ... John Joseph Lydon (born January 31, 1956), also known as Johnny Rotten, is an English rock musician. ...

Tutu won a Grammy Award in 1987
Tutu won a Grammy Award in 1987

Having first taken part in the Artists United Against Apartheid recording, Davis signed with Warner Brothers records and reunited with Marcus Miller. The resulting record, Tutu (1986), would be his first to use modern studio tools — programmed synthesizers, samples and drum loops — to create an entirely new setting for Davis' playing. Ecstatically reviewed on its release, the album would frequently be described as the modern counterpart of the classic Sketches of Spain, and won a Grammy in 1987. Image File history File links Miles_Davis-Tutu_(album_cover). ... Image File history File links Miles_Davis-Tutu_(album_cover). ... Artists United Against Apartheid was a protest group founded by activist performer Steven van Zandt to protest the existence of apartheid in South Africa. ... Warner Bros. ... Marcus Miller (born June 14, 1959 in New York) is a jazz musician, composer and producer, perhaps best known as a bass guitarist with Miles Davis, Luther Vandross and David Sanborn. ... Tutu is an album released in 1986 by Miles Davis on Warner Bros. ... For other uses, see Synthesizer (disambiguation). ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...


He followed Tutu with Amandla, another collaboration with Miller and Duke, plus the soundtracks to four movies: Street Smart, Siesta, The Hot Spot, and Dingo. He continued to tour with a band of constantly rotating personnel and a critical stock at a level higher than it had been for 15 years. His last recordings, both released posthumously, were the hip hop-influenced studio album Doo-Bop and Miles & Quincy Live at Montreux, a collaboration with Quincy Jones for the 1991 Montreux Jazz Festival in which Davis performed the repertoire from his 1960s recordings for the first time in decades. An album by Miles Davis Catembe Cobra Big Time Hannibal Jo-Jo Amandla Jilli Mr. ... Street Smart (1987) is a film starring Christopher Reeve, Morgan Freeman and Kathy Baker. ... The Hot Spot is a 1990 American drama/romance movie directed by Dennis Hopper and starring Don Johnson, Virginia Madsen, and Jennifer Connelly. ... Miles Davis and Michel Legrands soundtrack to the 1992 film of the same name. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Doo-Bop was jazz innovator Miles Davis final studio album, which would have marked the beginning of the artists turn to hip hop music. ... Miles & Quincy Live at Montreux is a Miles Davis collaboration with Quincy Jones for the 1991 Montreux Jazz Festival. ... This article is about the producer and songwriter. ... The Montreux Jazz Festival is the best-known music festival in Switzerland. ...


Davis received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1990. The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and...


Early 1991 saw the release of the Rolf de Heer film Dingo, starring Colin Friels as a frustrated jazz trumpeter from outback Australia who follows his dream of meeting and performing with Billy Cross, a fictional jazz legend played by Davis. In the film's opening sequences, Davis and band unexpectedly land on a remote airstrip in the Australian outback and proceed to perform for the stunned locals. The performance forms the impetus for the main character to pursue a life in music and was one of Davis' last filmed performances. Rolf de Heer (born 4 May 1951) is an Australian Film director, writer and producer. ... Dingo is a 1991 Australian film that traces the pilgrimage of John Anderson, an average guy with a passion for jazz, from his home in outback Western Australia to the jazz clubs of Paris, to meet his idol, jazz trumpeter Billy Cross. ... Colin Friels (b. ...


Miles Davis died from a stroke, pneumonia and respiratory failure at the age of 65. He is buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York. For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Respiratory failure is a medical term for inadequate gas exchange by the respiratory system. ... Located in The Bronx, Woodlawn Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in New York City. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ...


Awards

Down Beat is an American magazine devoted to jazz. ... Down Beat is an American magazine devoted to jazz. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Solo has been awarded since 1959. ... The Léonie Sonning Music Prize, or Sonning Award, which is recognized as Denmarks highest musical honor, is given annually to an international musician. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Honoris causa (plural: Causae) is a Latin term meaning for the sake of honor, abbreviated as . ... The Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra performing in Jordan Hall, New England Conservatory of Music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Solo has been awarded since 1959. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Solo has been awarded since 1959. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album has been presented since 1961. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Medal for the officer class, decorated with a rosette Napoleon wearing the Grand Cross The President of France is the Grand Master of the Legion. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best R&B Instrumental Performance was awarded from 1970 to 1990 and in 1993. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album has been presented since 1961. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Guitar Center is the largest chain of musical instrument retailers located throughout the United States. ... The RIAA Logo. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... Kind of Blue is a jazz album by musician Miles Davis, released on August 17, 1959. ...

Discography

This is a list of Miles Daviss major recordings. ...

Other uses of Davis' work

Miles Davis is one of 36 artists featured in the computer game Civilization IV.[8] This article or section may contain excessive or improper use of copyrighted images and/or audio files. ...


References

  1. ^ Kahn, Ashley. Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece. ISBN 0-306-81067-0
  2. ^ You Can't Steal a Gift: Dizzy, Clark, Milt, and Nat, by Lees, Gene, Yale University Press (2001), p. 24
  3. ^ Chambers, J. K. (1998). Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis. Da Capo Press, 246.. ISBN 0306808498. 
  4. ^ Carr, Ian (1998). Miles Davis: The Definitive Biography. Thunder's Mouth Press, 284, 303, 304, 306. ISBN 1560252413. 
  5. ^ Intro.de article (in German).
  6. ^ Fodderstompf
  7. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  8. ^ List of historical figures in Civilization IV

The following is a comprehensive list of the historical figures in the PC game Civilization IV. The list matches the order in which they appear in the game, which is roughly based on chronological order. ...

Sources

  • Carr, Ian. Miles Davis. ISBN 0-00-653026-5.
  • Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis. ISBN 0-306-80849-8.
  • Cole, George. The Last Miles: The Music of Miles Davis 1980 – 1991. ISBN 1-904768-18-0.
  • Davis, Miles & Troupe, Quincy. Miles: The Autobiography. ISBN 0-671-63504-2.
  • Davis, Gregory. Dark Magus: The Jekyll & Hyde Life of Miles Davis. ISBN-13: 978-0-87930-875-9. [2]
  • Early, Gerald. Miles Davis and American Culture. ISBN 1-883982-37-5 cloth, ISBN 1-883982-38-3, paper.
  • Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis. ISBN 0-434-00759-5.
  • Tingen, Paul. Miles Beyond: The Electric Explorations of Miles Davis, 1967-1991. ISBN 0-8230-8360-8. [3]

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Miles Davis

Web sites dedicated to Miles Davis: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

Web site pages about Miles Davis:

Persondata
NAME Davis, Miles Dewey III
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Jazz trumpeter
DATE OF BIRTH May 26, 1926
PLACE OF BIRTH Alton, Illinois
DATE OF DEATH September 28, 1991
PLACE OF DEATH Santa Monica, California

is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historic Alton Home Alton is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles north of St. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Miles Davis, romantic hero. - By Stanley Crouch - Slate Magazine (1198 words)
Davis became a matinee idol in the mid-1950s when dark-skinned men were beginning to break through the barriers that kept them from being seen in romantic roles or thought of as superb interpreters of love songs.
Miles Davis, however, tamed those savage surroundings and made it clear that if he didn't feel respected or comfortable he would leave and the paying customers could have it out with the club owners.
Little, dark, touchy, even evil, Miles Davis walked onto his bandstand and made public visions of tenderness that were, finally, absolute rejections of everything silly about the version of masculinity that might hobble men in either the white or the fl world.
Miles Davis - Music Downloads - Online (2160 words)
Davis was the son of a dental surgeon, Dr. Miles Dewey Davis, Jr., and a music teacher, Cleota Mae (Henry) Davis, and thus grew up in the fl middle class of east St. Louis after the family moved there shortly after his birth.
Davis, meanwhile, had moved on to co-leading a band with pianist Tadd Dameron in 1949, and the group took him out of the country for an appearance at the Paris Jazz Festival in May. But the trumpeter's progress was impeded by an addiction to heroin that plagued him in the early '50s.
Miles Davis took an all-inclusive, constantly restless approach to jazz that had begun to fall out of favor by the time of his death, even as it earned him controversy during his lifetime.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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