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Encyclopedia > Mile
1 mile =
SI units
1609.344 m 1.609344 km
US customary / Imperial units
5280 ft 1760 yd

A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. Its size can vary from system to system, but in each is between 1 and 10 kilometers. In contemporary English contexts mile refers to either: Cover of brochure The International System of Units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... U.S. customary units, also known in the United States as English units[1] (but see English unit) or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the USA, in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units — the modern metric system). ... The Imperial units are an irregularly standardized system of units that have been used in the United Kingdom and its former colonies, including the Commonwealth countries. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Miles is the plural of mile. ... The former Weights and Measures office in Middlesex, England. ... Look up length, width, breadth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Distance is a numerical description of how far apart objects are at any given moment in time. ... The Imperial units or the Imperial system is a collection of English units, first defined in the Weights and Measures Act of 1824, later refined (until 1959) and reduced. ... U.S. customary units, also known in the United States as English units[1] (but see English unit) or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the USA, in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units — the modern metric system). ... A mil (Norwegian and Swedish for mile) is a unit of length, usually used to measure geographic distance, fairly common in Norway and Sweden. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ...

  • the statute mile of 5,280 feet (1,609.344 m exactly), or 63360 inches
  • the international nautical mile of exactly 1,852 m (about 6,076 feet).

There have been several abbreviations for mile, with and without trailing period: mi, ml, m, M. NIST now uses and recommends "mi", but miles per hour are usually shortened to "mph", "m.p.h." or "MPH" instead of "mi/h". This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial unit of length. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... NIST logo The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly known as The National Bureau of Standards) is a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ...

Contents

The original mile

A unit of distance called a mile was first used by the Romans and denoted a distance of 1000 paces (1 pace is 2 steps, 1000 paces being, in Latin, mille passus) or 5000 Roman feet, and corresponded to about 1480 meters, or 1618 modern yards.[1] Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


The current definition of a mile as 5,280 feet (as opposed to 5000) dates to the 13th century, and was confirmed by statute in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I; the change was needed to accommodate the rod which (as opposed to the mile) was a measure ensconced in legal documents (see the discussion about furlongs). This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... A rod is a unit of length, equal to 5. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ...


Types of mile

In modern usage, various distances are referred to as miles.


Statute miles

The Statute Mile is the distance typically meant when the word mile is used without other qualifying words (e.g. Nautical Mile, see below).


It originates from a Statute of the English parliament in 1592 during the reign of Elizabeth I. This defined the Statute Mile as 5,280 feet or 1,760 yards; or 63,360 inches. The reason for these rather irregular numbers is that 5280 feet is made up of eight furlongs (the length generally that a furrow was plowed before the horses were turned, furlong = furrow-long). In turn a furlong is 10 chains (a surveyor's chain, used as such until laser rangefinders took over); a chain is 22 yards and a yard is three feet, making up 5280 ft. 22 yards is also the length of a cricket pitch, a game originating in England and played today particularly in countries that were once part of the British Empire. The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...


Before the statute of the English parliament, there was confusion on the length of the "mile". The Irish mile was 2240 yards (6720 ft) and the Scottish mile was the length of the so-called Royal Mile in Edinburgh, from the Castle to the Palace of Holyroodhouse, and was 1976 yards (5928 ft). In England the Roman mile of 5,000 feet was often used, a length not divisible without fractions into furlongs or yards (5000 ft = 1666 2/3 yards). For other "miles" see the list below. In the late 1500s, accurate ground mapping was becoming commonly available, such as Saxton's maps of the English Counties. Therefore, a standard mile became more important than before, hence the Parliamentary Statute. It may also have been related to the potential for taxation, for which a standard measure across the country would be required to prevent regional arguments about length and area. Much of the Royal Mile is cobbled, as seen in this view looking east down the High Street past the old Tron Kirk. ...

  • In modern times, the international statute mile is by international agreement. It is defined to be precisely 1,760 international yards (by definition, 0.9144 m each) and is therefore exactly 1,609.344 metres (1.609344 km). A kilometer is 0.621371192 miles. It is used in the United States and the United Kingdom as part of the U.S. customary and Imperial systems of units, respectively. The components of the International Statute Mile are the same as those of the English Parliamentary Statute of 1592, that is 8 furlongs, 80 chains or 5,280 international feet.
  • All of the metric conversions follow from the international agreement, made in 1960, that one inch equals 25.4 millimetres (2.54 centimetres) exactly. There are 12 inches to a foot and all of the feet-to-metre conversions (and vice versa) follow.
  • The U.S. survey mile is based on an inch defined by 1 metre = 39.37 inches exactly. It is equal to 5,280 U.S. survey feet, 6,336/3,937 km or approximately 1,609.347 metres. One international mile is equal to 0.999 998 survey miles. The survey mile is used by the United States Public Land Survey System.

A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... U.S. customary units, commonly known in the United States as English units or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the U.S., in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units—the modern metric system). ... The Imperial units or the Imperial system is a collection of English units, first defined in the Weights and Measures Act of 1824, later refined (until 1959) and reduced. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... As a unit of measurement within the Imperial system, the chain is defined as 22 yards, 66 feet, or 4 rods. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... The Public Land Survey System (PLSS) is a method used in the United States to survey and identify land parcels, particularly for titles and deeds of rural, wild or undeveloped land. ...

Nautical miles

On the utility of the nautical mileEach circle shown is a great circle – the analog of a line in spherical trigonometry – and hence the shortest path connecting two points on the globular surface.
On the utility of the nautical mile
Each circle shown is a great circle – the analog of a line in spherical trigonometry – and hence the shortest path connecting two points on the globular surface.
Main article: Nautical mile

The nautical mile was originally defined as 1 minute of arc along a meridian (or in some instances any great circle) of the Earth. Although this distance varies depending on the latitude of the meridian (or great circle) where it is used, on average it is about 6,076 feet (about 1852 m or 1.15 statute miles). Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For the Brisbane bus routes known collectively as the Great Circle Line (598 & 599), see the following list of Brisbane Transport routes A great circle on a sphere A great circle is a circle on the surface of a sphere that has the same diameter as the sphere, dividing the... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... In Euclidean geometry, an arc is a closed segment of a differentiable curve in the two-dimensional plane; for example, a circular arc is a segment of a circle. ... On the earth, a meridian is a north-south line between the North Pole and the South Pole. ... For the Brisbane bus routes known collectively as the Great Circle Line (598 & 599), see the following list of Brisbane Transport routes A great circle on a sphere A great circle is a circle on the surface of a sphere that has the same diameter as the sphere, dividing the... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ...


The nautical mile per hour is known as the knot. A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ...


Navigators use dividers to step off the distance between two points on the map, then place the open dividers against the minutes-of-latitude scale at the edge of the map, and read off the distance in Nautical Miles. Since it is now known that the earth is an ellipsoid (spheroid), not a sphere, the distance of Nautical Miles derived from this method varies from the equator to the poles. For instance, using the WGS84 Ellipsoid, the commonly accepted Earth model for many purposes today, 1 minute of latitude at the WGS84 equator is 6,087 feet and at the poles is 6,067 feet In mathematics, a spheroid is a quadric surface in three dimensions obtained by rotating an ellipse about one of its principal axes. ...


In the United States, the nautical mile was defined in the nineteenth century as 6,080.2 feet (1,853.249 m), whereas in Britain the Admiralty Nautical Mile was defined as 6,080 feet (1,853.184 m) and was approximately one minute of latitude in the latitudes of the south of the UK. Other nations had different definitions of the nautical mile, but it is now internationally defined to be exactly 1,852 metres.

  • The nautical mile is almost universally used for navigation in aviation, maritime, and nautical roles because of its relationship with degrees and minutes of latitude and the ability to use the latitude scale of a map for distance measuring.
  • An alternative term - sea mile - is still used for the distance of one minute of latitude.

Other miles

  • The Roman mile (Latin mille passus, plural milia passuum), equalled 1000 double paces (passus, plural passūs) of five Roman feet (pēs, plural pedēs) each. Its length was 5,000 Roman feet, approximately 1500 m.
  • The Danish mile (Danish mil) was equal to 7,532 metres (or 24,000 Danish feet or 12,000 alen).
  • The Data mile is used in radar-related subjects and is equal to 6,000 feet (1.8288 kilometres).
  • The Dutch mile (the "Hollandic" mile) was nearly the 19th part of a degree (~5.8 kilometres).
  • The Dutch mile (or "Netherlandic" mile) was exactly 1 kilometre in the Dutch Metric System 1820-1870.
  • The German mile was reckoned to be the 15th part of a degree (and thus about four nautical miles in length or 6.4 kilometres).
  • The Irish mile was equal to 2,240 yards (2,048.256 m).
  • The Italian mile also called the Roman mile (~1.52 kilometres or 0.944 statute miles) was a thousand paces of 5 Roman feet each (the Roman foot being one fifth of an inch less than the London foot).
  • The term metric mile is used in sports such as athletics (track and field) and speedskating to denote a distance of 1.5 kilometres. In United States high school competition the term is sometimes used for a race of 1.6 kilometres.
  • The Norwegian/Swedish mil (the Swedish mile, currently used in Norway and Sweden) has been defined as 10 kilometres from 1 January 1889, when a metric system was introduced in Sweden. The pre-metric mil (in earlier times rast, lit. rest, pause) was about 11.3 kilometres in Norway (see Long Mile below) and 10,688.54 metres in Sweden, representing a suitable distance between rests when walking. In informal and non-precise situations involving longer distances of several kilometres, the mil is, as a rule, used instead of the kilometre. It is also used commonly for measuring vehicle fuel consumption; litres per mil means litres consumed per 10 kilometres [1].
  • The Polish mile was nearly equal to the Dutch mile.
  • The Scottish mile was equal to 1,976.5 yards (1,807.3116 m).
  • The long mile, traditionally used by the Norwegians, Swedes and Hungarians, was about a German mile and a half or around 11 kilometres.
  • The Finnish corresponding unit, virsta, was 1068.8 m. Ten virsta made one peninkulma (literally "hound's hearing", a distance a dog's bark can be heard in still air), 10.688 km. Today peninkulma refers to 10 km in Finnish colloquial usage (compare mil in Norwegian and Swedish usage).
  • The swimmer's mile is 1500 meters or 30 laps in a 25 meter pool. This (roughly) converts to 1650 yards in a 25 yard pool (33 laps), the standard distance for intercollegiate competition in the United States.
  • A country mile is used colloquially to denote a very long distance.

A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ... The Danes started with a system of units based on a Greek pous of 308. ... Alen or aln is a traditional Scandinavian unit of distance similar to the north German elle: roughly 60 centimeters. ... In radar-related subjects and in JTIDS, a data mile is a unit of distance equal to 6000 feet (1. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... This article describes the unit of angle. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... This article describes the unit of angle. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A metric mile is a distance of 1,500 meters. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... Gaetan Boucher training for the 1976 Olympics Speed skating (as well Speedskating) is a form of ice skating in which the competitors attempt to travel a certain distance over the ice as quickly as possible. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... A mil (Norwegian and Swedish for mile) is a unit of length, usually used to measure geographic distance, fairly common in Norway and Sweden. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... The Royal Mile in Edinburgh was used as the standard for a Scottish mile A Scottish mile was the same length as the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, i. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... In Finland, approximate units of measure derived from body parts and were used for a long time, some being later standardised for the purpose of commerce. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ...

See also

A system of measurement is a set of units which can be used to specify anything which can be measured. ... In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers form a sequence defined recursively by: In words: you start with 0 and 1, and then produce the next Fibonacci number by adding the two previous Fibonacci numbers. ... The four minute mile, in athletics, is the running of a mile (1,609. ... The Imperial units or the Imperial system is a collection of English units, first defined in the Weights and Measures Act of 1824, later refined (until 1959) and reduced. ... League is a unit of distance long common in Europe and Latin America, although no longer an official unit in any nation. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... U.S. customary units, commonly known in the United States as English units or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the U.S., in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units—the modern metric system). ...

References

'Of Divers Measures', in Laurence Echard, 1741, The Gazetteer's or Newsman's Interpreter, London: Ballard et al. (first published 1703) Laurence Echard (circa 1670 - 1730) was a British historian. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ...

  1. ^ Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, page 762

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