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Encyclopedia > Milan
Comune di Milano
The Milan Cathedral

Flag

Coat of arms
Location of the city of Milan
Location of the city of Milan
Coordinates: 45°28′N 09°10′E / 45.467, 9.167
Sovereign state Italy
Region Lombardy
Province Province of Milan
Insubric settlement c. 600 BC
Roman foundation 222 BC
Government
 - Mayor Letizia Moratti
Area
 - City 182 km² (70.3 sq mi)
 - Urban 1,982 km² (765.3 sq mi)
Elevation +120 m (394 ft)
Population (December 2006)[1]
 - City 1,303,437 ( 2nd)
 - Density 7,159/km² (18,541.7/sq mi)
 - Metro 7.4 million
 - Called Milanesi or Meneghini
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal codes 20100, 20121-20162
Area code(s) 02
Patron saints Ambrose (7 December)
Website: www.comune.milano.it

Milan (Italian: Milano; Western Lombard: Milan (listen)) is one of the largest cities in Italy, located in the plains of Lombardy. The municipality (Comune di Milano) has a population of 1.3 million. The Milan metropolitan area, depending on the specific definition, has a population ranging from 2.9 to 7.4 million. The municipal border covers a relatively small area (about one-eighth of that of Rome) because of the historical development of high density centres in agriculturally rich Lombardy. Milan is the name of several places in the world: the city Milan, capital of the Province of Milan in the Lombardy region of Italy the Duchy of Milan, a historic state in northern Italy Milan, Quebec, a village in Canada Milán, Caquetá a town and municipality in Colombia... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 702 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1314 × 1123 pixel, file size: 1,009 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Milan Cathedral ... , The Duomo di Milano from the Square. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Flag of Milan, Italy consists of a red cross in a white field, and is near identical to the Flag of England or the one of Genoa. ... Image File history File links Milano-Stemma. ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Milan (It. ... The Insubres or Insubri were a population settled in Insubria, in what is now Lombardy. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... This is a list of mayors of Milan (sindaci di Milano). ... Letizia Brighetto Arnaboldi Moratti, better Known as Letizia Moratti was born in Milan 26th of November 1946. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... For other uses, see Ambrose (disambiguation). ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Western Lombard is a Romance language spoken in Italy, in the Lombard provinces of Milan, Monza, Varese, Como, Lecco, Sondrio, a little part of Cremona (except Crema and its neighbours), Lodi and Pavia, and the Piedmont provinces of Novara, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola and a small part of Vercelli (Valsesia), and... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Milan metropolitan area View from the Duomo di Milano towards the Castello Sforzesco and the Alps beyond. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ...


Milan is renowned as one of the world capitals of design and fashion.[2] The English word milliner is derived from the name of the city. The Lombard metropolis is famous for its fashion houses and shops (such as along via Montenapoleone) and the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele in the Piazza Duomo (reputed to be the world's oldest shopping mall). The city hosted the World Exposition in 1906 and will host the Universal Expo in 2015. Inhabitants of Milan are referred to as "Milanese" (Italian: Milanesi or informally Meneghini or Ambrosiani). All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A milliner is a person who designs, makes, or sells womens hats. ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... Via Montenapoleone is an elegant street in Milan, Italy, very famous for fashion and jewelry shops. ... Categories: Buildings and structures stubs | Milan | Shopping malls ... For a listing of World Fairs, see List of worlds fairs. ... Expo 2015 is the next scheduled Worlds Fair after Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China. ...


The Olona river, the Lambro river and the Seveso creek run through Milan. Olona and Seveso run mostly underground. Seveso is an Italian town and comune of 19,872 inhabitants situated in the Province of Milan, in the Region of Lombardy. ...

Contents

History

Etymology

The Celtic name for the settlement of the Insubres is not attested, but in the Roman name Mediolanum the name element -lanum is the Celtic equivalent of -planum "plain'", thus Mediolanum: "in the midst of the plain", due to its location in a plain close to the confluence of two small rivers, the Olona and the Seveso. The origin of the name and of a boar as a symbol of the city are fancifully accounted for in Andrea Alciato's Emblemata (1584), beneath a woodcut of the first raising of the city walls, where a boar is seen lifted from the excavation, and the etymology of Mediolanum given as "half-wool",[3] explained in Latin and in French. The foundation of Milan is credited to two Celtic peoples, the Bituriges and the Aedui, having as their emblems a ram and a boar;[4] therefore "The city’s symbol is a wool-bearing boar, an animal of double form, here with sharp bristles, there with sleek wool."[5] Alciato credits the most saintly and learned Ambrose for his account.[6] The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ... The Insubres or Insubri were a population settled in Insubria, in what is now Lombardy. ... Arcadius solidus, from Mediolanum mint, 400s. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Emblema CLXXXIX stating Mentem, non formam, plus pollere Andrea Alciato (1492-1550), was a jurist born in Alzano, near Milan, Italy on the 1492-01-12. ... The Bituriges (Bituriges-Cubi) was a tribe with its capital at Bourges (Avaricum). ... A map of Gaul in the 1st century BC, showing the relative position of the Aedui tribe. ... Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal emblem of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400. ... For other uses, see Ambrose (disambiguation). ...


The German name for the city is Mailand, while in the local Western Lombard dialect, the city's name is Milán, similar to the French. Western Lombard is a Lombard language spoken in Italy, in Lombard provinces of Milan, Monza, Varese, Como, Lecco, Sondrio, little part of Cremona (Crema and neighbors), Lodi and Pavia, and Piedmont provinces of Novara, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola and little part of Vercelli (Valsesia), and Switzerland (Canton Ticino and part of...

Milan in 1621.
Milan in 1621.
View of Milan in early 1900s.
View of Milan in early 1900s.
Castello Sforzesco, sign of the power of the House of Sforza.
Castello Sforzesco, sign of the power of the House of Sforza.

1621 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 417 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1881 × 2701 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 417 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1881 × 2701 pixel, file size: 2. ... Front view of Castello Sforzesco Courtyard in Castello Sforzesco Castello Sforzesco (English: Sforza Castle) is a castle in Milan, Italy that now houses an art gallery. ... Map of Italy in 1494. ... Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Piazza del Duomo entrance The Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II is a covered arcade situated on the northern side of the Piazza del Duomo in Milan, connecting to the Piazza della Scala. ...

Roman times

Main article: Mediolanum

Around 400 BC, the Celtic Insubres inhabited Milan and the surrounding region. In 222 BC, the Romans conquered this settlement, which received the name Mediolanum. After several centuries of Roman control, Milan was declared the capital of the Western Roman Empire by Emperor Diocletian in 293 AD. Diocletian chose to stay in the Eastern Roman Empire (capital Nicomedia) and his colleague Maximianus the Western one. Immediately Maximinian built several gigantic monuments, like a large circus (470 x 85 meters), the Thermae Erculee, a large complex of imperial palaces and several other services and buildings.
In the Edict of Milan of 313, Emperor Constantine I guaranteed freedom of religion for Christians. The city was besieged by the Visigoths in 402, and the imperial residence was moved to Ravenna. Fifty years later (in 452), the Huns overran the city. In 539, the Ostrogoths conquered and destroyed Milan in the course of the so-called Gothic War against Byzantine Emperor Justinian I. In the summer of 569, the Longobards (from which the name of the Italian region Lombardy derives) conquered Milan, overpowering the small Byzantine army left for its defence. Milan surrendered to the Franks in 774 when Charlemagne, in an utterly novel decision, took the title "King of the Lombards" as well (before then the Germanic kingdoms had frequently conquered each other, but none had adopted the title of King of another people). Subsequently Milan was part of the Holy Roman Empire. Arcadius solidus, from Mediolanum mint, 400s. ... The Celtics claim Vienna, Austria. ... The Insubres or Insubri were a population settled in Insubria, in what is now Lombardy. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 227 BC 226 BC 225 BC 224 BC 223 BC - 222 BC - 221 BC 220 BC... Arcadius solidus, from Mediolanum mint, 400s. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... Events March 1 - Diocletian and Maximian appoint Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. ... Nicomedia (modern İzmit, also known as Iznik) was founded by Nicomedes I of Bithynia at the head of the Gulf of Astacus (which opens on the Propontis) in 264 BC. The city has ever since been one of the chief towns in this part of Asia Minor. ... The Edict of Milan was a letter that proclaimed religious toleration in the Roman Empire. ... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... Events Stilicho recalls troops from the frontiers of the Roman Empire to defend Italy against the Visigoths. ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... Events Attila, king of the Huns, invades Italy Northern Wei Tai Wu Di is succeeded by Northern Wei Nan An Wang, then by Northern Wei Wen Cheng Di as ruler of the Northern Wei Dynasty in China. ... For other uses, see Hun (disambiguation). ... Events November 29 - Antioch struck by an earthquake. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ostrogoths Franks Visigoths Commanders Belisarius Narses Mundalias Germanus Justinus Liberius Theodoric the Great Witigis Totila The Gothic War, was a war fought in Italy in 535-552. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... This article is about the Roman emperor. ... Events The Nubian kingdom of Alodia is converted to Christianity, according to John of Ephesus. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Events Charlemagne conquers the kingdom of the Lombards, and takes title King of the Lombards. ... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medieval empire. ...


Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, Milan prospered as a center of trade due to its command of the rich plain of the Po and routes from Italy across the Alps. The war of conquest by Frederick I Barbarossa against the Lombard cities brought the destruction of much of Milan in 1162. After the founding of the Lombard League in 1167, Milan took the leading role in this alliance. As a result of the independence that the Lombard cities gained in the Peace of Constance in 1183, Milan became a duchy. In 1208 Rambertino Buvalelli served a term as podestà of the city, in 1242 Luca Grimaldi, and in 1282 Luchetto Gattilusio. In 1395, Gian Galeazzo Visconti became duke of Milan. In 1450, Milan passed to the noble House of Sforza, which made Milan one of the leading cities of the Italian Renaissance. Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I Hohenstaufen (1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Frederick Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and was crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... Events June 3 - Thomas Becket consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The Lombard League was an alliance formed around 1167, which at its apex included most of the cities of northern Italy (although its membership changed in time), including, among others, Milan, Piacenza, Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo, Brescia, Bologna, Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, Verona, Lodi, and Parma, and even some lords, such as... Taira no Kiyomori becomes the first samurai to be appointed Daijo Daijin, chief minister of the government of Japan Peter of Blois becomes the tutor of William II of Sicily Absalon, archbishop of Denmark, leads the first Danish synod at Lund Absalon fortifies Copenhagen William Marshal, the greatest knight that... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... The Palace of the Podestà in Florence, known as the Palazzo Vecchio or the Palazzo della Signoria Podestà is the name given to certain high officials in many Italian cities, since the later middle ages, mainly as Chief magistrate of a city state (like otherwise styled counterparts in other cities... Events End of reign of Hungary by Capet-Anjou family. ... Portrait attributed to Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis, reputed to be of Gian Galeazzo Visconti Gian Galeazzo Visconti (November 1351 – September 3, 1402), son of Galeazzo II Visconti and Bianca di Savoia, was the first Duke of Milan (1395)[1] and ruled the late-medieval city just before the dawn of... // March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen. ... Map of Italy in 1494. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...


Periods of Spanish, French and Austrian domination

The French king Louis XII first laid claim to the duchy in 1492. At that time, Milan was defended by Swiss mercenaries. After the victory of Louis’s successor Francis I over the Swiss at the Battle of Marignano, the duchy was promised to the French king Francis I. When the Habsburg Charles V defeated Francis I at the Battle of Pavia in 1525, northern Italy, including Milan, passed to the House of Habsburg. In 1556, Charles V abdicated in favour of his son Philip II and his brother Ferdinand I. Charles’s Italian possessions, including Milan, passed to Philip II and the Spanish line of Habsburgs, while Ferdinand’s Austrian line of Habsburgs ruled the Holy Roman Empire. Louis XII Louis XII the Father of the People (French: Louis XII le Père du Peuple) (June 27, 1462 - January 1, 1515) was King of France from 1498-January 1, 1515. ... Also film, 1492: Conquest of Paradise. ... Combatants France, Republic of Venice Duchy of Milan Commanders Francis I, Gian Giacomo Trivulzio, Bartolomeo dAlviano, Louis de la Trémoille Maximilian Sforza, Cardinal Matthaeus Schiner Strength 30,000 Unknown The Battle of Marignano, in the phase of the Italian Wars (1494–1559) that is called the War of... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... “Battle of Pavia” redirects here. ... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Ferdinand in 1531, the year of his election as King of the Romans Ferdinand I (10 March 1503 – 25 July 1564) was an Austrian monarch from the House of Habsburg. ...


However, in 1700 the Spanish line of Habsburgs was extinguished with the death of Charles II. After his death, the War of the Spanish Succession began in 1701 with the occupation of all Spanish possessions by French troops backing the claim of the French Philippe of Anjou to the Spanish throne. In 1706, the French were defeated in Ramillies and Turin and were forced to yield northern Italy to the Austrian Habsburgs. In 1713, the Treaty of Utrecht formally confirmed Austrian sovereignty over most of Spain’s Italian possessions including Lombardy and its capital, Milan. Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Charles II of Spain (Carlos Segundo) (November 6, 1661, Madrid - November 1, 1700, Madrid) was King of Spain, Naples, Sicily, nearly all of Italy (except Piedmont, the Papal States and Venice), and Spains overseas Empire, stretching from Mexico to the Philippines. ... Combatants Habsburg Empire England (1701-6) Great Britain (1707-14)[1] Dutch Republic Kingdom of Portugal Crown of Aragon Duchy of Savoy [2] Kingdom of France Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Bavaria Hungarian Rebels [3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy Margrave of Baden Count Starhemberg Duke of Marlborough Marquis de Ruvigny... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... Year 1706 (MDCCVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Battle of Ramillies was a major battle in the War of Spanish Succession, May 23, 1706. ... The Battle of Turin took place on 7 September 1706 west of the city of Turin during the War of the Spanish Succession. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A map depicting the major changes in Western Europes borders as a result of the Treaties of Utrecht and Rastatt. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ...


19th Century

Napoleon conquered Lombardy in 1796, and Milan was declared capital of the Cisalpine Republic. Later, he declared Milan capital of the Reign of Italy and was crowned in the Duomo. Once Napoleon’s occupation ended, the Congress of Vienna returned Lombardy, and Milan, along with the Veneto, to Austrian control in 1815. During this period, Milan became a centre of lyric opera. Here Mozart wrote three operas, and in a few years La Scala became the reference theatre in the world, with its premieres of Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini and Verdi. Verdi himself is now tumulated in a precious Institute, the "Casa di Riposo per Musicisti", the Verdi's present to Milan. In the 19th century other important theatres were La Cannobiana and the Teatro Carcano. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The flag of the Cisalpine Republic was the Transpadane Republic vertical Italian tricolour, with the square shape of the Cispadane Republic The Cisalpine Republic (Italian: Repubblica Cisalpina) was a French client republic in Northern Italy that lasted from 1797 to 1802. ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ... Veneto is my fatherland. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... Bellini can mean: A family of Italian painters, the most famous of which is Giovanni Bellini (c. ... Categories: People stubs | 1797 births | 1848 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | Italian composers | People born in Bergamo, Italy ... Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ...


On March 18, 1848, the Milanese rebelled against Austrian rule, during the so-called "Five Days" (It. Cinque Giornate), and Field Marshall Radetzky was forced to withdraw from the city temporarily. However, after defeating Italian forces at Custoza on July 24, Radetzky was able to reassert Austrian control over Milan and northern Italy. However, Italian nationalists, championed by the Kingdom of Sardinia, called for the removal of Austria in the interest of Italian unification. Sardinia and France formed an alliance and defeated Austria at the Battle of Solferino in 1859. Following this battle, Milan and the rest of Lombardy were incorporated into the Kingdom of Sardinia, which soon gained control of most of Italy and in 1861 was rechristened as the Kingdom of Italy. is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Josef Graf von Radetzky Johann Josef Wenzel Graf Radetzky von Radetz (English: , Czech: ) (November 2, 1766 – January 5, 1858) was a Bohemian nobleman and Austrian general, immortalised by Johann Strauss Is Radetzky March. ... The Battle of Custoza (1848) was fought (23-25 July 1848) during the Austro-Sardinian War (also known as First Independence War within Italian unification process) between the armies of the Austrian Empire, led by Field Marshal Radetzky, and of the Kingdom of Sardinia, led by king Charles Albert of... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ... Italian Unification (Italian: il Risorgimento, or The Resurgence) was the political and social movement that unified different states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ... Combatants French Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon III Victor Emmanuel II Franz Joseph Strength 118,600 about 100,000 Casualties 2,492 dead 12,512 wounded 2,922 captured or missing 3,000 dead 10,807 wounded 8,638 captured or missing The Battle of Solferino, also... There have been several entities known as the Kingdom of Italy. ...


The political unification of Italy cemented Milan’s commercial dominance over northern Italy. It also led to a flurry of railway construction that made Milan the rail hub of northern Italy. Rapid industrialization put Milan at the centre of Italy’s leading industrial region,in the 90s of XIX Century Milan was sheked by the a riot related to an high inflation rate. Meanwhile, as Milanese banks dominated Italy’s financial sphere, the city became the country’s leading financial centre. Milan’s economic growth brought a rapid expansion in the city’s area and population during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Italian Unification (Italian: il Risorgimento, or The Resurgence) was the political and social movement that unified different states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ... The Bava Beccaris massacre, named after the Italian General Fiorenzo Bava Beccaris, refers to the repression of widespread riots in Milan in May 1898. ...


20th Century

In 1919, Benito Mussolini organized the Blackshirts, who formed the core of Italy’s Fascist movement, in Milan. In 1922, Mussolini started his March on Rome from Milan. Mussolini redirects here. ... For the University of Nebraska–Lincoln football teams defense, see Blackshirts (football). ... Italian fascism (in Italian, fascismo) was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... For the movie by Dino Risi, see March on Rome (film) The March on Rome was a pseudo-coup détat by which Mussolinis National Fascist Party came to power in Italy. ...


During World War II, Milan suffered severe damage from British and American bombing, Even though Italy quit the war in 1943, the Germans occupied most of northern Italy until 1945. Some of the worst Allied bombing of Milan was in 1944. Much of the bombing focused around Milan's main train station. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The frontpage of Il Corriere della Sera announcing the sign of the armistice. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ...


In 1943, anti-German resistance in occupied Italy increased and there were explosions in Milan.


As the war came to an end, the American 1st Armored Division advanced on Milan as part of the Po Valley Campaign. But even before they arrived, members of the Italian resistance movement rose up in open revolt in Milan and liberated the city. Nearby, Mussolini and several members of his Italian Social Republic (Repubblica Sociale Italiana, or RSI) were captured by the resistance at Dongo and executed. On 29 April 1945, the bodies of the Fascists were taken to Milan and hung unceremoniously upside-down at Piazzale loreto a public square. The 1st Armored Division —nicknamed “Old Ironsides”— is the standing armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Wiesbaden, Germany. ... Combatants  United Kingdom United States Poland New Zealand India South Africa Brazil and others Germany Commanders Mark Clark Richard McCreery Lucian Truscott Heinrich von Vietinghoff Traugott Herr Joachim Lemelsen Strength U.S. 5th Army British 8th Army German 10th Army German 14th Army The Spring 1945 offensive in Italy was... Partisans parading in Milan The Italian resistance movement was a partisan force during World War II. // After Italys capitulation on 8 September 1943, the Italian resistance movement became massive. ... Anthem Giovinezza (The Youth)¹ From the Gustav Line to the Gothic Line Capital Salò Language(s) Italian Religion None defined. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


After the war the city was the site of a refugee camp for Jews fleeing from Austria. During the 1950s and 1960s, thousands of Italians, particularly from Southern Italy, moved to Milan to seek jobs within the city’s rapidly expanding economy and the population peaked at 1,723,000 in 1971. From the 1980s Milan become to host many immigrants from other countries of third world. However, much of Milan's population was lost during the 1970s and 1980s to the belt of new suburbs and small cities surrounding Milan. Nonetheless, Milan’s population seems to have stabilized, and there has been a slight increase in the population of the city since 2001. Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a...


Municipal Administration

The nine boroughs of Milan.
The nine boroughs of Milan.

Politics

See also: Mayors of Milan

Of nine boroughs into which Milan is divided, eight are governed by centre-right coalition (1-8) and one by centre-left coalition (9). This is a list of mayors of Milan (sindaci di Milano). ... Letizia Brighetto Arnaboldi Moratti, better Known as Letizia Moratti was born in Milan 26th of November 1946. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Forza Italia (Forward Italy, FI) [1] is an Italian political party. ...


Administrative Subdivision

The city of Milan is subdivided into 9 administrative zones, called Zonas. In 1999 the administration decided to reduce the number of these zones from 21 to 9. The Zona 1 is in the historic centre, the others eight zones form the borders of the first to the suburbs[7].


The following table reports the datas for every Zona; the total population is higher than the official city population because it includes foreign born immigrants with permits in its count.

Zona Area
(km²)
Population
(31 December 2006)
Density
(inhab/km²)
Subdivisions
Zona 1 Centro Storico 9.67 107,087 11,074 centro storico, Piazza Duomo, quartieri di Porta Magenta, Porta Tenaglia, Porta Sempione o Arco della Pace, Giardini Pubblici, Repubblica, Crocetta, Guastalla, Il Ticinese, Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio, Papiniano/San Vittore, Parco delle Basiliche, Carrobbio
Zona 2 Stazione Centrale, Gorla, Turro, Precotto, Greco, Crescenzago 12.58 163,932 13,031 Porta Nuova, Centrale, Ponte Seveso, Loreto, Maggiolina, Villaggio dei Giornalisti, Greco, Gorla, Turro, Precotto, Padova, Crescenzago, Adriano, Breda, Cassina di Pomm
Zona 3 Porta Venezia, Città Studi, Lambrate 14.23 153,470 10,785 Porta Venezia, Porta Monforte, Città Studi, Lambrate, Parco Lambro, Ortica, Feltre, Casoretto, Corelli, Rottole, Cimiano, Carnia, Naviglio Martesana
Zona 4 Porta Vittoria, Porta Romana, Forlanini, Monlué, Rogoredo 20.95 169,051 8,069 Porta Vittoria, Porta Romana, Libia, Cavriano, Calvairate, Monluè, Taliedo, La Trecca, Porto, Gamboloita, Nosedo, Corvetto, Rogoredo, Santa Giulia, Morsenchio, Forlanini, Omero, Mazzini, San Luigi, Ponte Lambro
Zona 5 Porta Ticinese, Porta Lodovica, Vigentino, Chiaravalle, Gratosoglio 29.87 134,016 4,487 Porta Ticinese, Porta Lodovica, Vigentino, Chiaravalle, Gratosoglio, Porta Vigentina, Conchetta, Ravizza, Ohm, Ripamonti, Vigentino, Ortles, Quaranta, Morivione, Spaventa, Stadera, Torretta, Meda, Conca Fallata, Vaiano Valle, Selvanesco, Casenuove, Macconago, Quintosole, Ronchetto delle Rane, Chiesa Rossa, Ferrari, Naviglio Pavese, Vettabbia, San Gottardo
Zona 6 Barona, Giambellino, Lorenteggio, Porta Genova 18.28 164,487 8,998 Porta Genova, Darsena, Magolfa, Solari, San Cristoforo, Moncucco, Lorenteggio, Dazio del Lorenteggio, Molinetto di Lorenteggio, Giambellino, Restocco Maroni, Ronchetto sul Naviglio, Boffalora, Cascina Bianca, Cascina Cantalupa, Sant'Ambrogio, Bisceglie, Inganni, Frattini, Naviglio Grande, Barona, Santa Rita, Legioni Romane, Foppa
Zona 7 Porta Vercellina, Baggio, San Siro, Forze Armate 31.34 190,969 6,093 Porta Vercellina, Baggio, San Siro, Forze Armate, S.Siro, Porta Vercellina, Aquileia, Piemonte, Washington, Marghera, Brescia, Siena, Saint Bon, San Carlo, Valsesia, Quinto Romano, Quarto Cagnino, Selinunte, Figino, Assiano, Muggiano, Novara, Marx, Bellaria, Ippodromi
Zona 8 Porta Volta, Fiera, Gallaratese, Quarto Oggiaro 23.72 197,484 8,326 Porta Volta, Fiera, Gallaratese, (Gallaratese I° e Gallaratese II°), Quarto Oggiaro, Sempione, Bullona, Monumentale, Porta Comasina, Cenisio, Paolo Sarpi, Ghisolfa, Cagnola, Il Portello, Monte Stella, Boldinasco, Q.T.8, Bonola, Ghisallo, Trenno, Lampugnano, San Leonardo, Accursio, Musocco, Porta Volta, Villapizzone, Garegnano, Vialba, Certosa, Quarto Oggiaro, Belgioioso
Zona 9 Affori, Porta Nuova, Niguarda, Bovisa, Fulvio Testi 21.12 194,386 9,204 Affori, Porta Nuova, Niguarda, Bovisa, Fulvio Testi, Centro Direzionale, Gioia, Isola, Zara, Lancetti/Dogana, Farini, Bovisasca, Dergano, Derganino, Montalbino, Prato Centenaro, Cà Granda, Comasina, Segnano, Bicocca, Sarca, Fermi, Astesani, Maciachini, Bruzzano, Parco Nord, Seveso
Total City 181,76 1,483,882 8,164

Climate

Under the Köppen climate classification Milan is typically classified as having a Humid subtropical climate (Cfa). In contrast to most of Italy, which is famous for a comfortable Mediterranean climate, Milan's winters are typically damp and cold, while summers are warm and quite muggy at times. Average temperatures are -3/+6°C in January and +15/+28°C in July. Snowfalls are relatively common in winter, even if in the last 15-20 years they have decreased in frequency and amount. The historic average of Milan's area is between 35 and 45 cm (16"/18"); single snowfalls over 30-50 cm in 1-3 days happen periodically, with a record of 80-100 cm during the famous snowfall of January 1985. Humidity is quite high during the whole year and annual precipitation averages about 1000 mm (40 in). In the stereotypical image, the city is often shrouded in the fog characteristic of the Po Basin, although the removal of rice fields from the southern neighbourhoods, urban heating effect and the reduction of pollution levels have reduced this phenomenon in recent years, at least in the downtown. Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ...  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ...

Weather averages for Milan
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 6 (44) 8 (47) 13 (56) 16 (62) 21 (70) 25 (77) 28 (83) 28 (82) 24 (75) 17 (64) 11 (52) 7 (45) 17 (63)
Average low °C (°F) -4 (25) -3 (27) 1 (34) 4 (40) 9 (49) 12 (55) 15 (60) 15 (60) 12 (54) 6 (44) 0 (33) -3 (26) 5 (42)
Precipitation cm (inches) 5 (2.0) 6 (2.4) 8 (3.5) 12 (4.9) 12 (4.9) 8 (3.5) 6 (2.5) 8 (3.5) 6 (2.7) 8 (3.3) 10 (4.2) 5 (2.0) 97 (38.3)
Source: Weatherbase[8] 2008
The Milan Cathedral from the opposite square
The Milan Cathedral from the opposite square
Piazza del Duomo.
Piazza del Duomo.
Inside view of the FieraMilano exhibition centre
The Pirelli Tower, symbol of the post-war economic boom
The Borsa Italiana, based in Milan, is Italy's main stock exchange.
The Borsa Italiana, based in Milan, is Italy's main stock exchange.
Milan, the Sempione Axis with the 1991 IDC project.
Milan, the Sempione Axis with the 1991 IDC project.
State University of Milan.
State University of Milan.
State University of Milan-Bicocca.
Brera Academy.
Brera Academy.
Bocconi University.
Bocconi University.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1988x1016, 367 KB) Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) - The Last Supper (1495-1498) File links The following pages link to this file: The Last Supper (Leonardo) ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1988x1016, 367 KB) Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) - The Last Supper (1495-1498) File links The following pages link to this file: The Last Supper (Leonardo) ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... This article is about the painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... Santa Maria delle Grazie is a Renaissance church in Milan built by Guiniforte Solari between 1466 and 1490 on a commission by Dominican monks. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Milano_Duomo_1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Milano_Duomo_1. ... , The Duomo di Milano from the Square. ... Santa Maria delle Grazie is a Renaissance church in Milan built by Guiniforte Solari between 1466 and 1490 on a commission by Dominican monks. ... Donato Bramante Donato Bramante (1444 - March 11, 1514), Italian architect, who introduced the Early Renaissance style to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his most famous design was St. ... View of the covered circulation corridor FieraMilano, is the large-scale exhibition centre that opened in 2005 and ranks at the top of the international trade fair sector in terms of size, functional features and building quality. ... The Pirelli Tower in Milan The Pirelli Tower or Pirelli Building (Italian: Grattacielo Pirelli - also called Pirellone), is a prominent building in Milan, Italy. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1360 pixel, file size: 755 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Dettaglio dellingresso Palazzo della Borsa di Milano, in Piazza degli Affari. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1360 pixel, file size: 755 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Dettaglio dellingresso Palazzo della Borsa di Milano, in Piazza degli Affari. ... The Borsa Italiana S.p. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 465 KB) Cortile della Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano, Italia Foto scattata da me, Aprile 2005 --Paolo da Reggio 18:45, 21 Apr 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 465 KB) Cortile della Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano, Italia Foto scattata da me, Aprile 2005 --Paolo da Reggio 18:45, 21 Apr 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

Main sights

See also: Buildings and structures in Milan

Milan is one of the major artistic centres of northern Italy. Its chief landmarks include:

Piazza and Duomo di Milano, 1909. ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Piazza del Duomo entrance The Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II is a covered arcade situated on the northern side of the Piazza del Duomo in Milan, connecting to the Piazza della Scala. ... Front view of Castello Sforzesco Courtyard in Castello Sforzesco Castello Sforzesco (English: Sforza Castle) is a castle in Milan, Italy that now houses an art gallery. ... The hut façade of SantAmbrogio with the entrance portico. ... The Basilica of St. ... Entrance to the Ambrosian Library. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Palazzo Brera The Pinacoteca di Brera (Brera Art Gallery) in Milan contains one of the foremost collections of Italian paintings, an outgrowth of the cultural program of the Accademia di Belle Arti (Academy of Fine Arts or Accademia di Brera), which shares the site in the Palazzo Brera. ... Santa Maria delle Grazie is a Renaissance church in Milan built by Guiniforte Solari between 1466 and 1490 on a commission by Dominican monks. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... This article is about the painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... The interior with the Bramantesque perspective. ... [[: Le Image:Mural de Narbonne. ... Donato Bramante Donato Bramante (1444 - March 11, 1514), Italian architect, who introduced the Early Renaissance style to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his most famous design was St. ... The Cimitero Monumentale in Milan, Italy is a very large cemetery located on the square given its name, Piazzale del Cimitero Monumentale. ... The Pinacoteca Brera (Brera Art Gallery) in Milan contains one of the foremost collections of Italian paintings, an outgrowth of the cultural program of the Accademia di Belli Arte (Academy of Fine Arts or Accademia Brera), which shares the site in the Palazzo Brera. ... Entrance to the Ambrosian Library. ... Lamentation over the Dead Christ, by Sandro Botticelli. ... The Bagatti Valsecchi Museum is a not-for-profit historic house museum in the Montenapoleone district [1] of downtown Milan, northern Italy. ...

Demographics

The city proper (Comune di Milano) has a population of 1,303,437 inhabitants (2006). Between 1991 to 2001, the city proper has lost 113,084 inhabitants (8.3 percent), mostly due to suburban sprawl and expulsion of population from the inner city centre, which is now almost fully dedicated to offices and commerce. The population of the urban area, that coincides with the Province of Milan, is estimated as of 2006 to be 3,884,481 [1]. Finally, the official population of the Milan Metropolitan area counts over 7.4 million residents, the largest in Italy [2]. As of 2006, the Italian national institute of statistics ISTAT estimated that 292,204 foreign-born immigrants live in Milan Urban Area, equal to 7.6% of total population. Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Milan (It. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Economy

Milan is one of the major financial and business centres of the world. The city is the seat of the Italian Stock Exchange (the Borsa Italiana)"Piazza Affari" and its hinterland is an avant-garde industrial area. Milan was included in a list of ten "Alpha world cities" by Peter J. Taylor and Robert E. Lang of the Brookings Institution in the economic report "U.S. Cities in the 'World City Network'" (Key Findings, Full ReportPDF (940 KiB)). The Borsa Italiana S.p. ... The meaning of hinterland and its history. ... “World city” redirects here. ... The Brookings Institution is a United States nonprofit public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.. Described in 1977, by TIME magazine as as the nations pre-eminent liberal think tank,[1] the institution is devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...


Milan is also well-known as the seat of the Alfa Romeo motorcar company, for its silk production, and as one of the world's capitals for fashion and a world leader for design. Alfa Romeo is an Italian automobile manufacturing company, founded as Darracq Italiana by Cavaliere Ugo Stella, an aristocrat from Milan in partnership with the French automobile firm of Alexandre Darracq. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Fashion design is the applied art dedicated to clothing and lifestyle accessories created within the cultural and social influences of a specific time. ...


Milan also provides directional functions for the whole of Lombardy, as its industrial base has been externalized throughout the region in the 1960s-70s.


FieraMilano, the city's Exhibition Centre and Trade Fair complex, is notable. The original fairground, known as "FieraMilanoCity", is slated for redevelopment. The new fairground, in the north-western suburb of Rho, opened in April 2005, making the Fiera Milano the largest trade fair complex in the world. View of the covered circulation corridor FieraMilano, is the large-scale exhibition centre that opened in 2005 and ranks at the top of the international trade fair sector in terms of size, functional features and building quality. ... Rho is an Italian town near Milan, Italy. ...


Milan of the future

At present, Milan is experiencing a significant architectural and urban design renaissance. Many new construction projects are under way with the aim of rehabilitating disused, peripheral industrial areas, including entire quarters. Examples of these projects include: the addition to the Teatro alla Scala; the CityLife project in the old "fiera" site; the new quarter Santa Giulia; and the Porta Nuova project in the Garibaldi-Repubblica zone. Famous architects are involved in the construction of this "new" Milan, such as Renzo Piano, Norman Foster, Zaha Hadid, Massimiliano Fuksas and Daniel Libeskind. These major works will give Milan a new skyline no longer dominated by the Duomo and the Pirelli Tower. La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo. ... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ... Interior of Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg, Germany Bergisel Ski Jump, Innsbruck BMW Central Building, Leipzig Vitra fire station, Weil am Rhein, Germany Maggies Centre, Kirkcaldy Zaha Hadid (Arabic: زها حديد) CBE (born October 31, 1950, Baghdad, Iraq) is a notable Iraqi-British deconstructivist architect. ... Massimiliano Fuksas is an Italian architect, born in Rome in 1944. ... Daniel Libeskind in front of his extension to the Denver Art Museum. ... Piazza and Duomo di Milano, 1909. ... The Pirelli Tower in Milan The Pirelli Tower or Pirelli Building (Italian: Grattacielo Pirelli - also called Pirellone), is a prominent building in Milan, Italy. ...


This urban rebirth will continue due to the selection of Milan to host Expo 2015. Expo 2015 is the next scheduled Worlds Fair after Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China. ...


Education

Milan is home to numerous universities and other institutions of higher learning:


Science and medical

  • Vita-Salute San Raffaele University
  • Tethys Research Institute

The Vita-Salute San Raffaele University (Italian: Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele) is a university located in Milan, Italy. ...

Architecture and engineering

Politecnico di Milano is the largest technical university in Italy with about 42,000 students. ...

Business, economic and social

Atrium of the Velodromo at Bocconi University Bocconi University (full official name in Italian Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi) is a private university located near the city center of Milan, Italy, not far from the Porta Ticinese, and was established in 1902. ... SDA School of Management is one of the leading business schools in Europe. ...

Language, art and music

The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... The Academy of Fine Arts of Brera, (Italian: Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera) also known as Brera Academy (Italian: Accademia di Brera) is a public academic institution located in the city center of Milan - Italy, in via Brera 28. ... The IULM University - Milan (Italian: Libera Università di Lingue e Comunicazione IULM ) is a university located in Milan, Italy. ... Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti Milano (NABA) NABA is a private Academy within the Higher Education Fine Arts System ([AFAM]) that is a department of the Italian Universities governed by Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR). ... The Milan Conservatory, or the Conservatorio Giuseppe Verdi, is a famous music school in Milan whose alumni include Giacomo Puccini, Giovanni Bottesini, Vittorio Giannini, Francisco Mignone, Italo Montemezzi, Alceo Galliera, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Maurizio Pollini, and Claudio Abbado. ...

Fashion and design

For student housing in Helsinki, see Domus Academica. ... The Istitute Europeo di Design (IED) is a design school that is spread out over six cities, in three countries. ... A fashion college with schools in Milan and London. ...

Other

  • I.S.E.F. Milano – Centro accademico sportivo "Rino Fenaroli"

Transportation

Airwiew of Malpensa International Airport. It handled over 23.8 million passengers in 2007.
Airwiew of Malpensa International Airport. It handled over 23.8 million passengers in 2007.

Malpensa International Airport (IATA: MXP, ICAO: LIMC) is located in the province of Varese, at more than 45 Km far from Milan, Italy. ...

Airports

The city has a large international airport known as Malpensa International Airport (MXP), located near the industrial towns of Busto Arsizio and Gallarate and connected to the downtown with the "Malpensa Express" railway service (from Cadorna Station and central station ). Malpensa was designed by the famous Ettore Sottsass. Milan also has the Linate Airport (LIN) within the city limits (for European and domestic traffic), connected with bus line 73 (from S. Babila). A third airport is Orio al Serio (BGY), close to the city of Bergamo. Vergiate, Venegono, Bresso, Voghera and Montichiari are additional airports in the region. Malpensa International Airport (IATA: MXP, ICAO: LIMC) is located in the province of Varese, at more than 45 Km far from Milan, Italy. ... Busto Arsizio is a city in the region of Lombardy, in northern Italy, 25 km north of Milan in the province of Varese (longitude: 08 5051, latitude: 3648). Population In 2001 Busto Arsizio had 77,094 inhabitants (a. ... Gallarate is a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the Province of Milan, from which it is 25 miles NW by rail. ... Ettore Sottsass (1917-) is an Italian designer of the late 20th century. ... Linate Airport (IATA: LIN, ICAO: LIML) is the city airport of Milan, Italy. ... Orio al Serio International Airport (IATA: BGY, ICAO: LIME) is an airport located in Bergamo, near Milan, Italy and it serves the low-cost traffic of Milan. ... Small street (via della Noca) leading to città alta. ...

The classic trams from the 1920s are still in use.
The classic trams from the 1920s are still in use.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 802 pixel, file size: 143 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The 1924 trams still running in Milan. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 802 pixel, file size: 143 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The 1924 trams still running in Milan. ... A modern tram in the Töölö district of Helsinki, Finland A tram (or tramway, trolley, streetcar, tramcar, Straßenbahn) is a railborne vehicle (lighter than a train) for transport of passengers (or, occasionally, freight). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... ETR 500 ETR-500 (ElettroTreno 500) is the Italian high-speed train, introduced in 1993. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Subways, tramways, trolleybuses and buses

Milan has 3 subway lines (M1 – red, M2 – green, M3 – yellow) and the system, called Milan Metro – "La Metro", running for more than 80 km. There is also a light metro-service, "Metrò S. Raffaele", connecting the San Raffaele Hospital with Cascina Gobba station (M2). Extensions of lines 1, 2 and 3 are under construction, to create more than 15 km of track with 10 new stations. Line 5 is also under construction, to be finished in the first half of 2012. Lines 4 (linking downtown with Linate Airport) and 6 are in planning stages. “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... The Milan transportation system (Italian: Rete metropolitana di Milano) is the transport network of Milan, Italy. ...


The "Passante" is a railway tunnel under the city centre used by suburban trains, and allow passengers coming from suburbs a direct interchange to the three (soon to be four) metro lines at Garibaldi, Repubblica and P.ta Venezia stations.


Greater Milan also has one of the most extensive tramway systems[citation needed] in the world, with more than 286 km of track, and 20 lines.


Milan also has four trolleybus routes; included in the fleet are ten air-conditioned Cristalis trolleybuses.


Ninety-three bus lines cover over 1,070 km between them. The local transportation authority (ATM) transported more than 600 million passengers in 2003 .


Railways

Milan is the second railway hub of Italy, and the five major stations of Milan, amongst which the Milan Central station, are among Italy's busiest. The first railroad built in Milan, the Milan and Monza Rail Road was opened for service on August 17, 1840. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Milan and Monza Rail Road is one of the oldest railroads in Italy, the first rail road in North Italy, Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia, opening in 1840 and consists of 12,8 Km in length. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


High speed train lines are under construction all across Italy, and new lines will open from Milan to Rome and Naples, and from Milan to Torino.


Other than the Central Station, High Speed Trains will sometimes stop also at:

  • Milano Rogoredo (for trains coming from Bologna and Rome)
  • Milano/Rho Fiera (from Turin)
  • Milano Pioltello (from the planned high speed line from Venice)

Platform Roofing works in the station. ...

Regional-Metropolitan Railway services

The Suburban Railway Service ( "S" Lines, a service similar to the French RER and German S-Bahn), composed of eight suburban lines and ten more scheduled for 2008, connects the "Greater Milan" to cities such as Como and Varese. The Regional Railway Service ("R"), instead, links Milan with the rest of Lombardy and the national railway system. The "Passante ferroviario" is an underground railway serving a couple of "S" lines and is very much like another subway line (and is even marked as such on subway maps), except that it is connected to LeNord and Trenitalia suburban networks. See the map of the M (subway) + S (regional metropolitan railway) Network on msrmilano.com Go on [3] For other uses, see Como (disambiguation). ... Varese is a city in north-western Lombardy, northern Italy, 55 km north of Milan. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Trenitalia logo. ...


Taxis

Milan has a taxi service operated by private companies and licensed by the City of Milan (Comune di Milano). All taxis are the same color, white. Prices are based on time elapsed and distance traveled. As the number of licences is kept low by lobbying of present taxi drivers, prices are fairly high (significantly higher than, for example, in New York) and finding a taxi may be difficult in rush hours, and almost impossible during public transportation strikes. For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ... This article is about the color. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x742, 239 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: La Scala Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x742, 239 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: La Scala Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ...

Culture

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Literature

In the late eighteenth century, and throughout the nineteenth, Milan was an important centre for intellectual discussion and literary creativity. The Enlightenment found here a fertile ground. Cesare Beccaria, with his famous Dei delitti e delle pene, and Pietro Verri, with the periodical Il Caffè were able to exert a considerable influence over the new middle-class culture, thanks also to an open-minded Austrian administration. In the first years of the nineteenth century, the ideals of the Romantic movement made their impact on the cultural life of the city and its major writers debated the primacy of Classical versus Romantic poetry. Here, too, Giuseppe Parini, and Ugo Foscolo published their most important works, and were admired by younger poets as masters of ethics, as well as of literary craftmanship. Foscolo's poem Dei sepolcri was inspired by a Napoleonic law which—against the will of many of its inhabitants—was being extended to the city. The word Enlightment redirects here. ... Cesare, Marquis of Beccaria (or the Marchese de Beccaria-Bonesana) (March 11, 1738 - November 28, 1794) was an Italian philosopher and politician. ... Dei delitti e delle pene (English: On Crime and Punishment) is a judiciary treatise written by the Italian philosopher and thinker Cesare Beccaria between 1763 and 1764. ... Detail of Pietro Verri monument in Milan. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... Giuseppe Parini (Bosisio, now in Lecco province, May 23, 1729 - Milan, 1799) was an Italian satirist and poet. ... Ugo Foscolo (1778-1827), Italian writer, was born at Zakynthos in the Ionian Isles on 6 Febraury 1778. ...


In the third decade of the nineteenth century, Alessandro Manzoni wrote his novel I Promessi Sposi, a Milanese story of the XVII century, etc.. This historical novel was the real manifesto of Italian Romanticism, which found in Milan its centre. The periodical Il Conciliatore published articles by Silvio Pellico, Giovanni Berchet, Ludovico di Breme, who were both Romantic in poetry and patriotic in politics. Alessandro Manzoni (Francesco Hayez, 1841, Brera Art Gallery). ... I Promessi Sposi (English The Betrothed) is an Italian historical novel by Alessandro Manzoni. ... Silvio Pellico (born June 24, 1788 in Saluzzo (Piedmont); died January 31, 1854) was an Italian dramatist. ...


After the Unification of Italy in 1861, Milan lost its political importance; nevertheless it retained a sort of central position in cultural debates. New ideas and movements from other countries of Europe were accepted and discussed: thus Realism and Naturalism gave birth to an Italian movement, Verismo. The greatest verista novelist, Giovanni Verga, was born in Sicily but wrote his most important books in Milan. Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... Look up realism, realist, realistic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Naturalism may refer to: Naturalism (philosophy), any of several philosophical stances wherein all phenomena or hypotheses commonly labeled as supernatural, are either false, unknowable, or not inherently different from natural phenomena or hypotheses Methodological naturalism is the methodological assumption that that observable events in nature are explained only by natural... Verismo was an Italian literary movement born approximately between 1875 and 1895. ... Giovanni Verga. ...


Media

Milan is the base of operations for many local and nationwide communication services and businesses, such as newspapers, magazines, and TV and radio stations.


Newspapers:

Magazines: The headquarters in Milan. ... Italian for The Newspaper, Il Giornale was essentially the first Starbucks. ... Il Sole 24 ore is an Italian daily business newspaper. ... Il Manifesto (Italian for The Manifesto) is an Italian communist newspaper. ... La Repubblica (meaning: The Republic) is an Italian daily newspaper. ... La Gazzetta dello Sport is an Italian newspaper dedicated to coverage of various sports. ... Libero can refer to: A specialist defensive position in soccer (also known as a sweeper). ...

  • La Settimana Enigmistica
  • Abitare (architecture & design monthly)
  • Casabella (architecture & design monthly)
  • Domus (architecture & design monthly)
  • Panorama (weekly)

La casa bella, n. ... Domus is an Italian Magazine, first published in 1928, which focuses on design and architecture. ... Panorama is an Italian newsmagazine owned by Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi. ...

Language

In addition to Italian, approximately a third of the population of western Lombardy can speak the Western Lombard language, also known as Insubric. In Milan, some natives of the city can speak the traditional Milanese language—that is to say the urban variety of Western Lombard, which is not to be confused with the Milanese-influenced regional variety of the Italian language. For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Western Lombard is a Romance language spoken in Italy, in the Lombard provinces of Milan, Monza, Varese, Como, Lecco, Sondrio, a little part of Cremona (except Crema and its neighbours), Lodi and Pavia, and the Piedmont provinces of Novara, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola and a small part of Vercelli (Valsesia), and... Milanese (milanes, milanées, meneghin, meneghìn) is a variety of Western Lombard spoken in the city of Milan and in its province. ...


Religion

The Waldensian Church in Milan, built in 1949, incorporates materials from the demolished Catholic gothic church of San Giovanni in Conca.
The Waldensian Church in Milan, built in 1949, incorporates materials from the demolished Catholic gothic church of San Giovanni in Conca.

Milan's population, like that of Italy as a whole, is overwhelmingly Catholic. Other religions practised include Buddhism[9], Judaism, Islam[10][11] and Protestantism[12][13]. It is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Milan. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Buddhism, a Dharmic faith, is usually considered one of the worlds major religions, with between 230 to 500 million followers. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Milan is a particular church of the Roman Catholic Church in Italy. ...


Milan has its own historic Catholic rite known as the Ambrosian Rite (it: rito ambrosiano). It varies slightly from the typical Catholic rite (the Roman, used in all other western regions), with some differences in the liturgy and mass celebrations, and in the calendar (for example, the date of carnival is celebrated some days after the common date). The Ambrosian rite is also practised in other surrounding locations in Lombardy and in the Swiss canton of Ticino. Ambrosian Rite (also sometimes called the Milanese Rite) named after Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan in the fourth century, is a Catholic liturgical rite practised among Catholics in the greater part of the Archdiocese of Milan (excluding, notably, the city of Monza, and a few other towns), and neighbouring area... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... For other uses, see Carnival (disambiguation). ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Swiss may be: Related to Switzerland: the Swiss Confederation Swiss people Swiss cheese Swiss corporations Switzerland-related topics Named Swiss: Swiss, Missouri Swiss, North Carolina Swiss, West Virginia Swiss, Wisconsin Swiss International Air Lines Swiss Re SWiSS is also used as a disparaging nickname for the Socialist Workers Student Society. ... For the river, see Ticino river. ...


Another important difference concerns the liturgical music. The Gregorian chant was completely unused in Milan and surrounding areas, because the official one was its own Ambrosian chant, definitively established by the Council of Trent (1545-1563) and earlier than the Gregorian [4]. To preserve this music there has developed the unique schola cantorum, a college, and an Institute in partnership with the "Pontifical Ambrosian Institute of Sacred Music" (PIAMS) in Rome [5]. Gregorian chant is the central tradition of Western plainchant, a form of monophonic, unaccompanied sacred song of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Ambrosian chant (also known as Milanese chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Ambrosian rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Food

Like most cities in Italy, Milan and its surrounding area has its own regional cuisine. Milanese cuisine includes "cotoletta alla milanese", a breaded veal (pork and turkey can be used) cutlet pan-fried in butter (which some claim to be of Austrian origin, as it is similar to Viennese "Wienerschnitzel", while others claim that the "Wienerschnitzel" derived from the "cotoletta alla milanese"). Other typical dishes are cassoeula (stewed pork rib chops and sausage with Savoy cabbage and tomato sauce), ossobuco (stewed veal shank with tomato or lemon sauce), risotto alla milanese (with saffron, white wine and beef marrow), busecca (stewed tripe with beans and tomato sauce), and brasato (stewed beef or pork with wine and potatoes). Season-related pastries include chiacchiere (flat fritters dusted with sugar) and tortelli (fried spherical cookies) for Carnival, colomba (glazed cake shaped as a dove) for Easter, pane dei morti ("Bread of the Dead", cookies aromatized with cinnamon) for All Soul's Day and panettone for Christmas. The salame milano, a salami with a very fine grain, is widespread throughout Italy. The best known Milanese cheese is gorgonzola from the nearby town of that name, although today the major gorgonzola producers operate in Piedmont. Cotoletta (literally, little cut or cutlet) is an Italian language word for a cooked veal cutlet with breading. ... Ossobuco alla milanese (sometimes osso buco) is a Piemontese dish of braised veal shanks. ... Risotto prepared with mushrooms and scallions. ... For other uses, see Carnival (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... All Souls Day by William Bouguereau All Souls Day (formally, Commemoratio omnium Fidelium Defunctorum or Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed), also called Defuncts Day in Mexico and Belgium, is the day set apart in the Roman Catholic Church for the commemoration of the faithful departed. ... Panettone (this isnt the original shape). ... Salami Salami is cured sausage, fermented and air-dried. ... Gorgonzola is a blue-headed Italian cheese, made from unskimmed cows milk. ...


Sports

The city hosted, among other events, the FIFA World Cup in 1934 and 1990, the UEFA European Football Championship in 1980. The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the mens national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the... The UEFA European Football Championship is the main football competition of the mens national football teams governed by the UEFA. Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the European Nations Cup, changing to the name European Football...


Football is the most popular sport in Italy, and Milan is home to two world-famous football teams: A.C. Milan and Internazionale. The former is normally referred to as "Mìlan" (notice the stress on the first syllable, unlike the English and Milanese name of the city), the latter as "Inter". Soccer redirects here. ... Associazione Calcio Milan, commonly referred to by the abbreviation AC Milan or simply Milan, is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy. ... Internazionale Milano Football Club is an Italian football club based in Milan, Lombardy, which plays in the Serie A. It is more commonly known as Inter, and often named Inter Milan in foreign countries. ...


Milan is the only city in Europe whose teams have won both the European Cup and the Intercontinental Cup. Both teams play at Giuseppe Meazza – San Siro Stadium (85,700). Many of the strongest Italian football players were born in Milan, in the surrounding metropolitan area, or in Lombardy: Valentino Mazzola, Paolo Maldini, Giuseppe Meazza, Giacinto Facchetti, Luigi Riva, Gaetano Scirea, Giuseppe Bergomi, Walter Zenga, Antonio Cabrini, Roberto Donadoni, Gianluca Vialli, Silvio Piola, Gabriele Oriali, Giovanni Trapattoni and Franco Baresi as well as many others. The Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, also known as the San Siro, is a football stadium in Milan,Italy. ... Valentino Mazzola. ... Paolo Maldini (born 26 June 1968 in Milan) is an Italian footballer who plays for Serie A club A.C. Milan. ... For the stadium named after this man - which is more commonly known as the San Siro - see Stadio Giuseppe Meazza. ... Giacinto Facchetti. ... Luigi Riva (born November 7, 1944 in Leggiuno, close to Milano), best known as Gigi Riva, is a former Italian footballer, the all-time leading scorer for the Italian national team. ... Gaetano Scirea (May 25, 1953 - September 3, 1989) was an Italian football player and one of the greatest defenders of all-time: Scirea is one of the very few players to have won all national and international trophies for football clubs. ... Giuseppe Bergomi (born December 22, 1963 in Milan) is a former Italian football (soccer) player, who spent his entire career at Internazionale and was a key member of the Italian national team in the 1980s and 1990s. ... Walter Zenga (born April 28, 1960 in Milan) is an Italian football (soccer) manager and former player, a long-time goalkeeper for the Italian national team and Inter Milan. ... Antonio Cabrini, (born October 8, 1957) is a football (soccer) coach and former successful player from Italy. ... Roberto Donadoni (born September 9, 1963 in Cisano Bergamasco, Province of Bergamo, Lombardy) is an Italian football (soccer) manager and former player. ... Gianluca Vialli (born July 9, 1964 in Cremona) is an Italian football striker and manager. ... Silvio Piola (September 29, 1913 in Robbio Lomellina, Italy - October 4, 1996 in Gattinara, Italy) was an Italian footballer whose career lasted from 1929 until 1954. ... Gabriele Oriali (November 25, 1952) was an Italian soccer player who mainly played defensive midfield but could also play center-back. ... Giovanni Trapattoni (born March 17, 1939) is an Italian football coach, considered the most successful club coach in the history of that country [3], and former player. ... Franco Baresi (born May 8, 1960 in Travagliato, province of Brescia) is an Italian youth team coach and former football defender with A.C. Milan, acknowledged as one of the greatest defenders ever to play the game. ...

  • The famous Monza Formula One circuit is located near the city, inside a wide park. It is one of the world's oldest car racing circuits. The capacity for the F1 races is currently around 137,000 spectators, although in the 1950s the stands could hold more than 250,000. It has hosted an F1 race nearly every year since the first year of competition, exception made of 1980.
  • Olimpia Milano (sponsored Armani) is a successful italian and european basketball team. It is one of the most important and succesful italian team and one of the top one in Europe too. Olimpia plays at the DatchForum arena (capacity 14,000)
  • Rhinos Milano American Football Club is the oldest American football club in Milan and have won four Italian Super Bowls. They are one of the five foundation clubs of the Italian Football League.
  • CUS Milano Baseball is the oldest baseball club in Milan and have won eight Italian Scudetti.
  • The Amatori Rugby Milano have won 18 National Championships and are the most famous and important Rugby team in Italy.
  • Different ice hockey teams from Milan have won 30 National Championships between them. The Vipers Milano have won the last 5 national championships, the Alpenliga and several Coppa Italia, and are the leaders of that sport in Italy. They play at the Agora Stadium (capacity 4,500) during the regular season, and at the Forum during playoffs
  • Every year, Milan hosts the Bonfiglio Trophy Under 18 Tennis Tournament. It is the most important youth tournament in the world, and is played at the Milan Tennis Club. The central court has a capacity of 8000. Past winners include Tacchini, Jan Kodes, Adriano Panatta, Corrado Barazzutti, Moreno, Björn Borg, Smid, Ivan Lendl, Guy Forget, Jim Courier, Goran Ivanišević, Yevgeny Kafelnikov, and Guillermo Coria.

Milan and Lombardy are official candidates for the Summer Olympic Games of 2020 ("Milan-Lombardy 2020"). Autodromo Nazionale di Monza is a motorsport race track near the town of Monza, Italy, north of Milan. ... F1 redirects here. ... Formula One, abbreviated to F1 and also known as Grand Prix racing, is the highest class of single-seat open-wheel auto racing. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article is about the sport. ... Year founded 1977 City Milan (Italy) Owner Gentile Fabio Fields Arena Civica (Milan), 12. ... Amatori Rugby Milano is an Italian rugby union team, based in Milan, Italy. ... The Super 10 is the national rugby union competition in Italy. ... HCJ Milano Vipers Hockey Club Junior Milano Vipers are an Italian professional ice hockey team from Milan, currently playing in Serie A. Categories: | ... Serie A (full name: la Serie A di hockey su ghiaccio, or A Series of ice hockey) is the name of the top tier of professional ice hockey in Italy, which first began play in 1924. ... Jan KodeÅ¡ (born March 1, 1946, in Prague, Czechoslovakia) was a right-handed Czech tennis player who won three Grand Slam events in the early-1970s. ... Adriano Panatta Adriano Panatta (born July 9, 1950, in Rome, Italy) is a former professional tennis player from Italy. ... Corrado Barazzutti (born February 19, 1953) is a Italian former tennis player. ...   (born June 6, 1956, in Stockholm, Sweden) is a former World No. ... Ivan Lendl (IPA: ) (born March 7, 1960, in Ostrava, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic)) is a former World No. ... Guy Forget (born January 4, 1965 in Casablanca, Morocco) is a formerFrench professional tennis player. ... James Spencer Jim Courier, Jr. ... Goran Å imun IvaniÅ¡ević [] (born in Split, September 13, 1971) is a former professional tennis player from Croatia. ... Yevgeny Aleksandrovich Kafelnikov (born 18 February 1974; Russian: , yev-GHE-neey KAH-fill-nee-coff) is a former World No. ... Guillermo Sebastián Coria (born January 13, 1982 in Rufino, Santa Fe Province), nicknamed El Mago (The Magician in Spanish), is a professional tennis player from Argentina. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... 2020 (MMXX) will be a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Stadia

San Siro Stadium, one of Europe's largest.
San Siro Stadium, one of Europe's largest.
  • Autodromo Nazionale Monza – car and motorcycle racing – 137,000
  • San Siro – only football; Milan and Inter – 85,700
  • Arena Civica – Athletics, Rugby, Football, American Football 30,000
  • Brianteo – Athletics, Football – 18,568
  • Ippodromo del Trotter – Horse Racing – 16,000
  • Ippodromo del Galoppo – Horse Racing – 15,000
  • Datch Forum – Basketball, Ice Hockey, Volleyball, Music – 9,000 to 12,000
  • MazdaPalace – Basketball, Volleyball – 9,000
  • Velodromo Vigorelli – Cycling, American Football – 12,000
  • PalaLido – Basketball – 5,000
  • Agorà – Ice Hockey – 4,000
  • Nuovo Giuriati – Rugby – 4,000

There are other stadiums and multiuse palaces located in the metropolitan area, the biggest being Monza Brianteo Stadium (18,000 seats), the PalaDesio (10,000) and Geas Stadium (8,500). Image File history File linksMetadata San_Siro3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata San_Siro3. ... The Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, also known as the San Siro, is a football stadium in Milan,Italy. ... Autodromo Nazionale di Monza is a motorsport race track near the town of Monza, Italy, north of Milan. ... The Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, also known as the San Siro, is a football stadium in Milan,Italy. ... Arena Civica is a multi-use stadium in Milan, Italy. ... Velodromo Vigorelli is a velodrome in Milan, Italy. ...

Club League Sport Venue Established Championships
A.C. Milan Serie A Football San Siro – Giuseppe Meazza 1899 4 World Club cups; 7 European championship; 17 Italian championship; 2 Cup Winners' Cup
F.C. Internazionale Milano Serie A Football San Siro – Giuseppe Meazza 1908 2 World Club cups; 2 European championship; 16 Italian championship
Olimpia Milano Serie A Basketball Datchforum 1936 1 World cup; 3 European championship; 25 Italian championship; 3 Cup Winners' Cup; 2 Korac cup
H.C. Milano/Milano Vipers Serie A Ice Hockey Agorà 1924 2 European championship; 20 Italian championship
H.C. Diavoli/Devils today settled in Courmayeur Serie A Ice Hockey 1930 3 European championship; 7 Italian championship
Amatori Rugby Milano Serie B Rugby Stadio Giuriati 1928 18 Italian championship
Rhinos Milano Serie A2 American Football Velodromo Vigorelli-Maspes 1977 4 Italian championship

Associazione Calcio Milan, commonly referred to by the abbreviation AC Milan or simply Milan, is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... The Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, also known as the San Siro, is a football stadium in Milan,Italy. ... Football Club Internazionale Milano, commonly referred to as simply Internazionale, Inter or Inter Milan[1], is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy, founded in 1908. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... The Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, also known as the San Siro, is a football stadium in Milan,Italy. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lega A Basket logo In Italian Basketball, the Serie A is the highest level club competition where play determines the national champion. ... Datch Forum di Assago (formerly known as Fila Forum, Forum di Assago; also known as DatchForum, Datchforum, Datch Forum) is an indoor sporting arena in Assago, near Milan, Italy. ... HCJ Milano Vipers Hockey Club Junior Milano Vipers are an Italian professional ice hockey team from Milan, currently playing in Serie A. Categories: | ... Serie A (full name: la Serie A di hockey su ghiaccio, or A Series of ice hockey) is the name of the top tier of professional ice hockey in Italy, which first began play in 1924. ... Serie A (full name: la Serie A di hockey su ghiaccio, or A Series of ice hockey) is the name of the top tier of professional ice hockey in Italy, which first began play in 1924. ... Amatori Rugby Milano is an Italian rugby union team, based in Milan, Italy. ... Year founded 1977 City Milan (Italy) Owner Gentile Fabio Fields Arena Civica (Milan), 12. ...

Parks and gardens

Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ... Front view of Castello Sforzesco Courtyard in Castello Sforzesco Castello Sforzesco (English: Sforza Castle) is a castle in Milan, Italy that now houses an art gallery. ...

Sister Cities

Milan is twinned with the following cities:

Other forms of cooperation and city friendship: Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the British city. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Image File history File links Flag_of_Senegal. ... (City of Dakar, divided into 19 communes darrondissement) City proper (commune) Région Dakar Département Dakar Mayor Pape Diop (PDS) (since 2002) Area 82. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the French city. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... For other uses, see Osaka (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... This article is about the Brazilian state, São Paulo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Jordan. ... For other meanings, see Amman (disambiguation) and Ammann. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... Location Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governor Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Nickname: Location in Brazil Coordinates: , Country Brazil Region State Minas Gerais Founded 1901 Incorporated (as city) December 12, 1897 Government  - Mayor Fernando da Mata Pimentel (PT) Area  - City 330. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of South Korea highlighting the city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Coordinates: , Country State Foundation 1542 Government  - Mayor Alfonso Petersen Farah ( PAN) Area  - City 187. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Peru. ... For other uses, see Lima (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... For other uses, see Medellín (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... This article is about the capital of Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - Total 641. ...

See also

This is a list of mayors of Milan (sindaci di Milano). ... Milan metropolitan area View from the Duomo di Milano towards the Castello Sforzesco and the Alps beyond. ... Milan (It. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://demo.istat.it/bilmens2006/index.html- ISTAT demographics
  2. ^ http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1264/is_4_34/ai_106388962
  3. ^ medius + lanum; Alciato's "etymology" is intentionally far-fetched.
  4. ^ Bituricis vervex, Heduis dat sucula signum.
  5. ^ Laniger huic signum sus est, animálque biforme, Acribus hinc setis, lanitio inde levi.
  6. ^ Alciato, Emblemata, Emblema II
  7. ^ web site of Milan
  8. ^ Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Milan, Italy. Weatherbase (2008). Retrieved on 2008-06-03.
  9. ^ Lankarama Buddhist Temple - Milan,Italy
  10. ^ Islam in Italy » Inter-Religious Dialogue » OrthodoxEurope.org
  11. ^ American Chronicle - Milan: The Center for Radical Islam in Europe
  12. ^ Centro Culturale Protestante - Protestanti a Milano delle Chiese Battiste Metodiste Valdesi
  13. ^ Chiesa Evangelica Valdese - Milano

Istituto Nazionale di Statistica (ISTAT) is the Italian national statistical institute, roughly corresponding to the United States Census Bureau. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... -1...

References

  • The decline and fall of the Roman Empire (Edward Gibbon)
  • The later Roman empire (Jones), Blackwell and Mott, Oxford
  • Milano romana / Mario Mirabella Roberti (Rusconi publisher) 1984
  • Marchesi, i percorsi della Storia Minerva Italica (It)
  • Acts of international convention "Milan Capital"), Convegno archeologico internazionale Milano

capitale dell'impero romano 1990 ; Milano Altri autori: Sena Chiesa, Gemma Arslan, Ermanno A. Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ...

  • Milano tra l'eta repubblicana e l'eta augustea : atti del Convegno di studi, 26-27 marzo 1999, Milano
  • Milano capitale dell'impero romano : 286-402 d.c. – (Milano) : Silvana, (1990). – 533 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
  • Milano capitale dell'Impero romano : 286-402 d.c. - album storico archeologico. – Milano : Cariplo : ET, 1991. – 111 p. : ill. ; 47 cm. (Pubbl. in occasione della Mostra tenuta a Milano nel) 1990.
  • Agostino a Milano: il battesimo - Agostino nelle terre di Ambrogio: 22-24 aprile 1987 / (relazioni di) Marta Sordi (et al.) Augustinus publ.
  • Anselmo, Conte di Rosate : istoria milanese al tempo del Barbarossa / Pietro Beneventi, Europia publ.

This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Meanings of Barbarossa (Italian: Red Beard): Barbarossa was the nickname of two famous people in history: Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor Khair ad Din, Barbary pirate and Ottoman admiral. ...

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Milano

Coordinates: 45.4636° N 9.1884° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



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