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Encyclopedia > Mike and the Mad Dog
Mike and the Mad Dog


Mike and the Mad Dog at Super Bowl XL in Detroit with Archie Manning. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Date February 5, 2006 Stadium Ford Field City Detroit, Michigan MVP Hines Ward, wide receiver Favorite Steelers by 4 National anthem Aaron Neville, Aretha Franklin and Dr. John, ASL performed by Angela LaGuardia Coin toss Tom Brady Referee Bill Leavy Halftime show The Rolling Stones Attendance 68,206 TV in... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Elisha Archie Manning (born May 19, 1949) is a former quarterback in professional American football. ...

Genre Sports Talk
Running time 5 hours, 30 minutes
(1:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. ET)
Country Flag of the United States United States
Home station WFAN (1989-present)
Starring Mike Francesa and
Chris "Mad Dog" Russo
Air dates September 5, 1989 – present

Mike and the Mad Dog is an afternoon drive sports radio program on WFAN in New York City. The hosts of the radio program are Mike Francesa and Christopher "Mad Dog" Russo, and the show debuted on September 5, 1989. Currently it is simulcast on the YES Network, WROW in Albany, New York, and WQYK in Tampa, Florida. // Sports radio (or sports talk radio) is a radio format devoted entirely to discussion and broadcasting of sporting events. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see WFAN (disambiguation). ... Michael Patrick Tank Francesa, Jr. ... For the Apprentice 2 candidate Chris Russo, see The Apprentice 2 candidates. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see WFAN (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Patrick Tank Francesa, Jr. ... For the Apprentice 2 candidate Chris Russo, see The Apprentice 2 candidates. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Yankees Entertainment and Sports (YES) Network is a New York City regional cable TV channel dedicated to broadcasting baseball games of the New York Yankees, and basketball games of the New Jersey Nets. ... WROW is an AM radio station broadcasting on 590 kHz licensed to Albany, New York with its tower in Glenmont, New York. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... WQYK-AM is a classic country music radio station broadcasting on 1010 AM in the Tampa, Florida area. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida. ...

Contents

History

Before Francesa and Russo were paired, Russo was an overnight/weekend and fill-in host. He caught the attention of Don Imus, who was so impressed with his vibrant personality that he brought Russo onto the Imus in the Morning show as its sports reporter. The attention Russo received on Imus was enormous. John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ... Imus in the Morning was a comedy, news, and political radio program the United States, hosted by radio personality Don Imus. ...


Meanwhile, Francesa was a midday and weekend host at WFAN, and was known to be knowledgeable but somewhat dry on-air. Like Russo, Francesa got the attention of Imus when he made an on-the-air bet with Francesa that Seton Hall University's basketball team would not make the Final Four in the NCAA tournament. Imus promised Francesa a new Porsche if Seton Hall made the Final Four, which they did. Though Imus found a way around the bet, the dialogue between the two is considered to be among the classic moments in the history of Imus in the Morning.[1][2] “Seton Hall” redirects here. ... // Final four redirects here. ... The 1989 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... This article is about the auto company. ...


In August 1989, WFAN (which was owned at the time by Emmis Communications) was looking for hosts to replace the controversial Pete Franklin in the afternoon drive time period. Mark Mason, then the program director, floated the idea of teaming Francesa with Russo.[3] At first the station management thought the idea was crazy because they were no-names at that time. However, because of Francesa and Russo's popularity on the weekends and on Imus in the Morning individually, the station management decided to pair the two together.[1] 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emmis Communications is an Indianapolis, Indiana-based radio and television group. ... Pete Franklin (1928 - November 23, 2004) (The King) was a U.S. sports radio talk show who worked in San Francisco, Cleveland and New York. ... Connes nippian recapers sang terning faizing relist revisi. ...


While Francesa's brand of sports commentating was considered hard-hitting and serious, Russo's was considered lighter, unconventional, and more entertaining. The show was dubbed Mike and the Mad Dog and debuted on September 5, 1989. The show quickly gained popularity and has been a staple of the New York sports scene ever since. is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


George Vecsey of The New York Times once described Russo's voice as "a bizarre mixture of Jerry Lewis, Archie Bunker and Daffy Duck."[4] His voice is also described as "Donald Duck on steroids."[5] George Vecsey is a non-fiction author and sports columnist for the New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Information Gender Male Age 50 (in 1974) Date of birth 1924 Date of death Unknown (still alive as of 1983) Occupation Blue Collar (19??-1978) Bar Owner (1979-????) Family Michael Stivic (son-in-law) Joey Stivic (grandson) Alfred Bunker (brother) Barbara Lee Billie Bunker (niece) Katherine Bunker (sister-in-law... Daffy Duck is an animated cartoon character in the Warner Brothers Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons. ... Donald Duck is an animated cartoon and comic-book character from Walt Disney Productions. ... In chemistry and biology, Steroids are a type of lipid, characterized by a carbon skeleton with four fused rings. ...


Originally it was broadcast weekdays from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Because of its popularity, WFAN extended its starting time twice, first to 2:00 p.m., and then to 1:00 p.m.[6] The program currently airs from 1:00 to 6:30 p.m. on radio. Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ...


In the wake of Imus' firing in April 2007, Mike and the Mad Dog was also broadcast in the mornings from 6:00 to 10:00 a.m. for two weeks between April 16 and April 27, and again on May 21 and May 22, 2007. The afternoon portion of the show ran from 2:00 through 6:30 p.m..[7][8][9] The morning portion of the show was nationally syndicated and news-oriented.[10] While in the morning drive slot, they inherited some of the staff from Imus in the Morning, including news anchor Charles McCord, sports anchor Chris Carlin and engineer Lou Rufino.[11] On April 18, 2007, it was announced that Rufino would also serve as surpervising engineer for the afternoon show. The syndicated broadcast was available to the handful of former Imus in the Morning affiliates who had not had a chance to pick a new morning show. Francesa and Russo hosted the morning drive program several times since, either together or taking turns solo, until Boomer Esiason and Craig Carton took over the timeslot on September 4, 2007.[12] For other uses, see WFAN (disambiguation). ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Chris Carlin born in Albany, New York May 13, 1973is an on-air personality for WFAN 660, an AM radio station in New York City. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Craig Carton is an American radio personality and shock jock who has worked on a variety of radio stations and talk formats. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Mike and the Mad Dog were No. 1 in the market among men between 25 and 54, which notched a 6.9 share in 2007, up from a 6.2 in 2006.[13] According to New York magazine, Francesa made $1.4 million and Russo made $1.3 million in 2005.[14] Headquarters New York magazine is a weekly magazine, founded in 1968, concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Show format and discussions

The show starts with its theme song and then with Russo's intro: "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAnnnnnnnnnnnd good afternoon, everybody! How are you today?"[15] Mike and the Mad Dog is an afternoon drive sports radio program on WFAN in New York City. ...


The show involves Francesa and Russo talking and arguing with each other or with callers about sports, or rarely, about non-sports. They are also known for their hard-hitting questions in interviews with their guests. Francesa is the more cerebral of the pair and Russo will defer to him in most arguments. Russo is known to make bold statements when hosting the show solo but will back down when Francesa is cohosting. Nevertheless, Russo also exhibits a vast knowledge of sports. One of the show's marketing pitches states: "Some shows report sports scores. We settle them."


The pair sometimes leave their Astoria, Queens studios to do remote broadcasts from the Super Bowl, pre-season football camps, U.S. Open Tennis Championship (typically Russo hosts this show solo because Francesa is not a tennis fan), the Yankees and Mets' spring training sites, and playoff games for various New York teams. Aerial view of the Triborough Bridge (left) and the Hell Gate Bridge (right) spanning Astoria Park and the Astoria Pool Astoria is a neighborhood in the northwestern corner of the borough of Queens in New York City. ... For other uses, see U.S. Open. ...


Today, The Mike and the Mad Dog show primarily concentrates on baseball and football.[16] In an interview with New York Daily News,[17] Francesa said, This article is about the sport. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

"As far as changes in the city, baseball has now become year-round. We cover baseball every single day of the year...just look at the back pages in November, December, they have screaming baseball headlines. Baseball has become so dominant in what we do."

Basketball and golf to a much lesser extent do receive mention, usually because the show has a strong relationship with Jim Nantz, an acclaimed golf and college basketball broadcaster, plus a few noted college coaches and NBA coaches, reporters, and broadcasters. It is well noted that Russo is a big fan of tennis; and tennis does get some play on their show, much to Francesa's chagrin, generally leading into and then during the four majors. This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the ex-NFL fullback, see Jim Nance. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ...


International classics such as the Tour de France get little mention except when there is a scheduled interview or major story. Boxing also has not been talked about much in several years, as both hosts consider the sport not to be what it once was; both used to purchase certain pay-per-view fights. However, ESPN analyst Teddy Atlas was interviewed by Russo in 2006, while Atlas was promoting a book. Although Freddy Adu and a few other soccer celebrities have done interviews on the show, the FIFA World Cup receives little attention except following USA games. Russo said in his first book that he played as a teenager, but was not a big fan of the game. For other uses, see Tour de France (disambiguation). ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Theodore A. Atlas, Jr. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fredua Koranteng Freddy Adu (born 2 June 1989 in Tema, Ghana) is a Ghanaian-American footballer playing as a striker and an attacking midfielder. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... For the club competition, see FIFA Club World Cup. ...


Russo is first and foremost a baseball fan. He has said that he believes football ratings are overstated and that he doesn't believe that many people go to sports bars to watch the NFL on Sundays. As years have passed, Russo's unrequited devotion to baseball has subsumed the entire format of the show. Even during the middle of the NFL season, Russo will mention the San Francisco Giants more often than the New York Giants.


Incidents and controversies

While Mike and the Mad Dog is a success, the duo has had their share of problems. Things did not go well at first. Neither of them was happy about the arrangement, and each felt that he deserved his own show. Arguments between the two have spilled onto the air and there were backstage debates about such matters as whose name would come first and which of them would get the power seat - the one facing the control room. Each had an entourage of advisers and friends who pushed him to ask for more.[3] Sometimes Don Imus needled them on his program or walked by them in the hall and said, "You are so much better than [the other guy]." However, Imus did play peacemaker during several of the more public fights.[1]


Regarding the relationship between Francesa and Russo, Francesa said, "It was an arranged marriage and almost a quickie divorce." Russo admitted that such a proposition of breaking up between the two would have been celebrated in 1992. However, Russo said in an interview, "I think that, in the long term, the station sees us as a tandem and would not want to break the brand up... And to tell you the truth, after almost 20 years together, Mike and I are like a married couple: It would be too hard to leave him. I never thought I would hear myself say this, but it would feel very strange to be on the air without him."[18]


1991 NCAA Tournament

in 1991, while Francesa was still at CBS Sports hosting the 1991 NCAA Tournament—Russo was very critical of CBS's coverage. The discussion began to gain momentum and soon snowballed over a number of days. CBS was unhappy that Francesa's show was being used as a platform for criticisms of their television coverage, prompting a call from Francesa asking Russo to not discuss the topic. Russo refused and an on-the-air argument followed. While the two have admitted to numerous disagreements, they have always contended that they have been professional and not personal. Francesa would eventually leave CBS Sports and concentrate on his radio career full-time. Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1991 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


Hockey

On the flip side, the duo have always defended each other in the face of adversity. Francesa and Russo have garnered a reputation for being ignorant and not knowledgeable when it comes to hockey, though Russo later claimed in his first book that he has watched regular-season NHL games that even some hockey writers would not. Also, long-time NHL television analysts John Davidson and Pierre McGuire have both been semi-regular guests on the show, and Ed Olczyk has made several appearances since joining NBC. In May 1992, Russo went to a New York Rangers game against the Pittsburgh Penguins.[19] When Russo arrived at the game, Rangers fans chided him and he eventually left the game. The next day, Francesa went on the air and blasted the Rangers fans for their behavior. They also allegedly had an on-air spat with long-time hockey writer and broadcaster Stan Fischler, who has since never done an interview on their show. In 2006, Jaromir Jagr jokingly made fun of their hockey knowledge, to which the duo said that he had sold them on watching more. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... John Davidson (born February 27, 1953 in Ottawa, Ontario) was a goaltender for the St. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Ed Olczyk (born August 16, 1966, Chicago, Illinois, USA) is a Polish-American and formerly the head coach for the National Hockey League Pittsburgh Penguins and former center for Toronto Maple Leafs, Winnipeg Jets, New York Rangers, Los Angeles Kings, Chicago Blackhawks and Pittsburgh Penguins. ... This article is about the television network. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Stan Fischler (Born in Brooklyn, NY, USA) is a noted Hockey and New York Subways historian, broadcaster, author and professor. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


Doggie going solo: ____ and the Mad Dog

In the summer of 1992, while his partner was on vacation at the Breakers, in Palm Beach, Florida, Russo jokingly started the show by saying, "Welcome to....and the Mad Dog," leaving silence where the "Mike" should have been. Francesa was furious, calling several station bigwigs and demanding an apology.[5] On another occasion, Francesa returned from a vacation a day early, hoping to rejoin Russo on the air; Russo, savoring the solo airtime, accused Francesa of trying to horn in on his time. There was a great deal of shouting, and during a closed-door cool-down meeting with WFAN executives they nearly started throwing punches.[3] Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Being largely seasonal, downtown Palm Beachs streets are virtually vacant in the summer. ...


"ONE TIME!!"

The Monday after Russo's favorite baseball team, the San Francisco Giants, were eliminated from the 2003 postseason by the Florida Marlins he went into his most famous tirade.[20] He screamed that he was sick of the Giants always losing in the postseason and if they would just win (as he screamed very loudly) "ONE TIME!!" he would give up everything he owned, including his (at the time) three children. YES often replays this clip in promos for the show. Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... The 2003 National League Division Series, the first round of the 2003 National League playoffs, pitted the NL East Champion Atlanta Braves (101-61) against the NL Central Champion Chicago Cubs (88-74), and the NL West Champion San Francisco Giants (100-62) against the Wild Card Florida Marlins (91... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Other nicknames The Fish Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ...


Several callers have commented over the years that Russo spends far too much time talking about a team in the SF Giants that very few people in his listening audience care one iota about. Others have commented that he excludes local teams and far more popular sports such as football in favor of baseball discussions.


Russo has also been called hypocritical for his stance on Barry Bonds who has been called the biggest fraud in professional sports. The Mad Dog has often lambasted Bonds for cheating but rails against callers and baseball players and writers when they do the same.


"Enter Sandman"

When New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera enters the game, his entrance song is "Enter Sandman" by Metallica. Billy Wagner, Rivera's New York Mets counterpart, also uses "Enter Sandman" as his entrance music. When Wagner entered his first game as a Met against the Washington Nationals at Shea Stadium on April 3, 2006 using Enter Sandman as his entrance music, Francesa, an avid Yankee fan, expressed his anger and discontent, and strongly suggested that Wagner change the song. His argument was that the song belonged to Rivera and Yankee Stadium, and that Wagner was "stealing" the song and should be forbidden from using it and needed to get some originality. Wagner was the one who first used the song earlier in his career.[21] However, Rivera was not bothered by it.[22] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Mariano Rivera is the closing pitcher for the New York Yankees. ... Mariano Rivera (born November 29, 1969 in Panama City, Panama) is a Panamanian baseball player. ... Music sample Enter Sandman ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... William Edward Wagner (born July 25, 1971 in Tannersville, Virginia) is a American Major League Baseball relief pitcher for the New York Mets. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Washington Nationals (2005–present) Montreal Expos (1969-2004) Other nicknames Nats, Nacionales (Spanish) Ballpark RFK Stadium (2005–present) Hiram Bithorn Stadium[3] (San Juan) (2003-2004) Olympic Stadium (Montreal) (1977-2004) Jarry Park... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Music sample Enter Sandman ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


After seeing plenty of backlash, Francesa and Russo would try to downplay it as a "tongue in cheek" thing which was never serious. However, Phil Mushnick of the New York Post blasted the two for "making complete fools of themselves" and for trying to "rewrite unforgettable history to have their audience think that they were just kidding around."[23] Phil Mushnick is a sportswriter who writes a sports media column for the New York Post. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ...


Joining the Yankees?

With over 40 years of disappointment with the San Francisco Giants, and the lackluster quality of teams in both the American League and National League, Russo started the August 10, 2006 show with a monologue proclaiming his newfound love for the New York Yankees. Right before the 5 p.m. flash update, Russo called for Yankee gear, which he displayed on the YES broadcast. Later in the show, staff member Marc Malusis gave Russo a Yankee hat that he wore for the rest of the show. Fans have had a mixed reaction of Russo's supposed conversion. The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...


On August 16, 2006, Francesa returned to the airwaves coming back from his vacation. Because Arbitron ratings are not conducted during this part of the summer, Russo and Francesa switch weeks doing a solo program while the other is on vacation, except for an annual show at the Jersey Shore. Francesa returned to the airwaves (minus Russo) only to discover this story of Russo and his "epiphany." Francesa noted that this is not the first time that Russo, during the dog days of summer in their 15-plus years of broadcasting together has claimed to see the light and become a Yankee fan. Francesa warned callers that Russo sometimes likes to stir up situations and that this could be another one of his acts. Russo has suggested that his kids will likely end up being Yankee fans, because he does not expect them to stay up late to watch Giants games on television as he often does. is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arbitron is a radio audience research company in the United States. ... This article is about a feeling, for other meanings see epiphany (disambiguation). ... The Dog Days are the period during which time the star Sirius, known as the Dog Star (and the brightest star of all as seen from Earth), both rises after, and sets before, the Sun and is hence lost in the latters glare. ...


On August 25, 2006, Francesa and Russo were on air together for the first time in two and a half weeks. Within the first fifteen minutes of the program, Francesa first accepted Russo's conversion but then settled the issue once and for all by asking Russo to say (in front of a large crowd at the Jersey Shore) that Mickey Mantle was a better player than Willie Mays. Unable to do it, Russo shouted "We (sic) hate the Yankees" on air, with a loud cheer from the crowd. is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ...


Controversy stir-up

Russo has been accused by many for saying controversial things just to elicit responses and get people to call the radio show and debate. At the end of one of these he often will say something like "we killed that last 40 minutes" or whatever time period he wanted to get through.


For example, during the first week of August 2006, Russo called for the firing of Peter Greenberg, a well known and regarded baseball agent of Jose Reyes. Peter Greenberg also represents other well known athletes in baseball, such as Bobby Abreu, Angels pitcher Kelvim Escobar, Phillies pitcher Freddy Garcia, and Twins pitcher and 2004 and 2006 Cy Young Award winner Johan Santana. Russo's basis for his call of firing Greenberg was what he thought was an atrocious deal reached between Mets shortstop Jose Reyes and the Mets organization. Russo felt that Reyes was being vastly undervalued and underpaid as a player through his arbitration and free-agent years. José Reyes (born June 11, 1983 born in Villa Gonzalez, Dominican Republic) is a Major League Baseball shortstop who has played for the New York Mets since 2003. ... Bob Kelly Abreu (nicknamed El Comedulce) (born March 11, 1974 in Maracay, Aragua State, Venezuela) is a Major League Baseball right fielder who plays for the New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... Kelvim Escobar [ess-coe-BAR] (born April 11, 1976 in La Guaira, Venezuela) is a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who currently plays for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2004-present). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Freddy Antonio García (born June 10, 1976 in Caracas, Venezuela) is a Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who plays for the Chicago White Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... In baseball, the Cy Young Award is an honor given annually to the best pitchers in the Major Leagues. ... Johan Alexander Santana Araque (born March 13, 1979) is a Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who plays for the Minnesota Twins. ...


Cory Lidle

See also: October 11, 2006 New York City plane crash

On October 9, 2006, after the sudden exit of the Yankees from the divisional series, Francesa and Russo took many grievances with so called Yankee dissenters, feeling most strongly about alleged comments made by Yankee starter Cory Lidle. Lidle was lambasted on air about comments that were seemingly directed towards Yankees manager Joe Torre. Lidle called into the station, and a 13-minute heated discussion ensued where Francesa and Russo challenged Lidle's credibility over these unofficial statements made to the media.[24] On October 11, 2006, a Cirrus SR20 small private plane crashed in New York City about 2:42 p. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2006 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2006 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Saturday, October 7, with the champions of the three AL divisions – along with a wild card team – participating in two best-of-five series. ... Cory Fulton Lidle (March 22, 1972 – October 11, 2006) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Joseph Paul Torre (born July 18, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball player and the current manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers. ...


Tragically on October 11, 2006, Lidle and his flight instructor crashed a small plane into a 50-story condominium tower on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Francesa and Russo quickly went on the defensive, as they were emotionally disturbed and upset by the tragic loss of Lidle, whom they had scolded on air two days prior. They also refused to take any phone calls for the first couple of days after the crash, which led many to speculate that they were afraid of what their callers would say. In fact, many of the other hosts during their shows received quite a number of phone calls lambasting Francesa and Russo. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ...


After the crash, Francesa said,

"If I knew he had two days to live, I would've told him to enjoy himself...But you can't do interviews that way. No one in the world thinks that way...And then to think my last words to him were that I don't think about him very much. You just weigh it very differently now."[24]

Here is another quote from Francesa:

"You're not going to make me feel guilty. There have been times when we've been rude, I'd be crazy not to admit that. ... But this was an interview we never thought twice about."[25]

Russo said to New York Daily News media columnist Bob Raissman, This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

"Do I wish right this second I had a better relationship with Cory Lidle? Yeah, I absolutely do, (but) you got to do what you got to do. I don't know what to tell you. You can make the argument that I look like a heel....I've been ripping him for five or six months. Does that make me a bad guy? I'll let others evaluate that."[26]

Stance on the Imus-Rutgers controversy

Francesa and Russo opened their show on April 10, 2007, by weighing in on the controversy involving Don Imus and the disparaging comments he made the previous Wednesday about the Rutgers University women's basketball team. The program began with an airing of statements delivered by team coach C. Vivian Stringer and team captain Essence Carson at a news conference held two hours prior. Mike followed with a monologue, in which he flatly denied rumors of a gag order in effect at WFAN, and confirmed that the decision to air portions of the Rutgers news conference at the top of the show had been made in consultation with program director Mark Chernoff. Francesa went on to clarify that while he had spoken with Imus a few days after the incident in question, his discussions with Imus had no bearing on how he reported the matter on Mike and the Mad Dog. is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Charlene Vivian Stringer (born March 16, 1948) is currently the head coach of the Rutgers University Womens Basketball team (an NCAA Division I program that is part of the Big East Conference). ...


Picking up from Francesa's opening monologue, Russo criticized Imus for failing to submit a public apology within forty-eight hours of making the offending comments, and found fault with his strategy on both Al Sharpton's radio show and The Today Show of citing his personal accomplishments in raising money for charitable causes like sickle-cell anemia, children's cancer and the plight of wounded veterans of the Iraq War. In Russo's estimation, this stance was "defensive." Russo suggested that Imus should have focused on atoning for his comments, rather than on burnishing his record of charitable activism. This biographical article needs additional references for verification. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ...


Both Francesa and Russo were in agreement that Imus, in Francesa's words, "went too far" in his unflattering characterization of the Rutgers women's basketball team. They also agreed with a caller that the statements made by Imus were both "racist and sexist." In their opening comments, they pointed out that Imus had made countless remarks during his nearly thirty-five years on the radio that could be perceived as offensive; Russo cited the specific example of Bernard McGuirk's running parody of New York Catholic Archbishop Edward Cardinal Egan (and prior to this, John Cardinal O'Connor), speculating that many Catholic listeners may have found this gag offensive. Bernard McGuirk is the former executive producer of the Imus in the Morning radio program. ... Edward Michael Cardinal Egan STL JCD (born April 2, 1932) is an archbishop and a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ... John Cardinal OConnor His Eminence John Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ...


Despite these criticisms, however, both Francesa and Russo balked at the idea that Imus should be fired as host of his nationally syndicated radio program Imus in the Morning. They disagreed, too, that the then proposed two-week suspension was merely, as one journalist had characterized it, "a slap on the wrist."


On April 12, 2007, Francesa announced in the afternoon that Don Imus had been dismissed by CBS Radio, the parent company of WFAN. This dismissal, which came on the heels of the permanent cancellation of Imus's telecast on MSNBC the previous day, effectively marked the end of Imus's tenure as host of the nationally syndicated radio program, Imus in the Morning. is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... CBS Radio Inc. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ...


Both Francesa and Russo criticized both MSNBC and CBS Radio for dismissing Imus in the middle of the annual WFAN radiothon, which supports three prominent children's charities (the Tomorrows Children's Fund, the CJ Foundation for S.I.D.S. and the Imus Ranch).[27] Since Imus was scheduled to host the radiothon the following morning, the immediate dismissal created a serious scheduling complication. Initially, Francesa reported that both he and Russo would host the radiothon in lieu of Imus; however, this plan was soon amended to allow Imus' wife Deidre Imus, and Charles McCord to host instead. For the next two weeks, Francesa and Russo filled in the morning slot.


When the morning portion of Mike and the Mad Dog debuted on April 16, Francesa opened the show by saying, "We would hope someone would come to their senses and Don would come back in a couple of weeks...We're not saying that's going to happen. We would hope something like that would happen."[28] Later on both Francesa and Russo blasted Tim Russert (No. 1 on the list anointed by Russo)[28], Mike Wallace, Christopher Dodd ("The biggest phony" by Russo), Harold Ford, Jr., etc.[29] for not supporting Imus. Timothy John Russert, Jr. ... Mike Wallace (born Myron Leon Wallace on May 9, 1918) is a former American game show host, television personality, and journalist. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Harold Eugene Ford, Jr. ...


Notable moments

Marconi Award

Francesa and Russo won the 2000 Marconi Award for Major Market Personality of the Year.[30] The announcement was made on September 23 at the 2000 National Association of Broadcasters Marconi Radio Awards Dinner and Show in San Francisco, CA. They were the first sports-talk hosts ever to win the award. The Marconi Radio Awards are presented annually by the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) to the top commercial radio stations and on-air personalities in the United States. ... The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) is a US trade association that advocates on behalf of over 8,300 radio and television stations and networks before Congress, the Federal Communications Commission and various judicial bodies. ... This article is about the city in California. ...


Fifteenth anniversary

On December 15, 2004, Francesa and Russo celebrated their fifteenth anniversary on the air from 2 to 7 p.m. This anniversary special was preceded by a special preshow from 1 to 2 p.m. featuring highlights of the past 15 years of Mike and the Mad Dog.[31] is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Twenty-five hour broadcast

Between June 30, 2005 and July 1, 2005, Francesa and Russo broadcasted live for 25 straight hours for the first time ever to raise money for various charities.[32][33] It started after the completion of the New York Mets game (approximately 5 p.m.) and continued through the next day at 6:30 p.m. The show was broadcasted from the Summer Garden at Rockefeller Center in New York City. Notable guests included Tiki Barber and Mark Messier. Through WFAN's one or two radiothons per year, they have also helped raise money for World Hunger Year and the CJ Foundation For SIDS, among other charities. is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Atiim Kiambu Hakeem-ah Tiki Barber (born April 7, 1975 in Roanoke, Virginia) is a news and sports broadcaster, author, and former American football running back for the New York Giants. ... Not to be confused with Marc Messier, an actor from Quebec. ... World Hunger Year (WHY) is an organization that seeks to address the root causes of hunger and poverty. ...


Live play-by-play

On May 25, 2006, Francesa and Russo broadcast a Major League Baseball game at Shea Stadium between the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Mets on radio for local charities.[34] Russo did the play-by-play and Francesa did the color analysis except that they reversed the roles during the third and seventh innings. Their broadcasting performance was evaluated later on by Ed Coleman, Howie Rose, and Mets senior management. WFAN and the Mets claimed to raise over $40,000 from the event. During the game, when the two were shown on the scoreboard, they were loudly booed by the audience in Shea Stadium.[35]. It was believed that the boos stemmed from the fact that neither Mike nor Chris are Met fans. Mike is an avid Yankee fan and Chris is a life long fan of the San Francisco Giants. is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Play-by-play, in broadcasting, is a North American term and means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. ... Ed Coleman is a radio reporter/host for the New York Mets on WFAN. He also did some radio work for the 1988 and 1992 Summer Olympics, as well as the 1994 Winter Olympics. ... Howie Rose (born 1954) is an American sportscaster with the New York Mets and the New York Islanders for WFAN and Fox Sports New York. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ...


Before Russo and Francesa entered the booth to be broadcasters for the day, Russo mentioned that he was unsure how to correctly score a swinging strike three or a pitch taken called strike three. Russo and Francesa aired on the radio waves, whereas Gary Cohen and Keith Hernandez were the television play-by-play broadcasters. Keith Hernandez jokingly (on May 25th, day of broadcast on TV) poked fun at Russo concerning his play scoring abilities on television where Russo, on the day before had reservations about the event; in the light that he was unsure about the quality of play-by-play that Francesa and Russo would give the audience. Days beforehand, it was entirely possible that Pedro Martinez was going to pitch, but was given the extra day off. On air (Francesa's and Russo's radio program) joked and jeered about the play-by-play calls which they practiced and intended to use regardless of Martinez's eventual non-start. Cohen Gary Cohen (born April 29, 1958 in Queens, New York) is an American sportscaster, best known as a radio and television play-by-play announcer for the New York Mets of Major League Baseball. ... Keith Hernandez (born October 20, 1953 in San Francisco, California) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman, who played for the St. ... Pedro Martinez warming up in right field of Fenway Park before a game, June 22, 2004. ...


Prior to this event, Francesa and Russo had broadcast several college basketball games for charities.

Mike and the Mad Dog
Format Sports
Starring Mike Francesa
Chris Russo
Chris Shearn
Country of origin USA
Production
Running time 5 hours 30 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel YES Network (2002
Original run April 5, 2003-present –
Chronology
Preceded by Various Programing
Followed by Yankees Batting Practice Today
External links
Official website

Michael Patrick Tank Francesa, Jr. ... For the Apprentice 2 candidate Chris Russo, see The Apprentice 2 candidates. ... Chris Shearn is a broadcaster for the YES Network. ... The Yankees Entertainment and Sports (YES) Network is a New York City regional cable TV channel dedicated to broadcasting baseball games of the New York Yankees, and basketball games of the New Jersey Nets. ... The year 2003 in television involved some significant events. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Yankees Entertainment and Sports (YES) Network is a New York City regional cable TV channel dedicated to broadcasting baseball games of the New York Yankees, and basketball games of the New Jersey Nets. ...

YES simulcast

The simulcast on YES opens with a sports report from Chris Shearn, who also serves as producer for the simulcast (and who is also a favorite with Francesa and Russo), and usually plays music to block the advertising that is sold on WFAN (YES often returns from commercial before WFAN does). When Francesa and Russo are out of the studio, these outside shows are also recorded live by YES. Beginning in 2007, some of the outside shows have aired in high definition as YES launched a full-time HD channel. Chris Shearn is a broadcaster for the YES Network. ... Generally, high-definition refers to an increase in resolution or clarity such as in: High-definition television (HDTV), television formats that have a higher resolution than their contemporary counterparts High-definition video, which is used in HDTV broadcasting, as well as digital film and computer HD video file formats HDV...


During WFAN's 20/20 Sports Flash reports, a selection of sports news is on the screen. Notably, the lead story onscreen (but not always in the actual report), is usually the Yankees or Nets game that will be airing on YES or WWOR-TV later that evening. YES then broadcasts the traffic report during rush-hour, but does not have a graphic to illustrate the report. WWOR-TV, channel 9, is a MyNetworkTV-affiliated television station licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, and serving the New York City metropolitan area. ...


Since the broadcast on YES is a simulcast, there have been times when the show has been delayed or pre-empted on WFAN, usually due to New York Mets baseball. Francesa and Russo have never done a show specifically for YES, so the network usually shows reruns of its original programming like Yankees Classics, Yankeeography or CenterStage in its place. Yankees Classics is a program on the YES Network which features classic games featuring the New York Yankees. ... Yankeeography is a biography style television program that chronicles the lives and careers of the players, coaches, and other notable personnel associated with the New York Yankees Major League Baseball team. ... CenterStage is a show on the YES Network, which talks with figures from the world of sports and entertainment in front of of studio auddience. ...


When both Francesa and Russo have the day off, YES does not broadcast the show, although other WFAN hosts, usually led by Joe Benigno, replace Francesa and Russo as the hosts of the Mike and the Mad Dog show, complete with theme music. This is apparently because Francesa and Russo are paid additional salary by YES for the show, while other WFAN hosts are not. YES did simulcast with the substitute hosts in its first couple of years. Joseph Benigno (born September 1953) is an American sports radio personality. ...


WFAN's recent contract with YES to simulcast Mike and the Mad Dog ended at the end of 2006. Despite the Cory Lidle controversy and some negative things that Russo said about the Yankee organization in the summer of 2006 (including a heated on-air discussion with Yankees general manager Brian Cashman), the contract was renewed as part of the Yankees' radio deal with WCBS which, like WFAN, is owned by CBS Radio.[36] It should also be noted that there have been a few occasions where YES has ended a simulcast in progress due to comments that may have been too critical of YES or the Yankees management. The two sometimes joke about the incidents when they get started talking about YES producers on the show or poke fun at team owner George Steinbrenner's feud with former Yankee bench coach Don Zimmer. Still, Francesa and Russo say that YES does not censor them on-air. Both they and YES officials have commented that the simulcast likely would have been canceled quickly if YES forced them to not criticize Yankees or Nets management. Brian Cashman is the Senior Vice-President and General Manager of the New York Yankees. ... WCBS (880 kHz. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Donald William Zimmer (born January 17, 1931 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former infielder, manager and coach in Major League Baseball. ...


Radio affiliates outside of New York City

In 2004, radio station WROW in Albany, New York, began simulcasting the show. The simulcast is unique in that, unlike most syndication, it is a straight pickup of what airs over WFAN's air, including jingles and the occasional inadvertent advertisement. WROW airs the show from 2:00 until 6:00 p.m.. Whenever it is either delayed or pre-empted, the station airs a montage of interviews, known as The Best of Mike and the Mad Dog, or alternate news-talk programming such as Dennis Prager. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... WROW is an AM radio station broadcasting on 590 kHz licensed to Albany, New York with its tower in Glenmont, New York. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... Dennis Prager (born August 2, 1948) is an American syndicated radio talk show host, columnist, author, ethicist, and public speaker. ...


On July 16, 2007, WQYK in Tampa, Florida, became the second radio affiliate of the program, and broadcasts the show during the 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. time slot. WQYK also broadcasts select New York Yankees games which do not conflict with home Tampa Bay Devil Rays games. Tampa is the permanent residence of George Steinbrenner, as well as the spring training home of the Yankees, and the location of the Class-A Tampa Yankees of the Florida State League. WQYK, like WFAN, is owned by CBS Radio. is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... WQYK-AM is a classic country music radio station broadcasting on 1010 AM in the Tampa, Florida area. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida. ... Major league affiliations American League (1998–present) East Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 12, 42 Name Tampa Bay Devil Rays (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-Rays, The Rays Ballpark Tropicana Field (1998–present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) none Division titles... New York Yankees American League AAA Columbus Clippers AA Trenton Thunder A Charleston RiverDogs Tampa Yankees Staten Island Yankees R Gulf Coast Yankees The Tampa Yankees are a minor league baseball team based in Tampa, Florida. ... The Florida State League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the state of Florida. ...


In welcoming the Tampa station, Francesa commented that WFAN is working on adding at least two more Mike and the Mad Dog affiliates. Though he did not reveal locations, he said the stations could be on-line with the program by September 2007. As of October 1, 2007, these affiliates have not signed on to the show.


Theme song

Each program starts with a theme song jingle produced by JAM Creative Productions. The jingle package has been used for nearly the entire run of the show (originally, the theme from the Blues Brothers was used) and it is the only WFAN show not to use the station's standard jingle package. Lyrics below: This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


Mike and the Mad Dog...Sports Radio 66, W-F-A-N


They're talkin' sports, goin' at it as hard as they can,


It's Mike and the Mad Dog on the FAN


Nothing can get by 'em


Turn it on and try 'em


Mike and the Mad Dog


W-F-A-N


Trivia

Nicknames of Francesa and Russo

John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ... Steve Somers Steve Somers is an American radio host on the New York City sports radio station WFAN (660 AM). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... Phil Mushnick is a sportswriter who writes a sports media column for the New York Post. ...

Mike and the Marquis

On the weeks leading up to the Super Bowl, the show has a trivia contest called Mike and the Marquis, where Russo's alter ego "The Marquis", a send up of the late-18th Century French Aristocrat, the Marquis de Sade, makes a yearly visit to deliver five trips to the Super Bowl. Players must get four very difficult questions correctly from several different categories (all picked by the Marquis). The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ...


"The Marquis" is called such because Russo believes only a true sadist (hence the selection of the Marquis de Sade character) could come up with the difficult questions through the years.


For the first several years the character had only existed in the mind of Russo, but with the advent of YES television cameras in the studio since 2002, Russo has done the contest segments in full 18th century French Aristocrat costume, including a wig that may have been used in Amadeus, which Russo considers a favorite movie. Amadeus is a 1984 film directed by Miloš Forman. ...


In 2007 Russo added a new character, former United States President Richard M. Nixon. For the bit Russo donned a Nixon mask for the segment. Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


References and notes

  1. ^ a b c Jim Reed (1999), Everything Imus: all you ever wanted to know about Don Imus, Birch Lane Press, pp. 65-66, (ISBN 1-55972-504-4).
  2. ^ Jack Craig (1990-03-30), CBS' Francesa is plainly a success basketball, football expert defies network standards for appearance, accent, The Boston Globe.
  3. ^ a b c d e Nick Paumgarten (2004-08-30). The boys: what Mike and the Mad Dog talk about when they talk about sports. The New Yorker.
  4. ^ George Vecsey (1991-02-17). Mad Dog is a preppie!. The New York Times.
  5. ^ a b Jeff Pearlman (2004-02-24). Mike and the Mad Dog make nice. Newsday.
  6. ^ Richard Sandomir (1997-07-02). It's rants, raves and ratings. The New York Times.
  7. ^ Richard Sandomir (2007-04-14). Post-Imus, WFAN opts for more sports, for now. The New York Times.
  8. ^ Matthew Futterman (2007-04-15). Succeeding an icon. The Newark Star-Ledger.
  9. ^ Neil Best (2007-04-20). WFAN fix, if only temporary. Newsday.
  10. ^ Nick Paumgarten (2007-04-30). On the air: pinch-hitters. The New Yorker.
  11. ^ Jacques Steinberg (2007-04-17). Imus’s longtime sidekick joins other pinch-hitters. The New York Times.
  12. ^ WFAN morning replacement. WFAN (2007-04-17).
  13. ^ Bob Raissman (2007-10-21). Will Yank brass use network to grill new skipper? YES. New York Daily News.
  14. ^ Who makes how much - New York's salary guide 2005. New York Magazine (2005-09-26).
  15. ^ ademakid212. Chris' famous intro to the Mike and the Mad Dog show. youtube.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-21.
  16. ^ Michael Patrick Nelson (2004-12-09). Nothing's shocking. The Long Island Press.
  17. ^ Michael O'Keeffe (2004-11-14), Mike and the Mad Dog still rapping after all these years, New York Daily News.
  18. ^ Robin Finn (2007-04-20). Chaotic duo indignantly fills post-Imus void. The New York Times.
  19. ^ Bruce Weber (1992-06-07). A loud, angry world on the dial. The New York Times.
  20. ^ Mad Dog's tirade on SF Giants playoff elimination in 2003 (click link for audio).
  21. ^ NY Closer Controversy. Baseball & The Boogie Down Bronx (2006-04-04).
  22. ^ Ben Shpigel with Tyler Kepner (2006-04-05). For Wagner and Rivera, it's play it again, Metallica. The New York Times.
  23. ^ Phil Mushnick (2006-07-02). Mike and Dog's joke was on you...if you bought their 'Sandman' rant. New York Post.
  24. ^ a b Neil Best (2006-10-12). Francesa feels haunted by Lidle interview. Newsday.
  25. ^ John Howell (2006-10-13). Lidle's death puts focus on Mike and Mad Dog interview. Hartford Courant.
  26. ^ Bob Raissman (2006-10-12). Guilt & regret, but Dog barks on. New York Daily News.
  27. ^ Neil Best (2007-04-13). Mike & Mad Dog defend Imus, blast MSNBC. Newsday.
  28. ^ a b Bob Raissman (2007-04-17). After Imus, the Dog days. New York Daily News.
  29. ^ Jim Baumbach (2007-04-16). Waking up to Mike and the Mad Dog. Newsday.
  30. ^ 2000 Marconi Radio Award Winners. National Association of Broadcasters. Retrieved on 2006-09-26.
  31. ^ Raymond A. Edel (2004-12-10), Dolenz brings a Monkee to WCBS, The Bergen Record.
  32. ^ Press release (2005-06-24). WFAN's Mike and the Mad Dog to broadcast for 24 consecutive hours. Radio Ink.
  33. ^ Press release (2005-06-30). Ruland to appear on WFAN's Mike and the Mad Dog show tomorrow morning. Iona College Athletics.
  34. ^ Press release (2006-05-17). Mike and the Mad Dog to call Mets play by play on Thursday, May 25th live on WFAN. New York Mets.
  35. ^ Neil Best (2006-05-26), Mikey and Mad Dog, that wasn't a bad job, Newsday.
  36. ^ Bob Raissman (2006-12-10). Yanks, CBS close to deal. New York Daily News.
  37. ^ Dovie Quint (2005-12-19). An idiot and a know-it-all worth listening to. The Yeshiva College Commentator.
  38. ^ Phil Mushnick (2006-10-06). A new low for Mike and Dog. New York Post.

This article is about the year. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Mike Francesa and Chris Russo bios on WFAN
  • Mike and the Mad Dog interview audios
  • Mike and The Mad Dog Theme Note: Click on Demo Download on the Home Page, and under the News, Sports, and Talk Packages, the WFAN package is called "New York Fan". Click on the mp3 audio section. The opening to Mike and the Mad Dog is Cut #19.
  • Long Island History: Mike Francesa and Chris Russo
  • Mike and the Mad Dog video clips at youtube.com.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mike and the Mad Dog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3997 words)
Mike and the Mad Dog is an afternoon drive sports radio program on WFAN AM 660 in New York.
Mike and Dog's joke was on you...if you bought their 'Sandman' rant.
Mike and The Mad Dog Theme Note: Click on Demo Download on the Home Page, and under the News, Sports, and Talk Packages, the WFAN package is called "New York Fan".
WFAN - The Fan - Mike Francesa (282 words)
The Mike and the Mad Dog show debuted on the FAN in September of 1989 creating the two man talk team that is now the industry standard.
Beyond the numbers, the Mike and the Mad Dog show is known far and wide in the world of sports.
Mike’s career has included stops at CBS Sports where he served as an in-studio analyst for college football and basketball as well as a stint at MSG Network.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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