FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Midwest

The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. The term is now somewhat archaic, as this region was the "Middle West" of the United States before the Lousiana purchase. At the present, this region is neither the middle nor the west of the United States. More accurate regional terms for these locations are the East North Central States and the West North Central States, as defined by the United States Census Bureau. U.S.West File links The following pages link to this file: Midwest Categories: GFDL images ... The East North Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States which are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... The West North Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


The Midwest term originated in the 19th century, along with "Middle West" and "Heartland", and referred to generally the same areas and states in the middle of the country. The heart of the Midwest is bounded by the Great Lakes and the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys, the "Old Northwest" (or the "West") referring to the states of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin, which comprised the original Northwest Territory, which are now called the East North Central States by the United States Census Bureau. The Northwest Territory was created out of the ceded English (formerly French and Native American) frontier lands by the Continental Congress just before the U.S. Constitution was ratified under the Northwest Ordinance. The Northwest Ordinance prohibited slavery and religious discrimination, and promoted public schools and private property. As Revolutionary War soldiers from the original colonies were awarded lands in Ohio and migrated there and to other Midwestern states with other pioneers, including many immigrants from central and northern Europe, the area became the first thoroughly "American" region. The Midwest region today refers not only to states created from the Northwest Ordinance, but also may include states between the Appalachian Mountains to the Rocky Mountains and north of the Ohio River. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Heartland is a geopolitical term, used to refer to a central area of Eurasia that is remote and inaccessible from the periphery. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes on or near the United States-Canadian border. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ... Length 6,270 km Elevation of the source 450 m Average discharge Saint Louis¹: 5,500 m³/s Vicksburg²: 16,800 m³/s Baton Rouge³: 12,800 m³/s Area watershed 2,980,000 km² Origin Lake Itasca Mouth Gulf of Mexico Basin countries United States (98. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1. ... State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. ... This article is about the historic region of the United States; you may be looking for: North-Western Territory, British North American territory Northwest Territories, present-day Canadian territory Pacific Northwest, unofficial region in the United States The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North... The East North Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States which are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The Continental Congress was the federal legislature of the Thirteen Colonies and later of the United States from 1774 to 1789, a period that included the American Revolutionary War and the Articles of Confederation. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... The Northwest Ordinance (formally An Ordinance for the Government of the Territory of the United States, North-West of the River Ohio, and also known as the Freedom Ordinance) was an act of the Continental Congress of the United States passed on July 13, 1787 under the Articles of Confederation. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery is a condition of control over a person against their will, enforced by violence or other forms of coercion. ... Religious discrimination is valuing a person or group lower because of their religion, or treating someone differently because of what they do or dont believe. ... The term public school has two contrary meanings: In England, one of a small number of prestigious historic schools open to the public which normally charge fees and are financed by bodies other than the state, commonly as private charitable trusts; here the word public is used much as in... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... The Northwest Ordinance (formally An Ordinance for the Government of the Territory of the United States, North-West of the River Ohio, and also known as the Freedom Ordinance) was an act of the Continental Congress of the United States passed on July 13, 1787 under the Articles of Confederation. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a system of North American mountains running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada to Alabama in the United States, although the northernmost mainland portion ends at the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of NPS) The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ...


Though definitions vary, any definition of the Midwest would include the Northwest Ordinance "Old Northwest" states and often includes many states that were part of the Louisiana Purchase. The states of the Old Northwest are also known as "Great Lakes states". Many of the Louisiana Purchase states are also known as Great Plains states. The Midwest is defined, by the U.S. Census Bureau as these 12 states: This article is about the historic region of the United States; you may be looking for: North-Western Territory, British North American territory Northwest Territories, present-day Canadian territory Pacific Northwest, unofficial region in the United States The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North... From Frank Bond, Louisiana and the Louisiana Purchase. ... The Great Lakes states are colored red in this map. ... The Great Plains states. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has a related story: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

  • Illinois: Old Northwest, Ohio River and Great Lakes state
  • Indiana: Old Northwest, Ohio River and Great Lakes state
  • Iowa: Louisiana Purchase
  • Kansas: Louisiana Purchase, Great Plains and "border state"
  • Michigan: Old Northwest, and Great Lakes state
  • Minnesota: eastern part Old Northwest, and Great Lakes state; western part Louisiana Purchase
  • Missouri: Louisiana Purchase and once, a "border state"
  • Nebraska: Louisiana Purchase, Great Plains state
  • North Dakota: Louisiana Purchase, Great Plains state
  • Ohio: Old Northwest, Ohio River and Great Lakes state
  • South Dakota: Louisiana Purchase, Great Plains state
  • Wisconsin: Old Northwest, and Great Lakes state

The region's largest city is Chicago, the nation's third largest city; other important cities in the regions include Cleveland, Indianapolis, Detroit, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and Minneapolis. Those cities and the farms of Kansas and Iowa loom large in any imaginative description of the Midwestern soul. State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1. ... State nickname: The Hawkeye State Other U.S. States Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Governor Thomas Vilsack Official languages English Area 145,743 km² (26th)  - Land 144,701 km²  - Water 1,042 km² (0. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... Missouri, named after the Missouri Siouan Indian tribe meaning canoe, is a Midwestern state of the United States with Jefferson City as its capital. ... State nickname: Cornhusker State Other U.S. States Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Governor Dave Heineman Official languages English Area 200,520 km² (16th)  - Land 199,099 km²  - Water 1,247 km² (0. ... State nickname: Peace Garden State, Roughrider State, Flickertail State Other U.S. States Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Governor John Hoeven Official languages English Area 183 272 km² (19th)  - Land 178 839 km²  - Water 4 432 km² (2. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... State nickname: The Mount Rushmore State Other U.S. States Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Governor Mike Rounds Official languages English Area 199,905 km² (17th)  - Land 196,735 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. ... Chicago, Illinois — officially the City of Chicago and colloquially known as Chicago, the Second City and the Windy City — is the third largest city of the United States after New York City and Los Angeles and is the largest inland city of the nation. ... City nickname: The Forest City Location within the state of Ohio County Cuyahoga Mayor Jane Campbell Area   â€“Land   â€“Water 213. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... City motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the territorial city) City nicknames: The Motor City and Motown Location in the state of Michigan Founded July 24, 1701 County Wayne... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. ... Downtown Minneapolis as viewed from the Stone Arch Bridge Minneapolis is the largest city in Minnesota and the county seat of Hennepin County. ...


Because the Northwest Ordinance region, comprising the heart of the Midwest, was the first large region of the United States which prohibited slavery (the Northeastern states emancipated slaves four decades into the 19th century), the region remains culturally apart from the country and proud of its free pioneer heritage. The regional southern boundary was the Ohio River, the border of freedom and slavery in American history and literature (See: Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe; Beloved, by Toni Morrison). The U.S. Northeast is a region of the United States of America defined by the US Census Bureau. ... Emancipation means becoming free and equal; the term can be used in various contexts: historically, a slave becoming free by being set free by the owner (manumission), voluntarily or in accordance with laws requiring it after a certain time or in certain cases, thereby becoming freedman (e. ... Simon Legree menaces Uncle Tom Uncle Toms Cabin is a novel by American novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. ... Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an abolitionist, and writer of more than 10 books, the most famous being Uncle Toms Cabin which describes life in slavery, and which was first published in serial form from 1851 to 1852 in an abolitionist organ, the National... Beloved cover Beloved is a 1987 novel by Toni Morrison about the legacy of slavery. ... Toni Morrison is one of the most prominent authors in world literature, having won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. ...


The region was shaped by the relative absence of slavery (except for Missouri), pioneer settlement, education in one-room free public schools, and democratic notions brought with Revolutionary War veterans, Protestant faiths and experimentation, and agricultural wealth transported on the Ohio River riverboats, flatboats, canal boats, and railroads. The canals in Ohio and Indiana opened so much of Midwestern agriculture that it launched the world's greatest population and economic boom foreshadowing later "emerging markets". The commodities that the Midwest funneled into the Erie Canal down the Ohio River contributed to the wealth of New York City, which overtook Boston and Philadelphia. New York State would proudly boast of its "inland empire" — the Midwest — and would become known as the Empire State. The Midwest was predominantly rural at the time of the Civil War, dotted with small farms across Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, but industrialization, immigration, and urbanization fed the Industrial Revolution, and the heart of industrial progress became the Great Lakes states of the Midwest. German, Scandinavian, Slavic and African American immigration into the Midwest continued to bolster the population there in the 19th and 20th centuries, though generally the Midwest remains a predominantly diverse, Protestant region. Large concentrations of Catholics are found in the big cities like Chicago and St. Louis because of Irish, Italian, and Polish immigrants in the 1800s. Before the Revolution: The 13 colonies are in red, the pink area was claimed by Great Britain after the French and Indian War, and the orange region was claimed by Spain. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... A first class tourist riverboat High speed planing riverboat High speed hydrofoil riverboat Local passenger transport craft Riverboat specialized for cargo truck transport Self propelled gravel barge M.V. Splendid China layout A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Categories: Water-transport stubs | Canals | Water transport ... The white section highlights the general area of the canal, with the actual canal shown in blue The Erie Canal (later replaced by the Barge Canal, and subsequently renamed to the Erie Canal) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York and abbreviated NYC) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... Nickname: Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe), Athens of America Location in Massachusetts Founded  -Incorporated September 17, 1630  1820, as a city County Suffolk County Mayor Thomas Menino (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 232. ... Independence Hall Philadelphia (sometimes referred to as Philly or the City of Brotherly Love) is the fifth most populous city in the United States and the most populous city in the state of Pennsylvania, occupying all of Philadelphia County. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... The Industrial Revolution was the major technological, socioeconomic and cultural change in the late 18th and early 19th century resulting from the replacement of an economy based on manual labor to one dominated by industry and machine manufacture. ... The Great Lakes region can refer to: The Great Lakes region of North America The Great Lakes region of Africa This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Scandinavia, Fennoscandia, and the Kola Peninsula. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Chicago, Illinois — officially the City of Chicago and colloquially known as Chicago, the Second City and the Windy City — is the third largest city of the United States after New York City and Los Angeles and is the largest inland city of the nation. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ...


Midwestern influence is felt in Pittsburgh (an old pioneer town), West Virginia (which seceded from Virginia), Louisville (an industrial city on the Ohio River) and, with some irony, in former states where slavery was legal or tolerated before the Civil War, including Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, and parts of Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Kentucky, though most of these cities and states are not truly Midwestern. A similar influence also exists in the western parts of New York State (from Syracuse onward through Buffalo) due to a related industrial heritage and adjacent geography, though others consider the "culture" of this area to be more a hybrid of the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic. Parts of Colorado and Utah were settled by Midwestern migrants, and retain some "Heartland feeling". Because of trade ties, the province of Ontario (particularly the southwestern and northern parts) has some cultural affinity to the Midwest. Generally, though, the region is bounded by the Ohio River, through the Great Plains to the Rockies and Canada. Nickname: The Steel City Location in Pennsylvania Founded  -Incorporated 1758   County Allegheny County Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin Official languages English Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ... Secession is the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or political entity. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... The official logo of Louisville Metro Louisville (usually pronounced ; see Pronunciation below) is Kentuckys largest city and the 16th largest city of the United States. ... Missouri, named after the Missouri Siouan Indian tribe meaning canoe, is a Midwestern state of the United States with Jefferson City as its capital. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... Oklahoma is a South Central state of the United States (with strong western and even Midwestern influences) and its U.S. postal abbreviation is OK; others abbreviate the states name Okla. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee Official languages English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis (largest metropolitan area is Nashville) Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Syracuse, Italy Syracuse, New York Syracuse is the name of two major cities in the world. ... A buffalo is one of several species of bovine. ... Mid-Atlantic English describes a version of the English language which is neither predominantly American or British in usage. ... This is the article on the state. ... State nickname: Beehive State Other U.S. States Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Governor Jon M. Huntsman, Jr. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal it began, loyal it remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th)  - Land 917,741 km²  - Water 158,654 km² (14. ... Western Ontario is a region of Ontario centred on London, Ontario. ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... The Great Plains states. ... Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of NPS) The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ...


The term West was applied to the region in the early years of the country. During this time, the vast majority of the population lived east of the Appalachian Mountains, but the country's borders stretched west all the way to the Rocky Mountains. Later, the vast region west of the Appalachians was divided into the Far West (now just the West), and the Middle West. Some parts of the Midwest have also been referred to as North West for historical reasons (for instance, this explains the Minnesota-based Northwest Airlines and the former Norwest Bank), so the current Northwest region of the country is called the Pacific Northwest to make a clear distinction. This article deals with the western United States. ... Northwest Airlines (IATA: NW, ICAO: NWA, and Callsign: Northwest) (NASDAQ: NWAC) is an airline headquartered in Eagan, Minnesota, with three major hubs in the United States: Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport, Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, and Memphis International Airport. ... Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified financial services company in the United States, with consumer finance subsidiaries doing business in Canada, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Caribbean. ... Darker red states are always part of the Pacific Northwest. ...


The Midwest term is used sometimes interchangeably with the Heartland term to refer to "Mid-America" and its citizens, "Mid-Americans". Heartland states would seem to increasingly include states like Arkansas and Oklahoma, whom Atlanta-based CNN referred as the location of the "tragedy in the Heartland". Because the middle of the country has sometimes lagged the Coasts and Sunbelt states in agriculture and industry, the poverty of Southern border states and the religious character there leads some to include these states, like Kentucky, West Virginia, Tennessee, and Arkansas in a definition of the "Heartland". Many Southerners and Westerners might be included in the "Heartland" definition as well, though strong regional affiliations with the old Confederacy and the Rocky Mountains usually trump those associations. City nickname(s): The A-T-L, The Horizon City, The Capital of the South, The Phoenix City, The City Too Busy to Hate, Hotlanta, A-Town, The Big A, The New York of the South, The Big Peach County Fulton County, Georgia Area  - Total  - Water 343. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although he currently is not recognized in CNNs official history). ... National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans...


The term Midwest is sometimes used in as a minor insult by persons living outside of the region that consider those living within the region to be uncultured average Americans. A label of being "Midwestern" could be a negative classification of religious intolerance, close-mindedness, or conservatism. Some people who live or lived in the region are offended by the use of the term, and would rather a more accurate geographical term be used, such as using "Great Lakes region" to describe the "Old Northwest" region.

Contents


Geography

These states are sometimes denigrated as being relatively flat, either heavily developed into urbanized areas or left in pastoral agriculture, and demarcated by the surveyor's grid imposed by the ordinances, and most easily seen by residents of the coasts in airplanes as they fly over "flyover" country. States like Colorado and Utah sometimes get lumped into the region for these reasons. A city is an urban area, differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Surveying is concerned with the application of mathematics and physics in obtaining accurate measurements for the determination of the position of points on the Earths surface. ...


Among the westernmost states listed, residents of the eastern agricultural areas generally consider themselves part of the Midwest, while residents of the remaining ranching areas usually do not. Of course, exact boundaries are nebulous and shifting. Ranching is the raising of cattle or sheep on rangeland, although one might also speak of ranching with regard to less common livestock such as elk, bison or emu. ...


History

The Midwest is a cultural crossroads.


Starting in the 1790s, Revolutionary war veterans and settlers from the original 13 colonies moved there in response to government land grants. The Ulster-Scots Presbyterians of Pennsylvania (often through Virginia) and the Dutch Reformed, Quaker, and Congregationalists of Connecticut were among the earliest pioneers to Ohio and the Midwest, though by the time of the Civil War, European immigrants bypassed the East Coast to settle directly in the interior: German Lutherans to Ohio, Wisconsin, Illinois, and eastern Missouri, Swedes and Norwegians to Wisconsin and Minnesota, and Poles, Hungarians, and German Catholics and Jews to Midwestern cities. In the 20th century, African American migration from the South into the Midwestern states changed cities dramatically, as factories and schools enticed families by the thousands to new opportunities. Events and Trends French Revolution ( 1789 - 1799). ... Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Missouri, named after the Missouri Siouan Indian tribe meaning canoe, is a Midwestern state of the United States with Jefferson City as its capital. ... One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ...


The region's fertile soil made it possible for farmers to produce abundant harvests of cereal crops such as corn, oats, and, most importantly, wheat. In the early days, the region was soon known as the nation's "breadbasket". Cereal crops are mostly grasses cultivated for their edible seeds (actually a fruit called a caryopsis). ... Species Zea diploperennis Zea luxurians Zea nicaraguensis Zea perennis References ITIS 42268 2002-09-22 Sorting Zea names This article is about the staple food. ... Species References ITIS 41455 2002-09-22 Oats are the seeds of any of several cereal grains in the genus Avena. ... Species T. boeoticum T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat (Triticum spp. ...


Two waterways have been important to the Midwest's development. The first and foremost was the Ohio River which flowed into the Mississippi River. Spanish control of the southern part of the Mississippi, and refusal to allow the shipment of American crops down the river and into the Atlantic Ocean, halted the development of the region until 1795. Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ... Length 6,270 km Elevation of the source 450 m Average discharge Saint Louis¹: 5,500 m³/s Vicksburg²: 16,800 m³/s Baton Rouge³: 12,800 m³/s Area watershed 2,980,000 km² Origin Lake Itasca Mouth Gulf of Mexico Basin countries United States (98. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The river inspired two classic American books written by a native Missourian, Samuel Clemens, who took the pseudonym Mark Twain: Life on the Mississippi and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Today, Twain's stories have become staples of Midwestern lore. Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was a famous and popular American humorist, writer and lecturer. ... Life on the Mississippi cover Life on the Mississippi is a memoir by Mark Twain detailing his days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War. ... Huckleberry Finn is the protagonist of Mark Twains famous book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. ...


The second waterway is the network of routes within the Great Lakes. The opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 completed an all-water shipping route, more direct than the Mississippi, to New York and the seaport of New York City. Lakeport cities grew up to handle this new shipping route. During the Industrial Revolution, the lakes became a conduit for iron ore from the Mesabi Range of Minnesota to steel mills in the Mid-Atlantic States. The Saint Lawrence Seaway later opened the Midwest to the Atlanic Ocean. The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes on or near the United States-Canadian border. ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York and abbreviated NYC) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... The Industrial Revolution was the major technological, socioeconomic and cultural change in the late 18th and early 19th century resulting from the replacement of an economy based on manual labor to one dominated by industry and machine manufacture. ... This heap of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production. ... The Mesabi Range, also known as the Mesabi Iron Range, is a vast deposit of iron ore in northern Minnesota, and the chief deposit of iron ore in the United States. ... Steel mills are the industrial plants where pig iron is converted into steel. ... The Mid-Atlantic States The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States of America, located in the northeastern section of the country, includes the following states and district: Delaware Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Washington, D.C. Virginia These areas provided the young United States with heavy industry and... The Saint Lawrence Seaway in its broadest sense is the system of canals that permits ocean-going vessels to travel from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes as far as Lake Superior. ...


Inland canals in Ohio and Indiana constituted another great waterway, which connected into the Great Lakes and Ohio River traffic.


Culture

Education is another of the region's strongest legacies. Top ranking universities include the University of Michigan, Northwestern University, Notre Dame University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chicago, with which more Nobel-prize winners have been affiliated than with any other university in the world except Cambridge in the UK. A cluster of top-ranking liberal arts colleges in the Midwest include Oberlin College, Carleton College, Macalester College, Grinnell College, Kenyon College, Ohio Wesleyan University, Denison University, DePauw University, Antioch College, and Earlham College. Miami University is considered a public ivy. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor is a public coeducational university located in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... The Arch, the main entrance to Northwesterns Evanston campus Northwestern University is a private university which has its main campus in Evanston, Illinois, on a 240-acre (970,000 m²) campus along the shore of Lake Michigan. ... Not to be confused with the University of Notre Dame Australia University of Notre Dame du Lac The University of Notre Dame (standard name; full legal name University of Notre Dame du Lac) is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning located in Notre Dame, Indiana, USA adjacent to the... Plaque on Bascom Hall, UW-Madison. ... University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, also known as UIUC and the U of I (the officially preferred abbreviation), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the Oberlin College campus Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, USA, was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... Macalester College is a privately supported coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... Grinnell College Grinnell College is a selective, four-year undergraduate liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college founded in Gambier, Ohio in 1824, by Episcopal Bishop Philander Chase. ... Ohio Wesleyan University (also Wesleyan or OWU) is a private, independent, coeducational, selective liberal arts college located in Delaware, Ohio (population 26,000), 20 miles north of Columbus, Ohio, the capital of the state of Ohio in the United States and is easily accessible by car, plane, bus or train. ... Denison University is a private liberal arts and science college in Granville, Ohio, approximately 30 miles east of Columbus. ... Founded in 1837, DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, is a selective private liberal arts college with a 2002 enrollment of 2,339. ... Antioch College is a private, independent liberal arts college in Yellow Springs, Ohio. ... Earlham College Earlham College is a Quaker liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana. ... Miami University, founded in 1809, is the second oldest college west of the Allegheny mountains. ...


Midwesterners are alternately viewed as open, friendly, and straightforward, or stereotyped as unsophisticated and stubborn. The former values probably stem from the freedom-loving heritage of the free states in the region, and from belief in widespread education and tolerance. The latter values probably stem from the stalwart Calvinist heritage of the Midwestern Protestants and pioneers who settled the area, and in the mind of people on the coasts, this continuing religious appeal strikes many as anti-intellectual. For the religious adherents, though, this heritage is loving and inspirational. The Midwest remains a melting pot of Protestantism and Calvinism, mistrustful of authority and power. Calvinism has been known at times for its simple, unadorned churches and lifestyles, as depicted in this painting by Emmanuel de Witte where the 17th century congregation stands to hear a sermon. ...


The Bible Belt, some say, starts in the South and ends in the Midwest. In fact, religious attendance is lowest in the United States in the Industrialized Midwest and in the Southeast, and highest in coastal cities like Boston, New York, and Los Angeles, due to strong Catholic and African-American congregations there, and in the Southern and Midwestern strip from Texas to the Dakotas, where socialization in rural communities often starts at church services. Hence the "Bible Belt" going "across the middle of the country" is an archaic description of what is in fact a "Bible strip" going North to South in the Plains, and two "Bible Buckles" on the coasts. The Bible Belt, highlighted in red The Bible Belt is an area including a number of southern states in the United States in which fervent Evangelical Protestantism is a pervasive part of the culture. ...


The rural heritage of the land in the Midwest remains widely held, even if industrialization and suburbanization have overtaken the states in the original Northwest Territory. Given the rural, antebellum associations with the Midwest, further rural states like Kansas have become icons of Midwesternism, most directly with the 1939 film, the Wizard of Oz.


Midwestern politics tends to be cautious, but the caution is sometimes peppered with protest, especially in minority communities or those associated with agrarian, labor or populist roots.


Due to 20th-century African-American migration from the South, a large African-American urban population lives in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Columbus, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Toledo, Dayton, and other cities. The combination of industry and cultures, Jazz, Blues, and Rock and Roll, led to an outpouring of musical creativity in the 20th century in the Midwest, including new music like the Motown Sound and techno from Detroit and house music from the south side of Chicago. Rock and Roll music was first identified as a new genre by a Cleveland radio DJ, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is now located in Cleveland. See also Music of the Midwest African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans, or simply blacks, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and sub-Saharan Africa. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... City nickname: The Forest City Location within the state of Ohio County Cuyahoga Mayor Jane Campbell Area   â€“Land   â€“Water 213. ... City motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the territorial city) City nicknames: The Motor City and Motown Location in the state of Michigan Founded July 24, 1701 County Wayne... Chicago, Illinois — officially the City of Chicago and colloquially known as Chicago, the Second City and the Windy City — is the third largest city of the United States after New York City and Los Angeles and is the largest inland city of the nation. ... Skyline of downtown Columbus, Ohio, viewed across the Scioto River. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Downtown Minneapolis as viewed from the Stone Arch Bridge Minneapolis is the largest city in Minnesota and the county seat of Hennepin County. ... Toledo, Ohio. ... Dayton, Ohio Dayton is the county seat of Montgomery County, Ohio. ... Look up Culture in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikinews has a related story: Culture and entertainment Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Cultural Development in Antiquity Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Culture and Civilization in Modern Times Classificatory system for cultures and civilizations, by Dr. Sam Vaknin Categories: Culture... Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. ... Media:Example. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodical and chord structure, and a call and response singing style originating in gospel music. ... Techno is a form of electronic music that emerged in the mid-1980s and primarily refers to a particular style developed in and around Detroit and subsequently adopted by European producers. ... This article refers to the largest city of Michigan. ... House music refers to a collection of styles of electronic dance music, the earliest forms beginning in the early- to mid- 1980s. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the background The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum and institution in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Political trends

The Midwest gave birth to one of America's two major political parties, the Republican Party, which was formed in the 1850s and included opposition to the spread of slavery into new states as one of its agendas. The rural Midwest is a Republican stronghold to this day. Hamilton County, the home of Cincinnati, is the only urban county in America which has voted predominately Republican at the close of the 20th century. From the Civil War to the Depression and World War II, Midwestern Republicans dominated American politics and industry, just as Southern Democrat planters dominated antebellum rural America and as Northeastern financiers and academics in the Democratic party would dominate America from the Depression to the Vietnam War and the height of the Cold War. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery is a condition of control over a person against their will, enforced by violence or other forms of coercion. ...


Cincinnati and the Midwest are home to the Underground Railroad center, to denote the anti-slavery passions and heritage of the Midwest and all of America. The Underground Railroad was a network of clandestine routes by which African slaves in the 19th century United States attempted to escape to free states, or as far north as Canada, with the aid of abolitionists. ...


Around the turn of the 20th century, the region also spawned the Populist Movement in the Plains states and later the Progressive Movement, which largely consisted of farmers and merchants intent on making government less corrupt and more receptive to the will of the people. The Republicans were unified anti-slavery politicians, whose later interests in invention, economic progress, women's rights and suffrage, freedman's rights, progressive taxation, wealth creation, election reforms, and temperance and Prohibition eventually clashed with the Taft-Roosevelt split in 1912. Similarly, the Populist and Progressive Parties grew out intellectually from the economic and social progress claimed by the early Republican party. The Protestant and Midwestern ideals of profit, thrift, pioneer self-reliance, education, democratic rights, and religious tolerance eventually manifested into different political beliefs, and no matter the current political reallignment, the Midwest remains a political battleground over thoroughly American ideas and ideals. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Populism is a political philosophy or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, and that the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and used for the benefit and advancement of the people as a whole. ... Progressivism or political progressivism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or substance (known as an invention) which is new, inventive and useful. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Feminism is a body of social theory and political movement primarily based on and motivated by the experiences of women. ... The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, popularly known as the Freedmens Bureau or (mistakenly) the Freedmans Bureau, was an agency of the government of the United States that was formed to aid distressed refugees of the United States Civil War, including former slaves and poor white... A progressive tax, or graduated tax, is a tax that is larger as a percentage of income for those with larger incomes. ... Wealth usually refers to money and property. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... The Temperance Movement (see definition of temperance) was a movement in support of total abstinence from alcohol during the 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Order: 27th President Vice President: James S. Sherman Term of office: March 4, 1909 – March 4, 1913 Preceded by: Theodore Roosevelt Succeeded by: Woodrow Wilson Date of birth: September 15, 1857 Place of birth: Cincinnati, Ohio Date of death: March 8, 1930 Place of death: Washington D.C. First Lady... Order: 26th President Vice President: Charles Warren Fairbanks Term of office: September 14, 1901 – March 3, 1909 Preceded by: William McKinley Succeeded by: William Howard Taft Date of birth: October 27, 1858 Place of birth: New York City Date of death: January 6, 1919 Place of death: Oyster Bay, New... 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... The Populist Party was a short-lived political party in late 19th century in the United States. ... The United States Progressive Party refers to three distinct political parties in 20th-century United States politics. ... Protestantism is a movement within Christianity. ... Profit is defined as the residual value gained from business operations. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Liberal democracy History of democracy Referenda Representative democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by ideology...


Perhaps because of their geographic location and heritage of pioneers and Revolutionary War veterans, many Midwesterners have been sometime adherents of Washington's ideal of isolationism, the belief that Americans should not concern themselves with foreign wars and problems. Protectionism was also promoted by Midwestern politicians to protect native industry from free trade. Other Midwesterners, though, led to America greater internationalism, and eventually, belief in free trade. In the current era, Midwesterners wrestle with free trade beliefs along with protecting industrial jobs. The decline of industry in the Midwest led to the "Rust Belt" era when productivity stagnated and employment declined. The loss of jobs among union households and the plight of the unemployed in the inner cities in the Midwest led to greater demands to protect jobs. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen North American colonies. ... A veteran refers to a person who is experienced in a particular area, particularly referring to people in the armed forces. ... Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of promoting favored domestic industries through the use of high tariffs and other regulations to discourage imports. ... Internationalism is a political movement which advocates a greater economic and political cooperation between nations for the benefit of all. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... The Rust Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, also known as the Manufacturing Belt, is an area in the northeastern and north-central United States whose economy was formerly based largely on heavy industry, manufacturing, and associated industries. ... Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California during the Great Depression. ...


Linguistic influence

The accents of the region are generally distinct from those of the American Northeast and South. They are considered by many to be "standard" American English, and are preferred by many national radio and television broadcasters. Prominent broadcast personalities of the mid 20th century - such as Walter Cronkite, Johnny Carson, and Casey Kasem - came from this region and so influenced this perception. Walter Leland Cronkite Jr. ... Johnny Carson John William Johnny Carson (October 23, 1925 – January 23, 2005) was an American actor, comedian and writer best known for his iconic status as the host of The Tonight Show from 1962 until 1992. ... Casey Kasem (born Kemal Amin Kasem on April 27, 1932,) is a Lebanese-American radio personality and voice actor (of Druze heritage). ...


The Midwest today

Today, the wealth of the coastal regions and the growth of the Sunbelt have contributed to a sense of unease in the Midwest. The abandonment by many industries of the Midwest, in favor of the South, has led some to refer to the Midwest as the Rust Belt. As the East, South, and West retain colonial memories, the Midwest mainly remembers its American pioneer heritage. The Midwest remains, with the South, a disproportionately large source of soldiers for the United States military, and remains a thoroughly patriotic and American center. Today the population of the Midwest is 64,482,997. The Rust Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, also known as the Manufacturing Belt, is an area in the northeastern and north-central United States whose economy was formerly based largely on heavy industry, manufacturing, and associated industries. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...


Because of massive black migration in the 20th century, the urban Midwest continually wrestles with poverty and racism. However, there are prominent Midwesterners of African descent who are authors, teachers, and politicians who have forged a way into the American system.


Though its pioneer, religious, and economic heritage tends toward libertarianism and freedom, its geography in the center of America causes Midwesterners to be disproportionately concerned with the future of the federal government and America in general — East, South, and West. Conversely, the nation looks to the central and centrist Midwest to implicitly solve the inevitable political and geographic arguments of the wide-ranging nation. For these reasons, the truly pervasive culture of the Midwest remains powerful, but subservient to a larger American culture. Perhaps it can be said that the Midwest is America's youngest and most idealistic regional offspring.


Related topics


This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... Midwestern cuisine in the United States features simple dishes such as pot roast, sausage, scrapple, pancakes and other comfort foods. ...

Regions of the United States Flag of the United States
Intranational regions: Central | Deep South | East | East Coast | Gulf Coast | Mid-Atlantic | Midwest | Mountain states | New England | North | Northeast | Northwest | Pacific | South | South Atlantic | South Central | Southeast | Southwest | Upper Midwest | West | West Coast
International regions: Great Lakes | Great Plains | Pacific Northwest
See also: Coastal states, Geography of the United States, International Border states, List of regions of the United States

  Results from FactBites:
 
Midwestern United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2806 words)
The heart of the Midwest is bounded by the Great Lakes and the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys, the "Old Northwest" (or the "West"), referring to the states of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, and Wisconsin, which comprised the original Northwest Territory.
The Midwest was predominantly rural at the time of the Civil War, dotted with small farms across Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, but industrialization, immigration, and urbanization fed the Industrial Revolution, and the heart of industrial progress became the Great Lakes states of the Midwest.
The Midwest gave birth to one of America's two major political parties, the Republican Party, which was formed in the 1850s and included opposition to the spread of slavery into new states as one of its agendas.
Welcome to the Midwest Airlines Center (182 words)
Welcome to the Midwest Airlines Center, one of the world's most architecturally exhilarating and technologically robust convention facilities, located in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Opened in 1998, the Midwest Airlines Center is one of the few convention centers we know of that people visit just to admire, but don't let that fool you; it's a hard-working facility in a hard-working city.
The Midwest Airlines Center is designed for both sensory delight and astonishing efficiency, and operated with strict attention to customer service.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m