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Encyclopedia > Midnight movie
A classic midnight movie in every sense of the term, Tod Browning's Freaks (1932) is the sort of (then) obscure horror film shown on late-night TV beginning in the 1950s; in the 1970s and early 1980s it was a staple of midnight screenings at theaters around the U.S.[1]

The term midnight movie is rooted in the practice that emerged in the 1950s of local television stations around the United States airing low-budget genre films as late-night programming, often with a host delivering ironic asides. As a cinematic phenomenon, the midnight screening of offbeat movies began in the early 1970s in a few urban centers, particularly New York City, eventually spreading across the country. The screening of nonmainstream pictures at midnight was aimed at building a cult film audience, encouraging repeat viewing and social interaction in what was originally a countercultural setting. The national success of The Rocky Horror Picture Show and the changing economics of the film exhibition industry altered the nature of the midnight movie phenomenon; as its association with broader trends of cultural and political opposition dwindled in the 1980s, the midnight movie became a more purely camp experience—in effect, bringing it closer to the television form that shares its name. The term midnight movie is now often used in two different, though related, ways: as a synonym for B movie, reflecting the relative cheapness characteristic of late-night movies both theatrically and on TV, and as a synonym for cult film. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Charles Albert Browning, Jr. ... For other uses, see Freak (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films, based on the British musical stage production The Rocky Horror Show, with the screenplay written by Richard OBrien and Jim Sharman. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... The King of the Bs, Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. ...

Contents

History

On television

In the mid-1980s, Milwaukee's WCGV-TV was one of the many stations that carried Elvira's Movie Macabre. After a break for alternative programming, like the local news, WCGV would often show another genre film—a literal midnight movie—resulting in such virtual double bills as Dr. Heckyl & Mr. Hype and The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave.[2]

In 1953, the Screen Actors Guild agreed to a residuals payment plan that greatly facilitated the distribution of B movies to television.[3] A number of local television stations around the United States soon began showing inexpensive genre films in late-night slots. In the spring of 1954, Los Angeles TV station KABC expanded on the concept by having an appropriately offbeat host introduce the films: for a year on Saturday nights, The Vampira Show, with Maila Nurmi in her newly adopted persona of a sexy bloodsucker ("Your pin-down girl"), presented low-budget movies with black humor and a low-cut black dress. The show—which ran at midnight for four weeks before shifting to 11 p.m. and, later, 10:30—aired horror pictures like Devil Bat's Daughter and Strangler of the Swamp and suspense films such as Murder by Invitation, The Charge Is Murder, and Apology for Murder.[4] The format was echoed by stations across the country, who began showing their late-night B movies with in-character hosts such as Zacherley and Morgus the Magnificent offering ironic interjections. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... WCGV-TV (Channel 24) is a television station located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, affiliated with MyNetworkTV. Its signal covers most of southeastern Wisconsin, including the cities of Racine, Kenosha, Sheboygan and Waukesha. ... Cassandra Peterson (born September 17, 1949) is an American actress best known for her on-screen horror host persona Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. She gained fame on Los Angeles television station KHJ wearing a black, gothic, cleavage-enhancing gown as host of Movie Macabre, a weekly horror movie presentation. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... A residual is a payment made to the creator of performance art (or the performer in the work) for subsequent showings or screenings of the (usually filmed) work. ... KABC is the callsign of the American Broadcasting Companys three flagship broadcast stations in Los Angeles: KABC AM, 790 kHz KABC-TV, channel 7 (DTV 53) KABC-FM 95. ... Maila Nurmi (born Maila Elizabeth Syrjäniemi, December 21, 1921 in Petsamo, Finland—now Pechenga, Russia) created the well-remembered 1950s character of Vampira. ... Horror hosts are a particular type of television presenter, often tasked with presenting low-grade films to television audiences. ... John Zacherle as Zacherley - promotional photo John Zacherle (born September 27, 1918, he is sometimes credited as John Zacherley) is a U.S. television host and voice actor known for his long career hosting television broadcasts of horror movies in Philadelphia and New York City in the 1950s and 1960s. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Momus Alexander Morgus. ...


A quarter-century later, Cassandra Peterson established a persona that was essentially a ditzier, more amplitudinous version of Vampira. As Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, Peterson became the most popular host in the arena of the TV midnight movie. Starting at L.A.'s KHJ-TV in 1981, Elvira's Movie Macabre was soon being syndicated nationally; Peterson presented mostly cut-rate horror films, interrupted on a regular basis for her tongue-in-cheek commentary and other putatively natural talents.[5] In 1993, Buffalo's WKBW-TV began airing began airing a late-night hosted mix of low-budget genre movies and foreign art films, Off Beat Cinema, that was picked up by several local stations around the United States. In the 2000s, horror-oriented late-night movie programming has disappeared from many broadcast stations, though B pictures, mostly of a melodramatic nature, are still widely used in post–prime time slots. In 2006, Turner Classic Movies began airing cult films as part of its new late-night series, TCM Underground.[6] Cassandra Peterson (born September 17, 1949) is an American actress best known for her on-screen horror host persona Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. She gained fame on Los Angeles television station KHJ wearing a black, gothic, cleavage-enhancing gown as host of Movie Macabre, a weekly horror movie presentation. ... KCAL-TV (Channel 9) is an independent station in Los Angeles, California. ... WKBW-TV, Channel 7 is a television station in Buffalo, New York. ... Bird, Zelda and Maxwell Truth in The Hungry Ear Coffeehouse. ... Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... The official site featuring a double feature of Night of the Living Dead and The Crazies TCM Underground is a weekly late-night cult film showcase airing on Turner Classic Movies. ...


In the cinema

Screenshot from a candidate for first midnight movie, Kenneth Anger's Invocation of My Demon Brother: a satanic figure superimposed on a documentary view of Hells Angels at a Rolling Stones concert in July 1969. The Angels were employed as a security force by the Stones, leading to the disaster at Altamont five months later.
Screenshot from a candidate for first midnight movie, Kenneth Anger's Invocation of My Demon Brother: a satanic figure superimposed on a documentary view of Hells Angels at a Rolling Stones concert in July 1969. The Angels were employed as a security force by the Stones, leading to the disaster at Altamont five months later.

Since at least as far back as the 1930s, exploitation films had sometimes been presented at midnight screenings, usually as part of independent roadshow operations.[7] In 1957, Hammer Films' The Curse of Frankenstein set off a spate of midnight presentations.[8] What film qualifies as the first true midnight movie in the sense of the term that emerged in the 1970s remains an open question. Critic Jennifer M. Wood points to the Palace Theater in San Francisco's North Beach district where, in 1968, San Francisco Art Institute graduates Michael Wiese and Steven Arnold, after a sellout screening of their Dalí-esque thesis film Messages, Messages, were invited to program offbeat films at midnight.[9] Author Gary Lachman claims that Kenneth Anger's short Invocation of My Demon Brother (1969), a mélange of occult symbology intercut with and superimposed on images from a Rolling Stones concert, "inaugurat[ed] the midnight movie cult at the Elgin Theatre."[10] The Elgin, in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood, would soon become famous as a midnight venue when it gave the U.S. premiere of a very unusual Mexican movie directed and written by a rather Dalí-esque Chilean. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Kenneth Anger Kenneth Anger (born February 3, 1927 in Santa Monica, California as Kenneth Wilbur Anglemyer) is an underground avant-garde film-maker and author. ... This article is about the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Promotional poster for concert. ... Exploitation is the name given to genre of films, extant since the earliest days of moviemaking, but popularized in the 1970s. ... New company logo as introduced in May 2007 A poster for Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966). ... The Curse of Frankenstein is a 1957 British horror film by Hammer Film Productions. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Founded in 1871, the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is one of the U.S.’s older and more prestigious schools of higher education in contemporary art. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, Marquis of Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Kenneth Anger Kenneth Anger (born February 3, 1927 in Santa Monica, California as Kenneth Wilbur Anglemyer) is an underground avant-garde film-maker and author. ... This article is about the rock band. ... The Elgin theater opened in 1942 on Eighth Avenue in New York. ... Converted townhouses along 23rd Street. ...


The movie generally recognized as igniting the theatrical midnight film movement is Alejandro Jodorowsky's surrealist El Topo, which opened in December 1970 at the Elgin. Playing with the conventions of the spaghetti Western, the film was described by one newspaper critic as "full of tests and riddles" and "more phony gore than maybe 20 years of The Wild Bunch."[11] El Topo regularly sold out every night for months, with many fans returning on a weekly basis. It ran at the theater through June 1971, until at the prompting of John Lennon—who was reported to have seen the film at least three times—Beatles manager Allen Klein purchased the film through his ABKCO film company and gave it a relatively orthodox rerelease.[12] The Elgin soon came up with another midnight hit in Peter Bogdanovich's spree-killer thriller Targets (1968), featuring one of the last performances by horror movie mainstay Boris Karloff and a tale that resonated with the assassinations and other political violence of recent years. By November 1971, four Manhattan theaters beside the Elgin were featuring regularly scheduled midnight movies: the St. Marks (Viva La Muerte, a blast of surrealism in the Franco-Spanish tradition of Luis Buñuel and another Lennon favorite), the Waverly (Equinox, which had just replaced Night of the Living Dead), the Bijou (both Freaks and Night of the Living Dead), and the Olympia (Macunaíma, a Brazilian political black comedy).[13] Equinox (1970) and Night of the Living Dead (1968), both low-budget horror pictures, demonstrate the ties between the old, TV brand of midnight movie and the newer phenomenon. George Romero's zombie masterpiece, in particular, highlights the differences: produced completely outside of the organized studio system, it has a subversive posture evident throughout and especially in its conclusion, an unmistakable allegory of a racist lynching. Alejandro (or Alexandro) Jodorowsky Alejandro Jodorowsky or Alexandro Jodorowsky (IPA: ) (born February 7, 1929, in Tocopilla, Chile) is an actor, playwright, director, producer, composer, mime, comic book writer and psychotherapist born to Ashkenazi Jewish parents of Russian origin. ... El Topo (The Mole) is a 1970 Mexican allegorical, cult western movie and underground film, directed by and starring Alejandro Jodorowsky. ... Clint Eastwood as the Man with No Name in A Fistful of Dollars Once Upon a Time in the West, in true Sergio Leone style, ends with an extended shootout scene between Harmonica (Charles Bronson) and Frank (Henry Fonda). ... The Wild Bunch is a 1969 English language western film directed by Sam Peckinpah, in which an aging group of outlaws hope to have one final score while the West is turning into a modern society. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ABKCO Music & Records, Inc. ... Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић (born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. ... Targets (1968) is a film written, produced and directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (London, November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor, who immigrated to Canada in the 1910s, best known for his roles in horror films and the creation of Frankensteins monster in 1931s Frankenstein. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Equinox is an horror movie by Jack Woods. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... For other uses, see Freak (disambiguation). ... George A. Romero (born 4 February 1940) is an American director, writer, editor, actor and composer. ...

Billed as a "new kind of musical comedy," Scarecrow in a Garden of Cucumbers, featuring Warhol protegé(e) Holly Woodlawn (left), had a midnight premiere at New York's Waverly Theater in March 1972. New York Times critic Vincent Canby found it "quietly witless."
Billed as a "new kind of musical comedy," Scarecrow in a Garden of Cucumbers, featuring Warhol protegé(e) Holly Woodlawn (left), had a midnight premiere at New York's Waverly Theater in March 1972. New York Times critic Vincent Canby found it "quietly witless."[14]

Shot over the winter of 1971–72, John Waters's "filth epic" Pink Flamingos, featuring incest and coprophagia, became the best known of a group of campy midnight films focusing on sexual perversions and fetishism.[15] Filmed on weekends in Waters's hometown of Baltimore, with a mile-long extension cord as a power conduit, it was also crucial in inspiring the growth of the independent film movement.[16] In 1973, the Elgin Theater started midnight screenings of both Pink Flamingos and a crime drama from Jamaica with a remarkable soundtrack. In its mainstream release, The Harder They Come (1972) had been a flop, panned by critics after its U.S. distributor, Roger Corman's New World Pictures, marketed it as a blaxploitation picture. Rereleased as a midnight film, it screened around the country for six years, helping spur the popularity of reggae in the United States. While the midnight-movie potential of certain films was recognized only some time after they opened, a number during this period were distributed to take advantage of the market from the beginning—in 1973, for instance, Broken Goddess, Dragula, The White Whore and the Bit Player, and Elevator Girls in Bondage (as well as Pink Flamingos) had their New York premieres at midnight screenings.[17] In 1974, midnight opener Flesh Gordon evidenced how the phenomenon lent itself to flirtations with pornography. Around this time, the black comedy Harold and Maude (1971) became the first major Hollywood studio movie of the era to develop a substantial cult audience of repeat viewers; though apparently it was not picked up by much of the midnight movie circuit during the 1970s, it subsequently became a late show staple as the phenomenon turned more to camp revivals.[18] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who became a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Holly Woodlawn Holly Woodlawn (born October 26, 1946) was a Warhol superstar, who appeared in his movies Trash (1970) and Women in Revolt (1972). ... IFC Center in New York Formerly The Waverly Theater, IFC Center is a brand new haven for fans of independent film in New York. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... John Waters (born April 22, 1946) is an American filmmaker, writer, personality, visual artist and art collector, who rose to fame in the early 1970s for his transgressive cult films. ... Pink Flamingos is a 1972 film directed by John Waters. ... Coprophagia is the consumption of feces, from the Greek copros (feces) and phagein (eat). ... A fetish (from French fétiche; from Portuguese feitiço; from Latin facticius, artificial and facere, to make) is an object believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular a man-made object that has power over others. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... The Harder They Come is a 1972 Jamaican crime film directed by Perry Henzell. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... // New World Communications Company Info •This company no longer exists. ... Shaft (1971) Blaxploitation is a film genre that emerged in the United States in the early 1970s when many exploitation films were made that targeted the urban African American audience; the word itself is a portmanteau of the words “black” and “exploitation. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Flesh Gordon was a 1974 science fiction and comedy adventure film. ... Porn redirects here. ... Harold and Maude is a movie directed by Hal Ashby in 1971. ...

Liquid Sky (1982) was one of the last true independent films to become a midnight hit during the movement's most influential years. As critic Emanuel Levy describes, like many midnight classics, this "perversely beautiful sci-fi movie...appeared out of nowhere."
Liquid Sky (1982) was one of the last true independent films to become a midnight hit during the movement's most influential years. As critic Emanuel Levy describes, like many midnight classics, this "perversely beautiful sci-fi movie...appeared out of nowhere."[19]

On the midnight following April Fool's Day 1976, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, which had flopped on initial release the year before, opened at the Waverly Theater, a leading midnight movie venue in New York's Greenwich Village. Midnight screenings of the film soon became a national sensation, amassing a cult following all over the United States. Every Friday and Saturday night, audience members would talk back to the screen, dress up as characters in the film, and act out scenes complete with props.[20] Where the social aspect had always been a part of the midnight movie's attraction, with Rocky Horror in an exaggerated way it became the attraction. By summer 1979, the film was playing on weekend midnights in twenty-odd suburban theaters in the New York region alone; 20th Century-Fox had approximately two hundred prints of the movie in circulation for midnight shows around the country.[21] Beginning in 1978, the Waverly developed another midnight success that was much smaller commercially, but more significant artistically: Eraserhead, originally distributed the previous year. David Lynch's feature debut, a model of shoestring surrealism, reaffirmed the midnight movie's most central traditions. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Liquid Sky (disambiguation). ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films, based on the British musical stage production The Rocky Horror Show, with the screenplay written by Richard OBrien and Jim Sharman. ... IFC Center in New York Formerly The Waverly Theater, IFC Center is a brand new haven for fans of independent film in New York. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... 20th Century Fox logo Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ...


The commercial viability of the sort of big-city arthouses that launched outsider pictures for the midnight movie circuit began to decline in the late 1970s as broad social and economic shifts weakened their countercultural base. Leading midnight movie venues were beginning to fold as early as 1977—that year, New York's Bijou switched back permanently to the live entertainment for which it had been built, and the Elgin, after a brief run with gay porn, shut down completely.[22] In succeeding years, the popularization of the VCR and the expansion of movieviewing possibilities on cable television meant the death of many additional independent theaters. While Rocky Horror soldiered on, by then a phenomenon unto itself, and new films like The Warriors (1979), The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980), The Evil Dead (1981), Heavy Metal (1981), and Pink Floyd The Wall (1982)—all from mainstream distributors—were picked up by the midnight movie circuit, the core of exhibitors that energized the movement was disappearing. By the time the fabled Orson Welles Cinema in Cambridge, Massachusetts, shut its doors after a fire in 1986, the days of the theatrical midnight movie as a significant countercultural phenomenon were already past. The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... The Warriors is a 1979 film directed by Walter Hill and based on the 1965 novel by Sol Yurick. ... The Gods Must Be Crazy is a film released in 1980, written and directed by Jamie Uys. ... For other uses, see The Evil Dead (disambiguation). ... Heavy Metal is a 1981 Canadian animated film from executive producer Leonard Mogel, who also was the publisher of Heavy Metal magazine. ... Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Ad as it appeared in The Real Paper in June 1973 Orson Welles Cinema was a well-remembered movie theater which operated at 1001 Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts from the late 1960s into the mid-1980s, often showcasing independent films, foreign films and revivals. ...

"[A] moody young dreamer trying to figure out the Vonnegutian complexities of the Tangent Universe and how to survive in the arid, psychically toxic suburbs": Donnie Darko played weekend midnights at New York's Two Boots Pioneer Theater for 28 straight months.
"[A] moody young dreamer trying to figure out the Vonnegutian complexities of the Tangent Universe and how to survive in the arid, psychically toxic suburbs":[23] Donnie Darko played weekend midnights at New York's Two Boots Pioneer Theater for 28 straight months.[24]

In 1988, the midnight movie experience was institutionalized in a new manner with the introduction of the Toronto International Film Festival's nightly Midnight Madness section.[25] In the years since, new or recent films still occasionally emerge as midnight movie "hits" on the circuit of theaters that continue to show them. The most successful of the 1990s generation was the Australian drag queen road saga The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994). One of the theaters to show it regularly at midnight was New York's Waverly (also now closed), where Rocky Horror had played for a house record ninety-five weeks. A celebrated episode of television's The Drew Carey Show features a song-and-dance battle between Rocky Horror fans (led by Drew Carey) and Priscilla fans (led by Mimi Bobeck). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... Poster for the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival Box office at the Manulife Centre The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), held in Toronto, Canada, is widely considered to be one of the top film festivals in the world. ... The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert is a 1994 Oscar-winning Australian film about two drag queens and a transsexual woman driving across the outback from Sydney to Alice Springs in a large bus they have named Priscilla. ... The Drew Carey Show was a long-running American sitcom (set in Cleveland, Ohio) that aired on ABC from 1995 to 2004 and was known for its everyman characters and themes. ... Drew Allison Carey (born May 23, 1958) is an American comedian and actor. ... Kathy Kinney Kathy Kinney (b. ...


Since the turn of the millennium, the most notable success among newly minted midnight movies has been Donnie Darko (2001). Older films are also popular on the circuit, appreciated largely in an imposed camp fashion—a midnight movie tradition that goes back to the 1972 revival of the hectoring anti-drug movie Reefer Madness (1938).[26] (Tod Browning's 1932 horror classic Freaks, the original midnight movie revival, is both too dark and too sociologically acute to readily consume as camp.) Where the irony with which Reefer Madness was adopted as a midnight favorite had its roots in a countercultural sensibility, in the latter's place there is now the parodoxical element of nostalgia: the leading revivals on the circuit currently include the crème de la crème of the John Hughes oeuvre—The Breakfast Club (1985), Pretty in Pink (1986), and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986)—and the preteen adventure film The Goonies (1985).[27] As of late 2006, Rocky Horror itself continues to play on a weekly basis at thirty-two venues around the country, and at least once a month at about two dozen others.[28] For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Reefer Madness is a 1936 drama film revolving around the tragic events that follow when high school students are lured by pushers to try marihuana: a hit and run accident, manslaughter, suicide, rape, and descent into madness all ensue. ... Charles Albert Browning, Jr. ... For other uses, see Freak (disambiguation). ... One may feel nostalgic for the familiar routine of school, conveniently forgetting the painful experiences such as bullying. ... For other people with this name, see John Hughes. ... This article is about the 1985 film. ... Pretty in Pink is a popular 1986 film about teenage love and social cliques in 1980s American high schools. ... Ferris Buellers Day Off is a 1986 comedy film written and directed by John Hughes. ... The Goonies was a hit movie in 1985, directed by Richard Donner. ...


Two popular midnight movies made during the phenomenon's heyday have been selected to the National Film Registry: Eraserhead (inducted 2004) and The Rocky Horror Picture Show (inducted 2005). Midnight movie staples Freaks (1932) and Night of the Living Dead (1968) were inducted in 1994 and 1997 respectively. Harold and Maude, a cult film before it was adopted as a midnight movie, was also inducted in 1997. The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Midnight releases

A distantly related phenomenon is the practice of premiering blockbuster films (e.g., The Lord of the Rings series, the Star Wars prequels, the Spider-Man and Batman series) at midnight or 12:01 a.m. of the official release date. Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith holds the record for the largest midnight opening of all-time with a $16.5 million take on May 19, 2005.[29] This article is about the novel. ... This article is about the series. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Patterson (2007).
  2. ^ Elvira's Movie Macabre. Retrieved 11/14/06.
  3. ^ Heffernan (2004), p. 161.
  4. ^ The Vampira Show. Retrieved 11/14/06.
  5. ^ See Gibron (2006) for a detailed analysis of the Elvira persona and Movie Macabre.
  6. ^ See TCM Underground: Films—Archive. Retrieved 12/19/06.
  7. ^ Schaefer (1999), pp. 124–125.
  8. ^ Heffernan (2004), p. 61.
  9. ^ Wood (2004).
  10. ^ Lachman (2001), p. 305.
  11. ^ Greenspun (1971).
  12. ^ Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), pp. 80, 95. For a detailed synopsis of the film, see El Topo (note the film's Elgin premiere is misdated).
  13. ^ Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), p. 95.
  14. ^ Canby (1972).
  15. ^ Waters (2006).
  16. ^ Pink Flamingos Production Notes. Retrieved 11/15/06.
  17. ^ Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), p. 13.
  18. ^ See Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), p. 298.
  19. ^ Levy (1999), p. 185.
  20. ^ See History of the Rocky Horror Picture Show and Rocky Horror Timeline. Retrieved 11/14/06.
  21. ^ Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), p. 13.
  22. ^ Bijou Theatre; Elgin Theatre. Retrieved 11/15/06.
  23. ^ Bryant (2005), p. lxxvii.
  24. ^ Burnett (2004).
  25. ^ Corliss and Catto (2007).
  26. ^ See Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), pp. 261–262. For their consideration of Freaks as part of the early midnight movie phenomenon, see pp. 3, 95, 99, 295–297.
  27. ^ Beale (2005).
  28. ^ Rocky Horror Showings List. Retrieved 11/14/06.
  29. ^ Gray (2005).

Sources

Published

  • Beale, Lewis (2005). "A New Time for Midnight Movies," International Herald Tribune (June 22) (available online).
  • Bryant, Edward (2005). "Fantasy and Horror in the Media: 2004," in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror, Eighteenth Annual Collection, ed. Ellen Datlow, Gavin J. Grant, and Kelly Link (New York: St. Martin's Griffin), pp. lxxiii–xcii. ISBN 0-312-34194-6
  • Canby, Vincent (1972). "Scarecrow in a Garden of Cucumbers: Holly Woodlawn Cast as Small-Town Girl," New York Times (March 17) (available online).
  • Corliss, Richard, and Susan Catto (2007). "The Freaks Come Out at Night," Time (September 12) (available online).
  • Greenspun, Roger (1971). "El Topo Emerges: Jodorowsky's Feature Begins Regular Run," New York Times (November 5) (available online).
  • Heffernan, Kevin (2004). Ghouls, Gimmicks, and Gold: Horror Films and the American Movie Business, 1953–1968 (Durham, N.C., and London: Duke University Press). ISBN 0-8223-3215-9
  • Hoberman, J., and Jonathan Rosenbaum (1983). Midnight Movies (New York: Da Capo Press). ISBN 0-306-80433-6
  • Kaufelt, David A. (1979). Midnight Movies (New York: Delacorte). ISBN 0-385-28608-2
  • Lachman, Gary (2001). Turn Off Your Mind: The Mystic Sixties and the Dark Side of the Age of Aquarius (New York: Disinformation). ISBN 0-88064-278-5
  • Levy, Emanuel. Cinema of Outsiders: The Rise of American Independent Film (New York and London: New York University Press, 1999). ISBN 0-8147-5123-7
  • Patterson, John (2007). "The Weirdo Element," Guardian (March 2) (available online).
  • Schaefer, Eric (1999). "Bold! Daring! Shocking! True!": A History of Exploitation Films, 1919–1959 (Durham and London: Duke University Press). ISBN 0-8223-2374-5
  • Waters, John (2006). "The Kindness of a Stranger," New York Times Book Review (November 19).
  • Wood, Jennifer M. (2004). "25 Great Reasons to Stay Up Late," MovieMaker no. 55 (summer) (available online).

OnlineAuthored

  • Burnett, Adam (2004). "Donnie Darko: The Director's Cut: The Strange Afterlife of an Indie Cult Film", indieWIRE (July 22).
  • Gibron, Bill (2006). "The Boob Tube: Elvira, Mistress of the Dark and Movie Macabre", PopMatters (October 31).
  • Gray, Brandon (2005). "'Sith' Draws $16.5M at Midnight", Box Office Mojo (May 19).

OnlineArchival

  • Cinema Treasures essential resource for information on classic movie theaters
  • Milwaukee Horror Hosts historical site administered by Dick Nitelinger
  • Pink Flamingos! official Fine Line Features site
  • RockyHorror.com official Rocky Horror Picture Show fansite
  • TCM Underground official Turner Classic Movies site

Film Fine Line Features was the speciality films division of New Line Cinema. ...

  • Midnight Movies: From the Margin to the Mainstream (2005) (for credits, see the film's IMDb page)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Midnight movies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (466 words)
Midnight movies are a once popular phenomenon that started in the early 1970s and largely faded with advent of the VCR in the 1980s.
Movie musicals and cult movies were the most common form of midnight movie.
Midnight movies appealed to moviegoers because of the social aspect of viewing films with friends and the pure shock value many of the movies contained.
Mad Dog Movies - Review: Midnight Movies (1417 words)
Midnight Movies: From the Margin to the Mainstream pays tribute to an era of moviegoing that was unlike anything before or since.
Midnight Movies concludes by touching briefly on the changes that brought on the end of the midnight distribution model.
Midnight Movies was directed by Stuart Samuels, who has a long history of quality projects, my favorite being Visions of Light.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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