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Encyclopedia > Midnight

For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight may refer to: Midnight, a time designated as either 12:00 AM, or the actual mid-point of the night (between sunset and sunrise) Midnight (1934 film) Midnight (1939 film) Midnight blue, a very dark shade of blue Midnight Oil, an Australian rock band Midnight Syndicate, an American Electronic...


Midnight, literally "the middle of the night", is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. Originally midnight depended on the time of the sunset and dawn, varying according to the seasons. Link title For other uses, see Sunset (disambiguation). ... Dawn or civil dawn is the time at which the Sun is 6 degrees below the horizon in the morning. ... A season is one of the major divisions of the year, generally based on yearly periodic changes in weather. ...


Solar midnight is that time opposite of solar noon, when the sun is closest to nadir and the night is furthest from dusk and dawn. Due to the advent of time zones, which makes time identical across a range of meridians, it rarely coincides with midnight on a clock, but can be computed on a number of websites that perform solar time calculations. Solar midnight is dependent on longitude rather than on a time zone. Noon is the time exactly through the day, written 12:00 in the 24-hour clock and 12:00 noon in the 12-hour clock. ... The nadir (from Arabic nazir, opposite) is the astronomical term for the point in the sky directly below the observer, or more precisely, the point in the sky with an inclination of -90°. Geometrically, it is the point on the celestial sphere intersected by a line drawn from the observer... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... On the earth, a meridian is a north-south line between the North Pole and the South Pole. ...


Start and end of day

Midnight marks both the start and the end of each day in civil time throughout the world. Since, therefore, two midnights are associated with each day, conventions are needed to distinguish between them. Civil time is another name for mean solar time reckoned from midnight. ...


In the 24-hour time notation, the solution is very simple: "00:00" refers to the start and "24:00" to the end of a given date. In other words, "today at 24:00" is the same point in time as "tomorrow at 00:00". The 24-hour clock is a convention of time-keeping in which the day runs from midnight to midnight and is divided into 24 hours, numbered from 0 to 23 (and 24 in the day-ending midnight). ...


With the 12-hour time notation, which is still used in Armenia, Greece, and parts of the English-speaking and South American world, there is no simple and unambiguous notation for midnight. While it has become common practice for computers and digital clocks in these regions to display "12:00 a.m." for midnight, other notations such as "12 midnight" are also encountered. As these notations provide no clear and unambiguous way to distinguish between midnight at the start and at the end of a day, it has become customary in these regions to move deadlines away from midnight, for example to "11:59 p.m." or "12:01 a.m." (23:59 or 00:01), to associate them unambiguously with a single date. The 12-hour clock is a timekeeping convention in which the 24 hours of the day are divided into two periods called ante meridiem (a. ... A word, phrase, sentence, or other communication is called ambiguous if it can be interpreted in more than one way. ... A wall clock A clock (from the Latin cloca, bell) is an instrument for measuring time and for measuring time intervals of less than a day—as opposed to a calendar. ...


Some religious calendars continue to begin the day at another time — for example, at dusk in the Hebrew calendar or the Islamic calendar. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Twilight. ... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (also called Hijri calendar, Arabic التقويم الهجري) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate Islamic holy days. ...


In many developed nations, particularly in Northern America, the colloquial "beginning of the next day" is sometime between 2-5am, as many people with daylight work schedules stay awake past midnight. A majority of TV stations advertise in accordance with this. Many college-agers in these areas (particularly frequent party-goers even define it as sunrise. Northern America is a name for the parts of North America besides Mexico when Mexico is considered as Latin America. ... A television station is a type of radio station that broadcasts both audio and video to television receivers in a particular area. ... The Rayleigh effect, seconds before sunrise in New Zealand Sunrise, also called sunup in some American English dialects, is the time at which the first part of the Sun appears above the horizon in the east. ...


Cultural meanings

In traditional magical thinking, midnight refers to solar midnight, which is opposite solar noon. These form an axis linking the mundane world with otherworlds by being the apogee of darkness and the perigee of light. Thus, traditional midnight is associated with chaos, death, underworld and mystery. It was seen as a moment when sacrum manifests itself and epiphanies were most likely. Of course the epiphanies expected were those associated with darkness, so it was thought that at midnight, visitation from spirits, ghosts, demons and devils were common. Magical thinking is a term used by historians of religion to describe one kind of non-scientific causal reasoning. ... Noon is the time exactly through the day, written 12:00 in the 24-hour clock and 12:00 noon in the 12-hour clock. ... For Irish Mythology, see Other World. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Death is the cessation of life. ... // In the study of mythology and religion, the underworld is a generic term approximately equivalent to the lay term afterlife, referring to any place to which newly dead souls go. ... Image of pelvis. ... John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ as Angels look on in wonder in an Eastern Orthodox icon of the Theophany This article is about the Christian feast. ... The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus, meaning breath. ... A manufactured image of a ghostly woman ascending a staircase A ghost is an alleged non-corporeal manifestation of a dead person (or, rarely, an animal or a vehicle). ... St. ... A modern interpretation of the devil, in red with goat like characteristics. ...


All the supernatural creatures of darkness - reminiscent of feared nocturnal predators - were believed to haunt the night, their potency greatest at its central point, midnight. According to Slavic folklore, midnight was time when strzygas rose from graves to suck the blood of mortals, zmoras assailed the sleeping to steal their breath, and devils came for sinners. Polish Jews believed that it was the time when dybbuks possessed folk, causing insanity. Vampires in Slavic culture that had two hearts and two souls, as well as two sets of teeth, but one set growing in normally would pinpoint a Strzyga. ... Dybbuk - in kabbalah and European Jewish folklore, is a malicious possessing spirit, believed to be the dislocated soul of a dead person, escaped from Gehenna, a Hebrew term very loosely translated as hell. The word dybbuk is derived from the Hebrew דיבוק, meaning attachment; the dybbuk attaches itself to the body...


As night's attributes are chaos and primordiality, all the acts of summoning from otherworlds were easiest to perform at the culmination of the night. Supernatural entities like demons and devils universally answered a human call - be it death wish, curse of famine, prostration or pact with the devil. All the acts of sorcery, witchcraft, necromancy were easiest then. While some beliefs stated that elaborate rituals were needed, some other folklore ascribed unholy power to such simple acts as calling the devil at crossroads at midnight. Even peeking into a mirror at night (without a reliable clock one could never be certain what time it was) was dangerous, as the devil himself could have looked back. For Irish Mythology, see Other World. ... The supernatural (Latin: super- exceeding + nature) refers to forces and phenomena which are beyond ordinary scientific measurement. ... Look up Curse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A famine is a phenomenon in which a large percentage of the population of a region or country is so undernourished that death by starvation or other related diseases becomes increasingly common. ... Magic (also called magick to distinguish it from stage magic) is a supposed way of influencing the world through supernatural, mystical, or paranormal means. ... Witchcraft, in various historical, religious and mythical contexts, is the use of certain kinds of alleged supernatural or magical powers. ... Necromancy (disambiguation). ... A crossroads (the word rarely appears in singular) is another word for road junction, where two or more roads meet (there are three or more arms). ...


Midnight was also the time to gather the ingredients used in magical acts done at other times, so various herbs were thought to be most potent when harvested at midnight. Sorcery redirects here. ...


Midnight is the name of a guy that you may find using various internet-related things. Find him and say hello.


  Results from FactBites:
 
MLK Papers Project Sermons: "A Knock at Midnight" (3172 words)
When we were in the midnight of dread plagues and diseases, science, through surgery, sanitation, and the wonder drugs, ushered in the bright day of physical health, thereby prolonging our lives and making for greater security and physical well-being.
Midnight is the hour when men desperately seek to obey the eleventh commandment, "Thou shalt not get caught." According to the ethic of midnight, the cardinal sin is to be caught and the cardinal virtue is to get by.
At midnight men are altogether ignored because of their limited education, or they are given bread that has been hardened by the winter of morbid class consciousness.
Midnight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (681 words)
Solar midnight is that time opposite of solar noon, when the sun is closest to nadir and the night is furthest from dusk and dawn.
According to Slavic folklore, midnight was time when strzygas rose from graves to suck the blood of mortals, zmoras assailed the sleeping to steal their breath, and devils came for sinners.
Midnight was also the time to gather the ingredients used in magical acts done at other times, so various herbs were thought to be most potent when harvested at midnight.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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