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Encyclopedia > Midgard
a:miþkarþi for Old Norse à Miðgarði meaning "in Midgard" - "in Middle Earth" on runestone Sö 56.
a:miþkarþi for Old Norse à Miðgarði meaning "in Midgard" - "in Middle Earth" on runestone Sö 56.

Midgard (an Anglicized form of Old Norse Miðgarðr), is an old Germanic name for our world, the places inhabited by humans, with the literal meaning "middle enclosure". Midgard may mean: Midgard, the Earth in Norse mythology. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 227 pixelsFull resolution (2573 × 731 pixel, file size: 726 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 227 pixelsFull resolution (2573 × 731 pixel, file size: 726 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Antarctica Oceania Africa Asia Europe North America South America Middle East Caribbean Central Asia East Asia North Asia South Asia Southeast Asia SW. Asia Australasia Melanesia Micronesia Polynesia Central America Latin America Northern America Americas C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa Southern Africa W. Africa C. Europe E. Europe N... Mannaz or Manwaz is the Proto-Germanic term for man, in the gender-neutral sense of person, human being. The word developed into Old English man, mann human being, person, (c. ...


This name is attested in many ancient germanic language. It occours in Old Norse literature as Miðgarðr. In Old High German poem Muspilli it appears as Mittilagart. Gothic form Midjungards is attested in Luke's Gospel as traduction of the word "earth". The word is present in Old English epic and poetry as Middangeard; later transformed to Middellærd or Middel-erde ("Middle-earth") in Middle English literature. Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... The Muspilli is one of the sole two substantial surviving fragments of Old High German epic poetry (the other being the Hildebrandslied), dating to ca. ... Gothic is an extinct Germanic language that was spoken by the Goths. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Penis[1], Englisc by its speakers) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the...


All these form are from a conjectural Proto-Germanic *medja-gardaz (*meddila-, *medjan-). Even if the two terms derive from indoeuropean roots *medhyo ("middle") and *ghartos ("enclosure"), the construct exists only in Germanic. It's possible to speculate about the ancientness of this cosmological concept, but it may be inappropriate to trace back the Germanic terminology in common Indoeuropean. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Danish and Swedish form Midgård, the Norwegian Midgard or Midgård, derive from the Old Norse term.

Contents

Old Norse

Midgard is a realm in Norse mythology. Pictured as placed somewhere in the middle of Yggdrasil, Midgard is surrounded by a world of water, or ocean, that is impassable. The ocean is inhabited by the great sea serpent Jormungand, who is so huge that he encircles the world entirely, grasping his own tail. In Norse mythology, Miðgarðr became applied to the wall around the world that the gods constructed from the eyebrows of the giant Ymir as a defence against the Jotuns who lived in Jotunheim, west of Mannheim, "the home of men," a word used to refer to the entire world (there is no direct relation to the German city of Mannheim, which is attested from the 8th century, named after an early settler called Manno). It is depicted as an intermediate world between heaven (Asgard) and hell (Niflheim or Hel). Thus it is part of a triad of upper (Heaven), middle (Earth), and lower (Underworld). It was said to have been formed from the flesh and blood of Ymir, his flesh constituting the land and his blood the oceans, and was connected to Asgard by the Bifrost Bridge, guarded by Heimdall. Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... This tree from the Viking Age Överhogdal tapestries is believed to show Yggdrasil with Viðópnir. ... Thor fighting the sea serpent, Henry Fuseli, 1788. ... Ymir is killed by the sons of Borr in this artwork by Lorenz Frølich In Norse mythology, Ymir, also named Aurgelmir (Old Norse gravel-yeller) among the giants themselves, was the founder of the race of frost giants and an important figure in Norse cosmology. ... In Norse mythology, Jotuns, Jötunn or Jotnar of Utgard, Jötunnheim were the race of Gods called giants (thurs), separated into categories such as frost giants (rime giants, hrimthurs), fire giants, sea giants and storm giants. ... Jotunheim is the world of the giants (two types: rock and frost, collectively called Jotuns) in the Norse Mythology. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... “The Inferno” redirects here. ... Niflheim (Land of Mists) is the realm of ice and cold in Norse mythology. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Niflheim. ... In Norse Mythology, Bifrost Bridge is the bridge leading from the realm of the mortals Midgård to the realm of the gods Asgård, which the gods travel daily to hold their councils under the shade of the tree Yggdrasil. ... Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Heimdall (Old Norse Heimdallr, the prefix Heim- means world, the affix -dallr is of uncertain origin, perhaps it means pole, bright, or valley) is one of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ...

The runestone Sö 56.
The runestone Sö 56.

According to the Eddas, Midgard will be destroyed in Ragnarok, the battle at the end of the world. Jormungand will arise from the ocean, poisoning the land and sea with his venom and causing the sea to rear up and lash against the land. The final battle will take place on the plain of Vígríðr, following which Midgard and almost all life on it will be destroyed, with the earth sinking into the sea. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 729 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 729 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Norse mythology, Vígríðr is the giant plain where Ragnarök will be fought. ...


Although most surviving instances of the word refer to spiritual matters, it was also used in more mundane situations, as in the Viking Age runestone poem Sö 56: The Viking Age is the name of the age in Northern Europe, following the Germanic Iron Age. ... A rune stone Rune stones are somewhat flat standing stones with runic stone carvings from the Iron Age (Viking Age) and early middle ages found in most parts of Scandinavia. ... Rundata - phreakin great guy, pwnz u all! telecommications fanatic website here - * rundata. ...

Iak væit Hastæin
þa Holmstæin brøðr,
mænnr rynasta
a Miðgarði,
sattu stæin
ok stafa marga
æftiR Frøystæin,
faður sinn.[1][2]
I know Hásteinn
and Holmsteinn,
the most rune-skilled
brothers in Middle Earth,
placed many a stone
and staff
in memory of Freysteinn,
their father.[1]

Old and Middle English

The name middangeard occurs half a dozen times in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf, and is the same word as Midgard in Old Norse. The term is equivalent in meaning to the Greek term Oikoumene, as referring to the known and inhabited world. Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Oikoumene, from the Greek Οικουμένη, which is the present participle of the verb Οικώ, meaning to inhabit. ...


The concept of Midgard occurs many times in Middle English. The association with earth (OE eorðe) in Middle English middellærd, middelerde is by popular etymology; the continuation of geard "enclosure" is yard. An early example of this transformation is from the Ormulum: Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... A fake etymology is an invented explanation (etymology) for the origin of a word. ... photo of a backyard A yard is an enclosed area of land, usually tied to a building. ... The Ormulum is a work of metrical Biblical exegesis written in early Middle English by a man named Ormin. The work is notable for being a key to the pronunciation of early Middle English at a critical time. ...

þatt ure Drihhtin wollde / ben borenn i þiss middellærd
that our Lord wanted / be born in this middle-earth.

The usage of "Middle-earth" as a name for a setting was popularized by Old English scholar J. R. R. Tolkien in his The Lord of the Rings and other fantasy works; he was originally inspired by the references to middangeard and Éarendel in the Old English poem Crist. A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Old Norse Aurvandil, Old English Éarendel, Lombardic Auriwandalo, German Orentil (or Erentil) are cognate Germanic personal names. ... Crist is a poem by the medieval poet Cynewulf, written in Anglo-Saxon. ...


Old High German

Mittilagart is mentioned in the 9th century Old High German Muspilli (v. 54) meaning "the world" as opposed to the sea and the heavens: As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was the century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... The Muspilli is one of the sole two substantial surviving fragments of Old High German epic poetry (the other being the Hildebrandslied), dating to ca. ...

muor varsuuilhit sih, suilizot lougiu der himil,
mano uallit, prinnit mittilagart
Sea is swallowed, flaming burn the heavens,
Moon falls, Midgard burns

References

  1. ^ a b Rundata
  2. ^ See also Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages for a version in normalized Old Norse orthography.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Midgard: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (915 words)
Midgard (the common English transliteration of Old Norse Miðgarðr), Midjungards (Gothic), Middangeard (Old English), Middellærd (Middle English), Midgård (common Danish and Swedish) and Mittilagart (Old High German), from Proto-Germanic *medja-garda (*meddila-, *medjan-, projected PIE *medhyo-gharto), is an old Germanic name for our world, the places inhabited by men, with the literal meaning "middle enclosure".
Midgard is the realm of the humans in Norse mythology.
It was said to have been formed from the flesh and blood of Ymir, his flesh constituting the land and his blood the oceans, and was connected to Asgard by the Bifrost Bridge, guarded by Heimdall.
The Armchair Empire - PC Preview: Midgard (798 words)
Instead their character will be plunked down in Midgard and players will then have to seek an apprenticeship and slowly learn the ropes in their trade, all the while developing a reputation in their skill, be it as a talented tanner, or an incompetent flsmith.
Midgard will be inhabited by the gambit of beasts from Norse mythology, from giants to the big boys of myth like Fenris, a gigantic wolf who roamed the forests, leaving death and destruction in his wake.
Unfortunately for Midgard, the biggest problem it faces is not the already crowded MMORPG market, nor the currently weak state of the global economy, it's the simple fact that the game is being made by Funcom, the same company responsible for the buggy debacle, Anarchy Online (Don't you just love the irony in that title?).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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