FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Middlesex School

Middlesex School

Middlesex clocktower Image File history File linksMetadata Middlesex_clocktower3. ...

Motto Fides, Veritas, Labor
School type Private, Boarding, Coeducational
Established 1901
Head of School Kathleen C. Giles
Location Concord, MA, USA
Campus Small town, 350 acres (1.4 km²)
Endowment $84 million
Religious affiliation None
Enrollment ~350
Faculty ~65
Average SATs 2010
Average class size 11
Teacher:Student ratio 1:5
Tuition $38,840 (boarder), $31,075 (day student)
Financial aid $2.8 million, 28% student body, $26,200 (average)
Applicants accepted 25% (200 out of 800 applicants)
Boarding/day student ratio 74% boarding to 26% day
Faculty with advanced degrees 66%
Students of color 17%
International students 10%
Saturday classes Yes
AP courses 25
School Newspaper The Anvil
School colors Cardinal, White
Mascot Zebra
School website www.mxschool.edu
The Circle, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts
The Circle, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts
Clay Centennial Center, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts
Clay Centennial Center, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts

Middlesex School is an independent preparatory school for grades 9 - 12 located in Concord, Massachusetts, USA. It was founded in 1901 by Frederick Winsor, who headed the school until 1937. Formerly an all-boys' school, Middlesex became coeducational in 1974. Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Middlesex_circle. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... Image File history File links Centennial_center. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: founder of a high school - not particularly notable If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ...


The school was named for the county Middlesex in which it stands, mentioned in the poem "Paul Revere's Ride": "So, Revere’s cry of alarm / To every Middlesex village and farm, / A cry of defiance and not of fear". Middlesex County is a county located in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... This Paul Revere Statue in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts, was made by Cyrus Dallin and unveiled on September 22, 1940. ...


From the school's earliest days, Middlesex enjoyed a close affiliation with Harvard University, and for many years the majority of Middlesex graduates attended Harvard. Today, the largest numbers of graduates of the last four years now attend Brown University, Harvard University, Cornell University, and Tufts University. Harvard redirects here. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ...


Middlesex is a member of the Independent School League. The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ...

Contents

History

From its inception, Middlesex was intended to be different from the other academies and "church schools" of the day. Frederick Winsor, a Roxbury Latin School alumnus who founded Middlesex in 1901, wanted the school to be non-denominational, where students from different religious backgrounds could learn. From the very beginning, his mission was "to find the promise that lies hidden" in every student. Roxbury Latin School, founded in 1645 and located at 101 Saint Theresa Avenue in West Roxbury, Massachusetts since 1927, is the oldest school in continuous existence in North America. ...


The design for Middlesex's campus was created by the sons of Frederick Law Olmsted, arguably the greatest landscape architect of the 19th century and the designer of New York's Central Park, Boston's Emerald Necklace and Stanford University. The school's main buildings, which surround The Circle, were designed by noted Boston firm, Peabody & Stearns. Completed in 2003, The Clay Centennial Center is the newest addition to The Circle. The building hosts science and math classrooms as well as an observatory with an 18-inch (460 mm) research grade telescope. {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Boston Public Garden, the second link of the Emerald Necklace The Emerald Necklace consists of an 1,100-acre chain of parks linked by parkways and waterways in Boston and Brookline, Massachusetts. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Peabody and Stearns was a premier architectural firm in the eastern United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... This article is about scientific observatories. ...


One of Winsor's greatest achievements was the creation of the National Scholarship Program, the first of its kind at any secondary school. These scholarships brought students from across the country and made Middlesex a truly national institution. This broad representation continues today, with current Middlesex students representing 27 states and 11 foreign countries.


Plaques

Among Middlesex's many traditions, one has remained virtually unchanged: every member of Class I (senior) since the first graduating class of 1904 has carved a plaque, which is displayed permanently on a wall of one of the school's main buildings. Students have always been given great latitude in the subject matter of their carvings. Common subjects include students' places of origin, favorite sports, interests in music, and meaningful experiences. The process is time intensive, usually taking between 20 and 30 hours. Carving a plaque is a graduation requirement, and more than a few students over the years have spent the night before Commencement applying the final coat of varnish to their plaques.


Campus

Most of the major campus buildings face The Circle, the School’s most enduring and familiar feature. It was exacted as part of the original campus design by the Olmsted Brothers. The Olmsted Brothers company was an extremely influential landscape design firm in the United States, formed in 1898 by step-brothers John Charles Olmsted (1852-1920) and Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. ...

  • Eliot Hall - The main academic and administration building, in which most English, history, and foreign language classes are held. Eliot also houses the Terry Room, a social space for students and waiting room for prospective applicants.
  • Clay Centennial Center - Completed in 2003, it houses state-of-the art laboratories and most science and math classes classrooms. The observatory features a Centurion18, an eighteen-inch, reflective optic, research-grade telescope, accompanied by a rooftop observation deck with seven computer-controlled telescopes.
  • Ware Hall - the School’s dining hall and administration building. The main dining room features flags from every nation represented by a Middlesex student. Ware also houses the Cruz Health Center and the school store. The Student Center (or, “Stu-Fac,” as it is called) is a lounge where students congregate between classes and after study hours.
  • Memorial Chapel - A non-denominational chapel, originally dedicated to the Middlesex graduates who had died during World War I, though later rededicated to also honor those graduates who had given their lives in World War II. Renovated in 2003, the Chapel also features a choral practice space and a new pipe organ. The school congregates here to receive a speech by a different senior each week.
  • Warburg Library - Contains more than 37,000 volumes and 100 periodicals. The library is a popular place among students to study throughout the day and during evening study hours. Ongoing exhibits, book talks, and film festivals are held in the Library throughout the year. Students can also borrow DVDs and videos from the Library’s collection.
  • Cornelius Ayer Wood ’13 Arts Building - home to Middlesex’s 408-seat theatre, where drama productions and biweekly all-school assemblies are held. The building also features two drawing studios, space for set-building, pottery and photography studios, black box theatre, exhibition gallery, and a woodworking studio, where students carve their plaques.
  • Orr Gymnasium - Houses a fitness center, wrestling room, dance studio, eight international squash courts, three recreational squash courts, Pratt Rink and Atkins Cage, which features two basketball courts. In the Spring, Pratt Rink is converted into four indoor tennis courts. The Middlesex Athletic Hall of Fame is also here.
  • Athletic Fields - Among the finest among secondary schools in the northeast. They are meticulously cared for, and are of such high quality that they have often been used by Boston-area college teams as well as several countries’ national teams, including the U.S. men's soccer team. All of the fields are contiguous so that spectators can move easily from one contest to another on game days.
  • Bateman’s Pond - Body of water that stretches half a mile from end to end. The crews’ lower boats use the pond for their practices. Student also use the pond for swimming, fishing, and canoeing. Walking trails and bike paths surround the pond and extend into Estabrook Woods.

There are four boys’ dorms and five girls’ dorms. Two or three faculty members live with their families in apartments within the buildings. All dorm rooms are wired for telephone and internet access, and each dorm has a common room equipped with a television and DVD player. Black box theatres are small, easily reconfigurable theatre spaces. ...

Boys' Houses

  • Bryant-Paine (B.P.)
  • Clay
  • East
  • Robert Winsor (R.W.)

Girls' Houses

  • Hallowell
  • Higginson
  • Kravis
  • LeBaron Briggs (L.B.)
  • Peabody

Athletics

Boys' Lacrosse (2005)
Boys' Lacrosse (2005)

Athletics have always been a defining characteristic of Middlesex. In the earliest years, faculty often suited up for games alongside the students. For the better part of six decades, the athletic offerings were simple: nearly all of the boys played football in the fall, ice hockey in the winter, and had a choice of baseball or crew in the spring. Over the years, more sports were added and the roster has grown considerably. Middlesex now fields 24 varsity teams. Image File history File links Mx_lacrosse1. ... Image File history File links Mx_lacrosse1. ...


Underclassmen are required to play three seasons of competitive sport each year. Although upperclassmen's requirements are progressively more lenient, students still participate beyond the minimum sporting requirement.


A founding member of the sixteen-school Independent School League (ISL), Middlesex boasts an unusually successful record for a school of its size. In the 2005-2006 academic year alone, football, girls' cross country, and girls' crew won New England championships; golf and boys' lacrosse won Independent School League championships; and boys' soccer, boys' hockey, and girls' field hockey each advanced to play in the postseason. In recent years, Middlesex athletes have earned Boston Globe All-Scholastic, All-New England, and All-America honors. Many graduates go on to play at Division I and Division III colleges. In the fall of 2007 senior Henry Harding became the first Middlesex student ever to win the Boys' New England Cross Country Championship. The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ... The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ...


St. George's School in Newport, Rhode Island is Middlesex's traditional rival. Three times a year athletes from the visiting school travel two hours by bus to compete against rival teams. The schools alternate each year to host the games, which conclude each regular, athletic season. St Georges School or Saint Georges School may refer to: // St. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ...

Fall Season

  • Cross-Country (|)
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Soccer (|)

Winter Season

  • Alpine Skiing (*)
  • Basketball (|)
  • Dance (*)
  • Ice Hockey (|)
  • Squash (|)
  • Wrestling

Spring Season

  • Baseball
  • Crew (|)
  • Golf (*)
  • Lacrosse (|)
  • Softball
  • Tennis (|)
  • Track (*)

(*) -- Denotes Co-ed teams (|) -- Denotes separate boys and girls teams


Music and drama

Into the Woods (2005)
Into the Woods (2005)

For nearly 50 years, Middlesex was renowned for its performances of Gilbert & Sullivan musicals. The youngest boys in the school were cast in the female roles. Today, the school performs at least one major drama and one musical each year. Between major productions, students direct and perform one-act plays. In addition, underclassmen are required to take a semester-long drama course. Recent graduates have attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and Carnegie-Mellon University's prestigious acting program. Image File history File links Into_the_woods. ... Image File history File links Into_the_woods. ... Playwright/lyricist William S. Gilbert (1836-1911) and composer Arthur S. Sullivan (1842-1900) defined operetta in Victorian England with a series of their internationally successful and timeless works. ...


Almost one sixth of the student body sings in one of the choruses. The Chapel Chorus, which does not require its members to audition, is the school's largest vocal group. The smaller male group, Bateman's Bullfrogs, and female group, MxOlydians, audition members from the larger Chapel Chorus, and together constitute the Small Chorus. Middlesex a cappella groups typically participate in the Wick Choral Festival each February and produce a CD of their work each year. This article is about the vocal technique. ...


The Middlesex Jazz Orchestra plays jazz of various eras and composes its own pieces, which are then played at school functions. Work is recorded and produced on a CD each year.


Freedom of Speech is a student-run club that organizes regular concerts of mostly contemporary music featuring students.


"Rank by Rank" (Hymn 26) is the school's official hymn. However, "Jerusalem" (Hymn 110), in spite of its obvious religious undertones, is the school's preferred hymn. It is sung at the conclusion of nearly every chapel meeting.


Middlesex School also is the site for Middlesex School Summer Arts (MSSA), a summer arts camp for children ages 9-16.

Recent Theatrical Productions

Chekhov in an 1898 portrait by Osip Braz. ... This article is about the musical production. ... A Flea in Her Ear is a 1907 play by Georges Feydeau written at the height of the Belle Époque. ... Les Liaisons dangereuses (Dangerous Liaisons) is a famous French epistolary novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, first published in 1782. ... Les Misérables is an 1862 novel by the famous French novelist Victor Hugo, set in the Parisian underworld. ... Our Town by Thornton Wilder Our Town is a three act play by Thornton Wilder which is, perhaps, the most frequently produced play by an American playwright. ... The City of Angels Broadway Playbill, courtesy of broadwayman. ...

Heads of School

The Terry Room, Eliot Hall
The Terry Room, Eliot Hall

In its century-long history, Middlesex has been led by only five individuals. Frederick Winsor, founded the School in 1901 and served as Head until 1937. Winsor was followed by Lawrence "Monk" Terry, who headed the school until 1964. David Sheldon was a member of the Middlesex faculty when he was tapped to be the third Head. Under Sheldon's stewardship, the School became coeducational (in 1974) and began admitting students of color. Deirdre Ling became the first female Head in 1990. During her tenure, Middlesex constructed a number of new facilities, added a non-Western language (Chinese) to the curriculum, wired the campus for the Internet, and celebrated the School's centennial. In 2003, Kathleen C. Giles became the fifth Head. Image File history File links Mx_flag. ... Image File history File links Mx_flag. ...


Estabrook Woods Controversy

Estabrook Woods
Estabrook Woods

The Estabrook Woods Image File history File links Estabrook_woods4. ... Image File history File links Estabrook_woods4. ...


The Estabrook Woods is a wild tract of more than 1,200 acres (4.9 km²) of woodland, hills, ledge, and swamp two miles (3 km) north of the Town of Concord.[1] It is the largest contiguous and undeveloped woodland within thirty miles of Boston.[2] However, the woods have a history of human disturbance dating back to the Algonquin Native Americans who used controlled burning to clear tracts of land.[3] Later, colonists cleared much of Estabrook for agriculture and pastures, although vegetation has since rejuvenated.[4] The Estabrook Woods is a wild tract of more than 1200 acres of woodland, hills, ledge, and swamp two miles north of the Town of Concord. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ...


Henry David Thoreau is intimately associated with this area, which he called Easterbrooks Country. In his October 20, 1857 journal entry, one of several on the woodland, he writes: “What a wild and rich domain that Easterbrooks Country! Not a cultivated, hardly a cultivatable field in it, and yet it delights all natural persons.”[5] The woods are also home to the Estabrook Road, which Minutemen used at the start of the Revolutionary War.[6] Thoreau redirects here. ... For other uses, see Minutemen (disambiguation). ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


Though accessible to the public, most of Estabrook is privately owned by Harvard University (672 acres) and Middlesex School (180 acres). Harvard redirects here. ...

Estabrook Site Plan (2004)
Estabrook Site Plan (2004)

The Controversy Image File history File links Estabrook_woods1. ... Image File history File links Estabrook_woods1. ...


In the early 1990s, Middlesex announced plans to develop Parcel A, a 40 acre tract in Estabrook, half of which is protected wetland. Over the course of 15 years, Concord residents and a group of Middlesex students and alumni have resisted efforts by the school to develop this land. Middlesex argues that the campus needs more athletic fields and tennis courts to compete favorably with rival schools. The school currently has four indoor courts and no outdoor courts for six tennis teams, which typically have 60 to 65 members.[7] Middlesex says that the fields are needed to ensure that three field hockey teams do not have to practice on the same field at the same time.[8]


Middlesex Graduates for Estabrook and Common Sense, a student group, counter that the intrinsic value of Estabrook outweighs the benefits of developing the land. In particular, they point to a 1963 article in the Middlesex Alumni Bulletin in which then-president Lawrence "Monk" Terry considers the educational resources that the Estabrook Woods offers, especially for biology students.[9] Furthermore, according to a 2000 survey conducted by Common Sense, most Middlesex students oppose the project.[10]


In June 2005, after a $1 million process to gain approval, Middlesex began construction in Estabrook, to be completed in 2007.[11] It will include 8 tennis courts, 2 artificial turf fields, sports shelter, and waterless toilets and will be connected to the main campus by a 300-foot (91 m) bridge over protected wetlands. In all, roughly 11 acres will be developed.[12]


Middlesex trustees previously turned down a $4.5 million offer to fund a joint environmental studies program in Estabrook with Harvard University. Middlesex felt that their share of the offer ($1.8 million) would not be sufficient to fund the program.[13] Harvard redirects here. ...


In 2017, a conservation restriction on Parcel B (another 40 acre tract of land) will expire. Middlesex has not announced plans to develop Parcel B.[14]


Notable alumni

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.

http://bioguide. ... http://bioguide. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... Conrad Potter Aiken (August 8, 1889 – August 17, 1973) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American author, born in Savannah, Georgia, whose work includes poetry, short stories, novels, and an autobiography. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Silent Snow, Secret Snow (1934) is Conrad Aikens best known short story, often included in anthologies of classic horror and fantasy fiction. ... Steven John Carell (born August 16, 1962[1]) is a Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American comedian, actor, producer and writer, who rose to fame as a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, from 1999 to 2004. ... The 40-Year-Old Virgin is a 2005 comedy film, written by Judd Apatow and co-written by Steve Carell, though it featured a great deal of improvised dialogue. ... For the childrens book character, see Little Miss Sunshine (character). ... This article is about the various versions of the television series The Office, comparing UK, US, French, German, and French Canadian versions. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, is a professional wrestling promotion, currently the largest in North America. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Marine is a 2006 action film starring professional wrestler John Cena. ... Joseph S. Clark Joseph Sill Clark, Jr. ... Pennsylvania ratified the Constitution on December 12, 1787. ... List of mayors of Philadelphia, arranged chronologically. ... Philip Dunne could refer to: Philip Dunne (writer) (1908–1992), Hollywood screenwriter and director. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... David and Bathsheba is a 1951 film about King David. ... Matthew von Ertfelda (born July 24, 1969 in Hong Kong) is known as a former contestant on the TV game show Survivor. ... Survivor: The Amazon was the sixth incarnation of the popular television reality show Survivor. ... James L. Halperin (born October 31, 1952 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American author and businessman. ... The Truth Machine (1996), science fiction novel by James L. Halperin about a genius who invents an infallible lie detector. ... Martin Richard Hoffmann (born April 20, 1932) is a U.S. administrator. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Army The United States Secretary of the Army has statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management. ... Christopher Chris Van Hollen, Jr. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... William Hurt (born March 20, 1950) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Kiss of the Spider Woman (Portuguese: O Beijo da Mulher Aranha) is a Brazilian and American film released in 1985 and directed by Hector Babenco. ... Peter Parker may refer to: Peter Benjamin Parker (born 1953, died 1998), alter ego of the fictional superhero Spider-Man Peter Parker (British businessman) (1924–2002), chairman of the British Railways Board 1976-1983 Peter Parker (physician) (1804–1888), the first Protestant medical missionary to China Sir Peter Parker, 1st... Joseph Kahn (born 1964) is an American journalist who has been the Beijing bureau chief of The New York Times since July of 2003. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Lake (left) meets with Bill Clinton and Leon Panetta at the White House in 1994. ... -1... President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about Mills Lane, the referee. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... Massachusetts ratified the Constitution on February 26, 1788. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... John Davis Lodge (October 20, 1903 – October 29, 1985) was a Republican, was governor of Connecticut from 1951 to 1955. ... // Further information: List of colonial governors of Connecticut Home of Governor Frank Weeks, Middletown, Connecticut, 1909 ^ According to the Connecticut State Library, governors are numbered started with John Haynes, the first governor of Connecticut Colony. ... John William Middendorf II (born September 22, 1924) is a U.S. diplomat. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Robin Moore (b. ... Ballad of the Green Berets is a patriotic song in the ballad style about the Green Berets, an elite special force in the U.S. Army. ... Tales of the Green Beret is a comic strip created by Robin Moore and Joe Kubert. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of New Mexico (est. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Seal of the United States Department of Energy The United States Secretary of Energy, the head of the United States Department of Energy, is concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This article lists official and potential Democratic candidates for the President of the United States in the election of 2008. ... Bret Stephens is a writer, editorialist and member of the Wall Street Journal Editorial Board. ... Cass R. Sunstein (b. ... The University of Chicago Law School, having recently celebrated its centennial in the 2002-2003 school year, has established itself as a high profile part of the University of Chicago. ... Gabriel Traversari (born Gabriel Augusto Traversari y Debayle on September 7, 1963 in Los Angeles, California) is a Nicaraguan-American actor, writer, singer, songwriter and painter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...

Popular culture


Flag of the United States Secretary of the Army The United States Secretary of the Army has statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... School Ties was a 1992 film directed by Robert Mandel that launched the acting careers of Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, and Chris ODonnell. ... Cover of The Official Preppy Handbook The Official Preppy Handbook is a tongue-in-cheek reference guide written by Lisa Birnbach as a parody of an aspect of North American culture she styles as prepdom. ... Refers to the elite group of American boarding schools including Groton, St. ... The Morehead-Cain Scholarship is a full four-year scholarship to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, modeled after the Rhodes Scholarship. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Andover and Phillips Andover) is a coed liberal arts high school, located in Andover, Massachusetts, near Boston. ... Boston (almost invariably called Boston magazine and often incorrectly written as Boston Magazine) is a glossy monthly magazine concerning life in the Greater Boston area and has been in publication for more than 40 years. ...

Members of the Independent School League, New England
Belmont Hill School | Buckingham Browne & Nichols | Brooks School | The Governor's Academy | Groton School | Lawrence Academy at Groton | Middlesex School | Milton Academy | Noble and Greenough School | Rivers School | Roxbury Latin School | St. George's School | St. Mark's School | St. Paul's School | St. Sebastian's School | Thayer Academy

The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Belmont Hill School an all-boys preparatory school located on a 23 acre campus in Belmont, a suburb of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Address 80 Gerrys Landing Road Town Cambridge, Massachusetts Country U.S. Browne & Nichols established 1883, by George H. Browne & Edgar H. Nichols[1] The Buckingham School established 1889 Buckingham Browne & Nichols merger 1974 Conference Independent School League Type Private Coeducational Religious Affiliation Secular Grades Pre-K to 12 (on... Brooks School // Brooks School is a private co-educational preparatory secondary school in North Andover, Massachusetts near the shore of Lake Cochichewick . ... The Governors Academy (formerly Governor Dummer Academy) is an independent school with 376 students in grades nine through twelve. ... Groton School is a private, Episcopal, college preparatory boarding school located in Groton, Massachusetts, U.S. It enrolls approximately 350 boys and girls, from the eighth (Second Form) through twelfth grades (Sixth Form). ... Lawrence Academy at Groton Lawrence Academy at Groton, (occasionally called LA or Lacademy), is a co-educational preparatory school located in Groton, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Milton Academy is a private, preparatory, coeducational boarding and day school in Milton, Massachusetts. ... The Noble and Greenough School, popularly referred to as Nobles, is a coeducational, nonsectarian day and boarding school for students in grades seven through twelve. ... The Rivers School The Rivers School is a private, coeducational, preparatory school, located in Weston, Massachusetts. ... Roxbury Latin School, founded in 1645 and located at 101 Saint Theresa Avenue in West Roxbury, Massachusetts since 1927, is the oldest school in continuous existence in North America. ... St. ... For the school in Dallas, see St. ... , This is about St. ... Saint Sebastians School, also known colloquially as St. ... Thayer Academy (TA) is a private, co-educational, college-preparatory day school located in Braintree, Massachusetts. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Description of Estabrook Woods, Concord, Mass
  2. ^ Middlesex School Plans in Estabrook Woods
  3. ^ http://www.oeb.harvard.edu/bs55/Web/Main_Page/EstabrookWoodsWeb1.htm
  4. ^ http://www.oeb.harvard.edu/bs55/Web/Main_Page/EstabrookWoodsWeb1.htm
  5. ^ Barefooted Brooks Clark, Estabrook Woods
  6. ^ Middlesex alums protest school's plan to use Estabrook Woods - The Boston Globe
  7. ^ School under fire for taking bite out of woods - The Boston Globe
  8. ^ Middlesex alums protest school's plan to use Estabrook Woods - The Boston Globe
  9. ^ http://www.estabrookwoods.org/documents/terrybulletin.pdf
  10. ^ http://www.estabrookwoods.org/documents/studentopposition.pdf
  11. ^ School under fire for taking bite out of woods - The Boston Globe
  12. ^ Sally Haeney. Boston Globe. March 5, 2006. Pg 1.
  13. ^ School under fire for taking bite out of woods - The Boston Globe
  14. ^ Sally Haeney. Boston Globe. March 5, 2006. Pg 1.
  15. ^ 196-207.schools.indd

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Middlesex: Information from Answers.com (1269 words)
Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and the second smallest (after Rutland).
When county councils were introduced in England in 1889 part of Middlesex was used to form the County of London and the remainder formed the administrative county of Middlesex.
Middlesex is still used in the names of organisations based in the area such as Middlesex County Cricket Club and Middlesex University.
District Profile (2712 words)
The North Middlesex Regional School District, serving the towns of Ashby, Pepperell and Townsend, is located in the north/central section of Massachusetts on the New Hampshire/Massachusetts border.
Ashby Elementary School continues to be committed to a team effort among faculty/staff members, parents and the community designed to assist students in achieving academic, social and emotional growth.
The school is located in the center of Pepperell within walking distance of the lower elementary school, Peter Fitzpatrick, and the newly constructed middle school, Nissitissit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m