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Encyclopedia > Middlesbrough
Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge
The Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge Image File history File links Transporter Bridge, Middlesbrough at night File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge (or simply Transporter Bridge) is the furthest downstream bridge across the River Tees. ...


Middlesbrough shown within North Yorkshire
Population 142,691 [1]
OS grid reference NZ495201
 - London 253.7 m
Unitary authority Middlesbrough
Ceremonial county North Yorkshire
Region North East
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town MIDDLESBROUGH
Postcode district TS1 - TS9
Dialling code 01642
Police Cleveland
Fire Cleveland
Ambulance North East
European Parliament North East England
UK Parliament Middlesbrough
Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland
List of places: UKEnglandYorkshire

Coordinates: 54°34′26″N 1°14′00″W / 54.574, -1.2334 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Middlesbrough is a unitary authority and borough in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The TS postcode area, also known as the Cleveland postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Billingham, Guisborough, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Stockton-on-Tees, Trimdon Station, Wingate and Yarm in England. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Cleveland Police is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the area of former county of Cleveland in North East England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Cleveland Fire Brigade is the statutory fire and rescue service covering the boroughs of Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland & Stockton-on-Tees. ... The North East Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Darlington, Durham, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Northumberland, Stockton-on-Tees, and Tyne and Wear in the North East England region. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... North East England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Middlesbrough is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the historic English county of Yorkshire. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Middlesbrough (pronunciation ; IPA ['mɪdəlzbɹə] (received pronunciation)) is a town in the Tees Valley sub-region of the North East of England. It is the largest and most populous settlement within the borough of Middlesbrough, which encompasses the town and several outlying villages which have become suburbs. Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, United States, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... The Tees Valley is a distinct economic area in the North East of England; it consists of the five Unitary Authorities of Darlington, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar & Cleveland, and Stockton-on-Tees. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Middlesbrough is a unitary authority and borough in North Yorkshire, England. ...


Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, in 1968 the town became the centre of the county borough of Teesside, which was absorbed by the non-metropolitan county of Cleveland in 1974. In 1996 Cleveland was abolished, and the Middlesbrough borough became a unitary authority, within the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire. The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three traditional subdivisions of Yorkshire, northern England, United Kingdom. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Arms of the County Borough of Teesside Teesside is the name given to the conurbation in northern England based on Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar, along the banks of the River Tees with a resident population of over 388,000 in 2005. ... Status: Non-metropolitan county Admin. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ...


Middlesbrough is different from the other districts on Teesside, as the borough is almost entirely urbanised, thus making it the largest town in terms of area and population, but the smallest district. However, the areas of Eston, Grangetown, Normanby, Ormesby, and South Bank in the neighbouring borough of Redcar and Cleveland, are also part of the Middlesbrough agglomeration. Eston is a township, parish and urban district in the North-East of England, historically part of the county of North Yorkshire. ... Grangetown is a township in borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England, however it is more closely related to Middlesbrough than Redcar and Cleveland. ... Normanby is an area in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Ormesby is an area in the Town of Middlesbrough, North East of England. ... South Bank is an area in Middlesbrough that lies 2. ... The borough of Redcar & Cleveland is a unitary authority in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, United Kingdom consisting of Redcar, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Guisborough, and small towns such as Brotton, Skelton, and Loftus. ... In the study of human settlements, an agglomeration is an extended city or town area comprising the built-up area of a central place (usually a municipality) and any suburbs or adjacent satellite towns. ...


Middlesbrough is situated on the south bank of the River Tees, a few miles from the edge of the North York Moors National Park. The Tees is a river in Northern England. ... North York Moors National Park is a National Park in the north of England. ...


Teesport[2] is the UK's second largest port, lies 3 miles (4.8 km) to the east, and Durham Tees Valley Airport[3] lies 8 miles (13 km) to the west, near Darlington. North east of Middlesbrough, the Tees Estuary with its colony of breeding seals has extensive sandy beaches in both directions. Some 7000 salmon and 13,000 sea trout migrated upstream through the estuary in 2000. Teesport is one of the UKs 3 largest ports[1], lies 3 miles to the East of Middlesbrough. ... Durham Tees Valley Airport (IATA: MME, ICAO: EGNV) is an airport in North East England, located approximately 10 km (6 miles) east of Darlington, about 16 km (10 miles) south west of Middlesbrough and 39 km (24 miles) south of Durham. ... This article is about the town in England. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... Binomial name Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758 Atlantic salmon, known scientifically as Salmo salar, is a species of fish in the family Salmonidae, which is found in the northern Atlantic Ocean and in rivers that flow into the Atlantic. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Morphs Salmo trutta morpha trutta Salmo trutta morpha fario Salmo trutta morpha lacustris The brown trout (Salmo trutta morpha fario and morpha lacustris) and the sea trout ( morpha trutta) are fish of the same species. ...

Contents

Geography and administration

Civic history

Middlesbrough was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1853. It extended its boundaries in 1866 and 1887, and became a county borough under the Local Government Act 1888. A Middlesbrough Rural District was formed in 1894, covering a rural area to the south of the town. It was abolished in 1932, partly going to the county borough; but mostly going to the Stokesley Rural District.[4] A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... Middlesbrough was a rural district in the North Riding of Yorkshire from 1894 to 19xx. ... Stokesley was a rural district in the North Riding of Yorkshire from 1894 to 1974. ...


Middlesbrough gained a "twin" in 1890 when the town of Middlesborough, Kentucky was incorporated in the United States; it was named after its English namesake due to the discovery of ironstone deposits in the region. Middlesborough, also spelled Middlesboro, is a city located in Bell County, Kentucky. ...


Middlesbrough is twinned with the Oberhausen in Germany, Masvingo in Zimbabwe and Dunkerque ('Dunkirk' in English) in France. This last association resulted from the Dunkirk evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force during World War II, in which one quarter of the ships involved were from Teesport. The seaside town Redcar (which borders Middlesbrough) was used to replicate the Dunkirk evacuation in the 2007 film Atonement. Oberhausen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... Masvingo is the capital of the Masvingo Province of Zimbabwe. ... Location within France Dunkirk ( French: Dunkerque; Dutch: Duinkerke) is a harbour city and a commune in the northernmost part of France, in the département of Nord, 10 km from the Belgian border. ... For other uses of Dunkirk or Dunkerque, see Dunkirk (disambiguation). ... The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the British army sent to France and Belgium in World War I and British Forces in Europe from 1939–1940 during World War II. The BEF was established by Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War in case the... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Teesport is one of the UKs 3 largest ports[1], lies 3 miles to the East of Middlesbrough. ... Atonement is a 2007 film adaptation of Ian McEwans critically acclaimed novel of the same name, directed by Joe Wright, and based on a screenplay by Christopher Hampton. ...


The district in England and Wales with the lowest healthy life expectancy, according to the Office for National Statistics study, is Middlehaven, the dockside area of Middlesbrough.[5]


Divisions and suburbs

The following is a table of the different districts and suburbs in the Middlesbrough area.

Acklam Beechwood Berwick Hills Brambles Farm Brookfield
Coulby Newham Easterside Eston Grove Hill Grangetown
Hemlington Lazenby Linthorpe Marton-in-Cleveland Marton Grove
Netherfields Normanby North Ormesby Nunthorpe Ormesby
Pallister Park End Priestfields Saltersgill South Bank
St. Hilda's Stainton-in-Cleveland Thorntree Teesville Tollesby
Town East Town Farm Town West West Lane Whinney Banks

Postcard View of Acklam Hall circa 1913, a stately home in Acklam Acklam was a village in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... Berwick Hills is a neighbourhood in east Middlesbrough with a population of 4,465. ... Brambles Farm is a small housing estate in east Middlesbrough with a population of 3,200. ... Coulby Newham is a large housing estate in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Easterside is a small housing estate towards the south of Middlesbrough with a population of 3,200. ... Eston is a township, parish and urban district in the North-East of England, historically part of the county of North Yorkshire. ... 11 Valley Road - Brian Cloughs old home. ... Grangetown is a township in borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England, however it is more closely related to Middlesbrough than Redcar and Cleveland. ... Hemlington is a settlement in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Lazenby is a place in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Map sources for Marton at grid reference NZ5115 Marton is a small town outside Middlesbrough in Cleveland, England. ... Marton Grove is an area in the town of Middlesbrough in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Normanby is an area in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... North Ormesby is an area in the town of Middlesbrough in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Nunthorpe is a small inner suburb to the town of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Ormesby is an area in the Town of Middlesbrough, North East of England. ... Pallister is in east Middlesbrough with the postcode TS3. ... Park End is in east Middlesbrough in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... South Bank is an area in Middlesbrough that lies 2. ... Stainton is a village in the Middlesbrough Ward of Stainton & Thornton in and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... The Thorntree public house Thorntree is a housing estate in east Middlesbrough. ... Teesville is an area in the Town of Middlesbrough, North East of England. ... Tollesby, is a residential area within the Acklam ward situated in the Town of Middlesbrough in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... West Lane is a neighbourhood in West Central Middlesbrough. ... Whinney Banks is a neighbourhood in the west of Central Middlesbrough. ...

History

Etymology

Although often thought of as a settlement with no early history, the name Middlesbrough can trace its roots back a long way. Mydilsburgh is the earliest recorded form of the name. The element '-burgh', from Old English burh, meaning 'fort' denotes an ancient fort or settlement of pre-Anglian origin (this being the term on which Middlesbrough Football Club's ardently chanted nickname, 'The Boro', plays). Maturing into brough gave this extension individuality in a country more customarily associated with the alternative borough in its town names. For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Middlesbrough F.C. are an English football team, commonly known as Boro. ... Boro has several meanings: Boro was a Dutch Formula One constructor. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


It is solely by retrospective conjecture that the first element of the name, Mydil, has come to be identified as a development of the Old English middel (subsequently morphing into middle and supposedly a tribute to the settlement's position between the great Christian centres of Durham and Whitby). The burgh, though, may have included a monastic cell and was probably situated on the elevated land where the Victorian church of St Hilda's (demolished in 1969) was later built. Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Hilda of Whitby (c. ...


Early history

In 686 a monastic cell was consecrated by St. Cuthbert at the request of St. Hilda Abbess of Whitby and in 1119 Robert Bruce granted and confirmed the church of St. Hilda of Middleburg to Whitby. Up until its closure on the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII in 1537,[6] the church was maintained by 12 Benedictine monks, many of whom became vicars or rectors of various places in Cleveland. The importance of the early church at “Middleburg”, later known as Middlesbrough Priory, is indicated by the fact that in 1452 it possessed four altars. Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (ca. ... Hilda of Whitby (c. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ...


After the Angles the area became home to Viking settlers and it is argued by some that 'old' Cleveland has the highest density of Scandinavian parish names in Britain. Names of Viking origin (with the suffix by) are abundant in the area - for example, Thornaby, Ormesby, Stainsby, Lackenby, Maltby and Tollesby were once separate villages that belonged to Vikings called Thormad, Orm, Steinn, Hlakkande, Malti and Toll, but now form suburbs of Middlesbrough. Lazenby was the village belonging to a Leysingr - a freeman; Normanby, a Norseman's village and Danby (in neighbouring North Yorkshire), a Dane's village. The name Mydilsburgh is the earliest recorded form of Middlesbrough's name and dates to Anglian times (400 to 1000 A.D.), while many of the aforementioned villages appear in the Domesday Book of 1086. For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... Status: Non-metropolitan county Admin. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... Thornaby-on-Tees is a town in the northernmost part of the historic county of North Riding of Yorkshire, located on the south bank of the River Tees. ... Ormesby is an area in the Town of Middlesbrough, North East of England. ... Lackenby is a small village in the unitary authority of Redcar and Cleveland and cerimonaly in the county of North Yorkshire. ... Maltby is a village within the borough of Stockton-on-Tees and ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Tollesby, is a residential area within the Acklam ward situated in the Town of Middlesbrough in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Lazenby is a place in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Normanby is an area in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


Other links persist in the area, often through school and/or road names, to now-outgrown or abandoned local settlements, such as the medieval settlement of Stainsby, deserted by 1757, which amounts to little more today than a series of grassy mounds near the A19 road.[7] In 1952 Stainsby Secondary Modern School, now renamed Acklam Grange Secondary School, was named for this village. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Remains of a Norman motte and bailey castle at the lost village of Alstoe, near Oakham, Rutland Deserted medieval village (DMV) sites are former settlements which have been abandoned for one reason or another over the years, usually leaving little but the remains of earthworks or ghostly cropmarks. ... The A19 is a major road in England, running parallel to and east of the A1 road. ... Acklam Grange Secondary School is a specialist college of mathematics and computing, its situated at the end of Lodore Grove, Acklam, Middlesbrough. ...


Post-industrial history

Old Town Hall
Old Town Hall

In 1801 Middlesbrough was a hamlet consisting of a population of just 25 people across four farmhouses, but during the latter half of the 19th century experienced a growth unparalleled in England. Development began with the purchase of the farm in 1829 by a group of Quaker businessmen, headed by Joseph Pease the Darlington industrialist, who saw the possibilities of Middlesbrough as a port for North East coal. Four initial streets, leading into the Market Square, were duly laid out. Their cause was facilitated by an 1830 extension of the Stockton and Darlington Railway to the site that all-but erased any existing logistical woes threatening to act as the last block to the more indefinite development of the town. Prior to 1830 the shipment of coal was problematic due to the shallow waters around Stockton-on-Tees. The opening of the Clarence Railway, in 1833, which shared some track belonging to the Stockton and Darlington Railway, also provided the stimulus for the growth of Port Clarence on the opposite side of the river to Middlesbrough. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 272 KB) Summary A picture of the old town hall over the border taken by myself Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 272 KB) Summary A picture of the old town hall over the border taken by myself Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A hamlet is (usually — see below) a small settlement, too small or unimportant to be considered a village. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Joseph Pease (22 June 1799 - 8 February 1872) was involved in the early railway system in England and was the first Quaker elected to Parliament. ... This article is about the town in England. ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway by John Dobbin, circa 1825. ... Port Clarence is a place in County Durham, in England. ...


All that remained to be partaken was the visit of one William Ewart Gladstone to the town, who was, once under the roof of the original (1846) Town Hall promptly, and famously to dub it 'an infant Hercules' in 'England's enterprise.' William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ...


At the very moment when early fortunes showed signs of giving way to decline, another great leap forward took place, with the discovery of ironstone in the Eston Hills in 1850. In 1841, Henry Bolckow (pronounced Belko), who had come to England in 1827, had formed a partnership with John Vaughan of Worcester, and started an iron-foundry and rolling mill at Middlesbrough. It was Vaughan who realised the economic potential of local ironstone deposits[8]. Pig-iron production rose tenfold between 1851 and 1856. On the 21st January 1853, Middlesbrough received its Royal Charter of Incorporation, giving the town the right to have a mayor, aldermen and councillors. Bolckow became mayor in 1853 and Middlesbrough's first Member of Parliament (MP). The first ten mayors of Middlesbrough were: This article is about the city of Worcester in England. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...

 1853. Henry William Ferdinand Bolckow, 1854. Isaac Wilson, 1855. John Vaughan, 1856 Henry Thompson, 1858. John Richardson, 1859. William Fallows, 1860. George Bottomley, 1861. James Harris, 1862. Thomas Brentnall, 1863. Edgar Gilkes. 

On the 15th of August, 1867, a Reform Bill was passed, making Middlesbrough a new parliamentary borough, Bolckow was unanimously elected member for Middlesbrough the following year.


The rapid growth of the town saw the prophetic words (probably spoken by Pease), 'Yarm was, Stockton is, Middlesbrough will be' come true. Indeed, the motto chosen by the first body of town councillors was in fact 'Erimus'; Latin for 'We shall be'. (See also the Pearson family grave at Crambe, which uses the motto "ERIMUS".) , Yarm is a small town in the borough of Stockton-on-Tees in North East England. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ... Karl Pearson FRS (March 27, 1857 – April 27, 1936) established the discipline of mathematical statistics. ... Crambe is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. ...


The population of Middlesbrough, as county borough, peaked at almost 165,000 in the late 1960s but has been in decline since the early 1980s. From 2001 to 2004, the recorded population jumped significantly, from 134,000 to 142,000, then to 147,000 in 2005, with 2006 estimates stating approximately 190,000, suggesting the population is increasing rather than decreasing as estimated by Tees Valley Partnership.


The Bell brothers opened their great ironworks on the banks of the Tees in 1853. Steel production began at Port Clarence in 1889 and an amalgamation with Dorman Long followed. After rock salt was discovered under the site in 1874, the salt-extraction industry on Teesside was founded. By now Bell Brothers had become a vast concern employing some 6,000 people. Isaac Lowthian Bell's own eminence in the field of applied science, where he published many weighty papers, and as an entrepreneur whose knowledge of blast furnaces was unrivalled, led to universal recognition. He was the first president of the Iron and Steel Institute, and the first recipient of the Bessemer Gold Medal in 1874. Bell was Lord Mayor of Newcastle in 1854-1855, and again in 1862-1863. He served as MP for Hartlepool in 1875-1880. The Tees, a river of England, rises on the eastward slope of Cross Fell in the Pennine Chain, and traverses a valley about 85 miles (137 km) in length to the North Sea. ... Port Clarence is a place in County Durham, in England. ... Iron-making has been known in Cleveland since the Romans found iron slags in North Yorkshire, with small-scale iron-making known to have taken place at Rievaulx, Whitby and Guisborough Abbeys in the 17th Century. ... Sir (Isaac) Lowthian Bell (18 February 1816 - 20 December 1904), Fellow of the Royal Society, was a Victorian Iron Master of Washington, Co. ... The Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3 or IMMM) was officially recognised by the UKs Privy Council on 26 June 2002. ... The Bessemer Gold Medal is an annual prize awarded by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining for outstanding services to the steel industry. It was established and endowed by Sir Henry Bessemer in 1874. ... , Hartlepool (IPA: ) is a North Sea port in North East England. ...

Transporter Bridge, built in 1911
Transporter Bridge, built in 1911

For many years in the 19th century Teesside set the world price for iron and steel. The steel components of the Sydney Harbour Bridge (1932) were engineered and fabricated by Dorman Long of Middlesbrough. Fittingly, the words MADE IN MIDDLESBROUGH are stamped on the Bridge. "The golden rivet" was hammered in by Kenneth Johnson Esq, Mechanical Engineer, whose son Christopher was later a pioneer in the Offshore Oil & Gas Industry. The company was also responsible for the earlier New Tyne Bridge across the river at Newcastle. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixel Image in higher resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixel Image in higher resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Arms of the County Borough of Teesside Teesside is the name given to the conurbation in northern England based on Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar, along the banks of the River Tees with a resident population of over 388,000 in 2005. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ... Iron-making has been known in Cleveland since the Romans found iron slags in North Yorkshire, with small-scale iron-making known to have taken place at Rievaulx, Whitby and Guisborough Abbeys in the 17th Century. ... Tyne Bridge looking east towards the modern The Sage Gateshead and the Gateshead Millennium Bridge, with the earlier Swing Bridge in the foreground The Tyne Bridge is a bridge over the River Tyne in North East England, linking Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead. ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ...


Via a 1907 Act of Parliament the Cleveland Bridge and Engineering Company also built the great Transporter Bridge (1911) which spans the Tees itself between Middlesbrough and Port Clarence. At 850 feet (260 m) long and 225 feet (69 m) high, is one of the largest of its type in the world, and one of only two left in working order in Britain (the other being in Newport). The bridge remains in daily use and it is worth noting, that contrary to what is suggested by the plot of popular BBC drama/comedy Auf Wiedersehen, Pet, the bridge was not at any point dismantled and removed to Arizona. It is, indeed, a Grade II* listed building. Another landmark, the Tees Newport Bridge opened further along the Tees in 1934. An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... Iron-making has been known in Cleveland since the Romans found iron slags in North Yorkshire, with small-scale iron-making known to have taken place at Rievaulx, Whitby and Guisborough Abbeys in the 17th Century. ... The Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge (or simply Transporter Bridge) is the furthest downstream bridge across the River Tees. ... Port Clarence is a place in County Durham, in England. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Auf Wiedersehen, Pet is a popular British comedy-drama series about a group of seven British migrant construction workers: Wayne, Dennis, Oz, Bomber, Barry, Neville and Moxey, who are living and working on a German building site. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... Tees (Newport) Bridge, 30th July 2006 Opened to traffic on 28th February 1934 by the Duke of York, the Tees Newport Bridge spans the River Tees a short distance upriver from Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge, linking Middlesbrough with the borough of Stockton-on-Tees, England. ...


The great steelworks, chemical plants, shipbuilding and offshore fabrication yards that followed the original Middlesbrough ironworks, have in the recent past contributed to Britain's prosperity in no small measure and still do to this day.


Middlesbrough had the distinction of being the first major British town and industrial target to be bombed during the Second World War when the Luftwaffe visited the town on the 25 May 1940. Most notably in 1942 a lone Dornier 217 picked its way through the barrage balloons and dropped a stick of bombs onto the railway station. It is a local tale that one or two fish and chip shops also came a cropper to the raids. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...   (German IPA: ) is a generic German term for an air force. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dornier Do 217 was a World War II medium bomber designed from scratch as a replacement for the venerable Dornier Do 17. ... US Marine Corps barrage balloon, Parris Island, May 1942 A barrage balloon is a large balloon tethered with metal cables, used to defend against bombardment by aircraft by damaging the aircraft on collision with the cables. ... Middlesbrough railway station serves the large town of Middlesbrough in England. ...


It is also alleged that Middlesbrough was the second target on the Soviet Union's list of UK nuclear targets during the Cold War, due to the mix of heavy industrialisation, a nuclear power plant, a major port, and a skilled workforce. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


Green Howards

Main article: The Green Howards

The Green Howards was a British Army infantry regiment very strongly associated with Middlesbrough and the area south of the River Tees. Originally formed at Dunster Castle, Somerset in 1688 to serve King William of Orange, later King William III, this famous regiment became affiliated to the North Riding of Yorkshire in 1782. As Middlesbrough grew, its population of men came to be a group most targeted by the recruiters. The Green Howards were part of the King's Division. On 6 June 2006, this famous regiment was merged into the new Yorkshire Regiment and are now known as 2 Yorks - The 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards). There is also a Territorial Army (TA) company at Stockton Road in Middlesbrough, part of 4 Yorks which is wholly reserve. The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Waless Own Yorkshire Regiment) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Kings Division. ... The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Waless Own Yorkshire Regiment) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Kings Division. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... The Kings Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all land force units in the North of England. ... The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) is one of the large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal and Volunteer reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces branch of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at a similar rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ...


One of the most well-known soldiers of this historic regiment was a man named WO2 (Company Sergeant Major) Stanley Hollis. He was the only soldier in all of the British and empire armies to win a Victoria Cross (V.C) in the D-Day Landings at Normandy, France in June 1944. Other well-known Green Howards have included the TV magician Paul Daniels, Middlesbrough Football Club's Wilf Mannion, General Sir Richard Dannatt (who was appointed Chief of the General Staff of the British Army in August 1996), former England rugby player Tim Rodber, and Yorkshire and England Cricketer Hedley Verity, killed in action in 1943. For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Paul Daniels (born Newton Edward Daniels, 6 April 1938) is a British magician and television performer. ... Middlesbrough F.C. are an English football team, commonly known as Boro. ... Wilf Mannion (May 16, 1918 - April 14, 2000) was a footballer who played for Middlesbrough from 1937 until 1954, scoring 110 goals in 368 appearances. ... General Sir Francis Richard Dannatt, KCB, CBE, MC (born 23 December 1950) is the Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army and a die hard Norwich City fan. ... In the military systems of many countries, the Chief of the General Staff is the professional head of that countrys General Staff. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Tim Rodber (born July 2, 1969) is an English rugby union player. ... Hedley Verity (18 May 1905 - 31 July 1943) was an England cricketer. ...


Present day

Panoramic view of Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough's contemporary townscape is largely workaday, it being no longer a heavy industrial town, though there are areas around which still support chemical, fertiliser and iron and steel production. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3000x1240, 1112 KB) Summary Panoramic view of Middlesbrough looking north-west from the Eston Hills. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3000x1240, 1112 KB) Summary Panoramic view of Middlesbrough looking north-west from the Eston Hills. ...


Landmarks

Located in the suburb and former village of Acklam and by some distance Middlesbrough's oldest domestic building is Acklam Hall of c.1680-3. Built by Sir William Hustler, it is also Middlesbrough's sole Grade I listed building. The Restoration mansion, accessible through an avenue of trees off Acklam Road, has seen progressive updates through the centuries, such that it makes for a captivating document of varying trends in English architecture. Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Postcard View of Acklam Hall circa 1913 Acklam Hall is a Restoration mansion in Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire, UK. It was built by William Hustler in 1678. ... Stonework detail : Hustler Coat of Arms above the Front Door of the Hall William Hustler (1655 - 1730) was an English draper of the Hustler family. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... For other uses, see Restoration. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The architecture of the United Kingdom has a long and diverse history from beyond Stonehenge to the designs of Norman Foster and the present day. ...


Built on extensive grounds by the Pennyman family now under the jurisdiction of the National Trust, Ormesby Hall, a Palladian mansion actually technically located within the neighbouring borough of Redcar and Cleveland, but within one of the town's seven conservation areas, was largely built around 1740, although an older wing dating from around 1599, still exists. The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Ormesby Hall is a predominantly c. ... A villa with a superimposed portico, from Book IV of Palladios I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura, in a modestly priced English translation published in London, 1736. ... The borough of Redcar & Cleveland is a unitary authority in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, United Kingdom consisting of Redcar, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Guisborough, and small towns such as Brotton, Skelton, and Loftus. ...


Not to be ignored either are a clutch of interesting churches, for example at Acklam, Marton and Stainton (c.12th century), or the modern St. Mary's Roman Catholic Cathedral at Coulby Newham, replacing in the 1980s the previous structure on Sussex Street that was left gutted at the mercy of arsonists in 2000. St. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Coulby Newham is a large housing estate in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ...


But a modest tally of pre-1900 buildings remain in the town centre, however; the priory, farmhouse and any other elements of the town's pre-industrial landscape (such as the Restoration Newport House and its associated Hustler Granary, which submitted to demolition in the 1930s by virtue of its vicinity to the then-recently opened Tees Newport Bridge, and the locally famous "White Cottages" on St. Barnabas Road in Linthorpe) have long since been banished to history.[9] Indeed, incorporation of the town itself did not occur until 1853. Even so, the urban centre remains home to a variety of architecture ranging from the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, opened in January 2007 to replace a number of former outlying galleries; and Centre North East, formerly Corporation House, which remains the tallest building in the North East of England, having initially opened in 1971. Many believe that there is a beauty to be found in the surrounding landscape of industry along the River Tees from Billingham to Wilton. The terraced Victorian streets surrounding the town centre are characterful elements of Middlesbrough's social and historical identity, and the vast streets surrounding Parliament Road and Abingdon Road a reminder of the area's wealth and rapid growth during industrialisation. For other uses, see Restoration. ... Tees (Newport) Bridge, 30th July 2006 Opened to traffic on 28th February 1934 by the Duke of York, the Tees Newport Bridge spans the River Tees a short distance upriver from Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge, linking Middlesbrough with the borough of Stockton-on-Tees, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art or mima is a flagship art gallery project based in the North of England. ... Image:Centre North East. ... The Tees is a river in Northern England. ... For people named Billingham, see Billingham (surname). ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ...

Middlesbrough Town Hall
Middlesbrough Town Hall

The town hall, designed by George Gordon Hoskins and built between 1883 and 1887 is a Grade II Listed Building, and a very imposing structure. Of comparable grandeur alongside these municipal buildings is the erstwhile Empire Palace of Varieties of 1897, the finest surviving theatre edifice designed by Ernest Runtz in the UK. The first artist to star there in its guise as a music hall was Lillie Langtry. Later it became an early nightclub (1950s), then a bingo-hall and is now once again a night club in the form of 'The Empire'. It has recently, as of 2005, had the missing ornate glass and steel over-canopy to the front entrance fully restored. Further afield in Linthorpe, can be found the Little Theatre (now Middlesbrough Theatre), which was opened by Sir John Gielgud in 1957 and was one of the first new theatres built in England after the Second World War. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (916x768, 278 KB) Summary Middlesbrough Town Hall my imge Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (916x768, 278 KB) Summary Middlesbrough Town Hall my imge Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... This article refers to Langtry, Lillie. ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an English theatre and film actor particularly known for his warm expressive voice, which his colleague Sir Alec Guinness likened to a silver trumpet muffled in silk. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Middlesbrough Central (Public) Library
Middlesbrough Central (Public) Library

The town can also boast this country’s only public sculpture by the celebrated modern American artist Claes Oldenburg, the "Bottle O' Notes" of 1993, which relates to Captain James Cook. Based alongside it today in the town's Central Gardens is the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (MIMA), the successor to previous art galleries on Linthorpe Road and Gilkes Street. Refurbished in 2006 is the Carnegie library dating from 1912. The Dorman Long office on Zetland Road, constructed between 1881 and 1891, is the only commercial building ever designed by Philip Webb, the great architect who worked for Sir Isaac Lowthian Bell. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 985 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Central (Carnegie) Library in Middlesbrough, England, built from 1910 to 1912 through a donation towards the expenses from Andrew Carnegie. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 985 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Central (Carnegie) Library in Middlesbrough, England, built from 1910 to 1912 through a donation towards the expenses from Andrew Carnegie. ... Claes Oldenburg (born January 28, 1929) is a sculptor, best known for his public art installations typically featuring very large replicas of everyday objects. ... This article is about the British explorer. ... The Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art or mima is a flagship art gallery project based in the North of England. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ... Iron-making has been known in Cleveland since the Romans found iron slags in North Yorkshire, with small-scale iron-making known to have taken place at Rievaulx, Whitby and Guisborough Abbeys in the 17th Century. ... Philip Speakman Webb born 12 January 1831 died 17 April 1915 was an architect who designed The Red House at Bexleyheath in 1859 and also the house Standen with William Morris. ...


The town centre has been undergoing a modernising makeover in recent years, including the addition in 2004 of 'Spectra-txt,' a 10 metre high interactive tower of metal and fibre-optics inspired by Blade Runner (whose own industrial scenery was inspired by that of Teesside, by virtue in part of the experiences of its director, the South Shields-born Ridley Scott, a former art college student up the coast in nearby industrialised West Hartlepool). 'Spectra-txt' allows a member of the public to send an SMS (text) message via a mobile phone to change the colours of the lights. Texting various codes, such as 'Chromapop' produce a display of changing colour lights. This article is about the 1982 film. ... , South Shields is a coastal town in Tyne and Wear, England, on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne, with a population of about 90,000. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Cleveland College of Art and Design is a further and higher education art and design college, based in the United Kingdom. ... West Hartlepool refers to the western part of the modern borough of Hartlepool in north-east England. ... For other uses, see SMS (disambiguation). ...


Transport

A Travel Information Display at a Middlesbrough Bus Shelter
A Travel Information Display at a Middlesbrough Bus Shelter

Middlesbrough is served well by public transport. The Arriva North East, Stagecoach on Teesside, Leven Valley, Alrite Travel and Go North East bus lines provide local transport mainly in Middlesbrough and to Durham Tees Valley Airport, Sunderland, Stockton-on-Tees, Darlington and Newcastle-upon-Tyne. National Express and Megabus operate long distance coach travel. Middlesbrough has recently benefited from an upgrade in bus services; with digital displays having being fitted at selected bus shelters in the town and many bus shelters being renovated. Mass transit redirects here. ... Arriva North-East is a division of Arriva. ... Stagecoach Group plc (LSE: SGC) is a leading international transport group operating bus, train, tram, express coach and ferry operations. ... Go North East, the founding company and part of the Go-Ahead Group, operates bus services in Tyne and Wear and County Durham in England. ... TheBus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... For other uses, see Sunderland (disambiguation). ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ... This article is about the town in England. ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... This article is about the Stagecoach Group brand. ...


Train services are operated by Northern Rail and Transpennine Express, the latter of which provides direct rail services to cities such as York and Manchester; departing from Middlesbrough Station. Northern Rail, usually known as Northern (and sometimes incorrectly called Northern Trains), is a train operating company, that has operated local passenger services in the north of England since 2004. ... TransPennine Express (TPE) is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... Middlesbrough railway station serves the large town of Middlesbrough in England. ...


Retail and commerce

There is a large and comprehensive shopping district made up of several separate shopping centres, which include 'The Mall Middlesbrough' renamed in 2005 from 'Cleveland Shopping Centre,' which has undergone a major refurbishment. 'Dundas Street Shopping' renamed in 2005 from 'Dundas Shopping Arcade,' 'Hill Street Shopping Centre' and 'Captain Cook Square.' Linthorpe Road is home to several independent and national fashion shops. One of these, Psyche, regularly claims accolades over the likes of the Selfridges, Harvey Nichols & Liberty stores in London. A recent four-part BBC documentary was made about the store, which highlighted how seriously Teessiders take fashion. For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... Selfridges in Birmingham. ... Harvey Nichols at the corner of Knightsbridge and Sloane Street in London A Harvey Nichols advertisement encourages women to buy an expensive pair of shoes that they are unable to afford and eat beans on toast every day until the next time they are paid A branch store in Central... Liberty is a well known department store in Regent Street in central London, England at the heart of the West End shopping district. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Culture and leisure

Dorman Museum
Dorman Museum

Long-awaited flagship art gallery project, the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art opened its doors in January 2007. It currently holds the second largest collection of Picassos in the United Kingdom. It also holds works of art by Andy Warhol, Henri Matisse and Damien Hirst among others. Its considerable arts and crafts collections span from 1900 to the present day. Surrounding it is the town's overhauled Victoria Square and Central Gardens, in tandem producing "the largest civic space in Europe".1 Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 298 KB) Summary Dorman Museum by myself Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 298 KB) Summary Dorman Museum by myself Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art or mima is a flagship art gallery project based in the North of England. ... Picasso redirects here. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Matisse redirects here. ... Damien Hirst (born June 7, 1965) is an English artist and the most prominent of the group that has been dubbed Young British Artists (or YBAs). ...


Middlesbrough can have two major recreational park spaces in Albert Park and Stewart Park, Marton. The former, originally touted as 'The People's Park' was donated to the town by Bolckow in 1866. It was formally opened by Prince Arthur, youngest son of the monarch, on 11 August 1868 and comprises a 30 hectare (70 acre) site accessible from Linthorpe Road. The park underwent a considerable period of restoration from 2001 to 2004, during which a number of the Park's most vaunted landmarks, including a fountain, bandstand and sundial saw either restoration or revival. Alongside these two parks are two of the town's premier cultural attractions, the century-old Dorman Memorial Museum and the Captain Cook Birthplace Museum respectively. In close vicinity to the latter can be found a granite urn marking the supposed spot of the famous explorer's birthplace. Albert Park is an open access, free public park, located in Middlesbrough, in the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Stewart Park is in Marton near Middlesbrough. ... Map sources for Marton at grid reference NZ5115 Marton is a small town outside Middlesbrough in Cleveland, England. ... Arthur Tudor (20 September 1486 – 2 April 1502) was the eldest son of Henry VII of England. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The worlds highest fountain: King Fahds Fountain in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Three traditional fountain features: a low jet, a pair of raised basins, and sculpture with a water theme, here hippocamps (Villa Borghese, Rome) A traditional fountain is an arrangement where water issues from a source (Latin fons... For other uses, see Sundial (disambiguation). ... Dorman Museum Dorman Museum is a general museum located in Middlesbrough within the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... The Captain Cook Birthplace Museum is a free-entry public museum located in Marton, Middlesbrough within the borough of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ...


Newham Grange Leisure farm in Coulby Newham, one of the most southerly districts of the town, has operated continuously in this spot since the 17th century, becoming a leisure farm with the first residential development of the suburb in the 1970s. Now a burgeoning tourist attraction, the chance to view its various cattle, pigs, sheep and other perennial farm animals is complimented by exhibitions of the farming history of the area. Newham Grange Leisure Farm, Coulby Newham, Middlesbrough is open to the Pubic. ...


Back in the 'Old Town' or St Hilda's, is the Transporter Bridge Visitor Centre, opened in 2000 and offering its own exhibitions charting the high-octane past of the heart of the surrounding industrial powerhouse, as well as that of the singular structure it commemorates.


Education

University of Teesside
University of Teesside

Middlesbrough became a university town in 1992, after a concerted campaign for a distinct 'University of Teesside' which had ran since the 1960s. Prior to its establishment, extramural classes had been provided by the University of Leeds Adult Education Centre on Harrow Road, from 1958 to 2001.[10] The University of Teesside has more than 20,000 students. It dates back to 1930 as Constantine Technical College (although teaching formalities had began in the then-new building as early as September 1929). Current departments of the University include Teesside Business School as well as the Schools of Arts and Media, Computing, Health and Social Care, Science & Technology and Social Sciences & Law. The University is internationally recognised as a leading institute for computer animation and games design and along with Arc arts centre at Stockton-on-Tees, Cineworld cinema in Middlesbrough, and the Riverside Stadium, hosts the annual Animex International Festival of Animation. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1054 KB) Front entrance of the Constantine Building of the University of Teesside on Borough Road. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1054 KB) Front entrance of the Constantine Building of the University of Teesside on Borough Road. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The University of Teesside, based in Middlesbrough, England, has a student body of 20,685 students as of 2005. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... Libraries are useful resources for adult learners. ... See also: Computer-generated imagery Computer animation is the art of creating moving images via the use of computers. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ... Cineworld Cinemas is a multiplex cinema chain in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Jersey. ... The Riverside Stadium is a football stadium in Middlesbrough, England, which has been the home of Middlesbrough F.C. since it opened in 1995. ... The Animex International Festival of Animation and Computer Games takes place every year in Middlesbrough in the North East of England. ...


The University is not alone in providing further and higher education in the town. There are also a number of modern schools, colleges and sixth forms, the largest of which is Middlesbrough College with 16,000 students, which covers the four campuses of Acklam, Kirby, Marton and Longlands, including the one-time Acklam Hall. Others include St. David's School in Acklam, Newlands School F.C.J in Saltersgill and Macmillan Academy on Stockton Road, which was recently declared the best state school in England.[11] Two of three campuses of Cleveland College of Art and Design are also based in Middlesbrough, with its primary site on Green Lane having been officially opened in 1960. It remains one of only four Further Education sector specialist art and design colleges in the United Kingdom (the others being at Herefordshire, Leeds and Plymouth), and the only such college remaining in the North-East. Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... Middlesbrough College is a college, comprising of predominantly further education but also selected higher education provision, existing on four sites in the town of Middlesbrough. ... St. ... State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ... Cleveland College of Art and Design is a further and higher education art and design college, based in the United Kingdom. ... Herefordshire College of Art and Design is an art school based in the English West Midlands, on the cusp of the Wales-England border. ... Leeds College of Art and Design | Leeds College of Art and Design is a specialist arts further and higher education institution, based in the city of Leeds in northern England, with a main campus opposite Leeds University. ... Plymouth College of Art and Design is an art school based in the city of Plymouth, the United Kingdom. ...


The £17 million Unity City Academy which replaced the Langbaurgh and Keldholme schools in east Middlesbrough was one of the first schools to open as part of the government's £5 billion City Academy programme for failing comprehensives. In 2005 an unusually large proportion of pupils gained no GCSEs and only 14% of pupils gained 5 A*-C grades, compared with a national average of 51%.[12] However in 2006 the school has had a new management in place and achieved pass rates of 33%.[13] Mossbourne Community Academy, the controversial successor to Hackney Downs School. ...


Religion

Middlesbrough is a deanery of the Archdeaconry of Cleveland, a subdivision of the Church of England Diocese of York in the Province of York. It stretches west from Thirsk, north to Middlesbrough, east to Whitby and south to Pickering. Tees (Newport) Bridge, 30th July 2006 Opened to traffic on 28th February 1934 by the Duke of York, the Tees Newport Bridge spans the River Tees a short distance upriver from Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge, linking Middlesbrough with the borough of Stockton-on-Tees, England. ... In the Church of England and Roman Catholic Church, a deanery is a collection of parishes within an archdeaconry. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The Diocese of York is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York. ... The Province of York consists of the following dioceses of the Church of England: Their archbishop is the Archbishop of York. ... Thirsk is a small market town in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... , Pickering is an ancient market town and a parish in the Ryedale district of the county of North Yorkshire, England,on the borders of the North York Moors National Park. ...


Middlesbrough is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough, which was created on 20 December 1878 from the Diocese of Beverley. Middlesbrough is home to the Mother-Church of the diocese; St. Mary's Cathedral which is located in the suburb Coulby Newham. The Seventh Bishop of Midddlesbrough, Bishop Terence Drainey was ordained on Friday 25th January 2008, following the previous Bishop's resignation. is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Nightlife

During university term time, Middlesbrough is busy throughout the week with student nights taking place throughout the bars and clubs. During the holidays, the town is especially busy from Thursday to Sunday.


One of the most popular venue is The Empire in the centre of town. Several large bands have played at this venue. The Crown, Basement, Blue, Cornerhouse, Walkabout, Aruba, Onyx, Barracuda and the Arena, now re-opened with a seven o'clock license are also popular. A Cineworld cinema is located at Middlesbrough Leisure Park, as well as a Showcase Cinema in the Middlesbrough part of Teesside Park. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cineworld Cinemas is a multiplex cinema chain in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Jersey. ... Sowcase Cinemas in Santiago, Chile Showcase Cinemas is the name given to some of the cinemas owned by National Amusements of Dedham, Massachusetts, USA. The company was one of the first to open multiplex cinemas in the United Kingdom in the 1980s; it now operates 19 cinemas across the UK... Teesside Park is a retail superstore and leisure development in the UK. Located just off the A66 near the A66/A19 interchange, it is split between the boroughs of Stockton-on-Tees (retail park) and Middlesbrough (leisure park) with the line of the Old River Tees, which runs down the...


The Rolling Stones, iconic and internationally famous rock-band, played their first gig outside of London on July 13th 1963 at The Outlook, Corporation Rd, Middlesbrough. The present Teesside Combined Law Courts now stand on the site of these premises which were built as a small department store featuring fashion, hair-styling and record sales. The small 'club' was actually a coffee and snack-bar (unlicensed) in the basement. Manchester band, The Hollies appeared the same night. Rolling Stones redirects here. ... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ...


Crime

Middlesbrough uses combined installations of CCTV cameras and loudspeakers to reprimand their citizens when they're committing infringements (throwing cigarette butts on the ground, littering etc.) in public. Middlesbrough was the first place in the UK to install CCTV with loudspeakers which inspired other towns to use this idea. The crime rate in Middlesbrough is nearly twice the UK average and was 4th highest in England in 2007 despite seeing year on year reductions according to the Home Office Crime Statistics. This article refers to a surveillance system. ... This article refers to a surveillance system. ...


Politics

Middlesbrough and the surrounding area has two Members of Parliament (MPs): Ashok Kumar and Sir Stuart Bell. Middlesbrough has been a traditionally safe Labour seat, largely due to its industrial, working class history. The Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland seat is also Labour but incorporates surrounding towns including Guisborough and Saltburn and is a more marginal seat and a Conservative target (having held the Langbaurgh predecessor seat until 1997). Ashok Kumar (born 28 May 1956, Uttar Pradesh, India) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Stuart Bell (born May 16, 1938) is the Member of Parliament for Middlesbrough, which is in the North-East of England. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For the village in Northamptonshire, see Guilsborough. ... Map sources for Saltburn-by-the-Sea at grid reference NZ6621 Saltburn-by-the-Sea pier and cliff lift Saltburn-By-The-Sea is a seaside resort in the unitary authority of Redcar and Cleveland, England. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Langbaurgh was a constituency electing one member to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Middlesbrough was selected to have a directly elected mayor as head of the council. The current mayor is Ray Mallon (independent), a former senior, and somewhat controversial, figure in the local police force. Mallon was re-elected for a second term in office in the May 2007 local and mayoral elections. In the United Kingdom, the office of Mayor or Lord Mayor (Provost and Lord Provost in Scotland) had long been ceremonial posts, with little or no duties attached to it. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Ray Mallon (b. ...


Future developments

As part of its £1.5 billion investment programme, Tees Valley Regeneration has started work on reclaiming Middlesbrough Docklands with the £500 million Middlehaven scheme to bring new business and homes to a 250 acre (1 km²) area. The first phase around the former docklands has already begun and is visible from the Riverside Stadium. The master plan drawn up by Will Alsop in 2004, includes proposals for the relocation of Middlesbrough College, the building of a virtual reality centre by the University of Teesside (part of the DigitalCity development), in addition to numerous offices, hotels, bars, restaurants and leisure attractions. Tees Valley Regeneration now has a shortlist of five developers seeking to build at Middlehaven, the list includes some of the most prestigious and groundbreaking names in development and regeneration, and a decision on the chosen developer is due to be made in the next few months. The Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art or mima is a flagship art gallery project based in the North of England. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... The Riverside Stadium is a football stadium in Middlesbrough, England, which has been the home of Middlesbrough F.C. since it opened in 1995. ... Will Alsop (born 1947) is an English architect based in London, responsible for several distinctive and controversial modernist buildings — most in the United Kingdom. ... Middlesbrough College is a college, comprising of predominantly further education but also selected higher education provision, existing on four sites in the town of Middlesbrough. ... The University of Teesside, based in Middlesbrough, England, has a student body of 20,685 students as of 2005. ...


The Stockton-Middlesbrough Initiative is a 20 year vision for regenerating the urban core of the Tees Valley, the main focus being the area of 30 km² along the banks of the River Tees between the two centres of Stockton and Middlesbrough. The master plan has been drawn up by environmental design specialists Gillespies, the eventual aim being to create a distinctive high-quality city of over 360,000 citizens at the heart of the Tees Valley, by connecting both Middlesbrough and Stockton along the Tees corridor. The project will include not only the existing developments at Middlehaven and North Shore Stockton, but many others over a 15-20 year period. The Tees Valley is a distinct economic area in the North East of England; it consists of the five Unitary Authorities of Darlington, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar & Cleveland, and Stockton-on-Tees. ... The Tees is a river in Northern England. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ... The Tees, a river of England, rises on the eastward slope of Cross Fell in the Pennine Chain, and traverses a valley about 85 miles (137 km) in length to the North Sea. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ...

The former Odeon cinema in Middlesbrough, during demolition
The former Odeon cinema in Middlesbrough, during demolition

Private local developers have recently announced plans to build a 360-foot (110 m) tower on the site of the old Odeon Cinema (more recently a nightclub) which collapsed in July 2006. The site is in central Middlesbrough at the eastern end of Newport Road and was proposed to be the tallest building in the North East, surpassing the existing record already held by Middlesbrough's own Centre North East building - although the plan was later, as of 2007, downscaled. The new development will be the first of such skyscrapers proposed in Middlesbrough with two more visioned for Middlehaven. The second one on the Middlehaven site is the most unlikely but still being considered and could see either an American or Dubai based company to build a skyscraper 750-900 feet in height, showing Middlesbrough is progressing into the future and is a growing centre for commerce and development. The idea for such skyscrapers is the result of limited land area in Middlesbrough. Instead of building outwards and subsequently having to apply for boundary extension, it makes sense to build up. It sees Middlesbrough a participant in the "skyscraper boom" currently hitting the United Kingdom. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 992 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This picture was taken by myself on my mobile phone on the 21st July 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 992 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This picture was taken by myself on my mobile phone on the 21st July 2006. ... Odeon Cinemas is the largest chain of cinemas in the United Kingdom. ... Image:Centre North East. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ...


Middlesbrough, along with other towns and cities in the UK, will be granted a licence to build a new large casino. Manchester won the bid to host the 'Super Casino'.[14] This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... A Regional casino, more commonly known as a Super Casino (or occasionally known as Mega Casino or variants) is the term given to the largest category of casino permitted under United Kingdom law. ...


Sport

Riverside Stadium 2006
Riverside Stadium 2006

The Premiership football team, Middlesbrough F.C., owned by local haulage entrepreneur Steve Gibson, is based at the Riverside Stadium by the River Tees, having been a founder member of the FA Premier League in 1992, before moving from its traditional home at Ayresome Park later in the 1990s. Having endured 128 years without a major trophy, under then manager Steve McClaren, Middlesbrough finally won the Carling Cup on the 29th Feb 2004, beating Bolton Wanderers 2–1 in the final at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.[15] The victory also qualified them for another club first: the first of two consecutive European UEFA Cup campaigns. Middlesbrough Ironopolis F.C. were another professional team in the town but eventually went bankrupt. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 240 KB) Summary Riverside Stadum with the Old gates outside. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 240 KB) Summary Riverside Stadum with the Old gates outside. ... The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays English Premier League for sponsorship reasons) comprises the top 20 football clubs in the league system of English football. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Middlesbrough Football Club (commonly known as Boro) are an English football club based in Middlesbrough. ... Steve Gibson is the Chairman of Middlesbrough Football Club. ... The Riverside Stadium is a football stadium in Middlesbrough, England, which has been the home of Middlesbrough F.C. since it opened in 1995. ... The Tees is a river in Northern England. ... This article described the FA Premier League 1992-93 season. ... Ayresome Park was a football stadium in the United Kingdom, and was the home of Middlesbrough F.C. from its construction in time for the 1903/1904 season, until the Riverside Stadium opened in 1995. ... For the ice hockey player, see Steve McLaren. ... The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ... Bolton Wanderers F.C. is an English professional football club. ... The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ... Middlesbrough Ironopolis Football Club were an English association football club which briefly played in the Football League in the 1890s. ...


In the 2005–2006 season, trying for the UEFA Cup, Middlesbrough was the only North Eastern team represented in European competition, having qualified directly with a record seventh-placed finish in the 2004-2005 FA Premier League. Having beat FC Basel and Steaua Bucureşti 4–3 in previous rounds and come back from 0–3 down in both games, Middlesbrough FC arrived at its first UEFA Cup final. Unfortunately they lost 4-0 at the hands of Sevilla FC at the Philips Stadion on 10 May 2006, although the scoreline was not particularly representative of the game - three of Sevilla's four goals were scored in the last 14 minutes.[16] The efforts of McClaren, though, were recognised in his appointment, to what would prove a short stint in the job, to succeed Sven-Göran Eriksson at the helm of the England national team after that summer's World Cup.[17][18] He was replaced at Middlesbrough by long-serving defender and present manager, Gareth Southgate, in a controversial appointment given his initial lack of the required license to manage in the English Premier League, and therefore to the chagrin of various Football Association officials.[19] Location of teams in the 2005-06 season The 2005-06 season of the FA Premier League began on August 13, 2005, and concluded on May 7, 2006. ... The UEFA Cup 2005-06 season was won by Sevilla, beating Middlesbrough in the final. ... The 2004-05 season of the FA Premier League began in August 2004 and ended in May 2005. ... Current season FC Basel (short for Footballclub Basel) is a Swiss football club based in Basel. ... FC Steaua BucureÅŸti is a Romanian football club based at Ghencea Stadium, Bucharest, Romania. ... The 2006 UEFA Cup Final took at place at Philips Stadion, Eindhoven, on May 10, 2006. ... Sevilla Fútbol Club is a Spanish professional football club that plays in the top-flight Spanish La Liga championship. ... For the indoor arena in Atlanta, Georgia, see Philips Arena. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (IPA: , born 7 April 1948) is a association football manager, currently with Manchester City F.C. of the English Premier League. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... 2006 World Cup redirects here. ... Gareth Southgate (born 3 September 1970 in Watford, Herts) is a former English footballer, currently manager of Middlesbrough in the English Premiership. ... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ...


Speedway racing was staged at Cleveland Park Stadium from the pioneer days of 1928 until the 1990s. The post-war team, known as The Bears, and for a time, The Teessiders, and the Teesside Tigers operated at all levels. The immediate post war Bears team which operated between 1945 and 1948 was reputed to a victim of its own success. The track operated for amateur speedway in the 1950s before re-opening in the Provincial League of 1961. The track closed for a spell later in the 1960s but returned in as members of the Second Division as The Teessiders. Speedway returned to the Middlesbrough area in 2006 and the team is known as the Redcar Bears. This article should be transwikied to wiktionary The term post-war is generally used for the period after the end of World War II, i. ... The Redcar Bears are a British Speedway team. ...


Television and filmography

Middlesbrough has featured in many television programmes, including The Fast Show, Steel River Blues, Spender, Play for Today (The Black Stuff; latterly the drama Boys from the Blackstuff) and Auf Wiedersehen, Pet. The Fast Show is a BBC comedy sketch show programme that ran for four series from 1994 to 2000. ... Steel River Blues is a British television drama serial first broadcast in September 2004 on ITV1. ... Spender was a BBC drama set in Newcastle upon Tyne, written by Ian La Frenais and Jimmy Nail, in which he also starred. ... The Play for Today logo, seen here in the opening title sequence from 1976. ... Boys from the Blackstuff is a British television drama serial of five episodes, originally transmitted from October 10 to November 7, 1982 on BBC TWO. The serial was written by Liverpudlian playwright Alan Bleasdale, and was a sequel to a television play called The Black Stuff, which he had originally... Auf Wiedersehen, Pet is a popular British comedy-drama series about a group of seven British migrant construction workers: Wayne, Dennis, Oz, Bomber, Barry, Neville and Moxey, who are living and working on a German building site. ...


Tyne Tees Television used to broadcast its news for the South regions from its studios located in at the base of Corporation House (now Walkabout bar), before moving to its new premises in Billingham. Tyne Tees Television is the ITV television contractor for North East England. ... For people named Billingham, see Billingham (surname). ...


On December 17, 2007, at about 1 p.m. local time, the American television network NBC broadcast live from the Transporter Bridge, where presenter Ann Curry performed a bungee jump above the river, as part of a fundraising effort for charities such as Save the Children and United Way. Despite advance publicity in the Evening Gazette[20] and the BBC, the occasion did not attract many spectators other than the members of the UK Bungee Club supervising the jump, and the recovery party in a river boat. Despite recent adverse publicity for the town, including a poll conducted by a Channel 4 television programme, Location, Location, Location, making use of criterion questioned by mayor Ray Mallon[21], which listed Middlesbrough as the country's supposed 'worst place to live' in 2007[22], no local politicians attempted to capitalize on the occasion. December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the television network. ... Ann Curry (born November 19, 1956) is a news anchor on NBCs morning television program Today since May 1997 and host of Dateline NBC since May 2005. ... Bungee Jump in Normandy, France Bungee jumping is an activity in which a person jumps off from a high place (generally of several hundred feet/meters) with one end of an elastic cord attached to his/her body or ankles and the other end tied to the jumping-off point. ... Save the Children Logo Save the Children is an international non-profit organization dedicated to working for children. ... The United Way of America is a coalition of charitable organizations in the United States that have traditionally pooled efforts in fundraising. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British television station. ... Location, Location, Location is a Channel 4 property programme, presented by Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer. ...


Notable residents

The world famous explorer, navigator, and map maker Captain James Cook was born in Marton, which is now a suburb in the south-east of Middlesbrough. This article is about the British explorer. ...

James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. 1775, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich
James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. 1775, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

Other famous people from the town include: Image File history File links Captain James Tiberius Cook official portrait from the National Maritime Museum, United Kingdom File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Captain James Tiberius Cook official portrait from the National Maritime Museum, United Kingdom File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sir Nathaniel Dance-Holland (8 May 1735-15 October 1811) was a notable English portrait painter (and later a politician). ... The National Maritime Museum, Greenwich The National Maritime Museum (NMM) is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom, and one of the most important in the world. ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ...

Other eminent sons and daughters of Middlesbrough and its environs include Martin Narey, chief executive of Barnardo's, E. W. Hornung, the creator of the gentleman-crook Raffles (who was fluent in three Yorkshire dialects, and Naomi Jacob novelist. Florence Easton, the Wagnerian soprano at the New York Met and Cyril Smith, the concert pianist, were also natives. The famous M.P. Ellen Wilkinson wrote a novel Clash (1929) which paints a very positive picture of ‘Shireport’ (Middlesbrough). Florence Olliffe Bell's classic study At The Works (1907) gives a striking picture of the area at the turn-of-the-century. She also edited the letters of her stepdaughter Gertrude Bell which have been continuously in print since 1927. Pat Barker's debut novel Union Street was set on the thoroughfare of the same name in the town, its central theme of prostitution still associated with the area around it to this day. Rory Underwood (born June 19, 1963) is a former rugby union footballer who played wing for Leicester Tigers and Bedford, who represented England and the British Lions internationally, and a former Royal Air Force pilot. ... Alan Old (born 23 September 1945) is an English Rugby Union player who had 16 caps for England. ... Donald George Revie, OBE, (10 July 1927 - 26 May 1989), was a football player for Leicester City, Hull City, Sunderland, Manchester City and Leeds United as a deep-lying centre forward. ... Wilf Mannion (May 16, 1918 - April 14, 2000) was a footballer who played for Middlesbrough from 1937 until 1954, scoring 110 goals in 368 appearances. ... Chris Kamara (born 25 December 1957 in Middlesbrough) is a former professional footballer in England. ... For the writer, see Bryan Clough. ... Middlesbrough F.C. are an English football team, commonly known as Boro. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... Stewart Downing (born July 22, 1984 in Middlesbrough) is an English football player, who currently plays for Middlesbrough, and is in the England squad. ... Middlesbrough F.C. are an English football team, commonly known as Boro. ... Steve Gibson is the Chairman of Middlesbrough Football Club. ... Tottenham Hotspur F.C. is a North London association football team, also known by the nickname Spurs. ... Jonathan Simon Woodgate (born 22 January 1980 in Middlesbrough) is an English footballer, who plays as a defender for Premier League side Tottenham Hotspur. ... Liam Edward Plunkett (born 6 April 1985 in Middlesbrough) is an English cricketer who plays for Durham and England. ... Christopher Middleton Old (born December 22, 1948, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire) is a former English cricketer who played in 46 Tests and 32 ODIs from 1972 to 1981. ... John Gatenby Hatfield (b. ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... Dr. Alyson Jones (b. ... Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... Christopher Tomlinson (born: September 15, 1981 in Middlesbrough, England) is an athlete who specialises in the long jump. ... Kicking to left side Kickboxing refers to sport-fighting using kicks and punches and sometimes throws and bows representing a certain martial art or can be practiced for general fitness, or as a full-contact sport. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... Robert Bob Renwick Mortimer (born May 23, 1959 in Middlesbrough, England), is an English comedian and actor who is best known for his double act with Vic Reeves (see Vic and Bob). ... Roy Chubby Brown (Née: Royston Vasey) English comedian, was born in Grangetown Middlesborough in the mid 1940s. ... Kevin Connelly was born in Middlesbrough, England. ... Cyril James Smith (born Middlesbrough, England, August 11, 1909; died London, August 2, 1974) was a virtuoso concert pianist of the 30s, 40s and 50s, piano teacher and composer. ... Christopher Anton Rea (born 4 March 1951) is a singer-songwriter, from Middlesbrough, England. ... Paul Rodgers, (born December 17, 1949) is an English rock singer-songwriter best known for being a member of Free and Bad Company. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Micky Moody is a guitarist most famous for playing with Whitesnake. ... Wendy Richard MBE (born Wendy Emerton on 20 July 1943) is a popular English actress best known for playing Miss Brahms in Are You Being Served? from 1972 to 1985 and Pauline Fowler in EastEnders from 1985 to 2006. ... Thelma Barlow (born 19 June 1929) is an English television actress and writer, most famous for her roles as Mavis Wilton in the long-running ITV soap opera Coronation Street and as Dolly Bellfield in the sitcom dinnerladies. ... Christopher Quinten (born Christopher Bell on July 12, 1957 in Middlesbrough, Yorkshire) is a British actor, best known for his role as Brian Tilsley on Coronation Street, which he played from 1978 to 1989. ... Elizabeth Carling (born 20 October 1967 in Middlesbrough, Yorkshire) is an English actress best know for her roles in Goodnight Sweetheart, Casualty and Barbara. ... Jerry Desmonde (July 20, 1908 – February 11, 1967 suicide[1]) was a British actor best known as a straight man to Sid Field, Norman Wisdom and others - Jerry is sometimes credited as Jerry Desmond. ... Jamie Parker is an English actor. ... Ernest William Hornung (June 7, 1866 – March 22, 1921) was a British author. ... Mackenzie Thorpe (born 1956 in Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire) is a British artist. ... External links Guardian Obituary - Nov 7 2002 Toonhound Categories: Stub | 1939 births | 2002 deaths | Cartoonists | British cartoonists | British comics artists ... William Tillyer (b. ... Paul Daniels (born Newton Edward Daniels, 6 April 1938) is a British magician and television performer. ... Kirsten OBrien (born 23 February 1972) is a CBBC presenter, originally from Middlesbrough. ... Journey South were a musical duo originating from Middlesbrough, England, consisting of brothers Carl and Andy Pemberton. ... Martin Narey (b. ... Ernest William Hornung (June 7, 1866 – March 22, 1921) was a British author. ... Naomi Jacob b 1885 - d Aug 27th 1964, Author, Actress and Broadcaster Naomi Eleanor Claire Jacob was a well loved novelist, broadcaster and actress in her day. ... Florence Easton as Cio-Cio-San in Madama Butterfly, Metropolitan Opera Company Florence Easton was a popular English lyric dramatic soprano in the early 20th century. ... Cyril James Smith (born Middlesbrough, England, August 11, 1909; died London, August 2, 1974) was a virtuoso concert pianist of the 30s, 40s and 50s, piano teacher and composer. ... Ellen Cicely Wilkinson (8 October 1891, Manchester-6 February 1947) was the Labour Member of Parliament for Middlesbrough and later for Jarrow on Tyneside. ... Fin de siècle is French for End of the Century. The term turn-of-the-century is sometimes used as a synonym, but is more neutral (lacking some or most of the connotations described below), and can include the first years of a new century. ... Gertrude Margaret Lowthian Bell (July 14, 1868–July 12, 1926) was a British woman who had a major hand in creating the modern state of Iraq. ... Pat Barker (born May 8, 1943) is an English writer and historian. ... Whore redirects here. ...


Ford Madox Ford was billeted in Eston during the Great War (1914-18) and his great novel sequence Parade's End is partly set in Busby Hall, Carlton-in-Cleveland. Ford Madox Ford (December 17, 1873 - June 26, 1939) was an English novelist and publisher. ... Eston is a township, parish and urban district in the North-East of England, historically part of the county of North Yorkshire. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Carlton-in-Cleveland is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, on the edge of the North York Moors National Park. ...


Adrian 'Six Medals' Warburton, air photographer, was played by Alec Guinness in 'Malta Story'. Wing Commander Adrian Warby Warburton (10 March 1918 in Middlesborough - approximately 12 April 1944 over Germany) was an RAF pilot during the Second World War. ... Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE (2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning English actor. ... // Film Malta Story (1953) Malta Story is a B/W war film on the heroic defense of Malta, the island itself its people and the RAF aviators who fought to defend it. ...


Image gallery

Twin Towns

Middlesbrough is twinned with the following cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses of Dunkirk or Dunkerque, see Dunkirk (disambiguation). ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Oberhausen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Masvingo is the capital of the Masvingo Province of Zimbabwe. ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ...

See also

Middlesbrough Music Live or MML is an annual music festival in England held across multiple stages in Middlesbrough town centre. ... The A66 is a major road in England. ... Middlesbrough F.C. are an English football team, commonly known as Boro. ... The Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art or mima is a flagship art gallery project based in the North of England. ...

References

  1. ^ 2001 ONS Urban sub-area
  2. ^ PD Ports plc. Retrieved on 2006-05-11.
  3. ^ Location of Durham Tees Valley Airport. Retrieved on 2006-05-11.
  4. ^ Youngs, Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Volume 2
  5. ^ Regional health gap 'is 30 years'. Retrieved on 2007-09-09.
  6. ^ Moorsom, Norman (1983). Middlesbrough as it was. Hendon Publishing Co. Ltd.. 
  7. ^ Stainsby Medieval Village. Tees Archaeology. Retrieved on 2007-12-20.
  8. ^ John Vaughan (Middlesbrough)
  9. ^ Chohan, Araf (1996). Britain in Old Photographs: Middlesbrough. Sutton Publishing Limited. 
  10. ^ Chase, Malcolm (Spring 2007). "Leeds in Linthorpe". Cleveland History, Bulletin of the Cleveland and Teesside Local History Society (92): 5. 
  11. ^ Macmillan Academy is the best state school in the land. Macmillan Academy. Retrieved on 2006-02-08.
  12. ^ Academy fails another inspection. BBC News. Retrieved on 2006-05-14.
  13. ^ Academy nearly doubles pass rates. BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  14. ^ BBC News, Manchester Wins Super-Casino Race, 30 January 2007
  15. ^ "Boro lift Carling Cup", BBC Sport, 2004-02-29. Retrieved on 2008-01-02. 
  16. ^ Sevilla end 58-year wait. uefa.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-02.
  17. ^ "McClaren named as England manager", BBC Sport, 2006-05-04. Retrieved on 2008-01-02. 
  18. ^ "McClaren sacked as England coach", BBC Sport, 2007-11-22. Retrieved on 2008-01-02. 
  19. ^ "Southgate appointed as Boro boss", BBC Sport, 2006-06-07. Retrieved on 2008-01-02. 
  20. ^ "US Presenter plans bungee jump" in the Evening Gazette.
  21. ^ "Mallon wants apology from Channel 4" in the Evening Gazette.
  22. ^ "Middlesbrough Is Worst Place To Live", Sky News, BSkyB, 2007-10-15. Retrieved on 2007-10-20. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... The borough of Redcar & Cleveland is a unitary authority in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, United Kingdom consisting of Redcar, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Guisborough, and small towns such as Brotton, Skelton, and Loftus. ... Middlesbrough is a unitary authority and borough in North Yorkshire, England. ... Stockton-on-Tees is a unitary authority and borough in the Tees Valley area of north-east England, with a resident population in 2001 of 178,408, rising to 185,880 in 2005 estimates. ... For other uses, see Craven (disambiguation). ... Hambleton is a local government district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Harrogate is a local government district and borough of North Yorkshire, England. ... Richmondshire is a local government district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Ryedale is a local government district in North Yorkshire in England. ... Scarborough is a non-metropolitan district and borough of North Yorkshire, England. ... Selby is a local government district in North Yorkshire, England. ... Ampleforth is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 20 miles north of York. ... Map sources for Bedale at grid reference SE2688 The centre of Bedale with St. ... Map sources for Boroughbridge at grid reference SE3966 Boroughbridge is a small town 13 miles northwest of York in North Yorkshire in England. ... Brotton is a town in the parish of Skelton and Brotton, in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... Map sources for Catterick, North Yorkshire at grid reference SE2497 The village dates back to Roman times, when Cataractonium was a Roman fort protecting the crossing of the Great North Road over the River Swale. ... Map sources for Catterick Garrison at grid reference SE2497 Catterick Garrison is a major Army base located in North Yorkshire in England. ... Statistics Population: 4230 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE529696 Administration District: Hambleton Shire county: North Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (North Riding) Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: Yorkshire... Eston is a township, parish and urban district in the North-East of England, historically part of the county of North Yorkshire. ... Statistics Population: 6560 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TA115807 Administration Borough: Scarborough Shire county: North Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (East Riding) Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: North Yorkshire Ambulance... Grassington is a picturesque village in Wharfedale, Yorkshire, England. ... Great Ayton is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire on the edge of the North York Moors in England. ... For the village in Northamptonshire, see Guilsborough. ... , Harrogate is a large town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Hawes is a small market town in the Yorkshire Dales. ... Helmsley Castle Aerial photo of Helmsley Helmsley is a market town in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England on the River Rye. ... Statistics Population: 3,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SD666693 Administration District: Craven Shire county: North Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: North Yorkshire Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Ambulance: Yorkshire Post office and telephone... Kirbymoorside is a small market town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Overlooking the River Nidd in Knaresborough Knaresborough is an historic market town and spa town in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England, located four miles east of Harrogate town. ... Leyburn is a small market town in Richmondshire, North Yorkshire in the United Kingdom on the northern bank of the river Ure in Wensleydale. ... Loftus is a town in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... , Malton is a market town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Marske-by-the-Sea is a large village in East Cleveland, located in the borough of Redcar & Cleveland. ... Map sources for Masham at grid reference SE2280 Masham (pronounced Massam) is a market town in North Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... , Northallerton is a town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Norton-on-Derwent is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Pateley Bridge is a market town in Nidderdale in North Yorkshire, England, on the River Nidd. ... , Pickering is an ancient market town and a parish in the Ryedale district of the county of North Yorkshire, England,on the borders of the North York Moors National Park. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The town of Richmond as seen from the top of the keep of Richmond Castle Richmond is a market town on the River Swale in North Yorkshire, UK and is the administrative centre of the district of Richmondshire. ... Ripon is a small cathedral city in North Yorkshire, England. ... Map sources for Saltburn-by-the-Sea at grid reference NZ6621 Saltburn-by-the-Sea pier and cliff lift Saltburn-By-The-Sea is a seaside resort in the unitary authority of Redcar and Cleveland, England. ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... , Selby is a town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Statistics Population: 2420 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SD817639 Administration District: Craven Shire county: North Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: West Riding Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Ambulance: Yorkshire Post office and telephone Post... Skipton is a town in North Yorkshire, England that lies along the River Aire and Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... , Stokesley is a small market town and a civil parish in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Map sources for Tadcaster at grid reference SE4843 Tadcaster is a town in North Yorkshire, England, lying on the River Wharfe and the Great North Road. ... Thirsk is a small market town in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Thornaby-on-Tees is a civil parish within the borough of Stockton-on-Tees, in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... , Yarm is a small town in the borough of Stockton-on-Tees in North East England. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... This is a list of civil parishes in the non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire, England, and the non-metropolitan districts of Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland, Stockton-on-Tees (south of the river) and York. ... Gordale Beck flows out of Gordale Scar to join the Aire. ... The Derwent is a river in Yorkshire in the north of England. ... For similarly named rivers, see River Esk. ... The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ... The River Leven flows through North Yorkshire, and is a tributary to the River Tees at Yarm. ... The River Ouse in York The River Ouse (pronounced ooze) in North Yorkshire, England flows through York and Selby. ... The River Ribble at Ribchester The River Ribble is a river that runs through North Yorkshire and Lancashire, in the North of England. ... The River Swale is a river in Yorkshire, England and a major tributary of the River Ure, which itself becomes the River Ouse, emptying into the North Sea via the Humber Estuary. ... The River Ure rises in the Yorkshire Pennine hills and becomes the River Ouse between Ripon and York, close to Boroughbridge. ... The River Wharfe is a river in Yorkshire, England. ... The county of North Yorkshire, together with the unitary authority of York, is divided into 8 Parliamentary constituencies - 2 Borough constituencies and 6 County constituencies. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Middlesbrough Football Club - Official Site of the Premier League (516 words)
Middlesbrough have spent the last nine seasons in the Premier League and 12 seasons in total.
Middlesbrough paid the first-ever four-figure transfer fee for a player in 1905 when they spent £1,000 on centre forward Alf Common.
Middlesbrough Football Club was originally formed in 1876 by Middlesbrough Cricket team players to stay fit during the winter.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Middlesbrough (705 words)
Middlesbrough in ecclesiastical history goes to show that in the beginning of the twelfth century it was the site of a
Middlesbrough for the soul of the said Robert de Brus.
Middlesbrough" was granted by Queen Elizabeth to one Thomas Reeve on 4 February, 1563.
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