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Encyclopedia > Middlebury College

Middlebury College

Latin: Collegium Medioburiense Viridis Mons
"Middlebury College in the Green Mountains"

Motto Scientia et Virtus
"Knowledge and Virtue"
Established 1800
Type Private coeducational
Endowment $887 million (as of February 2007)
President Ronald D. Liebowitz
Undergraduates 2,350
Location Middlebury, Vermont, United States
Campus Rural, 350 acres (1.4 km²) (main campus)
1,800 acres (7.3 km²) (mountain campus)
Mascot Panther
Website www.middlebury.edu

Coordinates: 44.009247° N 73.177344° W Image File history File linksMetadata Midd_160. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Ronald D. Liebowitz is the 16th president of Middlebury College, located in Middlebury, Vermont. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Middlebury, Vermont Main Street Otter Creek Falls Middlebury is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Mclogo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. Drawing 2,350 undergraduates from all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and over 70 countries, the college is particularly well known for the strength of its foreign language, writing, international studies, and environmental studies programs. Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... Middlebury, Vermont Main Street Otter Creek Falls Middlebury is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ...

Contents

Background

Mead Chapel sits atop the highest point on campus, overlooking the main quadrangle
Mead Chapel sits atop the highest point on campus, overlooking the main quadrangle

Founded as the Addison County Grammar School in 1797 before receiving its charter on November 1, 1800, the college has a long history of distinguished scholarship. In addition to its undergraduate program, the college offers graduate study in foreign languages and in literature and creative writing. Mead Chapel, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont, USA. Looking west across the main quadrangle of Middlebury College toward Mead Chapel. ... Mead Chapel, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont, USA. Looking west across the main quadrangle of Middlebury College toward Mead Chapel. ...


The 350-acre (1.4 km²) main campus is located in the Champlain Valley between Vermont's Green Mountains to the east and New York's Adirondack Mountains to the west; the nearby 1,800-acre (7.3 km²) mountain campus hosts the college's Bread Loaf School of English and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference every summer. The Conference was founded on an idea first born of poet Robert Frost. Champlain Valley is a region of the United States around Lake Champlain in Vermont and New York. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... The Green Mountains are a mountain range in the U.S. state of Vermont. ... NY redirects here. ... The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... The Bread Loaf Writers Conference is the oldest writers conference in the United States. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ...


The German school founded in 1915, began the Middlebury Language Schools, which take over the campus during the summer, teaching about 1,200 students Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. The C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools Abroad host students at twenty-one sites in Argentina, China, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Spain, and Uruguay.


Alexander Twilight, class of 1823, was the first black graduate of any college or university in the United States; he also became the first African American elected to public office, being elected to the Vermont House of Representatives in 1856. In 1883, the trustees voted to accept women as students in the college, making Middlebury one of the first formerly all-male liberal arts colleges in New England to become a coeducational institution. Alexander Lucius Twilight was born September 26, 1795 in Corinth, Vermont to a free black family. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Vermont General Assembly. ...


In May 2004, an anonymous benefactor made a $50 million donation to Middlebury. It was the largest cash gift the school has ever received. The donor asked only that Middlebury name its recently-built science building, Bicentennial Hall, after outgoing President John McCardell Jr. In February 2007, Middlebury's endowment stood at approximately $887 million.[1] John M. McCardell, Jr. ...


In 2005, Middlebury signed an affiliation agreement with the Monterey Institute of International Studies, a graduate school in Monterey, California. While the Monterey Institute will remain a separate institution, the affiliation will enable both schools to further their programs in international studies and foreign languages. The Monterey Institute of International Studies (its acronym is MIIS) is a graduate school in Monterey, California, United States, that specializes in programs in international relations, international business, and translation and interpretation. ... A graduate school or grad school is a school that awards advanced degrees, with the general requirement that students must have earned an undergraduate (bachelors) degree. ...


Middlebury is part of the SAT optional movement for undergraduate admission. Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ...


All Middlebury students agree to abide by its Honor Code.


The campus

Old Chapel, completed in 1836, served as Middlebury's primary academic building for a century. Today it houses seminar classrooms and administrative offices.
Old Chapel, completed in 1836, served as Middlebury's primary academic building for a century. Today it houses seminar classrooms and administrative offices.

Middlebury's bucolic campus is referred to affectionately by students as "Club Midd." It is characterized by quads and open spaces, views of the Green Mountains and the Adirondacks, and historic granite, marble, and limestone buildings. Old Stone Row, consisting of the three oldest buildings on campus — Old Chapel, Painter Hall, and Starr Hall — is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Painter Hall, constructed in 1815, is the oldest extant college building in Vermont. Of the campus, famous postmodern architect Robert Venturi said, "If anyone had told me that gray stone boxes set in lawns could be so beautiful, I would have said they were crazy. Middlebury looks like what everyone thinks an American campus should be but seldom is."[2] The campus is situated on a hill to the west of the village of Middlebury, a traditional New England village centered around Otter Creek Falls. Image File history File linksMetadata Middlebury_College_Old_Chapel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Middlebury_College_Old_Chapel. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Robert Charles Venturi (June 25, 1925 -) is an award winning American architect. ...


Since the mid-1990s, student housing has been grouped into five residential Commons: Atwater, Brainerd, Cook, Ross, and Wonnacott. All are named for illustrious college figures. The creation of the Commons accompanied an increase in the size of the student body and an ambitious building campaign. Recently completed building projects include the 220,000 sq ft McCardell Bicentennial Hall (1999), a 135,000 sq ftlibrary (2004), two Atwater Commons Residence Halls (2004), and a new Atwater Dining Hall (2005). Hillcrest Hall, an Italianate-styled farmhouse constructed around 1874, is being renovated to provide a home for the environmental studies program according to LEED standards. Starr Library, a Beaux-Arts edifice completed in 1900, is set to become The Donald Everett Axinn '51 Center for Literary and Cultural Studies at Starr Library pending restoration of interior spaces and addition of two wings for faculty offices. It will house various academic departments and will add lecture halls, screening rooms, and a television production studio for the film studies department.[3] Jeremiah Atwater (1773-1858) was a notable as an educator, minister, and college president. ... Ezra Brainerd (1844-1924) is admired as one of the most successful presidents of Middlebury College in Vermont. ... The Railway station of Albury, New South Wales, Australia was built in the Italianate Architectural Style in 1881 Italianate Architectural Style Italianate Architectural Style Italianate Architectural Style Italianate, also known as Tuscan or Lombard, describes the style of villas which developed in England, emerging from the Picturesque Movement of the... 7 World Trade Center, considered New York Citys first green office tower by gaining gold status in the US Green Building Councils LEED program. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ...


The Bread Loaf School of English

The Inn at the Bread Loaf Mountain Campus
The Inn at the Bread Loaf Mountain Campus

The Bread Loaf School of English is based at the college's mountain campus (43.953784° N 72.992971° W) in Ripton, just outside Middlebury, in sight of Bread Loaf Mountain and the main ridge of the Green Mountains. The poet Robert Frost is credited as a major influence on the school. Frost "first came to the School on the invitation of Dean Wilfred Davison in 1921. Friend and neighbor to Bread Loaf, (he) returned to the School every summer with but three exceptions for 42 years."[4] Every summer since 1920, Bread Loaf has offered students from around the United States and the world intensive courses in literature, creative writing, the teaching of writing, and theater. Prominent faculty and staff have included George K. Anderson, William Carlos Williams, Herschel Brickell, Bernard DeVoto, Edward Weismiller, Theodore Roethke, John Crowe Ransom, Elizabeth Drew, A. Bartlett Giamatti, Lawrence B. Holland, Nancy Martin, Perry Miller, Catherine Drinker Bowen, Carlos Baker, Harold Bloom, James Britton, Cleanth Brooks, Reuben Brower, Martin Price, Donald Stauffer, Charles Edward Eaton, Richard Ellman, Cedric Whitman, Paul Muldoon, William Sloane, John Ciardi, John P. Marquand, and Wylie Sypher.[5] [6] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1332 KB) Summary CHH, personal photo Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1332 KB) Summary CHH, personal photo Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Bread Loaf Mountain is a mountain located in Addison County, Vermont, in the Green Mountain National Forest. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... William Carlos Williams Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. ... Bernard Augustine DeVoto (January 11, 1897 - November 13, 1955) was an American historian and author who specialized in the history of the American West. ... Theodore Huebner Roethke (; RET-key) (May 25, 1908 – August 1, 1963) was a United States poet, who published several volumes of poetry characterized by its rhythm and natural imagery. ... John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888, Pulaski, Tennessee- July 3, 1974, Gambier, Ohio) was an American poet, essayist, social and political theorist, man of letters, and academic. ... Elizabeth Drew (born November 16, 1935, Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American political journalist and author. ... Angelo Bartlett Bart Giamatti (April 4, 1938 – September 1, 1989) was the President of Yale University, and later, the 7th commissioner of Major League Baseball in the United States. ... Cover of Millers Errand into the Wilderness Perry Miller (1905-1963) was an American intellectual historian and Harvard University professor. ... Catherine Drinker Bowen, born January 1, 1897 in Haverford, PA, was an American biographer. ... Carlos Baker (May 5, 1909 – April 18, 1987) was the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature at Princeton University. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cleanth Brooks (October 16, 1906 - 1994) was an influential American literary critic and professor. ... Paul Muldoon (b. ... William Milligan Sloane (November 12, 1850–September 12, 1928) was an American educator and historian, born at Richmond, Ohio. ... John Anthony Ciardi (June 24, 1916 - March 30, 1986) was an American poet, translator, and etymologist. ... John Phillips Marquand (November 10, 1893 - July 16, 1960 ) was a 20th-century American novelist. ... Feltus Wylie Sypher (1905 - 1987) was an American non-fiction writer and professor. ...


The Bread Loaf School has campuses at five locations: Vermont, Oxford (England), North Carolina, New Mexico, and Alaska. The primary campus, near Middlebury, enrolls some 250 students every summer. The Oxford campus (at Lincoln College) enrolls 90 students. The fledgling North Carolina campus, near the Blue Ridge Mountains, is affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and enrolled its first class of 50 students in 2006. The New Mexico campus at St. John's College, Santa Fe, enrolls 80 students every summer. The Alaska campus, at the University of Alaska Southeast near Juneau, also enrolls 80 students. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister college Downing College, Cambridge Rector Prof. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The University of North Carolina at Asheville (known for short as UNC Asheville) is a public liberal arts university in Asheville, North Carolina. ... Asheville City Hall. ... St. ... Nickname: The City Different Location in the State of New Mexico Coordinates: Country United States State New Mexico County Santa Fe Founded 1607  - Mayor David Coss Area    - City  37. ... The University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) is a regional university in the University of Alaska System. ... Location in Juneau City and Borough, Alaska Coordinates: Country United States State Alaska Borough Juneau City and Borough Founded 1881 Incorporated 1890  - Mayor Bruce Botelho Area    - City  3,255. ...


Students at Bread Loaf can either attend for one or two summers as continuing graduate students, or work toward a Master of Arts (M.A.) or Master of Letters (M.Litt.) degree over the course of four or five summers spread over different campuses. A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... The Master of Letters (MLitt from the Latin magister litterarum) is a postgraduate Masters degree. ...


In addition to the six-week summer program, Middlebury College's Bread Loaf campus is also the site of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference for established authors. "Two weeks of intensive workshops, lectures, classes and readings present writers with rigorous practical and theoretical approaches to their craft, and offer a model of literary instruction."[7] Participants have included John Gardner, Charles Baxter, John Irving, Toni Morrison, and Barry Lopez. The conference takes place in late August, after the School of English summer session has ended. Additionally, The New England Young Writers' Conference brings together emerging writers every May for workshops and readings. The Bread Loaf Writers Conference is the oldest writers conference in the United States. ... John Champlin Gardner, Jr. ... Charles Baxter is an American author born in 1947 in Minneapolis. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Barry Holstun Lopez (born January 6, 1945) is an American essayist, fictionist, and poet whose work deals with nature and ecological concerns. ...


Language study, summer language schools, and schools abroad

General language study

Middlebury presently teaches Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek (Attic), Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Some students are also lobbying for Korean. The college provides students with extensive opportunities to speak their target language.


The general method of language study — and particularly summer language study — is properly characterized as "immersion," i.e., extensive use of the target language both in and outside the classroom. The isolated, residential nature of the college allows budding speakers to study, eat, and live with fellow speakers and to minimize the use of English and other languages. Each language has a House associated with it, where speakers and teaching assistants lodge to create distinct linguistic communities. Students and faculty may attend lunch daily at "language tables;" during the meals, students and faculty speak only in their target language and are served food by fluent student workers.


Professors with primary appointments in other departments have been known to offer natural science and social science courses in foreign languages.


Summer language schools

Middlebury’s summer programs enable students to undergo the equivalent of a year of college-level language study in seven- or nine-week summer sessions. Five of Middlebury's summer schools — French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish — also offer graduate programs. These are completed during six-week summer sessions, with an option of combining the sessions with overseas study. The graduate degree most often conferred is the Master of Arts. Middlebury also offers a Doctor of Modern Languages degree. Beginning in summer 2007, Middlebury will offer a sixth graduate program in Chinese.


All Language School students agree to abide by the "Language Pledge" (tm), a formal commitment to speak, listen, read, and write the language of study as the only means of communication for the entire summer session. The Pledge helps students focus their energies on the acquisition of language skills and to internalize the patterns of communication and cultural perspective associated with the target language. Each language school is allocated specific residence halls, where students, teaching assistants, and professors live to further aid in the immersion. Students and faculty eat lunch and dinner at separate times during the day to maintain the exclusivity of the target languages. Due to class schedules, however, breakfast is not at separate times for each language school, which often leads to comical gesticulated conversations between members of different language schools.


Study abroad and the C.V. Starr schools

Middlebury College has designed C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools Abroad to offer graduate and undergraduate language students the chance to enrich and expand their skills in a setting where they can fully live the language.


The college has schools abroad at twenty-one locations including Argentina (Buenos Aires and Tucumán), Brazil (Belo Horizonte and Niteroi), Chile (Concepcion, La Serena, Santiago, Tumuco, Valdivia, and Valparaiso), China (Hangzhou), France (Paris, Poitiers and Bordeaux), Germany (Berlin and Mainz), Italy (Ferrara and Florence), Mexico (Guadalajara and Xalapa), Russia (Irkutsk, Moscow, and Yaroslavl), Spain (Getafe, Logroño, Madrid, and Segovia), and Uruguay (Montevideo).


In January 2007, the college announced that it had established the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School Abroad in the Middle East, the first of the Middlebury Schools Abroad in this region. Located in Alexandria, Egypt, and affiliated with Alexandria University, the school will begin offering classes in the fall of 2007. Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa...


The C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools Abroad are designed to immerse every student as completely as possible in both the language and the culture of the host nation. All course work is taught in the target language. Students often have the opportunity to enroll directly in the local university, where their classmates will be from the host country, or to take courses designed exclusively for program participants.


Many of the newer sites abroad give students the opportunity to live and study in a provincial setting, where they will have less interaction with other Americans, and with tourists in general. Students looking for a more international city can still choose the programs in Berlin, Buenos Aires, Florence, Madrid, Moscow, and Paris. Each of the Schools Abroad has a resident director and other support staff.


The Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Middlebury College is home to the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs,[8], founded by Felix Rohatyn a Middlebury alumnus, former U.S. Ambassador, and founder of Rohatyn Associates. Located at the Robert A. Jones House, the center combines Middlebury's noted strengths in linguistic, cultural, and political studies to offer a packed schedule of internationally focused symposia, lectures, and presentations. In addition, the center regularly publishes working papers by prominent international scholars and offers several grants for faculty and student research. A growing collection of online documentary and video archives preserves some of the events recently hosted by the Center. Felix G. Rohatyn (born May 29, 1928 in Vienna, Austria) is a Jewish-American businessman and investment banker and has also served in public service. ...


Most events at the Center take a broad interdisciplinary approach and are divided evenly between contemporary political problems and historical topics. Students regularly propose, create, and moderate symposia with the Center's assistance. A sampling of recent conferences and presentations is as follows: The Idea of Jerusalem, The Privatization of American National Security, Genocide in Africa: The Method behind the Madness, The Infrastructure of American Democracy Promotion, The International Relations of the South China Sea, Islam and Globalization, Rebuilding Afghanistan, The Confucian Conception of Proper Humor, Cervantes and Italian Renaissance Art, The Oral Transmission of Cultural Traditions, etc.


Environmental studies and college environmentalism

The new Atwater Dining Hall (2004) features a living roof
The new Atwater Dining Hall (2004) features a living roof

The Environmental Studies major at Middlebury College was established in 1965, making it the first undergraduate major of its kind in the nation. The Program is an interdisciplinary, nondepartmental major that draws upon 52 faculty members from 26 departments. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1420 KB) Summary chh, personal photo Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1420 KB) Summary chh, personal photo Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...


Middlebury has a reputation as an environmentally conscious campus. The student population is considered active in environmental issues, with several activist groups operating on campus and organizing frequent trips to the state capitol and beyond. Students recently retrofitted a bus to run on biodiesel and drove it to Detroit in summer 2005 to protest the auto industry's environmental practices. This was based on the successful Project Biobus initiative, an educational cross-country tour of 13 Middlebury students promoting biofuel use in local communities. In some countries, filling stations sell bio-diesel more cheaply than conventional diesel. ...


In January 2005, the Sunday Night Group (SNG) was formed by several student activists to assist other students in coordinating various environmental campaigns, especially those concerning global warming. SNG was responsible for January 2006's Get Outside Week,[9] the Two Degree Campaign,[10] and a current effort towards carbon neutrality[11] of all Middlebury College operations. SNG pushes its activism beyond the campus, including co-organizing a rally in support of clean-energy legislation, called Fossil Fool's Day (April 1st), at the Vermont State House in Montpelier[12]. Over 130 student activists attended the December 2005 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Montreal where some served as official observer delgates. Internationally-renowned environmentalist Bill McKibben serves as an informal advisor to the organization. The organization and its members have received positive recognition from on-campus offices and from statewide media sources[13]. The Vermont State House The Vermont State House, located in Montpelier, Vermont, is the capitol and seat of government of the U.S. state of Vermont. ... The United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP 11 or COP/MOP 1, is a global event taking place in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from November 28 to December 9, 2005. ...


The college is also a leader in sustainable agriculture and recycling programs. Local farmers and the student-run organic garden supply more than a quarter of the food consumed in the dining halls, and the campus-wide recycling program has a 60% diversion rate. Moreover, the college has steadfastly used "green" building techniques in its recent construction. The college is committed to environmental sustainability and stewardship, both in its academic programs and in practice.[14]


Athletics

View of Bread Loaf Campus and the Champlain Valley from the summit of the Middlebury College Snow Bowl

Middlebury competes in the New England Small College Athletic Conference. Middlebury leads the conference in total number of National Championships, having won 27 individual titles since the NESCAC lifted its ban on NCAA play. Middlebury enjoys national success in tennis, cross country running, lacrosse, hockey, and skiing, and fields 30 varsity NCAA teams and over 10 competitive club teams. Middlebury's success in intercollegiate sports is evidenced by the college's second place ranking in the 2007 National Sports Academy Directors' Cup standings. From 2004 to 2006, both the men's and women's ice hockey teams won three consecutive NCAA Division III National Championships, an unprecedented feat for a college at any level. The baseball program is also on the rise, winning their first NESCAC championship in 2006, while finishing fourth in New England. In 2007, the Middlebury College Rugby Club won its first national championship by defeating Arkansas State in the Division II game 38 to 22. Middlebury's athletic facilities include a state-of-the-art 50-meter by 25-yard swimming pool, 3,500-seat football/lacrosse stadium, a 2,600 spectator hockey arena, a downhill ski area, a regulation rugby pitch, the Middlebury College Snow Bowl (43.938516° N 72.957826° W), the 18-hole Ralph Myhre golf course, and the Carroll and Jane Rikert Ski Touring Center at the Bread Loaf mountain campus. The college mascot is the panther. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1280 KB) Summary CH, Personal Photo, No Restrictions on use Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1280 KB) Summary CH, Personal Photo, No Restrictions on use Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... NCAA sponsors a championship tournament in ice hockey. ...


Policy on Wikipedia

In February, 2007, Middlebury made news headlines when the school's History department issued a policy stating that although Wikipedia is useful as a starting point for research, it cannot itself be cited as an authoritative source in the creation of academic papers.[1] The genesis for this policy, according to a New York Times article, stems from an instance in which six Middlebury College students taking a Japanese history course wrote on a test that Jesuits supported the Shimabara Rebellion. This is false, but according to the then publicly-displayed version of the Wikipedia article, it was correct. Nevertheless, a student editorial written in The Middlebury Campus described the new policy as “the beginnings of censorship.”[2] Assistant Professor Jason Mittell defended Wikipedia in The New York Times: “The message that is being sent is that ultimately they see it as a threat to traditional [institutions of] knowledge.”[3] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


On February 26, the college hosted a lively forum on this topic with audio and video available online. [4][5]


Presidents of Middlebury

  1. Jeremiah Atwater, 1800-1809
  2. Henry Davis, 1809-1818
  3. Joshua Bates, 1818-1840
  4. Benjamin Labaree, 1840-1866
  5. Harvey Denison Kitchel, 1866-1875
  6. Calvin Butler Hulbert, 1875-1880
  7. Cyrus Hamlin, 1880-1885
  8. Ezra Brainerd, 1885-1908
  9. John Martin Thomas, 1908-1921
  10. Paul Dwight Moody, 1921-1943
  11. Samuel Somerville Stratton, 1943-1963
  12. James Isbell Armstrong, 1963-1975
  13. Olin Clyde Robison, 1975-1990
  14. Timothy Light, 1990-1991
  15. John Malcolm McCardell, Jr., 1991-2004
  16. Ronald D. Liebowitz. 2004-current

Jeremiah Atwater (1773-1858) was a notable as an educator, minister, and college president. ... Henry Davis, a clergyman, was born in East Hampton, New York, September 15, 1771. ... Joshua Bates was born on a farm in Cohasset, Massachusetts in 1776 and graduted from Harvard College in 1797. ... Benjamin Labaree (1801-1883) was a minister, professor and the longest serving president of Middlebury College from 1840 until 1866. ... Harvey Denison Kitchel was the Middlebury College President from 1866 until 1875. ... Calvin Butler Hulbert was the president of Middlebury College from 1875 until 1880. ... Cyrus Hamlin (1811-1900) was an American Congregational missionary and educator, the father of A. D. F. Hamlin, born in Waterford, Maine. ... Ezra Brainerd (1844-1924) is admired as one of the most successful presidents of Middlebury College in Vermont. ... John Martin Thomas (1869-1952) John Martin Thomas (December 27, 1869 – 26 February 1952) was the ninth president of Middlebury College, the ninth president of Penn State, and the twelfth president of Rutgers University. ... Paul Dwight Moody (1879 - 1947) was a U.S. Presbyterian clergyman. ... Samuel Somerville Stratton (1898 - 1969) served as the eleventh president of Middlebury College, 1943 - 1963. ... James Isbell Armstrong is President Emeritus of Middlebury College. ... Olin Clyde Robison (born 1936) served as the thirteenth president of Middlebury College, 1975-1990[1]. A native of Anacoco, Louisiana, Robison studied at Baylor University and Southwestern Theological Seminary, and received a D. Phil. ... Timothy Light (born 1939) was the fourteenth president of Middlebury College, 1990-1991. ... ... Ronald D. Liebowitz is the 16th president of Middlebury College, located in Middlebury, Vermont. ...

Commencement speakers

Order: 42nd President Term of Office: January 20, 1993–January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic Vice... Ann Margaret Veneman (born June 29, United States 27th Secretary of Agriculture, and was a director of Calgene, the first company to market genetically-engineered food. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer and writer. ... Dana Reeve Dana Reeve (March 17, 1961 – March 6, 2006) was an American actress, singer, and activist for disability causes. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson III (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician, and the current Governor of New Mexico. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Dava Sobel is a writer of popular expositions of scientific topics. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Reverend Frederick McFeely Fred Rogers (March 20, 1928 – February 27, 2003) was an American educator, minister, songwriter and television host. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lech WaÅ‚Ä™sa (IPA: ; born September 29, 1943, Popowo, Poland) is a Polish politician, a former trade union and human rights activist, and also a former electrician. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... John Wallach (1943-10 July 2002) was an American journalist, author and editor as well as founder of Seeds of Peace international camp in Maine. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 - March 26, 2003) was a four-term U.S. Senator, ambassador, administration official, and academic. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Robert Brustein (born April 21, 1927) is and American educator, critic, and author. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Frank Sesno is a professor of public policy and communication at the George Washington University, School of Media and Public Affairs and is an Emmy Award-wining special contributor to CNN. He is a 1977 graduate of Middlebury College and currently serves as one of its trustees. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Natural History magazine Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 – May 20, 2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Arthur Meier Schlesinger, Jr. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Jeff Danziger is a syndicated political cartoonist and author. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Bill Moyers Bill D. Moyers (born June 5, 1934 as Billy Don Moyers) is an American journalist and socialist public commentator. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... David K. Shipler (born December 3, 1942) is an American author who won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1987 for Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Barbara Charline Jordan (February 21, 1936 – January 17, 1996) was an American politician from Texas. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... David McCullough David Gaub McCullough (mÉ™-kÅ­lÉ™) (born July 7, 1933) is an American historian and bestselling author. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Photo by Bob DAmico/ABC Ted Koppel, anchor of the ABC News program Nightline. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907 – September 9, 1997), known as Buzz, was a versatile American actor and is best known for portraying Rocky Balboas trainer Mickey Goldmill in the Rocky films and The Penguin in the television series Batman. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | People stubs ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Elliot Lee Richardson (July 20, 1920 – December 31, 1999) was an American lawyer and politician who was a member of the cabinet of Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anne Morrow Lindbergh (June 22, 1906 – February 7, 2001) was an author and pioneering American aviator. ...

Notable Alumni

Names and achievements of notable Middlebury alums in all fields can be found at the List of Middlebury College Alumni. // Ari Fleischer 82 conducts a White House press conference Ronald Harmon Brown 62, former Secretary of Commerce Eve Ensler 75, author of The Vagina Monologues Ron Brown - Former Chairman of the Democratic National Committee and U.S. Secretary of Commerce. ...


Points of interest

Established in 1948 by businessman Roger Babson (also founder of Babson College), the Gravity Research Foundation was an organization designed to find ways to block or reduce the effect of gravity. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Middlebury College. ... The Shelby Davis Scholarship is granted to graduates of the United World Colleges to study at American universities. ... The Dissipated Eight, also known as The Middlebury College Dissipated Eight or D8, is an all-male collegiate a cappella ensemble from Middlebury College in Vermont. ... Founded in 1978 by poets, Sidney Lea and Jay Parini, New England Review (NER) is a quarterly literary journal published by Middlebury College. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... MoeNa Lisa is an episode from the eighteenth season of The Simpsons. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This List of colleges and universities in the United States includes colleges and universities in the U.S. that grant four-year baccalaureate and/or post-graduate masters and doctorate degrees. ... This List of colleges and universities in the United States includes colleges and universities in the U.S. that grant four-year baccalaureate and/or post-graduate masters and doctorate degrees. ...

References

  1. ^ Brian Fung (January 24, 2007). Wikipedia distresses History Department. The Middlebury Campus.
  2. ^ Chandler Koglmeier (February 14, 2007). Op-Ed: Wikipedia ban is a slippery slope. The Middlebury Campus.
  3. ^ Noam Cohen (February 21, 2007). A History Department Bans Citing Wikipedia As a Research Source. The New York Times.
  4. ^ Jason Mittell (February 26, 2007). Post-debate Wiki-blogging. JustTV.
  5. ^ Wikipedia in academia: Open forum at Middlebury tackles the issue. Middlebury College (March 2, 2007).

January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Middlebury eyes largest-ever fundraising drive - Boston.com (266 words)
MIDDLEBURY, Vt. --Aiming to attract a more diverse student body and hire top faculty, Middlebury College is expected next fall to begin the biggest fundraising drive ever undertaken by a private liberal arts college.
College trustees are slated to vote in May whether to support the five-year, $500 million, fundraising drive, with the official kickoff expected next fall.
Middlebury spokeswoman Sarah Ray said it would be the largest fundraising campaign ever launched by a private liberal arts college.
Middlebury Vermont Real Estate Lodging Travel and Tourism Middlebury VT USA (498 words)
Middlebury, Vermont was granted a charter by New Hampshire Governor Benning Wentworth in the name of King George III on November 2, 1761, after a successful campaign by the Colonial British Army to drive the French Army and settlers out of the Lake Champlain region.
Middlebury is the site of many firsts, such as Vermont's marble industry, the first institution of higher learning for woman, the first community-founded college, the first chartered village museum, and first state symphony orchestra.
Middlebury area attractions and businesses include; The Frog Hollow Craft Center, Middlebury College Center for the Arts, UVM Morgan Horse Farm, The Champlain Valley Weekender, Otter Creek Brewery, Woody Jackson Vermont Store, the historic Henry Sheldon Museum, and the nearby Lake Champlain Maritime Museum.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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