FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Middle English Bible translations
History of the English Bible
Overview
Old English translations
Lindisfarne Gospels
Middle English translations
Wyclif's Bible
Early Modern English translations
Tyndale's Bible
Coverdale's Bible
Matthew's Bible
Taverner's Bible
Great Bible
Geneva Bible
Bishops' Bible
Douay-Rheims Bible
King James Version
Modern English translations
18th and 19th century
Quaker Bible
Thomson's Translation
Webster's Revision
Young's Literal Translation
Joseph Smith Translation
Julia E. Smith Parker Translation
English Revised Version
20th and 21st century
American Standard Version
Revised Standard Version
New World Translation
Jerusalem Bible
Lamsa Bible
New American Bible
New English Bible
New American Standard Bible
New International Version
Recovery Version
Ongoing translation projects
Anchor Bible Series
New English Translation
Edit this box (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/wiki.phtml?title=Template:BibleHistory&action=edit)

The age of Middle English was not a fertile time for Bible translations but saw the first major translation that of John Wyclif. The period of Middle English begins with the Norman conquest and ends about 1500. The influence of French as the preferred language limited English literature of all types.

  • The Ormulum produced by the Augustinian monk Orm of Lincolnshire includes translations into the East Midland of some of the Biblical passages from the Gospels and Acts used in the mass in a lengthy set of homilies. The manuscript may have been written about 1150. It is written in the poetic meter, iambic septenarius.
  • Richard Rolle of Hampole (or de Hampole) was an Oxford-educated hermit and writer of religious texts. He translated several parts of the Bible including the Psalms in the early 1300s. Rolle's Psalms was translated into a Northern English dialect but later copies have been adapted into Southern English dialects. Rolle's Psalms was written as a Latin gloss with English appearing between the Latin text.
  • At the same time another version of Psalms, the West Midland Psalms, was translated by an anonymous author in the West Midlands region. This version is also a gloss.
  • Also in the early years of the 1300's, an English translation appeared, also by an anonymous translator, of the French language version of Revelations which was popular in England as well as France.
  • Wyclif produced the first complete English language Bible in the late 1300's, often called Wyclif's Bible. His New Testament was completed in 1380 and the Old Testament a few years later. It is thought that a large portion of the Old Testament was translated by Nicholas Hereford with Wyclif completing it and translating the New Testament himself. Some 30 copies of this Bible survive despite the fact that it was banned by the church along with the Lollards who used it.
  • Wyclif's Bible was revised in the last years of the 1300's, perhaps by John Purvey. This edition was also banned and became even more popular than the first. Some 130 copies still exist including some belonging to the British royal family.

Sample of Wyclif's translation:

Be not youre herte affraied, ne drede it. Ye bileuen in god, and bileue ye in me. In the hous of my fadir ben many dwellyngis: if ony thing lasse I hadde seid to you, for I go to make redi to you a place. And if I go and make redi to you a place, eftsone I come and I schal take you to my silf, that where I am, ye be. And whidir I go ye witen: and ye witen the wey. (John 14:1-4)
  • After the controversy was begun by Wyclif, a unauthorized Roman Catholic version of the New Testament was produced in English. The oldest remaining copy dates to about 1400.

All translations of this time period were all from Latin or French. Greek and Hebrew texts would become available with the development of the Johann Gutenberg's movable-type printing press which coincided with the development of Early Modern English language and would lead to a great increase in the number of translations of the Bible in the Early Modern English era.


  Results from FactBites:
 
English Translations of The Bible (793 words)
The first translation of the Bible into English was initiated by The Venerable Bede toward the end of the 7th century.
The Coverdale translation was a remarkable contribution to the English Bible and the English language.
Many English translations of the Bible would follow as the language developed and discoveries of the origins of the Bible were made.
Middle English Bible translations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (595 words)
The age of Middle English was not a fertile time for Bible translations but saw the first major translation, that of John Wyclif.
Also in the early years of the 1300s, an English translation appeared, also by an anonymous translator, of the French language version of Revelation which was popular in England as well as France.
Some 30 copies of this Bible survive despite the fact that it was banned by the church along with the Lollards who used it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m