FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Mictlan" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mictlan

In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. Except for warriors who died in battle, people who died when hit by lightning and women who died in childbirth, people went to Mictlan after death. The journey was difficult and took four years, but the dead were aided by the psychopomp, Xolotl. The Aztec civilization recognized many gods and supernatural creatures. ... // In the study of mythology and religion, the underworld is a generic term approximately equivalent to the lay term afterlife, referring to any place to which newly dead souls go. ... Compass rose with north highlighted and at top North is one of the four cardinal directions, specifically the direction that, in Western culture, is treated as the primary direction: north is used (explicitly or implicitly) to define all other directions; the (visual) top edges of maps usually correspond to the... Lightning over Pentagon City in Arlington County, Virginia Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. ... Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy with the emergence of a newborn infant from its mothers uterus. ... Death is the cessation of physical life in a living organism or the state of the organism after that event. ... Many sets of religious beliefs have a particular spirit, deity, demon or angel whose responsibility is to escort newly-deceased souls to the afterlife, such as Heaven or Hell. ... In Aztec mythology, (and among the Toltecs), Xolotl was the god of lightning and the one who aided the dead on their journey to Mictlan. ...


The king of Mictlan was Mictlantecuhtli. The queen was Mictecacihuatl. Other deities in Mictlan included Ciucoatl (who commanded Mictlan spirits called Cihuateteo), Acolmiztli, Chalmecacihuilt, Chalmecatl and Acolnahuacatl. A monarch (see sovereign) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... Categories: Stub | Aztec gods | Death gods ... In Aztec mythology, Mictecacihuatl was the Queen of Mictlan, the underworld, and wife of Mictlantecuhtli. ... In Aztec mythology, Cihuacoatl (snake woman; also Chihucoatl, Ciucoatl) was a fertility goddess and patron of mothers, particularly women who died in childbirth. ... In Aztec mythology, the Cihuateteo (also Ciuteoteo or Ciuateoteo) were the spirits of human women who died in childbirth (). Childbirth was considered a form of battle, and its victims were honored as fallen warriors. ... In Aztec mythology, Acolmiztli was a god of the underworld. ... In Aztec mythology, Chalmecacihuilt was a goddess of Mictlan, the underworld. ... In Aztec mythology, Chalmecatl was a god of Mictlan, the underworld. ... In Aztec mythology, Acolnahuacatl was a god of Mictlan, the underworld. ...


Story

Source: [1]

Mictlan was the Aztec underworld, ruled over by its Lord and Lady. It was a gloomy place, reached by the dead only after wandering for four years beneath the earth, accompanied by a “soul-companion”, a dog which was customarily cremated with the corpse.


Aztec myth tells how the god Quetzalcoatl journeyed to Mictlan in the Fifth Sun in order to restore humankind to life from the bones of those who had lived in previous eras. For bones are like seeds: everything that dies goes into the earth, and from the earth new life is born in the sacred cycle of existence.


Quetzalcoatl approached the Lord of Mictlan, where he sat on his throne surrounded by spiders and owls. “I’ve come for the bones, the precious bones, the jade bones,” said Quetzalcoatl. “Can I have them in order to populate the earth?”


Only unwillingly did the Lord of Mictlan gives his assent. “You may take away that which I guard so carefully on one condition - that you parade four times around my throne blowing on this trumpet.” And he handed Quetzalcoatl a conch shell that had no finger holes. But worms bored the fingerholes, and bees flew inside to make a sound.


Even so, Quetzalcoatl knew that he’d better move quickly to take the bones and leave. And sure enough the Lord of Mictlan gave orders that the bones be recovered. Quetzalcoatl thought of a trick. “Tell the Lord I’ll leave the bones behind,” he said to his nahual, his spirit twin. Accordingly the nahual, looking just like Quetzalcoatl himself, assured the Lord of Mictlan that the bones would be left. Meanwhile Quetzalcoatl began to run. Unfortunately, the Lord of Mictlan ordered that a pit be dug in the fleeing god’s path, and sure enough he fell into it, having been startled by a covey of quail. Those bones that weren’t already shattered were pecked at by the quail. Which is why humans come in all sizes.


“This has not worked out well,” said Quetzalcoatl to his spirit twin.


“What must be must be,” replied the nahual. And so Quetzalcoatl scooped up the bones and, once safely beyond the dead land, ground them up in a bowl. Together with other gods, he sprinkled them with his own blood, restoring them to life. And thus humankind was born from the pennance of the gods themselves.

—Based on the Myth of the Suns and the Toltec-Chichimec Origins of the Mexica People, as translated by Willard Gingerich, in The Flayed God. by Roberta H. and Peter T. Markman, published by Harper San Francisco. Available in paperback and highly recommended.

See also

In this illustration from a 17th century Icelandic manuscript Heimdallr is shown guarding the gate of Valhalla. ...

External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mesoweb Articles (894 words)
Go to page: For bones are like seeds: everything that dies goes into the earth, and from the earth new life is born in the sacred cycle of existence.
Go to page: Unfortunately, the Lord of Mictlan ordered that a pit be dug in the fleeing god's path, and sure enough he fell into it, having been startled by a covey of quail.
The story of Quetzalcoatl in Mictlan is based on The Myth of the Suns and the Toltec-Chichimec Origins of the Mexica People, as translated by Willard Gingerich.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Mictlan (1042 words)
In Aztec mythology, Mictecacihuatl was the Queen of Mictlan, the underworld, and wife of Mictlantecuhtli.
Unfortunately, the Lord of Mictlan ordered that a pit be dug in the fleeing god’s path, and sure enough he fell into it, having been startled by a covey of quail.
In Aztec mythology, Chalmecacihuilt was a goddess of Mictlan, the underworld.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m