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Encyclopedia > Microbiology
An agar plate streaked with microorganisms
An agar plate streaked with microorganisms

Microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which are unicellular or cell-cluster microscopic organisms.[1] This includes eukaryotes such as fungi and protists, and prokaryotes such as bacteria and certain algae. Viruses, though not strictly classed as living organisms, are also studied.[2] Microbiology is a broad term which includes many branches like bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology and others. A person who specializes in the area of microbiology is called a microbiologist. Image File history File links An agar plate with microorganisms isolated from a deep-water sponge. ... Image File history File links An agar plate with microorganisms isolated from a deep-water sponge. ... An agar plate streaked with microorganisms isolated from a deep-water sponge. ... A cluster of Escherichia coli bacteria magnified 10,000 times. ... A microorganism or microbe is an organism that is so small that it is microscopic (invisible to the naked eye). ... A microorganism or microbe is an organism that is so small that it is microscopic (invisible to the naked eye). ... A microscope (Greek: micron = small and scopos = aim) is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye. ... “Life on Earth” redirects here. ... Kingdoms Animalia - Animals Fungi Plantae - Plants Chromalveolata Protista Alternative phylogeny Unikonta Opisthokonta Metazoa Choanozoa Eumycota Amoebozoa Bikonta Apusozoa Cabozoa Rhizaria Excavata Corticata Archaeplastida Chromalveolata Animals, plants, fungi, and protists are eukaryotes (IPA: ), organisms whose cells are organized into complex structures by internal membranes and a cytoskeleton. ... Divisions Chytridiomycota Zygomycota Ascomycota Basidiomycota The Fungi (singular: fungus) are a large group of organisms ranked as a kingdom within the Domain Eukaryota. ... Typical phyla Rhodophyta (red algae) Chromista Heterokontophyta (heterokonts) Haptophyta Cryptophyta (cryptomonads) Alveolates Pyrrhophyta (dinoflagellates) Apicomplexa Ciliophora (ciliates) Excavates Euglenozoa Percolozoa Metamonada Rhizaria Radiolaria Foraminifera Cercozoa Amoebozoa Choanozoa Many others; classification varies The Kingdom Protista or Protoctista is one of the commonly recognized biological kingdoms, including all the eukaryotes except for... Prokaryotes (pro-KAR-ee-oht) (from Old Greek pro- before + karyon nut or kernel, referring to the cell nucleus, + suffix -otos, pl. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ... Microbiology (in Greek micron = small and biologia = studying life) is the study of microorganisms, including unicellular (single-celled) eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fungi, and viruses. ... Virology, often considered a part of microbiology or of pathology, is the study of organic viruses: their structure and classification, their ways to infect and exploit cells to reproduce and cause disease, the techniques to isolate and culture them, and their potential uses in research and therapy. ... Mycology (from the Greek μύκης, meaning fungus) is the study of fungi, their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy, and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicinals (e. ... Parasitology is the study of parasites, their hosts, and the relationship between them. ... A Microbiologist is a biologist that studies the field of microbiology. ...


Although much is now known in the field of microbiology, advances are being made regularly. The most common estimates suggest that humans have studied only about 1% of all of the microbes in any given environment. Thus, despite the fact that over three hundred years have passed since the discovery of microbes, the field of microbiology could be said to be in its infancy relative to other biological disciplines such as microbiology likes pie zoology, botany and entomology. Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... Pinguicula grandiflora Example of a Cross Section of a Stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the origin of words. ...


==History== Bacteria were first observed by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1676 using a single-lens microscope of his own design.[1] The name "bacterium" was introduced much later, by Ehrenberg in 1828, derived from the Greek βακτηριον meaning "small stick". While van Leeuwenhoek is often cited as the first microbiologist, the first recorded microbiological observation, that of the fruiting bodies of molds, was made earlier in 1665 by Robert Hooke.[3] Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... Anton van Leeuwenhoek Anton van Leeuwenhoek (October 24, 1632 - August 30, 1723, full name Thonius Philips van Leeuwenhoek (pronounced Layewenhook) was a Dutch tradesman and scientist from Delft, Netherlands. ... Robert Hookes microscope (1665) - an engineered device used to study living systems. ... Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A Microbiologist is a biologist that studies the field of microbiology. ... It has been suggested that Toxic mold be merged into this article or section. ... Robert Hooke, FRS (July 18, 1635 – March 3, 1703) was an English polymath who played an important role in the scientific revolution, through both experimental and theoretical work. ...


The field of bacteriology (later a subdiscipline of microbiology) is generally considered to have been founded by Ferdinand Cohn (18281898), a botanist whose studies on algae and photosynthetic bacteria led him to describe several bacteria including Bacillus and Beggiatoa. Cohn was also the first to formulate a scheme for the taxonomic classification of bacteria.[4] Pasteur (18221895) and Robert Koch (18431910) were contemporaries of Cohn’s and are often considered to be the founders of medical microbiology.[5] Pasteur is most famous for his series of experiments designed to disprove the then widely held theory of spontaneous generation, thereby solidifying microbiology’s identity as a biological science.[6] Pasteur also designed methods for food preservation (pasteurization) and vaccines against several diseases such as anthrax, fowl cholera and rabies.[1] Koch is best known for his contributions to the germ theory of disease, proving that specific diseases were caused by specific pathogenic microorganisms. He developed a series of criteria that have become known as the Koch's postulates. Koch was one of the first scientists to focus on the isolation of bacteria in pure culture resulting in his description of several novel bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis.[1] Microbiology (in Greek micron = small and biologia = studying life) is the study of microorganisms, including unicellular (single-celled) eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fungi, and viruses. ... Ferdinand Julius Cohn (January 24, 1828 Breslau, Silesia, Prussia (now Wroclaw, Poland) - June 25, 1898 Breslau) was a biologist. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A seaweed (Laurencia) up close: the branches are multicellular and only about 1 mm thick. ... Phototrophs or photoautotrophs are photosynthetic algae, fungi, bacteria and cyanobacteria which build up carbon dioxide and water into organic cell materials using energy from sunlight. ... Species Bacillus anthracis Bacillus cereus Bacillus coagulans Bacillus globigii Bacillus licheniformis Bacillus natto Bacillus subtilis Bacillus sphaericus Bacillus thuringiensis etc. ... Beggiatoa is a filamentous genus of proteobacteria, and are among the largest prokaryotes, with cells about 200 micrometres in diameter. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Concept mining. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist who demonstrated the germ theory of disease and developed techniques of inoculation, most notably the first vaccine against rabies. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the American lobbyist, see Bobby Koch. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Medical microbiology is a branch of microbiology which deals with the study of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites which are of medical importance and are capable of causing diseases in human beings. ... Abiogenesis, in its most general sense, is the hypothetical generation of life from non-living matter. ... Pasteurization (or pasteurisation) is the process of heating liquids for the purpose of destroying viruses and harmful organisms such as bacteria, protozoa, molds, and yeasts. ... The germ theory of disease, also called the pathogenic theory of medicine, is a theory that proposes that microorganisms are the cause of many diseases. ... Kochs postulates (or Henle-Koch postulates) are four criteria designed to establish a causal relationship between a causative microbe and a disease. ... In biology, a pure culture is a population of identical cells originating from a single cell. ... Binomial name Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zopf 1883 Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes most cases of tuberculosis[1]. It was first described on March 24, 1882 by Robert Koch, who subsequently received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for this discovery in 1905. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...


While Pasteur and Koch are often considered the founders of microbiology, their work did not accurately reflect the true diversity of the microbial world because of their exclusive focus on microorganisms having direct medical relevance. It was not until the work of Martinus Beijerinck (18511931) and Sergei Winogradsky (18561953), the founders of general microbiology (an older term encompassing aspects of microbial physiology, diversity and ecology), that the true breadth of microbiology was revealed.[1] Beijerinck made two major contributions to microbiology: the discovery of viruses and the development of enrichment culture techniques.[7] While his work on the Tobacco Mosaic Virus established the basic principles of virology, it was his development of enrichment culturing that had the most immediate impact on microbiology by allowing for the cultivation of a wide range of microbes with wildly different physiologies. Winogradsky was the first to develop the concept of chemolithotrophy and to thereby reveal the essential role played by microorganisms in geochemical processes.[8] He was responsible for the first isolation and description of both nitrifying and nitrogen-fixing bacteria.[1] Martinus Willem Beijerinck (March 16, 1851 - January 1, 1931) was a Dutch microbiologist and botanist. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nitrogen cycle Sergei Nikolaievich Winogradsky (1856, Kiev - 1953, Paris) is a Russian microbiologist who discovered the biological process of nitrification, the first known form of chemoautotrophy. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A lithotroph is an organism which uses an inorganic substrate to obtain energy. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nitrogen fixation is the process by which nitrogen is taken from its relatively inert molecular form (N2) in the atmosphere and converted into nitrogen compounds (such as, notably, ammonia, nitrate and nitrogen dioxide)[1] useful for other chemical processes. ...

Contents

Types

The field of microbiology can be generally divided into several subdisciplines:

A few of the metabolic pathways in a cell. ... Bacteria, despite their apparent simplicity contain a well developed cell structure which is responsible for many of their unique biological properties. ... Microbial Genetics is a subject of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, related with genetics about very little (micro) organisms. ... For a non-technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to Genetics. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Medical microbiology is a branch of microbiology which deals with the study of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites which are of medical importance and are capable of causing diseases in human beings. ... Pathogenesis is the mechanism by which a certain etiological factor causes disease (pathos = disease, genesis = development). ... Epidemiology is the study of factors affecting the health and illness of populations, and serves as the foundation and logic of interventions made in the interest of public health and preventive medicine. ... Pathology (from Greek pathos, feeling, pain, suffering; and logos, study of; see also -ology) is the study of the processes underlying disease and other forms of illness, harmful abnormality, or dysfunction. ... Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers the study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... Look up taxonomy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Microbial ecology is the relationship of microorganisms with themselves and with their surroundings. ... A cycle by which chemical substance are constantly being recycled through the biosphere from the soil, as plant nutrients, to producers (plants), to consumers (animals), to decomposers in the soil, and then back to the producers. ... Geomicrobiology is a science that combines geology and microbiology, and studies the interaction of microscopic organisms with their inorganic environment, such as in sedimentary rocks. ... Bioremediation can be defined as any process that uses microorganisms, fungi, green plants or their enzymes to return the environment altered by contaminants to its original condition. ... Rhizosphere, the zone that surrounds the roots of plants. ... The phyllosphere is a term used in microbiology to refer to leaf surfaces or total above-ground surfaces of a plant as a habitat for microorganisms. ... Biological systematics is the study of the diversity of life on the planet earth, both past and present, and the relationships among living things through time. ... Look up taxonomy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An agar plate streaked with microorganisms Microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which are unicellular or cell-cluster microscopic organisms. ... The use of fermentation is an important process in the industry. ... Sewage treatment is the process that removes the majority of the contaminants from waste-water or sewage and produces both a liquid effluent suitable for disposal to the natural environment and a sludge. ... The structure of insulin Biological technology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... A 16th century brewer A 21st century brewer This article concerns the production of alcoholic beverages. ... Pharmaceutical microbiology is the part of industrial microbiology that is responsible for creating medications. ...

Benefits

Fermenting tanks with yeast being used to brew beer

While microbes are often viewed negatively due to their association with many human illnesses, microbes are also responsible for many beneficial processes such as industrial fermentation (e.g. the production of alcohol and dairy products), antibiotic production and as vehicles for cloning in higher organisms such as plants. Scientists have also exploited their knowledge of microbes to produce biotechnologically important enzymes such as Taq polymerase, reporter genes for use in other genetic systems and novel molecular biology techniques such as the yeast two-hybrid system.
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1752x1168, 293 KB) Summary Modern fermenting tanks. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1752x1168, 293 KB) Summary Modern fermenting tanks. ... Typical divisions Ascomycota (sac fungi) Saccharomycotina (true yeasts) Taphrinomycotina Schizosaccharomycetes (fission yeasts) Basidiomycota (club fungi) Urediniomycetes Sporidiales Yeasts are a growth form of eukaryotic microorganisms classified in the kingdom Fungi, with approximately 1,500 species described. ... A 16th century brewer A 21st century brewer This article concerns the production of alcoholic beverages. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... The use of fermentation is an important process in the industry. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dairy products are generally defined as foodstuffs produced from milk. ... Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics test plate. ... For other uses, see clone. ... Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... Structure of Taq polymerase Taq polymerase (Taq Pol, or simply Taq) is a thermostable polymerase used in polymerase chain reaction to check for the presence or absence of a gene by amplifying a DNA fragment. ... In molecular biology, a reporter gene (often simply reporter) is a gene that researchers attach to another gene of interest in cell culture, animals or plants. ... Overview of two-hybrid assay as follows. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Madigan M, Martinko J (editors) (2006). Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 11th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-144329-1. 
  2. ^ Rice G (2007-03-27). Are Viruses Alive?. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  3. ^ Gest H (2005). "The remarkable vision of Robert Hooke (1635-1703): first observer of the microbial world". Perspect. Biol. Med. 48 (2): 266-72. DOI:10.1353/pbm.2005.0053. PMID 15834198. 
  4. ^ Drews G (1999). "Ferdinand Cohn, a Founder of Modern Microbiology". ASM News 65 (8). 
  5. ^ Ryan KJ, Ray CG (editors) (2004). Sherris Medical Microbiology, 4th ed., McGraw Hill. ISBN 0-8385-8529-9. 
  6. ^ Bordenave G (2003). "Louis Pasteur (1822-1895)". Microbes Infect. 5 (6): 553-60. PMID 12758285. 
  7. ^ Johnson J (1998-07-01). Martinus Willem Beijerinck. American Phytopathological Society. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  8. ^ Paustian T, Roberts G. Beijerinck and Winogradsky initiate the field of environmental microbiology. The Microbial World. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth & K. Lee Lerner (eds) (2006). Medicine, health, and bioethics : essential primary sources, 1st ed., Thomson Gale. ISBN 1414406231. 

See also

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... The structure of insulin Biological technology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Geomicrobiology is a science that combines geology and microbiology, and studies the interaction of microscopic organisms with their inorganic environment, such as in sedimentary rocks. ... Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers the study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. ... Medicine is the science and art of maintaining andor restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. ... A medical technologist (MT) is a healthcare professional who performs diagnostic analytic tests on human body fluids such as blood, urine, sputum, stool, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), peritoneal fluid, pericardial fluid, and synovial fluid, as well as other specimens. ... Mycology (from the Greek μύκης, meaning fungus) is the study of fungi, their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy, and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicinals (e. ... Virology, often considered a part of microbiology or of pathology, is the study of organic viruses: their structure and classification, their ways to infect and exploit cells to reproduce and cause disease, the techniques to isolate and culture them, and their potential uses in research and therapy. ... Phyla Crenarchaeota Euryarchaeota Korarchaeota Nanoarchaeota ARMAN The Archaea (), or archaebacteria, are a major group of microorganisms. ... Kingdoms Animalia - Animals Fungi Plantae - Plants Chromalveolata Protista Alternative phylogeny Unikonta Opisthokonta Metazoa Choanozoa Eumycota Amoebozoa Bikonta Apusozoa Cabozoa Rhizaria Excavata Corticata Archaeplastida Chromalveolata Animals, plants, fungi, and protists are eukaryotes (IPA: ), organisms whose cells are organized into complex structures by internal membranes and a cytoskeleton. ... Prokaryotes (pro-KAR-ee-oht) (from Old Greek pro- before + karyon nut or kernel, referring to the cell nucleus, + suffix -otos, pl. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

External links

Wikiversity
At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Microbiology at:
The Department of Microbiology

Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Wikiversity logo Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation beta project[1], devoted to learning materials and activities, located at www. ...

General

Journals

A cover of Nature Reviews Microbiology Launched in October 2003, Nature Reviews Microbiology is part of the Nature Publishing Group. ...

Professional organizations

  • American Society for Microbiology
  • Society for General Microbiology
  • Fondation Mérieux

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... The DNA structure might not be the only nucleic acid in the universe capable of supporting life[1] Astrobiology (from Greek: ἀστρο, astro, constellation; βίος, bios, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of life in space, combining aspects of astronomy, biology and geology. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Map of the human X chromosome (from the NCBI website). ... Pinguicula grandiflora Example of a Cross Section of a Stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Views of a Foetus in the Womb, Leonardo da Vinci, ca. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Genomics is the study of an organisms entire genome; Rathore et al, . Investigation of single genes, their functions and roles is something very common in todays medical and biological research, and cannot be said to be genomics but rather the most typical feature of molecular biology. ... Various species of reef fish in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. ... Human biology is an interdisciplinary academic field of biology, biological anthropology, and medicine which focuses on humans; it is closely related to primate biology, and a number of other fields. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Paleontology, palaeontology or palæontology (from Greek: paleo, ancient; ontos, being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. ... Parasitology is the study of parasites, their hosts, and the relationship between them. ... Pathology (from Greek pathos, feeling, pain, suffering; and logos, study of; see also -ology) is the study of the processes underlying disease and other forms of illness, harmful abnormality, or dysfunction. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Taxonomy, sometimes alpha taxonomy, is the science of finding, describing and naming organisms, thus giving rise to taxa. ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Department of Microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania (480 words)
The Microbiology community at the University of Pennsylvania is comprised of approximately 60 faculty in the Schools of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Dental Medicine, and Arts and Sciences, as well as investigators at the adjacent Wistar Institute, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Fox Chase Cancer Center.
The Department of Microbiology in the School of Medicine provides the academic home for this large and highly interactive group of investigators whose specialties include virology, bacteriology, parasitology, immunity to infection, tumor virology, microbial genomics and evolution and emerging infectious diseases, with particular emphasis on problems relevant to human health and disease.
These seminars include a Tuesday noon Virology Seminar series in which students and postdoctoral fellows present their work, the Wednesday noon Microbiology Seminar series that brings prominent visiting scientists to campus, and a Friday noon Prokaryotic Seminar series in which outside speakers alternate with presentations given by students and postdoctoral fellows.
BioMed Central | BMC Microbiology (719 words)
BMC Microbiology is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in analytical and functional studies of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, viruses and small parasites, as well as host and therapeutic responses to them.
BMC Microbiology (ISSN 1471-2180) is indexed/tracked/covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, BIOSIS, CAS, Scopus, EMBASE, Thomson Scientific (ISI) and Google Scholar.
Combining probiotic bacteria with anti-rotavirus antibodies protects infant mice against rotavirus diarrhea as effectively as much higher doses of immunoglobulins alone, offering a potentially rapid and cost-effective new treatment for children with rotavirus diarrhea.
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