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Encyclopedia > Michigan Wolverines
Michigan Wolverines
University University of Michigan
Conference Big Ten
NCAA Division I
Athletics director William C. Martin
Location Ann Arbor, MI
Varsity teams
Football stadium Michigan Stadium
Basketball arena Crisler Arena
Baseball stadium Ray Fisher Stadium
Other arenas Yost Ice Arena
Mascot None
Nickname Wolverines
Fight song The Victors
Colors Maize and Blue

              Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Big Ten can refer to: Big Ten Conference, a college athletics conference Big Ten (movie studios), the largest movie studios in Hollywood This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Ann Arbor is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Crisler Arena, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is the home arena of the mens and womens basketball teams of the University of Michigan. ... Ray Fisher Stadium is a baseball stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Yost Ice Arena (formerly Yost Fieldhouse) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, is the home of the University of Michigan varsity ice hockey team. ... The Victors is the fight song of the University of Michigan (UM). ...

Homepage M-Go Blue

The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAA's Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except men's ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association, and women's water polo, which competes in the NCAA inter-divisional Collegiate Water Polo Association. The origin of the name is the subject of much debate. Team colors are maize and blue - interestingly, represented by different shades of "maize" and "blue" than the University at large.[1] The Winged Helmet is a recognized icon of Michigan Athletics. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... Water polo is a team water sport that combines some elements of swimming and football. ... The Collegiate Water Polo Association is a conference of colleges and universities in the Eastern United States that compete in water polo. ... The color maize, in the English language, usually refers to a color that is similar to yellow; it is named for the cereal of the same name - maize (or corn). ... Fritz Crisler first debuted the winged football helmet to Princeton University in 1935. ...


In seven of the past 10 years, Michigan has finished in the top six of the NACDA Director's Cup, a list compiled by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics that charts institutions' overall success in college sports. UM has finished in the top eleven of the Directors' Cup standings in each of the award's twelve seasons and has placed in the top six in each of the last eight seasons. The NACDA Directors Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities with the most success in collegiate athletics. ... The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics is a professional organization for college and university athletic directors in the United States. ...

Contents

Championships

The University of Michigan remains the only school in NCAA history to win at least one national championship in all four of these sports: baseball (2), basketball (men's - 1), football (11), and ice hockey (men's - 9). The Wolverines have won NCAA Division I national championships in women's field hockey (1), men's golf (2), men's gymnastics (3), women's softball (2), men's swimming and diving (11), men's tennis (1), and men's outdoor track and field (1). This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ...


Overall, UM's 32 official NCAA Division I titles ranks eighth all-time, trailing only UCLA, Stanford University, USC, Oklahoma State, Arkansas, LSU, and Texas. In NCAA D1 men's sports only, UM ranks sixth all-time in championships behind USC, UCLA, Stanford, Oklahoma State, and Arkansas. UM's official NCAA Division I national championships have come from ten different sports — this broad-based success matches the University of Texas for fourth place in the NCAA record book. Only UCLA and Stanford, each with titles in 16 varying sports, and USC in 15, have more diverse championship histories than the Wolverines. The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ...


The Wolverines' 32 official NCAA D1 titles are complemented by seven unofficial NCAA men's swimming and diving championships from 1927 through 1936, when no team championships were awarded; by men's trampoline NCAA titles in 1969 and 1970; and, by 11 unofficial NCAA/NCAA Division I football "consensus" championships recognized by the university, for a total of 52 national championships. In four additional seasons national number one rankings by at least one recognized authority were given to the UM football team.


University of Michigan teams have also been national runners-up an incredible 39 times in 13 different sports: men's basketball (4), women's cross country (1), women's field hockey (1), men's golf (4), men's gymnastics (2), women's gymnastics (2), men's ice hockey (2), women's rowing (1), women's synchronized swimming (2 in AIAW), men's swimming and diving (13), women's swimming and diving (1), men's outdoor track and field (1), and wrestling (5).[2][3][4] The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women’s athletics and to administer national championships. ...


Football

Retired football jerseys
Number Player

11 Wistert brothers
(Francis, Albert, and Alvin)
47 Bennie Oosterbaan
48 Gerald Ford
87 Ron Kramer
98 Tom Harmon

The best-supported of the Michigan varsity teams is the football team. Michigan's football program is among the most successful in college football history. Michigan won the first Rose Bowl game in 1902, has won an NCAA-record 860 games and has an all-time winning percentage of .745, also an NCAA record. The Wolverine football program has claimed 11 national titles.[5] Head coach Lloyd Carr 13th year, 121–40 Home stadium Michigan Stadium Capacity 107,501 - Field Turf Conference Big Ten First year 1879 Athletic director William C. Martin Website MGoBlue. ... 2007 Appalachian State vs. ... Francis Wistert (born February 20, 1912) was an American football player. ... Albert Alexander Wistert (born December 28, 1920) was an American football player. ... Alvin Wistert (born June 26, 1916) was an American football player. ... Bennie Oosterbaan (born February 4, 1906 in Muskegon, Michigan, USA - October 25, 1990) was a football player and coach at the University of Michigan. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... In the long tradition of outstanding Michigan athletes, Ron Kramer deserves to be ranked among the best. ... Thomas Dudley Harmon (September 28, 1919 - March 15, 1990) was a star player of United States college football, a sports broadcaster, and patriarch of a family of American actors. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Michigan's famous football coaches include Fielding Yost, Fritz Crisler, and Bo Schembechler. Their current coach is Lloyd Carr, who announced his retirement November 19, 2007. He has been the head coach since 1995 and will coach his final game during their upcoming bowl game.[6] Fielding Harris Yost (April 30, 1871 - August 20, 1946) was a U.S. football coach. ... Herbert O. Fritz Crisler (born January 12, 1899 near Earlville, Illinois; died August 19, 1982) was a head football coach, best known for his tenure at the University of Michigan from 1938 to 1947. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ... Lloyd H. Carr (born July 30, 1945) was the head coach of the University of Michigan football team from 1995-2007. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Michigan Stadium is the largest football-only stadium in the world, with an official capacity of 107,501, and with attendance commonly exceeding 110,000. The capacity, after each expansion, has always been listed as "-01", with the "extra seat" being in honor of Fritz Crisler. The University of Michigan Board of Regents has approved an expansion project for the stadium widely known as the “Big House”. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2007 and be completed prior to the 2010 season. The expansion project will accommodate home games for the 2007-2009 seasons. The plan is to build a new press box, add luxury boxes, widen aisles and seats, and increase capacity to over 108,000. Michigan Stadium has witnessed 200 consecutive crowds of greater than 100,000 - a streak that dates back to 1975. Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ...


Rivalries

A football game at Michigan Stadium
A football game at Michigan Stadium
Heisman Trophy winners
Year Player

1940 Tom Harmon
1991 Desmond Howard
1997 Charles Woodson

Michigan has a major rivalry with Ohio State, considered one of the fiercest rivalries in American sports. In a pair of ESPN fan polls, in 2000 and 2003, the Michigan-Ohio State series was voted the greatest rivalry in sports.[7] Michigan's meeting with Ohio State is always the last game of the regular season and has provided many memorable contests, such as the "Snow Bowl" of 1950. The game has frequently decided the Big Ten champion. Michigan leads the series 57-40-6. The contest on November 18, 2006 marked the first time ever these teams had been ranked #1 and #2 going into the game, and the first time they were both undefeated since 1973. The 2007 college football match-up between Ohio State and Michigan was predicted to be the #2 college football game to watch in 2007 by SI.com's "Top 20 Games To Watch In 2007" list.[8] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 316 KB) [edit] Summary Saturday, September 2nd, 2006 vs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 316 KB) [edit] Summary Saturday, September 2nd, 2006 vs. ... Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Brennan redirects here. ... Thomas Dudley Harmon (September 28, 1919 - March 15, 1990) was a star player of United States college football, a sports broadcaster, and patriarch of a family of American actors. ... Desmond Howard (born May 15, 1970 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football wide receiver and kick returner in the NFL. He played for the Washington Redskins (1992-1994), Jacksonville Jaguars (1995), Green Bay Packers (1996, 1999), Oakland Raiders (1997-1998) and Detroit Lions (1999-2002). ... Charles Woodson (born on October 7, 1976 in Fremont, Ohio) is an American football cornerback for the Green Bay Packers. ... The Michigan-Ohio State rivalry is the intense rivalry between the University of Michigan and The Ohio State University football teams. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... The Snow Bowl is the nickname given to a particular game of American football played on November 25, 1950, between the University of Michigan and the Ohio State University. ...


Michigan has an intrastate rival in Michigan State; the schools' football teams compete for the Paul Bunyan Trophy. Michigan leads the series 66-28-5. Michigan also enjoys a spirited rivalry with the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame. Michigan leads the series 19-14-1. Michigan (#1) and Notre Dame (#2) are the top two college football programs in both wins and winning percentage in Division 1-A, so it is perhaps fitting that when college football was in its infancy, students from the University of Michigan travelled to South Bend to teach the game to students there. The schools went on to play each other often in the early years of American college football, and continue do so today. The Wolverines also have a tradition-rich history with the University of Minnesota. The two football teams compete for the Little Brown Jug, a five-gallon jug with the respective schools' "M" on either side and the scores of previous games down the middle. The Little Brown Jug was the first trophy played for between college football teams. Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... The Paul Bunyan-Governor of Michigan Trophy is a college rivalry trophy awarded to the winner of the annual American football game between the University of Michigan Wolverines and the Michigan State University Spartans. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... This article is about the trophy for the Minnesota-Michigan football game. ...


Ice hockey

The Wolverines ice hockey team, which is a member of the Central Collegiate Hockey Association, plays its home contests at Yost Ice Arena. It is coached by Red Berenson, a former UM player. Altogether, the program has won nine NCAA national championships (1948, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1964, 1996, 1998), which is also an NCAA record. In 2007, the team was invited to the NCAA tournament for a record 17th year in a row. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... Yost Ice Arena (formerly Yost Fieldhouse) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, is the home of the University of Michigan varsity ice hockey team. ... Gordon Red Berenson (born December 8, 1939 in Regina, Saskatchewan) is a former Canadian professional ice hockey center and a current NCAA hockey head coach. ... NCAA sponsors a championship tournament in ice hockey. ...


Vic Heyliger led Michigan to a record six NCAA titles, including the first one in college hockey history in 1948. Heyliger, who played for the Wolverines from 1935-37, also won national titles as Michigan coach in 1951, 1952, 1953, 1955 and 1956. He was inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame in 1974, in recognition of his lifetime achievement. Heyliger is considered instrumental in getting the NCAA tournament off the ground. Following the 1946-47 season, Heyliger wrote to each of the college coaches around the country to see if they would be interested in creating a national tournament. They obliged and the inaugural four-team NCAA tournament began the following season in 1948. Heyliger was 228-61-13 as head coach at Michigan, and his .776 winning percentage is the best at the school. His only losing season was his first year, 3-6 in 1944-45. Victor Heyliger (September 26, 1915 - October 4, 2006) was a National Hockey League center and the head coach of the University of Michigan ice hockey team. ...


In 1980, Heyliger was inducted into the University of Michigan Hall of Honor. The Vic Heyliger Trophy has been given out at the end of each season by the Michigan hockey team to recognize its most outstanding defenseman.


Men's basketball

Retired basketball jerseys
Number Player Years

22 Bill Buntin 1963-1965
33 Cazzie Russell 1964-1966
35 Phil Hubbard 1975-1979
41 Glen Rice 1986-1989
45 Rudy Tomjanovich 1967-1970

The men's basketball team plays its games at Crisler Arena. The Wolverines have won 12 Big Ten regular-season conference titles, as well as the inaugural Big Ten Tournament in 1998, which it later forfeited due to NCAA violations. The team has appeared in the NCAA Final Four on six occasions (1964, 1965, 1976, 1989, 1992* and 1993*) and won the national championship in 1989 under Steve Fisher. The program later forfeited its 1992 and 1993 Final Four appearances due to NCAA violations. Other notable players who played for Michigan include Daniel Horton, Bernard Robinson, Gary Grant, Terry Mills, Glen Rice, Jalen Rose, Rumeal Robinson, Jamal Crawford, Juwan Howard, Chris Webber, Cazzie Russell, and Mark Hughes. William L. Bill Buntin (born May 5, 1942 in Detroit, Michigan; died May 9, 1968) was an American basketball player. ... Cazzie Lee Russell (born June 7, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Philip Phil Gregory Hubbard (born December 13, 1956 in Canton, Ohio) is an American former professional basketball player for the Detroit Pistons and Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association from 1979 to 1989. ... Glen Anthony Rice (born May 28, 1967 in Flint, Michigan) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Rudolph Tomjanovich, Jr. ... This article is about the sport. ... Crisler Arena, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is the home arena of the mens and womens basketball teams of the University of Michigan. ... The Big Ten Conference mens basketball tournament is held annually at the end of the mens college basketball regular season. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... Steve Fisher (born March 24, 1945 in Herrin, Illinois, USA) is a basketball coach currently at San Diego State University. ... Daniel Horton is a professional basketball player currently signed with the Miami Heat. ... Bernard Robinson may refer to: Bernard Robinson (production designer) - 1912-1970 Bernard Robinson (basketballer), a basketball player with the Charlotte Bobcats This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Gary Grant (born April 21, 1965 in Canton, Ohio) is a former professional basketball in the National Basketball Association, who played at point guard. ... Terry Richard Mills (born December 21, 1967 in Romulus, Michigan) is a former professional basketball player at the power forward position. ... Glen Anthony Rice (born May 28, 1967 in Flint, Michigan) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Jalen Anthony Rose (born January 30, 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former American professional basketball player in the NBA currently working for ESPN. In college he was a member of the University of Michigan Wolverines Fab Five (along with Chris Webber, Juwan Howard, Jimmy King and Ray Jackson) that... Rumeal Robinson (born November 13, 1966 in Jamaica) was a basketball guard. ... Jamal Crawford (born March 20, 1980 in Seattle, Washington) is an American NBA shooting guard currently with the New York Knicks. ... Juwan Antonio Howard (born February 7, 1973 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American professional basketball player in the NBA for the Minnesota Timberwolves. ... For the Canadian-born former BBL basketball player, see Chris Webber (Canadian basketball player). ... Cazzie Lee Russell (born June 7, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Mark Hughes (born October 5, 1966 in Muskegon, Michigan) is an American basketball coach. ...


During the 1990s, the program became involved in a scandal involving payments from a booster named Ed Martin to four players Chris Webber, Maurice Taylor, Robert Traylor, and Louis Bullock. The scandal ultimately resulted in four years' probation and a self-imposed ban from postseason play in the 2002-03 season. UM also voluntarily forfeited regular season games and "vacated" NCAA tournament games from selected past seasons. Vacating the results of 114 games won while the four players were eligible, including the 1992 and 1993 Final Fours, the entire 1992-93 season, and all seasons from fall 1995 through spring 1999. Since the scandal Michigan basketball has posted a 144-131 record and has not made the NCAA tournament.[9]
In April 2007, the university announced that its new head coach will be John Beilein. The 2007 recruiting class commits include Manny Harris, Kelvin Grady and Martell Webb. The University of Michigan basketball scandal was an incident in which the mens college basketball program at the University of Michigan was investigated and punished for NCAA rules violations, principally involving payments booster Ed Martin made to several players to launder money from an illegal gambling operation. ... John Beilein (pronounced bee-line; born February 5, 1953 in Burt, Niagara County, New York) is the mens basketball head coach at the University of Michigan. ...

// Final four redirects here. ... Demetrius Calip (born November 18, 1969, in Flint, Michigan) is an American former professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the NBA. He played collegiately at the University of Michigan. ... Sean Marielle Higgins (born December 30, 1968, in Los Angeles, California) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Mark Hughes (born October 5, 1966 in Muskegon, Michigan) is an American basketball coach. ... Terry Richard Mills (born December 21, 1967 in Romulus, Michigan) is a former professional basketball player at the power forward position. ... Rob Pelinka is an American lawyer, sports agent and former college basketball player. ... Glen Anthony Rice (born May 28, 1967 in Flint, Michigan) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Rumeal Robinson (born November 13, 1966 in Jamaica) was a basketball guard. ... Loy Vaught (born February 27, 1968 in Grand Rapids, Michigan) was a basketball center. ... Steve Fisher (born March 24, 1945 in Herrin, Illinois, USA) is a basketball coach currently at San Diego State University. ...

Other sports

Michigan has a world-renowned men's swimming program, which won the 1995 NCAA championship and has produced a number of Olympic medalists. The men’s swimming and diving teams have won 11 NCAA and NCAA Division I national titles and 147 individual titles.[10] // Mens Swimming History The University of Michigan Mens Swimming program began in 1921 and has had eight coaches in its history. ...


Michigan's field hockey program won the 2001 NCAA title - the school's first national title in a women's team sport. A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ...


In June 2005, Michigan's women's softball team won the 2005 Division 1 NCAA Softball Championship, defeating two-time defending champion and perennial softball power UCLA two games to one. Michigan is the first school east of the Mississippi River to win this title. The decisive game was won in dramatic fashion, with a home run in the 10th inning for a 4-1 final. Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... NCAA womens softball champions Division I 1982 UCLA 2-0 (8 inn. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


The men's baseball team won national championships in 1953 and 1962 and has sent 138 players to the major leagues.[11][12]


The men's and women's cross country teams have been nationally renowned since 1974 when Ron Warhurst started coaching the men, and more recently as alum Mike McGuire took on the women's team in 1991. The women's team has qualified for the NCAA championships every year but two since 1988, finishing 2nd in 1994, and has won the last five Big Ten titles.[1]. The men's team has qualified for the NCAA 24 times in the last 34 years, with a highest finish of 4th. Michigan men have won seven Big 10 titles in that period. The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Legendary athletic director Donald Canham coached the track/field team from 1949 to 1968, along with the cross country team. The men's team has won 56 Big Ten men's team titles indoors and out.[2] Notable alumni include Greg Meyer, 1983 Boston Marathon champ, Brian Diemer 1988 Olympic bronze medalist in the steeplechase, Bill Donakowski, US Marathon champion in 1986, Kevin Sullivan, Canadian 1500 meter record holder, and Alan Webb, U.S. mile record holder. The women's team has won 15 Big Ten titles.[3] Most notable alumna is Lisa Larsen Weidenbach Rainsberger, who won the Boston and Chicago Marathons. She qualified for the 1980 Olympic team in swimming but the U.S. did not go to Moscow. She then finished 4th in the Marathon Olympic Trials three times in 1984, 1988 and 1992, again missing the Olympics.[4] A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... The 100th running of the Boston Marathon, 1996 The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event hosted by the city of Boston, Massachusetts, on Patriots Day, the third Monday of April. ... Olympic can mean: Olympic Games, an international multi-sport event: Olympic Games, the modern games held since 1896 Ancient Olympic Games, the ancient games held in Olympia, Greece between 776 BC and 393 AD Olympic (band), a Czech rock band Olympic (MTR) A MTR station in Hong Kong Olympic Airlines...


The University of Michigan is also home to an internationally competitive synchronized skating team, who have medaled at competitions around the world. The Wolverines synchronized skating program consists of a senior team, which competes internationally as well as a collegiate level team which is competitive among the top university and collegiate teams from around the United States. Marigold IceUnity Synchronized skating, a large and fast-growing, yet little recognized discipline, consists of 12-16 athletes skating on ice at one time moving as one flowing unit at high speeds. ...


Other varsity teams include: baseball, golf, gymnastics, rowing, soccer, diving, tennis, volleyball, water polo, and wrestling. This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Water polo is a team water sport that combines some elements of swimming and football. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ...


Olympians

Through the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, 178 Michigan student-athletes and coaches had participated in the Olympics. The university has had medal winning alumnae in every Summer Olympics except 1896, and gold medalists in all but four Olympiads. A total of 22 countries, including the U.S. have been represented by Michigan athletes. Twelve athletes have been three time Olympians and 30 have been two-time Olympians.[13] [14] The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ...


The total number of medals won by Michigan athletes is 116, including 54 gold, 27 silver, and 35 bronze. By total medal count, Michigan would constitute the 26th most successful country out of 122; by gold medal count, Michigan would constitute the 17th most successful country.[15]


Michigan Olympians

Last First Year Sport Event Medal Country
Abbott Jim 1988 baseball gold USA
Arsenault Samantha 2000 swimming 800 m freestyle relay gold USA
Ault Garnet 1928 swimming 800 m freestyle relay bronze Canada
Barrowman Mike 1992 swimming 200 m breaststroke gold USA
Barton Greg 1984 kayaking 1000 m single bronze USA
Barton Greg 1988 kayaking 1000 m single gold USA
Barton Greg 1988 kayaking 1000 m double gold USA
Barton Greg 1992 kayaking 1000 m single bronze USA
Bernard Kent 1964 track 4x100 m relay bronze Tri.-Tobago
Boggs Phil 1976 diving 3 meter gold USA
Booker James 1924 track pole vault bronze USA
Borges Gustavo 1992 swimming 100 m freestyle silver Brazil
Borges Gustavo 1996 swimming 100 m freestyle bronze Brazil
Borges Gustavo 1996 swimming 200 m freestyle silver Brazil
Borges Gustavo 2000 swimming 100 m freestyle bronze Brazil
Brundage Jennifer 2000 softball gold USA
Christy Jim 1932 swimming 1500 m freestyle bronze USA
Clawson John 1968 basketball gold USA
Coe William 1904 track shot put silver USA
Corson Marilyn 1968 swimming 400 m freestyle relay bronze USA
Craig Ralph 1912 track 100 meters gold USA
Craig Ralph 1912 track 200 meters gold USA
Darnton William 1960 swimming 400 m medley relay gold* USA
Davies John 1952 swimming 200 m breaststroke gold Australia
Degener Richard 1932 diving springboard bronze USA
Degener Richard 1936 diving springboard gold USA
Diemer Brian 1984 track 3000 m steeplechase bronze USA
Doherty Ken 1928 track decathlon bronze USA
Dolan Tom 1996 swimming 400 m ind. medley gold USA
Dolan Tom 2000 swimming 400 m ind. medley gold USA
Dolan Tom 2000 swimming 200 m ind. medley silver USA
Downie Gordon 1976 swimming 800 m freestyle relay bronze Great Britain
Duenkel Ginny 1964 swimming 100 m freestyle bronze USA
Duenkel Ginny 1964 swimming 400 m backstroke gold USA
Dvorak Charles 1904 track pole vault gold USA
Dvorak John 1900 track pole vault silver USA
Fraser Steve 1984 wrestling Greco-Roman gold USA
Gaxiola Alvaro 1968 diving platform silver Mexico
Gillanders Dave 1960 swimming 200 m butterfly bronze USA
Gillanders Dave 1960 swimming 400 m medley relay gold* USA
Gorski Mark 1984 cycling 1000 m sprint gold USA
Hahn Archie 1904 track 60 meters gold USA
Hahn Archie 1904 track 100 meters gold USA
Hahn Archie 1904 track 200 meters gold USA
Hahn Archie 1906 track 100 meters gold USA
Handy H. J. "Jam" 1904 swimming 440 yd (400 m) breaststroke bronze USA
Handy H. J. "Jam" 1924 water polo bronze USA
Hanley Dick 1956 swimming 800 m freestyle relay silver USA
Harlan Bruce 1948 diving 3 meter bronze USA
Harlan Bruce 1948 diving platform silver USA
Harlock Dave 1994 hockey silver Canada
Hayes Howard 1900 track 800 meters silver USA
Herland Doug 1984 rowing pairs with coxswain bronze USA
Hubbard Phil 1976 basketball gold USA
Hubbard William DeHart 1924 track long jump gold USA
Ikola Willard 1956 hockey silver USA
Garrells John 1908 track shot put bronze USA
Garrells John 1908 track 110 meter hurdles silver USA
Johnson Carl 1920 track long jump silver USA
Johnson Kate 2004 rowing eight silver USA
Jones Burwell 1952 swimming 800 m freestyle relay gold* USA
Kennedy Bill 1972 swimming 400 m medley relay bronze* Canada
Ketchum Dan 2004 swimming 4x200 m free. relay gold USA
Kimball Bruce 1984 diving platform silver USA
King Micki 1972 diving 3 meter gold USA
Kraenzlein Alvin 1900 track 60 meter dash gold USA
Kraenzlein Alvin 1900 track 110 meter hurdles gold USA
Kraenzlein Alvin 1900 track 220 meter hurdles gold USA
Kraenzlein Alvin 1900 track long jump gold USA
Landstrom Eeles 1960 track pole vault bronze Finland
Lang Brent 1988 swimming 400 m freestyle relay gold USA
Larkin Barry 1984 baseball silver USA
Mahoney Bill 1972 swimming 400 m medley relay bronze Canada
Malchow Tom 1996 swimming 200 m butterfly silver USA
Malchow Tom 2000 swimming 200 m butterfly gold USA
Mariott Ron 1984 diving 3 meter bronze USA
Matchefts John 1956 hockey silver USA
McClatchey Alan 1976 swimming 800 m freestyle relay bronze Great Britain
McLean John 1900 track high hurdles silver USA
Namesnik Eric 1992 swimming 400 m ind. medley silver USA
Namesnik Eric 1996 swimming 400 m ind. medley silver USA
Orwig Bernice 2000 water polo silver USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 200 m ind. medley gold USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 400 m ind. medley gold USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 100 m butterfly gold USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 200 m butterfly gold USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 200 m freestyle bronze USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 4x100 m free relay bronze USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 4x200 m free. relay gold USA
Phelps Michael 2004 swimming 4x100 m medley relay gold USA
Roberts Trish 1976 basketball bronze USA
Robie Carl 1964 swimming 200 m butterfly silver USA
Robie Carl 1968 swimming 200 m butterfly gold USA
Rose Ralph 1904 track shot put gold USA
Rose Ralph 1904 track discus silver USA
Rose Ralph 1904 track hammer bronze USA
Rose Ralph 1908 track shot put gold USA
Rose Ralph 1912 track shot put silver USA
Rose Ralph 1912 track shot put-combined gold USA
Rydze Dick 1972 diving platform silver USA
Samson Paul 1928 swimming 800 m free. relay gold* USA
Schule Fred 1904 track 110 meter hurdles gold USA
Seufert Chris 1984 diving platform silver USA
Smoke Marcia Jones 1964 kayaking 500 m singles bronze USA
Sohl Robert 1948 swimming 220 m breaststroke bronze USA
Spillane Joan 1960 swimming 400 m freestyle relay gold USA
Spillane Joan 1960 swimming 400 m medley relay gold* USA
Thompson Chris 2000 swimming 1500 m freestyle bronze USA
Tolan Eddie 1932 track 100 meters gold USA
Tolan Eddie 1932 track 200 meters gold USA
Vanderkaay Peter 2004 swimming 4x200 m free. relay gold USA
Webster Robert 1960 diving platform gold USA
Webster Robert 1964 diving platform gold USA
White Robert 1956 hockey bronze Canada
Wouda Marcel 2000 swimming 800 m freestyle relay bronze the Netherlands

Notes

  1. ^ Which Maize? Which Blue?. Michigan Today, Fall 1996
  2. ^ Michigan Men's Track and Field All-Time NCAA Indoor Champions. MGOBlue.com
  3. ^ NCAA Championship History
  4. ^ Michigan Wolverine Athletics. University of Michigan Athletics History- Bentley Historical Library.
  5. ^ University of Michigan Football - National Championships. University of Michigan Athletics History (2002).
  6. ^ University of Michigan (2007-11-19). Carr Announces Retirement from Coaching. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  7. ^ The 10 greatest rivalries (1-3-2005). ESPN.com
  8. ^ Top 20 Games To Watch In 2007. SI.com. Retrieved on 30 September 2007.
  9. ^ U of M Men's Basketball. Bentley Historical Library (April 10, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  10. ^ Michigan Men's Swimming and Diving All-Time NCAA Champions - Through 2005 NCAA Championships (2006). MGoBlue.com.
  11. ^ Bergquist, Kevin (June 1, 2004). Prof: U-M baseball among University's storied programs. The University Record
  12. ^ College Baseball Players Who Made it to a Major League Baseball Team. Baseball Almanac - The Colleges. Accessed March 27, 2006.
  13. ^ Michigan in the Olympics (9-28-2005). Bentley Historical Library at www.umich.edu/~bhl/bhl/olymp2/oltitle.htm
  14. ^ Index to Michigan Olympians (2005). Bentley Historical Library at www.umich.edu/~bhl/bhl/olymp2/olindex.htm.
  15. ^ Olympics - Historic Totals (9-16-2000). Sports Illustrated at CNNSi.com.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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