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Encyclopedia > Michigan State University

Michigan State University

Michigan State University Seal Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Advancing Knowledge. Transforming Lives.
Established February 12, 1855
Type Public Land Grant University, Sea Grant
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $1.631 billion[1]
President Dr. Lou Anna Simon
Faculty 4,500
Students 45,520
Undergraduates 35,821
Postgraduates 9,600
Location East Lansing, Michigan, USA
Campus Suburban
5,200 acre (21 km²) campus
2,000 acres (8 km²) in existing or planned development
Sports Spartans
Colors Green and White[2]           [3]
Mascot Sparty
Website msu.edu
Michigan State University Logo

Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. MSU pioneered the studies of packaging, hospitality business, and music therapy. Today its study-abroad program is the largest of any single-campus university in the country, offering more than 200 programs in more than 60 countries on all continents including Antarctica. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are United States statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “USD” redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Lou Anna Kimsey Simon is the current president of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, USA as of 2005. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: , Country United States State Michigan County Ingham & Clinton Counties Incorporation 1907 Government  - Mayor Samir Singh Area  - City  11. ... The Michigan State Spartans are the athletic teams that represent Michigan State University. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Sparty, MSUs mascot, at The Spartan statue, which is nicknamed the Sparty statue. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Michigan_State_University_logo. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: , Country United States State Michigan County Ingham & Clinton Counties Incorporation 1907 Government  - Mayor Samir Singh Area  - City  11. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are United States statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges. ... Packaging is the enclosing of a physical object, typically a product that will be offered for sale. ... Hospitality management is the academic study of the running of hotels, restaurants, and travel and tourism-related business. ... Music therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a qualified professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ...


Following the introduction of the Morrill Act, the college became coeducational and expanded its curriculum beyond agriculture. After World War II, the number of students tripled as the institution became a major university. Today, MSU is the seventh-largest university in the United States, with 45,520 students and 4,500 faculty members. The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This list of largest United States higher education institutions by enrollment includes only individual four-year campuses, not four-year universities. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ...


MSU's Division I sports teams are called the Spartans. They compete in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except ice hockey, in which the team is part of the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. MSU's football team won the Rose Bowl in 1954, 1956, and 1988 and boasts six national championships.[citation needed] Its men's basketball team won the NCAA National Championship in 1979 and 2000. The MSU men's ice hockey has won national titles in 1966, 1986, and 2007. Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Michigan State Spartans are the athletic teams that represent Michigan State University. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NCAA sponsors a championship tournament in ice hockey. ...

Contents

History

MSUs Laboratory Row in 1912, consisting of Eustace-Cole, Marshall-Adams Halls, Old Botany, Chittenden, Cook and Agriculture. ...

Agriculture school

Beaumont Tower marks the site of the old College Hall.
Beaumont Tower marks the site of the old College Hall.

The Michigan Constitution of 1850 called for the creation of an "agricultural school",[4] though it was not until February 12, 1855 that Michigan Governor Kinsley S. Bingham signed a bill establishing the United States' first agriculture college, the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan.[5] Classes began in May 1857 with three buildings, five faculty members, and 63 male students. The first president, Joseph R. Williams, designed a curriculum that required more scientific study than practically any undergraduate institution of the era. It balanced science, liberal arts, and practical training. The curriculum excluded Latin and Greek studies, since most applicants did not study any classical languages in their rural high schools. However, it did require three hours of daily manual labor, which kept costs down for both the students and the College.[6] Despite Williams' innovations and his defense of education for the masses, the State Board of Education saw Williams' curriculum as elitist. They forced him to resign in 1859 and reduced the curriculum to a two-year vocational program. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 374 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1746 × 2796 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 374 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1746 × 2796 pixel, file size: 1. ... Beaumont Tower is a structure on the campus of Michigan State University. ... The Michigan Constitution is the governing document of the state of Michigan. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The following are governors of the Territory of Michigan and the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Kinsley Scott Bingham, sometimes spelled Kingsley, (December 16, 1808–October 5, 1861) was a U.S. Representative, a U.S. Senator, and Governor of the state of Michigan. ... Joesph R. Williams was the first president of the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, now Michigan State University. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Manual labour (or manual labor) is physical work done with the hands, especially in an unskilled job such as fruit and vegetable picking, road building, or any other field where the work may be considered physically arduous, and which has as a profitable objective, usually the production of goods. ... Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or...


Land Grant pioneer

In 1860, Joseph Williams became acting lieutenant governor[7] and helped pass the Reorganization Act of 1861. This gave the College a four-year curriculum and the power to grant master's degrees. Under the act, a newly-created body, known as the State Board of Agriculture, took over from the State Board of Education in running the institution.[8] The College changed its name to State Agricultural College, and its first class graduated in the same year. However, there was no time for an elaborate graduation ceremony: the Civil War had just begun, and the first alumni were drafted into the war effort. The following year, Abraham Lincoln signed the First Morrill Act of 1862 to support similar colleges, making the Michigan school a national model. Williams never witnessed the cause to which he had dedicated so much of his life, having taken ill and died the previous year. A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Co-ed college

The Alice B Cowles House is the official home of the university president and is the oldest existing building on campus.
The Alice B Cowles House is the official home of the university president and is the oldest existing building on campus.

The college first admitted women in 1870, although at that time there were no female residence halls. The few women who enrolled either boarded with faculty families or made the arduous stagecoach trek from Lansing. Nonetheless, even from the early days female students took the same rigorous scientific agriculture courses as male students. In 1896, the faculty created a "Women Course" that melded a home economics curriculum with liberal arts and sciences. That same year, the College turned the old Abbot Hall male dorm into a women's dormitory and more firmly established itself as co-ed. However, it was not until 1899 that the State Agricultural College admitted its first African American student, William O. Thompson. He went on to teach at what is now Tuskegee University under the wing of Booker T. Washington, whom President Jonathan L. Snyder invited to be the Class of 1900 commencement speaker. A few years later, Myrtle Craig became the first female African American student to enroll at the College. Along with the Class of 1907, she received her degree from U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, commencement speaker for the Semi-Centennial celebration. The City of East Lansing was incorporated in that same year,[9] and two years later the college officially changed its name to Michigan Agricultural College (M.A.C.). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution (2668 × 1737 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution (2668 × 1737 pixel, file size: 1. ... Stagecoach in Switzerland A stagecoach is a type of four-wheeled enclosed passenger and/or mail coach, strongly sprung and drawn by four horses, widely used before the introduction of railway transport. ... Location in Ingham County, Michigan1 Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Ingham, Eaton Settled 1835 Incorporation 1859 Government  - Type Strong Mayor-Council  - Mayor Virg Bernero (D) Area  - City  35. ... Family and consumer sciences, human sciences, human ecology or home economics, is an academic discipline which combines aspects of consumer science, nutrition, cooking, parenting and human development, interior decoration, textiles, family economics, housing, apparel design and resource management as well as other related subjects. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Tuskegee University is an American institution of higher learning located in Tuskegee, Alabama. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...

As part of its sesquicentennial celebration, MSU erected this 7-foot bronze statue of John A. Hannah, sculpted by California artist Bruce Wolfe.
As part of its sesquicentennial celebration, MSU erected this 7-foot bronze statue of John A. Hannah, sculpted by California artist Bruce Wolfe.[10]

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (456x615, 117 KB) Summary John A. Hannah was president of Michigan State University from 1941 to 1969. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (456x615, 117 KB) Summary John A. Hannah was president of Michigan State University from 1941 to 1969. ... Headline text John A. Hannah is a former President of Michigan State University. ...

Big Ten university

During the early 20th century, M.A.C. expanded its curriculum well beyond agriculture. By 1925, it had expanded enough that it changed its name to Michigan State College of Agriculture and Applied Science (M.S.C.). In 1941, the Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture, John A. Hannah, became president of the College. He began the largest expansion in the institution's history, with the help of the 1945 G.I. Bill, which helped World War II veterans to receive an education. One of Hannah's strategies was to build a new dormitory building, enroll enough students to fill it, and use the income to start construction on a new dormitory. Under his plan, enrollment increased from 15,000 in 1950 to 38,000 in 1965.[11] Hannah also got the chance to improve the athletic reputation of M.S.C. when the University of Chicago resigned from the Big Ten Conference in 1946. Hannah lobbied hard to take its place, gaining admission in 1950. Five years later, in its Centennial year of 1955, the State of Michigan renamed the College as Michigan State University of Agriculture and Applied Science.[12] Nine years after that, the University governing body changed its name from the State Board of Agriculture to the MSU Board of Trustees. The State of Michigan allowed the University to drop the words "Agriculture and Applied Science" from its name. Since 1964, the institution has gone by the name of Michigan State University. Headline text John A. Hannah is a former President of Michigan State University. ... Stamp commemorating the G.I. Bill or Servicemens Readjustment Act The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G. I.s) as well as one-year... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ...


Global leader by 2012

The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory features one of the most powerful instruments of its type in the world.
The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory features one of the most powerful instruments of its type in the world.

Since the end of the Hannah era, Michigan State has shifted its focus from increasing the size of its student body to advancing its national and global reputation. In September 2005, current president Lou Anna Simon called for MSU, one of the public ivy institutions, to become the global model leader for Land Grant institutions by the year 2012. Her plans include creating a new residential college and increasing National Institutes of Health donations past the $100 million mark. While there are over 100 Land-grant universities in the United States, she has stated that she would like Michigan State University to be the leader.[13] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 992 KB) Summary A photograph of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 992 KB) Summary A photograph of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Lou Anna Kimsey Simon is the current president of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, USA as of 2005. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical research. ... “USD” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ...


Campus

MSU's main campus lies north of the CN Railroad.
MSU's main campus lies north of the CN Railroad.

MSU's sprawling campus is located in East Lansing. The campus is perched on the banks of the Red Cedar River. Development of the campus started in 1856 with three buildings: a multipurpose building called College Hall, a dormitory later called "Saints' Rest",[14] and a barn. Today, MSU's contiguous campus consists of 5,200 acres (21 km²), 2,000 acres (8 km²) of which are developed. There are currently 676 buildings: 203 for academics, 154 for agriculture, 245 for housing and food service, as well as 74 other buildings. Overall, the University has 21,931,085 square feet (2,037,464.5 ) of total indoor space.[15] Connecting it all is 27 miles (43 km) of roads and 100 miles (161 km) of sidewalks.[16] MSU also owns 44 non-campus properties, totaling 22,000 acres (89 km²) in 28 different counties.[17] The river frozen over in the winter. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 539 pixelsFull resolution (888 × 598 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/png) Revision of previous image, MSU_Campus_Map_small_rev2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 539 pixelsFull resolution (888 × 598 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/png) Revision of previous image, MSU_Campus_Map_small_rev2. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: , Country United States State Michigan County Ingham & Clinton Counties Incorporation 1907 Government  - Mayor Samir Singh Area  - City  11. ... The Red Cedar River is a river in Michigan which is a tributary of the Grand River. ... College Hall was the first building erected on the campus of the Agriculture College of the State of Michigan (now Michigan State University), and the first in the United States to be erected for the teaching of scientific agriculture. ... Saints Rest was the second building erected on the campus of the Agriculture College of the State of Michigan (now Michigan State University). ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ...

Morrill Hall is amongst the oldest structures still standing on campus.
Morrill Hall is amongst the oldest structures still standing on campus.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1067 KB) Summary A photograph of Morrill Hall located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1067 KB) Summary A photograph of Morrill Hall located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ...

North campus

The oldest part of campus lies on the north bank of the Red Cedar. It includes Collegiate Gothic architecture, plentiful trees, and curving roads with few straight lines. It was in this area that the College built its first three buildings, of which none survive. Other historic buildings north of the river include Cowles House, the president's official residence, and Beaumont Tower, a carillon clock tower marking the site of College Hall, the original classroom building. To the east lies Eustace-Cole Hall, America's first freestanding laboratory for horticulture.[18] Other landmarks include the bronze statue of former president John A. Hannah,[19] the W. J. Beal Botanical Garden, and the painted boulder known as "The Rock", which is a popular spot for theatre, tailgating, and candlelight vigils. On the northwest corner of campus lies the University's hotel, the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Alice B. Cowles House (formerly Faculty Row House Number 7) is a structure on the campus of Michigan State University. ... Beaumont Tower is a structure on the campus of Michigan State University. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... College Hall was the first building erected on the campus of the Agriculture College of the State of Michigan (now Michigan State University), and the first in the United States to be erected for the teaching of scientific agriculture. ... Eustace-Cole Hall (formerly Harry J. Eustace Hall, formerly Horticultural Laboratory) is a structure on the campus of Michigan State University. ... Horticulture (Latin: hortus (garden plant) + cultura (culture)) are classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... Headline text John A. Hannah is a former President of Michigan State University. ... The W. J. Beal Botanical Garden (5 acres) is a botanical garden located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Boulder In geology, a boulder is a rock with grain size of usually no less than 256 mm (10 inches) diameter. ... The Rock is a boulder on the campus of Michigan State University. ... A tailgate party at the 2005 Big 12 Championship game - note the pickup truck tailgates In North America, a tailgate party is an often celebratory social event held on and around the open tailgate of a vehicle. ...


South campus

The Wharton Center for Performing Arts hosts many productions throughout the year and was host to the final US Presidential Debate before the 1992 election.
The Wharton Center for Performing Arts hosts many productions throughout the year and was host to the final US Presidential Debate before the 1992 election.

The campus south of the river consists mostly of post-World War II International Style buildings with sparse foliage, relatively straight roadways, and numerous parking lots. The "2020 Vision" Master Plan proposes replacing these parking lots with parking ramps and green space,[20] but these plans will take many years to reach fruition. As part of the master plan, the University erected a new bronze statue of "The Spartan" in 2005. This replica replaced the original modernist terra cotta statue,[21] which can still be seen horded inside Spartan Stadium. Notable academic and research buildings on the South Campus include the Cyclotron and the College of Law. This part of campus is home to the MSU Horticulture Gardens and the adjoining 4-H Children's Garden. South of the gardens lie the Canadian National and CSX railroads, which divide the main campus from thousands of acres of university-owned farmland. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1396 KB) Summary A photograph of the Wharton Center for Performing Arts on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1396 KB) Summary A photograph of the Wharton Center for Performing Arts on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... The Wharton Center for Performing Arts. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ... “Parking garage” redirects here. ... Sparty, MSUs mascot, at The Spartan statue, which is nicknamed the Sparty statue. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... Spartan Stadium was opened in 1923 in East Lansing, Michigan. ... The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is a Nuclear Physics/Chemistry lab where scientists perform experiments using a system of two coupled cyclotrons. ... The Law College Building. ... The Michigan State University Horticulture Gardens are horticultural gardens, with a landscape arboretum, located on Bogue Street on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Sign announcing 4-H membership on a ranch in Larimer County, Colorado. ... CN redirects here, as its the most common usage of the abbreviation in Canada; for more uses, see CN (disambiguation). ... CSX Transportation (AAR reporting marks CSXT) is a Class I railroad in the United States, owned by the CSX Corporation. ...


Academics

The MSU Library is located on the oldest part of campus between Beaumont Tower and the river.
The MSU Library is located on the oldest part of campus between Beaumont Tower and the river.

MSU has the seventh largest student body in the U.S. There are 45,520 total students, with 35,821 undergraduates and 9,699 graduate and professional students. The student body is 55% female and 45% male. While 89% of students come from all 83 counties in the State of Michigan,[22] also represented are all 50 states in the U.S. and about 125 other countries.[23] MSU has about 4,500 faculty and 6,000 staff members, and a student/faculty ratio of 19:1.[24] Listed as a Public Ivy,[25] Michigan State is a member of the Association of American Universities. Like other large American universities, MSU has a large number of teaching assistants teaching upper-level courses in certain disciplines. Michigan State University Ombudsman is the longest continually operating ombudsman office at a college or university in the country. [26] Albert Fert an Adjunct professor at MSU was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics together with Peter Grünberg. [27] Wells Hall is a sprawling classroom and office building just south of the Red Cedar River. ... The Michigan State University Library is the 26th largest academic library system in North America with over 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 827 KB) Summary A photograph of the Main Library on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 827 KB) Summary A photograph of the Main Library on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... The Michigan State University Library is the 26th largest academic library system in North America with over 4. ... Beaumont Tower is a structure on the campus of Michigan State University. ... This list of largest U.S. universities by enrollment includes only individual campuses of four-year universities. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... A teaching assistant (TA) is a junior scholar employed on a temporary contract by a college or university for the purpose of assisting a professor by teaching students in recitation or discussion sessions, holding office hours, grading homework or exams, supervising labs (in science and engineering courses), and sometimes teaching... An ombudsman (English plural: ombudsmans or ombudsmen) is an official, usually (but not always) appointed by the government or by parliament, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. ... Albert Fert (b. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Dr Peter Grünberg is a German physicist and one of the discoverers of the Giant magnetoresistive effect which brought about a breakthrough in gigabyte hard disks. ...


Rankings

Michigan State ranks 75th in the world, according to a Shanghai Jiao Tong University study,[28] with U.S. News & World Report's ranking MSU 70th in the U.S.[29] The university has over 200 academic programs, several of them highly-ranked. U.S. News has ranked MSU's graduate-level elementary education",[30] secondary education,[31] and Industrial and Organizational Psychology[32] programs number one for the last decade. In U.S. News also ranks MSU's nuclear physics program second, behind only MIT. Indeed, MSU’s Physics & Astronomy department ranks highly based on the number and impact of publications its faculty publishes. In addition to this, the 2008 U.S. News ranks Michigan State's Supply Chain Management program in the Eli Broad College of Business number one in the nation for the second year in a row.[33] The National Communication Association ranks MSU doctoral programs as the nation’s most effective in educating researchers in health communication and communication technology.[34] Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine has routinely ranked in the top five nationally for primary care according to U.S. News. MSU also is ranked in the top four in several other communication fields, including international/intercultural communication, mass communication and interpersonal communication. Other programs of note include criminal justice,[35] music therapy,[36] hospitality business,[37] packaging,[38] political science,[39] journalism [40] and communications.[41] MSU's study abroad program is the largest of any single-campus university in the United States with 2,461 students studying abroad in 2004–2005 in over 60 countries on all continents, including Antarctica.[42] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Primary or elementary education consist of the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Industrial and organizational psychology (also known as I/O psychology, work psychology, work and organizational psychology, W-O psychology, occupational psychology, personnel psychology or talent assessment) concerns the application of psychological theories, research methods, and intervention strategies to workplace issues. ... Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Supply chain management (SCM) is the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the operations of the supply chain as efficiently as possible. ... The National Communication Association (NCA) is the American national professional organization for the Communication Studies discipline. ... United States criminal justice system flowchart. ... Music therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a qualified professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. ... Hospitality management is the academic study of the running of hotels, restaurants, and travel and tourism-related business. ... Packaging is the enclosing of a physical object, typically a product that will be offered for sale. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Communication is a process that allows organisms to exchange information by several methods. ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ...


Research

The Computer Center once housed the early computer research: MISTIC
The Computer Center once housed the early computer research: MISTIC

The university spent nearly $380,000,000 million in 2005-06 on research ,[43] capping a long history of productive research. In 1877, botany professor William J. Beal performed the first documented genetic crosses to produce hybrid corn, which led to increased yields. MSU dairy professor G. Malcolm Trout invented the process for the homogenization of milk in the 1930s. In the 1960s, MSU scientists developed cisplatin, a leading cancer fighting drug. Today Michigan State continues its research with facilities such as the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory and a particle accelerator called the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x720, 216 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: MISTIC Michigan State University MSUDC Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x720, 216 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: MISTIC Michigan State University MSUDC Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The MISTIC or Michigan State Integral Computer, an early computer built by Michigan State University, was based on the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) architecture developed by John von Neumann. ... “USD” redirects here. ... William James Beal (March 11, 1833 - May 12, 1924), was an American botanist. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... G. Malcolm Trout was an important professor in food science at MSU for almost 50 years. ... Homogenization (or homogenisation) is a term used in many fields such as Chemistry, agricultural science, food technology, sociology and cell biology. ... Cisplatin, cisplatinum or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) is a platinum-based chemotherapy drug used to treat various types of cancers, including sarcomas, some carcinomas (e. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... For the DC Comics Superhero also called Atom Smasher, see Albert Rothstein. ... The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is a Nuclear Physics/Chemistry lab where scientists perform experiments using a system of two coupled cyclotrons. ...

The Veterinary Research Farm.
The Veterinary Research Farm.

In 2004, scientists at the Cyclotron produced and observed a new isotope of the element germanium, called Ge-60.[44] In that same year, Michigan State, in consortium with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the government of Brazil, broke ground on the 4.1-meter Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope (SOAR) in the Andes Mountains of Chile. The consortium telescope will allow the Physics & Astronomy department to study galaxy formation and origins.[45] Since 1999, MSU has been part of another consortium called the Michigan Life Sciences Corridor, which aims to develop biotechnology research in the State of Michigan.[46] Finally, the College of Communication Arts and Sciences' Quello Center researches current issues of information and communication management. Michigan State University has the largest African studies faculty in the nation, producing more Ph.D. dissertations and conducting more development work in Africa than any other university. [47]. The faculty of the MSU African Studies Center, which has the third largest U.S. library on Africa, and conducts a range of research and development work in Africa. [48] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 956 KB) Summary A photograph of the Veterinary Research Farm located off the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 956 KB) Summary A photograph of the Veterinary Research Farm located off the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... General Name, Symbol, Number germanium, Ge, 32 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 14, 4, p Appearance grayish white Standard atomic weight 72. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope (SOAR) is a modern 4. ... See also architecture with non-sequential dynamic execution scheduling (ANDES). ... MSUs Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building was built with money from the MLSC. The University of Michigan built the Biomedical Sciences Building - built to conduct MLSC-funded research. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Quello Center at the Michigan State University Campus Map The James H. and Mary B. Quello Center for Telecommunication Management & Law is a research facility at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. ... An Africanist is a specialist in African affairs, cultures, or languages. ...


Endowment

MSU's (private, non-Morrill Act) endowment started in 1916 when the Engineering Building burned down. Automobile magnate R.E. Olds helped the program stay afloat with a gift of $100,000.[49] While this opened the door for other types of private donations, MSU has often lagged behind peer institutions in terms of endowments. As recently as the early 1990s, MSU was last among the eleven Big Ten schools, with barely over $100 million in endowment funds. However, in the early 2000s, the University started a campaign to increase the size of the endowment. At the close of FY 2004–2005, the endowment had risen to $1.325 billion, raising the University to sixth of the 11 Big Ten schools in terms of endowment; within $2 million of the fifth-rated school.[50] The rapid increase in the size of the endowment will help to improve outdated facilities, such as the Music Building, which the College of Music hopes to soon replace with money from its alumni fundraising program.[51] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... Ransom Eli Olds (June 3, 1864–August 26, 1950) was a pioneer of American automobile industry. ...


Colleges

The South Campus skyline.
The South Campus skyline.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x620, 134 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Michigan State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x620, 134 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Michigan State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...

Residential colleges

MSU has several residential colleges, based on the Oxbridge "living-learning" model. By putting classes in student dormitories, these colleges improve student access to faculty and facilities. MSU's first residential college, Justin Morrill College started in 1965 with an interdisciplinary curriculum.[52] MSU closed Morrill College in 1979, but today the university has three residential colleges, including the recent opening of the Residential College in Arts and Humanities located in Snyder and Phillips halls. A residential college system is a housing and educational aspect of certain universities across the world, most notably Oxford University and Cambridge University in the United Kingdom; Yale University, Rice University, and the California Institute of Technology in the United States. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... Justin Smith Morrill (April 14, 1810 – December 28, 1898) was a Representative (1855–1867) and a Senator (1867–1898) from Vermont. ...


Started in 1967, James Madison College tries to merge the best attributes of a small public affairs college and a major university. Classes in the college are small, with an average of 25 students, and most instructors are tenure track faculty. James Madison College has about 1150 students total, with each freshman class containing about 320 students.[53] Each of Madison's four majors—Social Relations and Policy, International Relations, Political Theory and Constitutional Democracy, and Comparative Cultures and Politics [54]—requires two years of foreign language and one year of "field experience” in an internship or study abroad program. Although Madison students make up about 4% of MSU graduates, they represent around 35% of the MSU’s Phi Beta Kappa members.[55] James Madison College (often abbreviated to JMC or simply Madison) is a college of public affairs and international relations within Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ... Look up tenure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...

Snyder-Phillips Hall was built in 1947. The building was recently expanded to make room for a new residential college.
Snyder-Phillips Hall was built in 1947. The building was recently expanded to make room for a new residential college.

The Lyman Briggs College teaches math and science within social, historical and philosophical contexts.[56] Founded in 1967 as Lyman Briggs College, it was merged into the College of Natural Science in 1981, and was then known as Lyman Briggs School of Science.[57] On June 15th, 2007, Lyman Briggs regained college status, making it once again Lyman Briggs College.[58] Many Lyman Briggs students intend to pursue careers in medicine, but the school supports over 30 coordinate majors, from human biology to computer sciences.[59] Lyman Briggs is one of the few colleges that lets undergraduates teach as "Learning Assistants."[60] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (939x599, 165 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Michigan State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (939x599, 165 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Michigan State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Lyman Briggs College, located at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, United States, is named in honor of Lyman James Briggs, who attended Michigan Agricultural College from 1889-1893. ...


In 2007, MSU will accept its first class of students for the Residential College in Arts & Humanities. Founded October 21, 2005,[61] the college will provide around 600 undergraduates with an individualized curriculum in the liberal, visual and performing arts. Though all the students will graduate with the same degree, MSU will encourage students in the college to get a second degree or specialization.[62] The university will house the new college in a newly-renovated Snyder-Phillips Hall, the location of MSU's first residential college, Justin Morrill College.[63] Snyder-Phillips Hall will house the new college. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... Curriculum has many different conceptions. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... A double degree, sometimes called a conjoint degree, joint, ordual degree, programme normally involves a student working for two university degrees in parallel. ...

The MSU Law School Building.
The MSU Law School Building.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 883 KB) Summary A photograph of the Law School Building located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 883 KB) Summary A photograph of the Law School Building located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ...

Professional schools

The Michigan State University College of Law is a private law school, even though MSU is a public institution. Founded in Detroit in 1891 as the Detroit College of Law, MSU bought the school in 1995, and moved it to East Lansing. Students attending MSU College of Law come from 42 states and 13 countries. The law school publishes the Michigan State Law Review[64] and the Journal of Business and Securities law, one of the only nationally published student-run law journals dedicated to the leading issues confronting attorneys in the worlds of business/corporation law and securities law. Michigan State University College of Law is the home of the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute,[65] the first trial practice institute in the United States. The Intellectual Property and Communications Law program is ranked seventeenth nationally.[66] The Law College Building. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Geoffrey Fieger Geoffrey Fieger is an American attorney. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ...


The Eli Broad College of Business has programs in accounting, information systems, finance, management, marketing and supply chain management, and hospitality business. The school has 4,775 undergraduate students and 776 graduate students. The Eli Broad Graduate School of Management, which Business Week magazine ranks 11th among public institutions, offers 3 MBA programs, as well as joint degrees with the College of Law.[67] The Eli Broad College of Business is the business college at Michigan State University. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Information System (example) An Information System (IS) is the system of persons, data records and activities that process the data and information in a given organization, including manual processes or automated processes. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... For other uses, see Management (disambiguation). ... For the magazine, see Marketing (magazine). ... Supply chain management (SCM) is the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the operations of the supply chain as efficiently as possible. ... The School of Hospitality Business is an industry-specific school within the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A graduate student (also, grad student or grad in American English, postgraduate student or postgrad in British English) is an individual who has completed a bachelors degree (B.A., B.S./B.Sc. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... A double-degree programme, sometimes called a conjoint degree, dual degree, or simultaneous degree programme, involves a student working for two different university degrees in parallel, either at the same institution or at different institutions (sometimes in different countries), completing them in less time than it would take to earn... The Law College Building. ...


The College of Veterinary Medicine is one of three medical schools on campus.[68] The College of Human Medicine graduates students with medical doctor MD degrees and is split into six distinct campuses located in Lansing, Kalamazoo, Flint, Saginaw, Marquette and Grand Rapids. The College of Human Medicine has recently gained attention for its expansion into the Grand Rapids area, where a new campus is being built that is expected to fuel the growing medical industry in that region. [69] There is also a College of Osteopathic Medicine. The Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine was founded in 1910 and awards about 100 DVM degrees each year. ... The College of Human Medicine (CHM) at Michigan State University was founded in 1964. ... MD or md may stand for: Air Madagascar IATA code make dir (Microsoft DOS) or meta device (UNIX) in computing Managing Director, or CEO Maryland state code McDonnell Douglas aircraft McDonalds, a fast food restaurant Medicinæ Doctor, Doctor of Medicine (academic degree) Mendelevium (Md), symbol for the chemical element... Lansing is the name of several places in the United States of America: Lansing, Illinois Lansing, Kansas Lansing, Michigan Lansing (town), New York Lansing, North Carolina Lansing, Iowa Lansing is the name of several settlements: Lansing, a former settlement that is part of Toronto Lansing, West Virginia, north of Oak... Kalamazoo is a city located in Kalamazoo County in southwest Michigan. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ... Saginaw is the name of several places in the United States of America: Saginaw, Michigan Saginaw, Texas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... There are different meanings for Marquette, almost all of which are named after Father Jacques Marquette, S.J., a Jesuit missionary who along with Louis Joliet mapped the Mississippi River Places Marquette Heights, Illinois Marquette, Iowa Marquette, Kansas Marquette Township, Kansas Marquette, Michigan Marquette, Nebraska Marquette County, Michigan Marquette Island... Grand Rapids is the name of several places in the United States of America: Grand Rapids, Michigan Grand Rapids, Minnesota Grand Rapids, Ohio Grand Rapids, Wisconsin is the former name of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Grand Rapids is also the name of a town in Canada: Grand Rapids, Manitoba. ... Grand Rapids is the name of several places in the United States of America: Grand Rapids, Michigan Grand Rapids, Minnesota Grand Rapids, Ohio Grand Rapids, Wisconsin is the former name of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Grand Rapids is also the name of a town in Canada: Grand Rapids, Manitoba. ...


The Michigan State University College of Music is known throughout the United States and in many parts of the world as a leading professional training ground for composers, conductors, performers, and music educators, historians, theorists, and therapists.


An outstanding faculty of more than 70 resident artists and scholars, and more than 65 graduate assistants completing advanced studies, provide instruction and guidance. The faculty is noted for devotion to teaching, excellence in performance, creating innovative and imaginative curricula, the production of creative works, and significant research in many areas of music.


The College of Music enjoys students from all corners of the United States and has significant international representation with students from more than 17 nations. The College of Music has one of the leading music education programs in the nation, and an outstanding ethnomusicology and jazz studies program. The College boasts exceptionally high placement rates in music education and music therapy, and is one of the leading universities in placing graduate students in tenure stream positions.


Michigan State University Honors College

Founded in 1956, the goal of the Michigan State University Honors College is to challenge the top undergraduate students at Michigan State University. In order to challenge students of the Honors College, members are allowed to modify the education requirements outlined by the university with courses that allow the individual the ability to purse areas of interest in their major. This privilege is aided by an advising system which makes certain the Honors College student's freedoms are utilized in the best interests of the students educational pursuits. Due to the freedom from the typical constraints imposed on undergraduates, Honors students will often substitute Honors courses to meet a students graduation requirements.


Admission to the Michigan State University Honors College is a very competitive process; as a result only a very small percentage of the student population is a member of the Honors College at any given time. Usually anywhere from 3–5% of the entire student body at Michigan State is a member of the Honors College. A student admitted to the Michigan State University Honors College can be offered admission after initially being admitted to Michigan State University, or after proving exceptional academic abilities during the students freshman year. Furthermore, students of any major offered by the university are eligible for admission to the Honors College.


In order to graduate with a degree from the Michigan State University Honors College a student must take a minimum of eight honors courses during their tenure at Michigan State University. Additionally, in nearly all cases, the student must complete a senior research thesis; which is to be reviewed and accepted by a minimum of at least three members of the schools faculty. The main offices of the Michigan State University Honors College are housed in the Eustace-Cole Hall.


For the purposes of clarification, the Michigan State University Honors College is one of the many colleges that comprises Michigan State University and is not a separate institution.


Athletics

Spartan Stadium hosts varsity football games and other events.

Michigan State's NCAA Division I-A program offers 12 varsity sports for men and 13 for women.[70] Since their teams are called the Spartans, MSU's mascot is a Spartan warrior named Sparty. The university participates in the Big Ten Conference in all varsity sports except ice hockey, which competes in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. The current athletic director is Ron Mason, who served as head hockey coach from 1979 to 2002, retiring with a record total of 924 wins, and a 608–261–64 record at MSU.[71] MSU's Spartan Marching Band plays the fight song at every university event, and both students and alumni sing along. Michigan State is among only sixteen Division 1A programs to win multiple national titles in football, and the first school to win multiple national titles in both football and basketball. MSU has won all of it's football championships playing only division 1A opponents and has never played a division 1AA program. The Spartans have participated in two events, in basketball and ice hockey, which have set world records for spectator attendances for both sports. The Michigan State Spartans are the athletic teams that represent Michigan State University. ... MSUs Breslin Center hosts varsity basketball games and other events. ... Image File history File links SpartanStadium. ... Image File history File links SpartanStadium. ... Spartan Stadium was opened in 1923 in East Lansing, Michigan. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... Sparty, MSUs mascot, at The Spartan statue, which is nicknamed the Sparty statue. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... Ron Mason (born January 14, 1940, in Blyth, Ontario, Canada) is a former collegiate ice hockey player and head coach. ... The Spartan Marching Band march The Series from Spartan Stadium on September 10, 2005 The Spartan Marching Band (or SMB) is Michigan State Universitys Marching Band. ... The MSU Fight Song is the official fight song of Michigan State University. ...


Football

Football has a long tradition at Michigan State. Starting as a club sport in 1884, football gained varsity status in 1896.[72] In the 1950s, MSU led the nation in desegregation, allowing black athletes in all sports. It won the Rose Bowl in 1954, 1956, and 1988. In 1967 the Spartans accounted for four of the top eight picks in the NFL draft, the only time a college football program has accomplished such feat. Head Coach Mark Dantonio 1st Year, 3–0 Home Stadium Spartan Stadium (East Lansing) Capacity 75,005 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1896 Athletic Director Ron Mason Website MSUSpartans. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ...


Today, the football team competes in Spartan Stadium, a renovated 75,025 person football stadium in the center of campus. The current coach is Mark Dantonio, who was hired on November 27, 2006.[73] Dantonio had an 18–17 record in his three year tenure at the University of Cincinnati, including a 1–0 Bowl Game record.[74] MSU's traditional archrival is the University of Michigan, against whom they compete for the Paul Bunyan Trophy. MSU is traditionally the underdog, with a 28–66–5 record in the annual game.[75] Michigan State is one of three Big Ten teams to have an annual non-conference football game against Notre Dame. MSU's record against the Fighting Irish is 25–44–1.[76] Michigan State has won six national championships (3 are disputed depending on which listing organization is referenced) and eight conference championships. Spartan Stadium was opened in 1923 in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Mark Dantonio (born March 9, 1956) is the current head coach of Michigan State University football team. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... The Paul Bunyan-Governor of Michigan Trophy is a college rivalry trophy awarded to the winner of the annual American football game between the University of Michigan Wolverines and the Michigan State University Spartans. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ...

The Jack Breslin Student Events Center is home to the men and women's basketball teams.
The Jack Breslin Student Events Center is home to the men and women's basketball teams.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x492, 107 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Michigan State University Breslin Student Events Center Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x492, 107 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Michigan State University Breslin Student Events Center Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...

Men's basketball

See also: Category:Michigan State Spartans men's basketball players and Category:Michigan State Spartans men's basketball coaches

MSU's men's basketball team has won the National Championship twice: in 1979 and again in 2000.[77] In 1979, Earvin "Magic" Johnson, along with Greg Kelser, Jay Vincent, and Mike Brkovich, led the MSU team to a 75–64 win against the Larry Bird-led Indiana State Sycamores. In 2000, three players from Flint, Michigan, Morris Peterson, Charlie Bell, and Mateen Cleaves led the team to its second national title. Dubbed the "Flintstones", they were the key to the Spartans' win against the University of Florida. On December 13, 2003, Michigan State and Kentucky played in the Basketbowl, in which a record crowd of 78,129 watched the game in Detroit’s Ford Field. Kentucky won 79–74.[78] The team currently plays at the Breslin Student Events Center under head coach Tom Izzo, who has a 255–109 record.[79] The student spirit section is the Izzone. Izzo's coaching has helped the team make four of the last eight NCAA Final Fours, winning the title in 2000. The Michigan State Spartans mens basketball team represents Michigan State University (MSU) and competes in the Big 10 Conference of NCAA Division I. The team currently plays at the Breslin Student Events Center. ... // Final four redirects here. ... “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ... Gregory (Greg) Kelser (born September 17, 1957, in Panama City, Florida) is an African-American broadcaster for the National Basketball Associations Detroit Pistons. ... Jay Fletcher Vincent (born June 10, 1959 in Kalamazoo, Michigan) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Nickname: Location of Flint within Genesee County, Michigan. ... Morris Peterson (born August 26, 1977 in Flint, Michigan) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the New Orleans Hornets of the NBA. // Peterson played collegiate basketball at Michigan State University, and helped lead them to the 2000 NCAA title. ... Charlie Will Bell III (born March 12, 1979 in Flint, Michigan) is an NBA basketball player who currently plays point guard for the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Mateen Cleaves (born September 7, 1977 in Flint, Michigan) is a professional basketball player most recently playing for the Seattle SuperSonics of the NBA. Cleaves led the Michigan State basketball team to a national championship in 2000 and won the Most Outstanding Player award. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, space-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Basketbowl, between Michigan State University and the University of Kentucky was the most attended basketball game in history. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Ford Field is an indoor football stadium located in Detroit, Michigan that is the home of the Detroit Lions of the NFL. It is across the street from Comerica Park. ... It has been suggested that Izzone be merged into this article or section. ... Tom Izzo (born January 30, 1955 in Iron Mountain, Michigan) is the mens basketball coach for Michigan State University. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Breslin Student Events Center. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...


Men's Ice Hockey

Munn Ice Arena was named for former football coach Clarence L. "Biggie" Munn.
Munn Ice Arena was named for former football coach Clarence L. "Biggie" Munn.
See also: Category:Michigan State Spartans ice hockey players and Category:Michigan State Spartans ice hockey coaches

The MSU men's ice hockey team started in 1924, though it has only been a varsity sport since 1950. The team has since won national titles in 1966, 1986, and 2007. The Spartans came close to repeating the national title in 1987, but lost the championship game to the University of North Dakota. They play at MSU's Munn Ice Arena. The current head coach is Rick Comley, who has a 34–19–3 record at MSU.[80] Since the Big Ten Conference does not include Division I men's ice hockey, Michigan State competes in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. Along with the University of Michigan and the Ohio State University, it is one of three Big Ten schools in the CCHA. As with other sports, the hockey rivalry between MSU and U-M is a fierce one, and on October 6, 2001, MSU faced U-M in the Cold War, during which a world record crowd of 74,544 packed Spartan Stadium to watch the game end in a 3–3 tie.[81] In the 2006–2007 season, the Men's Ice Hockey team defeated Boston College for its third NCAA hockey championship.[82] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (949x548, 116 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michigan State University Munn Ice Arena Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (949x548, 116 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michigan State University Munn Ice Arena Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Munn Ice Arena is named for former MSU football coach and athletic director Biggie Munn. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The word varsity can refer to several things. ... The University of North Dakota (UND) is a comprehensive, public university in Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. UND is the largest and oldest university in the state of North Dakota. ... Munn Ice Arena is named for former MSU football coach and athletic director Biggie Munn. ... Coach in ice hockey refers to a head coach or an assistant coach given responsibility of organizing player offence and defence. ... Rick Comley (born January 20, 1947) is an ice hockey head coach of Michigan State University in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... The Cold War was an ice hockey game played between U.S. college rivals Michigan State University and the University of Michigan on Saturday October 6, 2001. ... Spartan Stadium was opened in 1923 in East Lansing, Michigan. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation)#Education. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Student life

Hubbard Hall is a twelve-story residence hall on the eastern edge of campus. It is MSU's second tallest building, surpassed by Spartan Stadium
Hubbard Hall is a twelve-story residence hall on the eastern edge of campus. It is MSU's second tallest building, surpassed by Spartan Stadium

East Lansing is very much a college town, with 60.2% of the population between the ages of 15 and 24.[83] President John A. Hannah's push to expand in the 1950s and 1960s resulted in the largest residence hall system in the United States.[84] 16,000 students live in MSU's 23 undergraduate halls, one graduate hall, and three apartment villages. Each residence hall has its own hall government, with representatives in the Residence Halls Association (RHA). Yet despite the size and extent of on-campus housing, 58% of students live off-campus,[85] mostly in the "student ghettos" of East Lansing. One of these student-dominated neighborhoods is "Cedar Village". The city since has declared Cedar Village "blighted", and proposed to redevelop the 35 acre (140,000 m²) site as a complex of upscale condominiums and retail stores called East Village. Several fraternities in the affected area mounted a campaign against the redevelopment plan.[86] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (948x461, 123 KB) Summary Hubbard Hall is a twelve-story residence hall on the eastern edge of Michigan State Universitys campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (948x461, 123 KB) Summary Hubbard Hall is a twelve-story residence hall on the eastern edge of Michigan State Universitys campus. ... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... Spartan Stadium opened in 1923 in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: , Country United States State Michigan County Ingham & Clinton Counties Incorporation 1907 Government  - Mayor Samir Singh Area  - City  11. ... In North America, a college town or university town is a community (often literally a town, but possibly a small or medium sized city, or in some cases a neighborhood or a district of a city) which is dominated by its university population. ... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... Michigan State University Housing is a large and complex network of housing for students and faculty of Michigan State University, most of the housing is in the form of residence halls on the schools campus, but there are also the University apartments, fraternity and sorority housing, and free-standing housing... This logo represents an example of a Residence Hall Association logo. ... A student ghetto is a residential neighbourhood, usually in proximity to a college or university, that houses mostly students. ... Blight is a condition of property or the uses of property in parts of a city, town, or neighborhood that are detrimental to the physical, social, and/or economic well-being of a community. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...

The MSU Union is home to many events on campus.
The MSU Union is home to many events on campus.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 990 KB) Summary A photograph of the MSU Union Building located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 990 KB) Summary A photograph of the MSU Union Building located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ...

Greek life

With over 3,000 members Michigan State University's Greek system is one of the largest in the nation. Started in the 1870s and re-established in 1922 by Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity, and Alpha Phi Sorority; the MSU Greek system now consists of around fifty Greek lettered student societies. These chapters are in turn under the jurisdiction of one of MSU's four Greek governing councils. Of these four, the Interfraternity Council (IFC) and the Women's Panhellenic Council are each entirely responsible for their own budgets, giving them the freedom to hold large fundraising and recruitment events. MSU's fraternities and sororities hold many philanthropy events and community fundraisers. For example, in March 2006, the Greek system held Greek Week to raise over $170,000 for the American Cancer Society, Ele's Place, the Ronald McDonald House, and the Special Olympics.[87] The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... The American Cancer Society (ACS) is a medical organization with a corporate attitude in the United States. ... Parker Anderson-Stanley, four, visits with Olympic gold-medalist Cassie Campbell at Ronald McDonald House Southern Alberta in Calgary on Saturday, 2006-01-14. ... Special Olympics is an international organization created to help people with intellectual disabilities develop self-confidence, social skills and a sense of personal accomplishment through sports training and competition. ...


Activism

Activists have played an important role in MSU history. During the height of the Vietnam War, student protests helped create co-ed residence halls, and blocked the routing of Interstate 496 through campus. In the 1980s, Michigan State students convinced the University to divest the stocks of companies doing business in apartheid South Africa from its endowment portfolio, such as Coca-Cola.[88] Today, MSU has many student groups focused on political change. The student government is the Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU). It is known for its unusual nonpartisan bicameral structure, which includes the parallel Student Assembly and Academic Assembly.[89] Graduate campus groups include the Graduate Employees Union (GEU) and the Council of Graduate Students (COGS). Michigan State also has a variety of partisan groups ranging from liberal to conservative, including the College Republicans, the College Democrats and several third party organizations. Other partisan activist groups include Young Americans for Freedom on the right; Young Democratic Socialists, Students for Economic Justice, and Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA) on the left. Given MSU's proximity to the Michigan state capital of Lansing, many politically-inclined Spartans do internships for the state representatives. Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Interstate 496 (abbreviated I-496) is an Interstate highway that passes through downtown Lansing, Michigan, USA and is a child of Interstate 96. ... In finance and economics, divestment or divestiture is the reduction of some kind of asset, for either financial or social goals. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturers, distributors and marketers of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... A students union, student government, student leadership, student council, or students association is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ... The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is the undergraduate student government of Michigan State University. ... Student Assembly is a common name the legislative branch of many university student governments in the United States. ... Academic Assembly is a common name the legislative branch of many university student governments. ... “Political Parties” redirects here. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The College Republicans is an organization for college and university students who support the Republican Party of the United States. ... The College Democrats (officially named the College Democrats of America) is the official organization of the Democratic Party of the United States for college and university students. ... In any two-party system of politics, a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ... Official seal of Young Americans for Freedom. ... “Right wing” redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... MEChA is an acronym for Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán (Chicano Students Movement of Aztlan), an organization dedicated to the promotion of Chicano history, education, and political action. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Location in Ingham County, Michigan1 Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Ingham, Eaton Settled 1835 Incorporation 1859 Government  - Type Strong Mayor-Council  - Mayor Virg Bernero (D) Area  - City  35. ...


Media

A 2005 bronze replica of "The Spartan" (nicknamed "Sparty") replaces Leonard D. Jungwirth's modernist original.
A 2005 bronze replica of "The Spartan" (nicknamed "Sparty") replaces Leonard D. Jungwirth's modernist original.[90]

MSU has a variety of campus media outlets. The student-run newspaper, the State News, is the country’s most widely distributed campus newspaper. Free copies of the paper are available online or at East Lansing newsstands. The paper prints 28,500 copies of the paper Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and 15,000 copies Monday through Friday during the summer.[91] The paper is not published on weekends, holidays, or semester breaks. The campus yearbook, the Red Cedar Log, is the largest in the United States. Red Cedar Review, Michigan State University's premier literary digest for over forty years, is the longest running undergraduate-run literary journal in the United States. It is published annually by the Michigan State University Press. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1666x2500, 676 KB) Summary A photograph of the Bronze version of MSUs mascot, Sparty, located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1666x2500, 676 KB) Summary A photograph of the Bronze version of MSUs mascot, Sparty, located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Sparty, MSUs mascot, at The Spartan statue, which is nicknamed the Sparty statue. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... The State News is the student newspaper of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ...


Electronic media include three radio stations and one public television station, as well as student-produced television shows. MSU's Public Broadcasting Service affiliate, WKAR-TV, the station is the second-oldest educational television station in the United States, and the oldest east of the Mississippi River. Besides broadcasting PBS shows, WKAR-TV produces its own local programming, such as a high school quiz bowl show called QuizBusters. In addition, MSU has three radio stations; WKAR-AM plays National Public Radio's talk radio programming, whereas WKAR-FM focuses mostly on classical music programming.[92] Michigan State's student-run radio station, WDBM, broadcasts mostly alternative music during weekdays, and electric music programming nights and weekends. Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... MSU Telecasters is an organization consisting of undergraduate students from Michigan State University. ... “PBS” redirects here. ... WKAR-TV is a PBS-member station serving the Lansing, Michigan area in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Quizbowl (or Quiz-bowl or quiz bowl) is a family of games of questions and answers on all topics of human knowledge, commonly played in high school and college. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... WDBM (88. ...

MSU's campus is heavily forested. This trail runs behind several residence halls, including Owen Hall, McDonel Hall, and Holmes Hall.
MSU's campus is heavily forested. This trail runs behind several residence halls, including Owen Hall, McDonel Hall, and Holmes Hall.

Image File history File linksMetadata MSU_forest_trail. ... Image File history File linksMetadata MSU_forest_trail. ...

People

The current president of the University is Lou Anna Simon who took over on January 1, 2005 after being appointed by MSU's governing board, the Board of Trustees. The Board receives its mandate from the Michigan Constitution since MSU is a state-owned school. The constitution allows for eight trustees who are elected by statewide referendum every two years. Trustees have eight-year terms, with two of the eight elected every other year.[93] As of 2007, the Board is made up of three Republicans and five Democrats, and has a 4:4 gender balance.[94] Liberty Hyde Bailey. ... Lou Anna Kimsey Simon is the current president of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, USA as of 2005. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


A listing of the President and 555 top-paid MSU employees for 2005 and 2006 has been posted by Michigan publisher and political consultant Chetly Zarko.


19th century

Eustace-Cole Hall was the United States' first freestanding horticulture laboratory. It is the only MSU building on the National Register of Historic Places. Additionally, Eustace-Cole Hall houses the offices of the Michigan State University Honors College.

Important College leaders in the 1800s include John C. Holmes, who kept the Agriculture School from being a part of the University of Michigan and is widely credited with being the prime mover for the school's founding; Joseph R. Williams, the first president; and Theophilus C. Abbot, the third president who stabilized the College after the Civil War. Also of importance was botany professor William J. Beal, an early plant (hybrid corn) geneticist who corresponded with Charles Darwin and championed the laboratory teaching method. Another distinguished faculty member of the era was the alumnus/professor Liberty Hyde Bailey. Bailey was the first to raise the study of horticulture to a science, paralleling botany, which earned him the title of "Father of American Horticulture".[95] Other famous 19th century graduates include Ray Stannard Baker, a famed "muckraker" journalist and Pulitzer Prize winning biographer of Woodrow Wilson; Minakata Kumagusu, a renowned environmental scientist; and William Chandler Bagley, a pioneering education reformer. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1156 KB) Summary A photograph of the Eustace-Call Hall located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1156 KB) Summary A photograph of the Eustace-Call Hall located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Eustace-Cole Hall (formerly Harry J. Eustace Hall, formerly Horticultural Laboratory) is a structure on the campus of Michigan State University. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... John C. Holmes (1809-1887), circa 1883. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Joesph R. Williams was the first president of the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, now Michigan State University. ... Theophilus C. Abbot (April 29, 1826 — November 7, 1892) was the president of the State Agricultural College (now Michigan State University) from 1862-1885. ... William James Beal (March 11, 1833 - May 12, 1924), was an American botanist. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Liberty Hyde Bailey. ... Ray Stannard Baker Ray Stannard Baker (April 17, 1870–July 12, 1946), American journalist and author, was born in Lansing, Michigan. ... Bold text McClures Magazine (cover, Jan, 1901) published many early muckraker articles. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Kumagusu in the USA at 1891 Minakata Kumagusu (南方 熊楠, April 15, 1867 - December 29, 1941) is a Japanese author, naturalist. ... William Chandler Bagley (born March 15, 1874, in Detroit; died July 1, 1946, in New York City), an American educator and editor, was born in Detroit, USA. He graduated in 1895 from Michigan State College, currently called Michigan State University; completed M.S., in 1898, from the University of Wisconsin...

The Human Ecology Building.
The Human Ecology Building.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1460 KB) Summary A photograph of the Human Ecology Building located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1460 KB) Summary A photograph of the Human Ecology Building located on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. ...

20th / 21st centuries

Today, there are around 400,000 living MSU alumni worldwide. Famous MSU alumni include former Michigan governors James Blanchard and John Engler, Michigan U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow, billionaire Eli Broad, Teamsters president James P. Hoffa, Quicken Loans founder Dan Gilbert, United States House Sergeant at Arms Wilson Livingood, and former United States Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham. Alumni in Hollywood include actors James Caan, Anthony Heald, the late Robert Urich, director Sam Raimi, and screenwriter David Magee. NBC reporter Chris Hansen and ABC reporters Neal Karlinsky and Don Dahler[citation needed] are also MSU Alums. Two of the Little Rock Nine attended Michigan State, including Ernest Green, the first black student to graduate from Little Rock Central High School; and Carlotta Walls LaNier. An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... James Johnston Blanchard (b. ... John Mathias Engler (born October 12, 1948) is an American politician. ... Deborah Ann Debbie Stabenow (born Deborah Ann Greer on April 29, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... Eli Broad (born June 6, 1933) a native of Detroit, Michigan is a Jewish American billionaire who lives in Los Angeles, California. ... The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), formerly known by the name International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, is one of the largest labor unions in the United States. ... James Phillip Hoffa (born May 19, 1941), is the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. ... Quicken Loans Corporation is an online retail home mortgage lending firm in the US. Quicken Loans Inc. ... Daniel Dan Gilbert is the Chairman and founder of Rock Financial and Quicken Loans Inc. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ... Wilson (Bill) Livingood, a thirty-one year veteran of the United States Secret Service, was elected Sergeant at Arms of the House of Representatives on January 4, 1995 for the 104th Congress, and subsequently re-elected through the current Congress. ... Seal of the United States Department of Energy The United States Secretary of Energy, the head of the United States Department of Energy, is concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Edward Spencer Abraham (born June 12, 1952 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an a former United States Senator of Lebanese descent. ... ... James Langston Edmund Caan (born March 26, 1940) is an American Academy Award, Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American film, stage and television actor. ... Anthony Heald is an American actor best known for portraying Hannibal Lecters smarmy psychiatrist, Frederick Chilton, in The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon, and as deputy principal Scott Guber in Boston Public. ... Robert Urich (December 19, 1946 – April 16, 2002) was an Emmy-winning actor, best known for playing private investigators on the television series Spenser: For Hire (1985-1988) and Vega$ (1978-1981). ... For the American opera singer, see Samuel Ramey. ... David Magee (b. ... Christopher Edward Hansen (born March 26, 1959) is a renowned American television journalist best known for his work on the Dateline NBC television segment To Catch a Predator. ... Don Dahler (born May 22, 1960 in Colorado Springs, CO) is an American journalist. ... Bottom row, left to right: Thelma Mothershed, Minnijean Brown, Elizabeth Eckford, Gloria Ray; Top row, left to right: Jefferson Thomas, Melba Pattillo, Terrence Roberts, Carlotta Walls, Daisy Bates (NAACP President), Ernest Green The Little Rock Nine were a group of African-American students who enrolled in Little Rock Central High... Ernest G. Green (born September 22, 1941) was one of the Little Rock Nine, a group of African-American students who, in 1957, were the first black students ever to attend classes at Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, U.S.A.. Green, the eldest of the... Little Rock Central High School is a secondary school in Little Rock, Arkansas, United States. ... Carlotta Walls Lanier was the youngest member of the Little Rock Nine the nine African American students who integrated Little Rock Central High School in 1957. ...


Spartans formerly or currently in the NBA include Earvin "Magic" Johnson, Steve Smith, Scott Skiles, Jason Richardson, Mateen Cleaves, Alan Anderson, Zach Randolph, Morris Peterson, and Charlie Bell. On the American Football League's All-Time Team are tight-end Fred Arbanas and safety George Saimes. In the National Football League, MSU alumni include Morten Andersen, Plaxico Burress, Andre Rison, Derrick Mason, Muhsin Muhammad, T.J. Duckett, Flozell Adams, Julian Peterson, Charles Rogers, Earl Morrall, Wayne Fontes, Bubba Smith, and Drew Stanton. Former Michigan State players in the National Hockey League include Rod Brind'Amour, Anson Carter, Donald McSween, Adam Hall, John-Michael Liles, brothers Kelly Miller and Kip Miller, as well as their cousins Ryan Miller and Drew Miller who are brothers. Former Michigan State players in Major League Baseball include Kirk Gibson, Steve Garvey, Robin Roberts, and Mark Mulder. Olympic gold medalists include Allan Kwartler, Sevatheda Fynes, and Frederick Alderman. “NBA” redirects here. ... Magic Johnson Earvin Magic Johnson, Jr. ... Steven (Steve) Delano Smith (born March 31, 1969, in Highland Park, Michigan) is a retired American National Basketball Association player. ... Scott Allen Skiles (born March 5, 1964 in LaPorte, Indiana) is a former professional basketball player and current head coach of the Chicago Bulls. ... Jason Anthonney J-Rich Richardson (born January 20, 1981, in Saginaw, Michigan) is a professional basketball player, currently playing shooting guard for the National Basketball Associations Charlotte Bobcats. ... Mateen Cleaves (born September 7, 1977 in Flint, Michigan) is a professional basketball player most recently playing for the Seattle SuperSonics of the NBA. Cleaves led the Michigan State basketball team to a national championship in 2000 and won the Most Outstanding Player award. ... Alan Jeffery Anderson (born on October 16, 1982 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is a professional basketball player in the NBA for the Charlotte Bobcats. ... Zach Randolph (born July 16, 1981 in Marion, Indiana) is an American professional basketball player currently with the New York Knicks of the NBA. // Randolph grew up in Marion, Indiana and attended Marion High School, where his coach was Moe Smedley. ... Morris Peterson (born August 26, 1977 in Flint, Michigan) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the New Orleans Hornets of the NBA. // Peterson played collegiate basketball at Michigan State University, and helped lead them to the 2000 NCAA title. ... Charles Hamilton Bell (November 7, 1960 - January 17, 2005) was an Australian business executive. ... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... The American Football League (AFL) All- Time Team was selected in 1970 by a panel of hall of fame selectors comprised of professional football writers from American Football League cities. ... Fred Arbanas was the first tight end to play for the Kansas City Chiefs and established the tight end position for the Chiefs as a strongpoint. ... George Saimes (born September 15, 1941), an All-American at defensive back and fullback for Michigan State, the Spartan MVP in 1961 and 1962 and a member of their all-time defensive team, joined the Buffalo Bills in 1963. ... NFL redirects here. ... Morten Andersen (born August 19, 1960 in Copenhagen, Denmark) is an American football placekicker. ... Plaxico Burress (born August 12, 1977 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American Football wide receiver for the National Football League New York Giants. ... Andre Previn Rison (born March 18, 1967 in Flint, Michigan) is a former American football wide receiver who played professionally for the National Football Leagues Indianapolis Colts, Atlanta Falcons, Cleveland Browns, Green Bay Packers, Jacksonville Jaguars, Kansas City Chiefs, Oakland Raiders, and the Canadian Football Leagues Toronto Argonauts. ... Derrick James Mason (born January 17, 1974 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American football player. ... Muhsin Muhammad, II (born Melvin Campbell on May 5, 1973) is an American Football player who currently plays wide receiver for the Chicago Bears of the NFL. // Muhammad was born in Lansing, Michigan. ... TJ Duckett is an American football player who plays for the Atlanta Falcons in the NFL. His position is running back, and he has spent his whole career so far with Atlanta. ... Flozell Justin Adams (born May 18, 1976 in Chicago, Illinois) is an offensive tackle who currently plays football for the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL. In 2005 he began his 8th season. ... Julian Peterson (born July 28, 1978) is an American Football player who currently plays Linebacker for the San Francisco 49ers of the NFL. High School Career Julian Peterson attended Crossland High School in Temple Hills,Maryland. ... Charlie Rogers (born May 23, 1981 in Saginaw, Michigan) is an American football wide receiver, currently a free agent in the NFL. He was originally selected by the Detroit Lions with the second overall pick of the 2003 NFL Draft out of Michigan State University. ... Earl Edwin Morrall (born May 17, 1934, in Muskegon, Michigan) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Wayne Fontes (born February 2, 1940) is a former American football coach and college and professional football player who was the head coach of the NFLs Detroit Lions from 1988 to 1996. ... Charles Aaron Bubba Smith (born February 28, 1945 in Orange, Texas) is an American actor and former athlete. ... Drew Emeric Stanton (born May 7, 1984) is a National Football League quarterback (QB) for the Detroit Lions. ... “NHL” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anson Carter (born June 6, 1974 in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian professional ice hockey right winger in the National Hockey League who is currently attending Edmonton Oilers training camp on a try-out. ... Theyre definitely a more talented team than we are, but the talented team doesnt always win --Don McSween Don McSween Donald Don McSween was born June 9, 1964 in Detroit, Michigan. ... Adam Hall (Born August 14, 1980 in Kalamazoo, MI) is a professional ice hockey player. ... John-Michael Liles is one of the defensemen for the NHL team the Colorado Avalanche, along with Rob Blake, Patrice Brisebois, Kurt Sauer, Karlis Skrastins, Brett Clark, Bob Boughner, and Ossi Vaananen, as of the 2005-2006 season. ... Kelly David Miller (born March 3, 1963 in Detroit, Michigan) is a retired American National Hockey League player. ... Kip Charles Miller (born June 11, 1969 in Lansing, Michigan) is currently an American hockey player for the American Hockey League Chicago Wolves. ... Ryan Miller (born July 17, 1980 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an American hockey player who is a goaltender for the Buffalo Sabres. ... Andrew Drew Miller (born February 17, 1984 in Dover, New Jersey, USA) is a professional ice hockey winger who is currently playing for the Anaheim Ducks of the National Hockey League. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Kirk Harold Gibson (born May 28, 1957) is a former American two-sport athletic star, best known as a Major League Baseball player noted for his competitiveness and clutch hitting. ... Steven Patrick Garvey (born December 22, 1948) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman, and current Southern California businessman. ... Robin Roberts can refer to at least two different people: Robin Roberts, the Hall of Fame baseball player. ... Mark Alan Mulder (born August 5, 1977 in South Holland, Illinois) is a left-handed starting pitcher for the St. ... Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... Allan S. Kwartler (September 10, 1917 - November 11, 1998) was a Pan-American sabre champion, three-time Olympian, and twice a member of sabre teams that earned 4th-place in Olympic Games (1952, 1960). ... Sevatheda Fynes (born October 17, 1974) is a Track and Field sprint athlete, competing internationally for Bahamas. ... Frederick Pitt Fred Alderman (June 24, 1905 - September 15, 1998) was an American athlete, winner of gold medal in 4x400 m relay at the 1928 Summer Olympics. ...


Notes

  1. ^ http://www.msutoday.msu.edu/04Oct2007-2
  2. ^ "Official colors of Michigan State University". MSU Web Style Guide. 2005. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  3. ^ "Official MSU Green (for Web and Print Projects)". MSU A-Z. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  4. ^ "Michigan Constitution of 1850". Michigan Legislature. Article 13, Section 11. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  5. ^ Widder, Keith. "Origins of MSU". MSU Sesquicentennial Celebration. January 16, 2004. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  6. ^ Darling, Birt. (1950). City in the Forest; The Story of Lansing. New York: Stratford House, 121. LCCN 50008202. 
  7. ^ "Joseph R. Williams Biographical Information". MSU University Archives and Historical Collection Accessed April 12, 2007.
  8. ^ "Milestones of MSU's Sesquicentennial". MSU University Archives and Historical Collection Accessed April 12, 2007.
  9. ^ Miller, Whitney. (2002). East Lansing: Collegeville Revisited (Images of America). Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 26. ISBN 0-7385-2045-4. 
  10. ^ Anderson, Kristin K. "Ceremony pays tribute to 'pragmatic visionary'". MSU Today. September 17, 2004. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  11. ^ Heineman, Kenneth J. (1993). Campus Wars: The Peace Movement at American State Universities in the Vietnam Era. New York: New York University Press, 21. ISBN 0-8147-3512-6. 
  12. ^ Kuhn, Madison. (1955). Michigan State: The First Hundred Years, 1855–1955. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 471. ISBN 0-87013-222-9. 
  13. ^ Darrow, Bob.Simon: MSU to be model university. The State News. September 9, 2005. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  14. ^ Saints Rest Aprin, 18, 2007
  15. ^ "Building Data Summary". MSU Physical Plant. 2004. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  16. ^ Miller, Matthew. "MSU a 'city' unto itself]". Lansing State Journal. August 20, 2006.
  17. ^ "About LMO". MSU Land Management Office. August 29, 2005. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  18. ^ Stanford, Linda O. (2002). MSU Campus: Buildings, Places, Spaces. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 60. ISBN 0-87013-631-3. 
  19. ^ Roeschke, Jaclyn. "Former 'U' president immortalized with bronze statue". State News. September 20, 2004. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  20. ^ "2020 Vision Campus Master Plan". MSU Campus Planning and Administration. 2006. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  21. ^ Stanford, Linda (2002). MSU Campus: Buildings, Places, Spaces. East Lansing, Michigan: Michigan State University Press. ISBN 0-87013-631-3. 
  22. ^ "Michigan State University: Student Body". The Princeton Review. 2005.
  23. ^ "MSU Facts". Michigan State University Newsroom. 2006–2007. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  24. ^ Davis, Amy. (2005). Michigan State University Off the Record. College Prowler, 4. ISBN 1-59658-083-6. 
  25. ^ Greene, Howard R. & Greene, Matthew W. (2001). The Public Ivies: America’s Flagship Public Universities (1st ed.). New York: Cliff Street Books. ISBN 0-06-093459-X. 
  26. ^ State University newsroom Accessed: Sep,20,2007. America’s longest-operating Office of the Ombudsman turns 40
  27. ^ [1] Accessed: Oct,10,2007. Adjunct physics professor at MSU wins Nobel Prize
  28. ^ "Top 500 World Universities". Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. August 15, 2006. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  29. ^ "America's Best Colleges 2007". U.S. News and World Report. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  30. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2006: Elementary Education." U.S. News and World Report. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  31. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2006: Secondary Education." U.S. News and World Report. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  32. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2006: Psychology Specialties: Industrial/Organizational Psychology." U.S. News and World Report. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  33. ^ http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/usnews/edu/college/rankings/brief/bizspec10_brief.php
  34. ^ Hollihan, Tom. "2004 Study of the Reputational Programs in Communication. National Communications Association. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  35. ^ Rykert, Wilbur Lewis. "The History of the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University 1935–1963" (Masters Thesis). 1985.
  36. ^ "About Us: Fast Facts. MSU College of Music. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  37. ^ "Historic Milestones" The School of Hospitality Business. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  38. ^ "History". MSU School of Packaging. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  39. ^ "Achievements". MSU Department of Political Science. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  40. ^ CAS > Tour > Highlights
  41. ^ "CAS > Tour > Highlights.". MSU College of Communications Arts and Sciences. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  42. ^ "Studies in Antarctic System Science—Antarctica". MSU Office of Study Abroad. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  43. ^ "The MSU news room". The Center. 2006. Accessed August 29, 2007.
  44. ^ "New germanium isotope discovered at MSU". MSU Today. July 29, 2004. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  45. ^ "Points of Pride". MSU Today. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  46. ^ Truscott, John. "Governor Signs Bill Creating 'Life Sciences Corridor' in Michigan". Michigan Executive Office press release. July 19, 1999. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  47. ^ http://africa.msu.edu/ MSU African studies Center 8/29/07
  48. ^ http://newsroom.msu.edu/site/indexer/2784/content.htm Michigan State University Newsroom 8/29/07
  49. ^ Rodriguez, Michael (2004). R.E. Olds and Industrial Lansing. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 117. ISBN 0-7385-3272-X. 
  50. ^ Seguin, Rick. "Endowment surges in growth, rankings". MSU News Bulletin. 2006. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  51. ^ "Capital Campaign". MSU School of Music. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  52. ^ "Unofficial website". Justin Morrill College]. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  53. ^ "Quick Madison Facts". James Madison College @ Michigan State University. Accessed June 25, 2007
  54. ^ "You and JMC". James Madison College @ Michigan State University. Accessed June 25, 2007
  55. ^ "Quick Madison Facts". James Madison College @ Michigan State University. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  56. ^ "Educational Philosophy @ Lyman Briggs School". Lyman Briggs School of Science. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  57. ^ "Growth and Expansion of Lyman Briggs School". Lyman Briggs School of Science. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  58. ^ Orlando, Jennifer. "Name change". State News. June 18, 2007. Accessed June 21, 2007.
  59. ^ "Major Information @ Lyman Briggs School". Lyman Briggs School of Science. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  60. ^ "Growth and Expansion of Lyman Briggs School" Lyman Briggs School of Science. p. 13. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  61. ^ Collins, Laura. "Trustees approve residential college". State News. October 24, 2005. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  62. ^ "Flexible Program". Michigan State University Residential College in Arts & Humanities. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  63. ^ "RCAH Life". Michigan State University Residential College in Arts & Humanities. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  64. ^ "Main Page". Michigan State Law Review. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  65. ^ "The Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute". Michigan State University College of Law. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  66. ^ White, Russ. "Press Release". Michigan State University Newsroom. April 4, 2006. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  67. ^ The Eli Broad College of Business and Eli Broad Graduate School of Management. Graduate Programs.
  68. ^ Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Education.
  69. ^ [http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/11/realestate/commercial/11hill.html?ex=1187496000&en=07ec444174548dce&ei=50700.
  70. ^ "MSU Facts". Michigan State University Newsroom. 2006–2007. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  71. ^ "Player Bio: Ron Mason. MSU Spartans.com. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  72. ^ Grinczel, Steve. (2003). They Are Spartans. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 9. ISBN 0-7385-3214-2. 
  73. ^ "Michigan State Looks to Cincinnati for Coach". New York Times. November 27, 2006. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  74. ^ "Michigan State hires former Cincy coach Dantonio". ESPN.com. November 27, 2006. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  75. ^ "Michigan State vs. Michigan". College Football Data Warehouse. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  76. ^ "Michigan State vs. Notre Dame". College Football Data Warehouse. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  77. ^ "Spartans can relate to Izzo's winning ways". ESPN.com. Accessed May 22, 2007.
  78. ^ "Men's Basketball Falls To No. 8 Kentucky, 79–74". MSU Spartans.com. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  79. ^ "Player Bio: Tom Izzo. MSU Spartans.com. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  80. ^ "Player Bio: Rick Comley". MSU Spartans.com. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  81. ^ "Spartan Hockey Ties Wolverines In Front Of Record Crowd". MSU Spartans.com. October 6, 2001. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  82. ^ "Abdelkader's Last-Minute Tally Hands Spartans Third NCAA Title". MSU Spartans.com. April 7, 2007. Accessed April 12, 2007.
  83. ^ East Lansing city, Michigan". U.S. Census. 2000. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  84. ^ Kiernan, Vincent. "Michigan State Asks Students to Turn Off Their Computers Over Winter Break". The Chronicle of Higher Education. January 2, 2003. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  85. ^ "Michigan State University: Campus Life". The Princeton Review. 2005.
  86. ^ Cendrowski, Scott. "FarmHouse and friends fight East Village plan". December 7, 2005. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  87. ^ Spurlock, Amanda. "Cancer relay promotes unity, awareness". March 27, 2006. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  88. ^ U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (1985). The Anti-Apartheid Act of 1985. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 213. 
  89. ^ "Organizational Flow Chart". Associated Students of Michigan State University. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  90. ^ Oswald, Tom. "'Sparty' Unveiled". MSU Today. August 26, 2005. Accessed April 14, 2007.
  91. ^ "Masthead". The State News Accessed April 13, 2007.
  92. ^ "Main Page". WKAR.org. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  93. ^ "Michigan Constitution of 1963". Article VIII. Section 5. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  94. ^ Roeschke, Jaclyn. "Ferguson, Foster win MSU trustee seats". The State News. November 5, 2004. Accessed April 13, 2007.
  95. ^ Hugo, Nancy (1997). Earth Works: Readings for Backyard Gardeners. University of Virginia Press, 68. ISBN 0-8139-1831-6. 

References

  • Kuhn, Madison. (1955). Michigan State: The First Hundred Years, 1855–1955. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press. ISBN 0-87013-222-9. 
  • Stanford, Linda O., and Dewhurst, C. Kurt. (2002). MSU Campus: Buildings, Places, Spaces. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press. ISBN 0-87013-631-3. 

External links

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This does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Central Michigan University (also known as CMU) is a coeducational state university located in Mount Pleasant in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Eastern Michigan University is a comprehensive, co-educational public university located in Ypsilanti, Michigan. ... ==Ferris State University! Ferris State University is an institute of higher learning whose main campus is located in Big Rapids, Michigan, in Mecosta County, with a secondary campus in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and smaller programs located throughout the region. ... Grand Valley State University is an American university located in Allendale, Michigan. ... Lake Superior State University is a small public university in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan. ... Michigan Technological University (abbr. ... Northern Michigan University is a four-year public university established in 1899 located in Marquette, in Michigans Upper Peninsula. ... Oakland University is a public university located in Rochester, Michigan. ... Saginaw Valley State University, commonly known as SVSU, is a state university in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... University of Michigan, Dearborn The University of Michigan-Dearborn, located in Dearborn, Michigan, is part of the University of Michigan system. ... The University of Michigan-Flint, located in Flint, Michigan, USA, is one of three campuses in the University of Michigan system. ... For College in Nebraska, see Wayne State College. ... Western Michigan University (abbr. ...


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Michigan State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5561 words)
MSU is home to the second oldest hospitality school in the country, and the study abroad program is the largest of any single-campus university in the United States, offering more than 200 programs in more than 60 countries on all continents including Antarctica.
MSU has the sixth largest student body in the U.S. There are 45,166 total students, with 35,678 undergraduates and 9,488 graduate and professional students.
MSU's study abroad program is the largest of any single-campus university in the United States with 2,461 students studying abroad in 2004–05 in over 60 countries on all continents, including Antarctica.
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