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Encyclopedia > Michelangelo
Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni

Chalk portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra
Birth name Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni
Born March 6, 1475(1475-03-06)
near Arezzo, in Caprese, Tuscany
Died February 18, 1564 (aged 88)
Rome
Field sculpture, painting, architecture and poetry
Training Apprentice to Domenico Ghirlandaio
Movement High Renaissance

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475February 18, 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, poet and engineer. Despite making few forays beyond the arts, his versatility in the disciplines he took up was of such a high order that he is often considered a contender for the title of the archetypal Renaissance man, along with his rival and fellow Italian Leonardo da Vinci. Michelangelo (or Michaelangelo) can refer to: the artist, see Michelangelo Buonarroti. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (767x1048, 166 KB) Summary Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra Source: [1] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michelangelo ... Daniele da Volterra (Volterra, 1509 - Rome, 1566), also known as Daniele Ricciarelli, was an Italian mannerist painter and sculptor. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 5<sup>Superscript text</sup>7<!-- Comment --><blockquote> Block quote </blockquote>{| class=class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |-{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |- | row 1, cell 1 | row 1, cell 2 | row 1, cell 3 |- | row 2... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... Caprese Michelangelo is a village and comune in Arezzo province, (Tuscany, Italy) (43° 38′ 36″ N 11° 59′ 15″ E) where the famous artist Michelango di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was born. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 — Naples bans kissing in public under the penalty of death June 22 — Fort Caroline, the first French attempt at colonizing the New World September 10 — The Battle of Kawanakajima Ottoman Turks invade Malta Modern pencil becomes common in England Conquistadors crossed the Pacific Spanish founded a colony... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... An Old Man with a Strawberry Nose (1480). ... The Creation of Adam, Michelangelos fresco from the . ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 5<sup>Superscript text</sup>7<!-- Comment --><blockquote> Block quote </blockquote>{| class=class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |-{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |- | row 1, cell 1 | row 1, cell 2 | row 1, cell 3 |- | row 2... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 — Naples bans kissing in public under the penalty of death June 22 — Fort Caroline, the first French attempt at colonizing the New World September 10 — The Battle of Kawanakajima Ottoman Turks invade Malta Modern pencil becomes common in England Conquistadors crossed the Pacific Spanish founded a colony... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For other uses, see Renaissance Man (disambiguation). ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ...


Michelangelo's output in every field during his long life was prodigious; when the sheer volume of correspondence, sketches and reminiscences that survive is also taken into account, he is the best-documented artist of the 16th century. Two of his best-known works, the Pietà and the David, were sculpted before he turned thirty. Despite his low opinion of painting, Michelangelo also created two of the most influential works in fresco in the history of Western art: the scenes from Genesis on the ceiling and The Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel in Rome. Later in life he designed the dome of St. Peter's Basilica in the same city and revolutionised classical architecture with his invention of the giant order of pilasters. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The Pietà (1498–1499) by Michelangelo is a marble sculpture in St. ... This article is about the sculpture by Michelangelo. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... The iconic image of the Hand of God giving life to Adam. ... The Last Judgment is a painting by Michelangelo located in the Sistine Chapel (Vatican City), above the altar. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... In Classical architecture, a giant order is an order whose columns or pilasters span two (or more) storeys. ... In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ...


In a demonstration of Michelangelo's unique standing, two biographies were published of him during his lifetime. One of them, by Giorgio Vasari, proposed that he was the pinnacle of all artistic achievement since the beginning of the Renaissance, a viewpoint that continued to have currency in art history for centuries. In his lifetime he was also often called Il Divino ("the divine one"), an appropriate sobriquet given his intense spirituality. One of the qualities most admired by his contemporaries was his terribilità, a sense of awe-inspiring grandeur, and it was the attempts of subsequent artists to imitate Michelangelo's impassioned and highly personal style that resulted in the next major movement in Western art after the High Renaissance, Mannerism. Giorgio Vasaris selfportrait Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari (Arezzo, Tuscany July 3, 1511 - Florence, June 27, 1574) was an Italian painter and architect, mainly known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The Creation of Adam, Michelangelos fresco from the . ... In Parmigianinos Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, affected poses, and unclear perspective. ...

Contents

Early life

Bust of Michelangelo on the roof of St Peter's Basilica, Vatican City
Bust of Michelangelo on the roof of St Peter's Basilica, Vatican City

Michelangelo was born in Caprese near Arezzo, Tuscany, the second of five sons. His father, Lodovico di Leonardo di Buonarroti di Simoni, was the resident magistrate in Caprese and podestà of Chiusi. His mother was Francesca di Neri del Miniato di Siena. The Buonarroti claimed to descend from Countess Mathilde of Canossa; this claim was probably false, but Michelangelo himself believed it.[1] However, Michelangelo was raised in Florence and later, during the prolonged illness and after the death of his mother, lived with a stonecutter and his wife and family in the town of Settignano where his father owned a marble quarry and a small farm. Michelangelo once said to the biographer of artists Giorgio Vasari, "What little good I have within me came from the pure air of your native Arezzo and the chisels and hammers." Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 189 KB) Summary Photo by User:Adam Carr, May 2002 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 189 KB) Summary Photo by User:Adam Carr, May 2002 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... Caprese Michelangelo is a village and comune in Arezzo province, (Tuscany, Italy) (43° 38′ 36″ N 11° 59′ 15″ E) where the famous artist Michelango di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was born. ... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... A magistrate is a judicial officer. ... The Palace of the Podestà in Florence, known as the Palazzo Vecchio or the Palazzo della Signoria Podestà is the name given to certain high officials in many Italian cities, since the later middle ages, mainly as Chief magistrate of a city state (like otherwise styled counterparts in other cities... Chiusi (Latin: Clusium; Etruscan: Clevsin; Umbrian: Camars) is a town and comune in Siena province, Tuscany. ... Mathilde of Canossa by Bernini in San Pietro (Rome). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... La piazza di Settignano, Telemaco Signorini, 1880 Settignano is a picturesque frazione ranged on a hillside northeast of Florence, Italy, with spectacular views that have attracted expatriates for generations. ... Giorgio Vasaris selfportrait Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari (Arezzo, Tuscany July 3, 1511 - Florence, June 27, 1574) was an Italian painter and architect, mainly known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. ...


Against his father's wishes and after a period of grammatics studies with the humanist Francesco da Urbino, Michelangelo continued his apprenticeship in painting with Domenico Ghirlandaio and in sculpture with Bertoldo di Giovanni. Michelangelo's father managed to persuade Ghirlandaio to pay the young artist, which was unheard of at the time. In fact, most apprentices paid their masters for the education. Impressed, Domenico recommended him to the ruler of the city, Lorenzo de' Medici, and Michelangelo left his workshop in 1489. From 1490 to 1492, Michelangelo attended Lorenzo's school and was influenced by many prominent people who modified and expanded his ideas on art, following the dominant Platonic view of that age, and even his feelings about sexuality. It was during this period that Michelangelo met literary personalities like Pico della Mirandola, Angelo Poliziano and Marsilio Ficino. For the rules of English grammar, see English grammar and Disputes in English grammar. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... An Old Man with a Strawberry Nose (1480). ... Bertoldo di Giovanni (born circa 1435/40 in Florence, Italy, died 28 December 1491 in Poggio a Caiano) was an Italian sculptor. ... For other uses, see Lorenzo de Medici (disambiguation). ... Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ... Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (February 24, 1463 – November 17, 1494) was an Italian Renaissance humanist philosopher and scholar. ... Politian (also known as Angelo Poliziano or Angelo Ambrogini) (1454 - 1494) was an Italian classical scholar and poet. ... Marsilio Ficino (Latin name: Marsilius Ficinus; Figline Valdarno, October 19, 1433 - Careggi, October 1, 1499) was one of the most influential humanist philosophers of the early Italian Renaissance, an astrologer, a reviver of Neoplatonism who was in touch with every major academic thinker and writer of his day, and the...


In this period Michelangelo finished Madonna of the Steps (1490–1492) and Battle of the Centaurs (1491–1492). The latter was based on a theme suggested by Poliziano and was commissioned by Lorenzo de Medici. After the death of Lorenzo on April 8, 1492, for whom Michelangelo had become a kind of son, Michelangelo left the Medici court. In the following months he produced a Wooden crucifix (1493), as a thanksgiving gift to the prior of the church of Santa Maria del Santo Spirito who had permitted him some studies of anatomy on the corpses of the church's Hospital. Between 1493 and 1494 he bought the marble for a larger than life statue of Hercules, which was sent to France and disappeared sometime in the 1700s. He could again enter the court on January 20, 1494, Piero de Medici commissioned a snow statue from him. But that year the Medici were expelled from Florence after the Savonarola rise, and Michelangelo also left the city before the end of the political upheaval, moving to Venice and then to Bologna. He did stay in Florence for a while hiding in a small room underneath San Lorenzo that can still be visited to this day. There are still some charcoal sketches on the walls which Michelangelo drew from his memory. Madonna of the Steps is a relief done by Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, created during the time he was in the school of Lorenzo de Medici. ... Battle of the Centaurs is a relief done by the Italian High Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti, around 1492. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... The Crucifix is a polychrome wood sculpture by High Renaissance master Michelangelo, finished in 1492. ... The Church of Santa Maria del Santo Spirito (St. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... Events and trends The Bonneville Slide blocks the Columbia River near the site of present-day Cascade Locks, Oregon with a land bridge 200 feet (60 m) high. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... Girolamo Savonarola by Fra Bartolomeo, ca 1498 Girolamo Savonarola (September 21, 1452&#8211;May 23, 1498), also translated as Jerome Savonarola or Hieronymous Savonarola, was a Dominican priest and, briefly, ruler of Florence, who was known for religious reformation and anti-Renaissance preaching and his book burning and destruction of... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ...


Here he was commissioned to finish the carving of the last small figures of the tomb and shrine of St. Dominic, in the church with the same name. He returned to Florence at the end of 1494, but soon he fled again, scared by the turmoil and by the menace of the French invasion. General view of the Arca di San Domenico. ...


He was again in his city between the end of 1495 and the June of 1496: whereas Leonardo da Vinci considered the ruling Savonarola a fanatic and left the city, Michelangelo was touched by the friar's preaching, by the associated moral severity and by the hope of renovation of the Roman Church. In that year a marble Cupid by Michelangelo was treacherously sold to Cardinal Raffaele Riario as an ancient piece: the prelate found out that it was a fraud, but was so impressed by the quality of the sculpture that he invited the artist to Rome, where he arrived on June 26, 1496. On July 4 Michelangelo started to carve an over-life-size statue of the Roman wine god, Bacchus, commissioned by Cardinal Raffaele Riario; the work was rejected by the cardinal, and subsequently entered the collection of the banker Jacopo Galli, for his garden. “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Girolamo Savonarola by Fra Bartolomeo, ca 1498 Girolamo Savonarola (September 21, 1452&#8211;May 23, 1498), also translated as Jerome Savonarola or Hieronymous Savonarola, was a Dominican priest and, briefly, ruler of Florence, who was known for religious reformation and anti-Renaissance preaching and his book burning and destruction of... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious denomination of Christianity with over one billion members. ... Michelangelos Cupid was a famous forgery by Michelangelo that has been lost. ... Raffaele Sansoni Galeoti Riario (May 3, 1461 – July 9, 1521) was an Italian Cardinal of the Renaissance, mainly known as the constructor of the Palazzo della Cancelleria and the one who called Michelangelo in Rome. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1496 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bacchus (1497) is a marble sculpture by the Italian High Renaissance sculptor, painter, architect and poet Michelangelo. ... Raffaele Sansoni Galeoti Riario (May 3, 1461 – July 9, 1521) was an Italian Cardinal of the Renaissance, mainly known as the constructor of the Palazzo della Cancelleria and the one who called Michelangelo in Rome. ...

Michelangelo's Pietà was carved in 1499, when the sculptor was 24 years old.
Michelangelo's Pietà was carved in 1499, when the sculptor was 24 years old.

Subsequently, in November of 1497, the French ambassador in the Holy See commissioned one of his most famous works, the Pietà. The contemporary opinion about this work — "a revelation of all the potentialities and force of the art of sculpture" — was summarised by Vasari: "It is certainly a miracle that a formless block of stone could ever have been reduced to a perfection that nature is scarcely able to create in the flesh." Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1584x1660, 636 KB) Summary Michelangelos Pietà, St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1584x1660, 636 KB) Summary Michelangelos Pietà, St. ... The Pietà (1498–1499) by Michelangelo is a marble sculpture in St. ... The Pietà (1498–1499) by Michelangelo is a marble sculpture in St. ...


The contract was stipulated in the August of the following year. Though he devoted himself only to sculpture, during his first stay in Rome Michelangelo never stopped his daily practice of drawing. In Rome, Michelangelo lived near the church of Santa Maria di Loreto: here, according to the legends, he fell in love (probably a Platonic love) with Vittoria Colonna, marquise of Pescara and poet. His house was demolished in 1874, and the remaining architectural elements saved by new proprietors were destroyed in 1930. Today a modern reconstruction of Michelangelo's house can be seen on the Gianicolo hill. The church of Santa Maria di Loreto, designed by Antonio da Sangallo the younger. ... Vittoria Colonna, drawing by Michelangelo. ... Pescaras port in the afterglow. ... Janiculum (Gianicolo in Italian) is a hill in western Rome. ...


Michelangelo's David

Michelangelo created the colossal statue of David, one of the most renowned works of the Renaissance.
Main article: David (Michelangelo)

Michelangelo returned to Florence in 1499–1501. Things were changing in the city after the fall of Savonarola and the rise of the gonfaloniere Pier Soderini. He was asked by the consuls of the Guild of Wool to complete an unfinished project begun 40 years earlier by Agostino di Duccio: a colossal statue portraying David as a symbol of Florentine freedom, to be placed in the Piazza della Signoria, in front of the Palazzo Vecchio. Michelangelo responded by completing his most famous work, David in 1504. This masterwork, created out of marble from the quarries at Carrara, definitively established his prominence as a sculptor of extraordinary technical skill and strength of symbolic imagination. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (614x819, 67 KB) Source: http://gutschke. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (614x819, 67 KB) Source: http://gutschke. ... This article is about the sculpture by Michelangelo. ... This article is about the sculpture by Michelangelo. ... Piero di Tommaso Soderini, also known as Pier Soderini, (May 18, 1450 - June 13, 1513), was a Florentine statesman. ... Agostino di Duccio (1418 - 1481) was an Italian early Renaissance sculptor. ... Palazzo Vecchio The Palazzo Vecchio is the town hall of Florence, Italy. ... This article is about the sculpture by Michelangelo. ... Carrara is a city in the Massa Carrara province of Tuscany, Italy, famous for the white or blue-gray marble quarried there. ...


Also during this period, Michelangelo painted the Holy Family and St John, also known as the Doni Tondo or the Holy Family of the Tribune: it was commissioned for the marriage of Angelo Doni and Maddalena Strozzi and in the 17th Century hung in the room known as the Tribune in the Uffizi. He also may have painted the Madonna and Child with John the Baptist, known as the Manchester Madonna and now in the National Gallery, London. The Doni Tondo or Doni Madonna is a painting by the Italian Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti (c. ... The narrow courtyard between the Uffizis two wings creates the effect of a short, idealized street. ... St. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ...


Under Pope Julius II in Rome: the Sistine Chapel ceiling

Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.
Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

In 1505 Michelangelo was invited back to Rome by the newly elected Pope Julius II. He was commissioned to build the Pope's tomb. Under the patronage of the Pope, Michelangelo had to constantly stop work on the tomb in order to accomplish numerous other tasks. Because of these interruptions, Michelangelo worked on the tomb for 40 years. The tomb, of which the central feature is Michelangelo's statue of Moses, was never finished to Michelangelo's satisfaction. It is located in the Church of S. Pietro in Vincoli in Rome. The iconic image of the Hand of God giving life to Adam. ... Image File history File links Lightmatter_Sistine_Chapel_ceiling. ... Image File history File links Lightmatter_Sistine_Chapel_ceiling. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... 1505 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope Julius II (December 5, 1443 – February 21, 1513), born Giuliano della Rovere, was Pope from 1503 to 1513. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Façade of the Basilica. ...


The major interruption on the tomb was the commission to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, which took approximately four years to complete (15081512). According to Michelangelo's own account, reproduced in contemporary biographies, Bramante and Raphael convinced the Pope to commission Michelangelo in a medium not familiar to the artist, in order that he might be diverted from his preference for sculpture into fresco painting, and thus suffer from unfavorable comparisons with his rival Raphael. However, this story is discounted by modern historians on the grounds of contemporary evidence, and may be merely a reflection of the artist's own perspective. 1508 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Donato Bramante Donato Bramante (1444 - March 11, 1514), Italian architect, who introduced the Early Renaissance style to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his most famous design was St. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ...


Michelangelo was originally commissioned to paint the 12 Apostles, but protested for a different and more complex scheme, representing Creation, the Downfall of Man and the Promise of Salvation through the prophets and Genealogy of Christ. The work is part of a larger scheme of decoration within the chapel which represents much of the doctrine of the Catholic Church THIS IS A FACT Creation is a doctrinal position in many religions and philosophical belief systems which maintains that a single God, or a group of or deities is responsible for creating the universe. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


The composition eventually contained over 300 figures and had at its centre nine episodes from the Book of Genesis, divided into three groups: God's Creation of the Earth; God's Creation of Humankind and their fall from God's grace; and lastly, the state of Humanity as represented by Noah and his family. On the pendentives supporting the ceiling are painted twelve men and women who prophesied the coming of the Jesus. They are seven prophets of Israel and five Sibyls, prophetic women of the Classical world. Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... The word sibyl comes (via Latin) from the Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. ...


Among the most famous paintings on the ceiling are the Creation of Adam, Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, the Great Flood, the Prophet Isaiah and the Cumaean Sibyl. Around the windows are painted the ancestors of Christ. Categories: Art stubs | Paintings ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... This article is on mythology involving great floods. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Michelangelos rendering of the Cumaean Sibyl The Cumaean Sibyl was the priestess presiding over the Apollonian oracle at Cumae, a Greek colony located near Naples, Italy. ...


Under Medici Popes in Florence

Michelangelo's Moses.
Michelangelo's Moses.

In 1513 Pope Julius II died and his successor Pope Leo X, a Medici, commissioned Michelangelo to reconstruct the façade of the basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence and to adorn it with sculptures. Michelangelo agreed reluctantly. The three years he spent in creating drawings and models for the facade, as well as attempting to open a new marble quarry at Pietrasanta specifically for the project, were among the most frustrating in his career, as work was abruptly cancelled by his financially-strapped patrons before any real progress had been made. The basilica lacks a facade to this day. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 486 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2209 × 2722 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 486 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2209 × 2722 pixel, file size: 3. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope Leo X, born Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (11 December 1475 – 1 December 1521) was Pope from 1513 to his death. ... Exterior from the Piazza San Lorenzo. ...


Apparently not the least embarrassed by this turnabout, the Medici later came back to Michelangelo with another grand proposal, this time for a family funerary chapel in the basilica of San Lorenzo. Fortunately for posterity, this project, occupying the artist for much of the 1520s and 1530s, was more fully realized. Though still incomplete, it is the best example we have of the integration of the artist's sculptural and architectural vision, since Michelangelo created both the major sculptures as well as the interior plan. Ironically the most prominent tombs are those of two rather obscure Medici who died young, a son and grandson of Lorenzo. Il Magnifico himself is buried in an unfinished and comparatively unimpressive tomb on one of the side walls of the chapel, not given a free-standing monument, as originally intended. Exterior from the Piazza San Lorenzo. ... ... Centuries: 15th century - 16th century - 17th century Decades: 1480s 1490s 1500s 1510s 1520s - 1530s - 1540s 1550s 1560s 1570s 1580s Years: 1530 1531 1532 1533 1534 1535 1536 1537 1538 1539 Events and Trends Spanish conquest of Peru Beginning of colonization of Brazil Categories: 1530s ... For other uses, see Lorenzo de Medici (disambiguation). ...

Michelangelo's The Last Judgment. Saint Bartholomew is shown holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. The face of the skin is recognizable as Michelangelo.
Michelangelo's The Last Judgment. Saint Bartholomew is shown holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. The face of the skin is recognizable as Michelangelo.

In 1527, the Florentine citizens, encouraged by the sack of Rome, threw out the Medici and restored the republic. A siege of the city ensued, and Michelangelo went to the aid of his beloved Florence by working on the city's fortifications from 1528 to 1529. The city fell in 1530 and the Medici were restored to power. Completely out of sympathy with the repressive reign of the ducal Medici, Michelangelo left Florence for good in the mid-1530s, leaving assistants to complete the Medici chapel. Years later his body was brought back from Rome for interment at the Basilica di Santa Croce, fulfilling the maestro's last request to be buried in his beloved Tuscany. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x1375, 205 KB)Detail of Michelangelos The Last Judgement (Sistine Chapel), executed 1535-1541. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x1375, 205 KB)Detail of Michelangelos The Last Judgement (Sistine Chapel), executed 1535-1541. ... The Last Judgment is a painting by Michelangelo located in the Sistine Chapel (Vatican City), above the altar. ... Michelangelos The Last Judgement shows Saint Bartholomew holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. ... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... Events June 19 - Battle of Landriano - A French army in Italy under Marshal St. ... Events April 22 - Treaty of Saragossa divides the eastern hemisphere between Spain and Portugal, stipulating that the dividing line should lie 297. ... June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... Façade. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ...


Last works in Rome

Michelangelo designed the dome of St. Peter's Basilica, although it was unfinished when he died.
Michelangelo designed the dome of St. Peter's Basilica, although it was unfinished when he died.

The fresco of The Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel was commissioned by Pope Clement VII, who died shortly after assigning the commission. Paul III was instrumental in seeing that Michelangelo began and completed the project. Michelangelo labored on the project from 1534 to October 1541. The work is massive and spans the entire wall behind the altar of the Sistine Chapel. The Last Judgment is a depiction of the second coming of Christ and the apocalypse; where the souls of humanity rise and are assigned to their various fates, as judged by Christ, surrounded by the Saints. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 578 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 578 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... The Last Judgment is a painting by Michelangelo located in the Sistine Chapel (Vatican City), above the altar. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ...


Once completed, the depictions of nakedness in the papal chapel was considered obscene and sacrilegious, and Cardinal Carafa and Monsignor Sernini (Mantua's ambassador) campaigned to have the fresco removed or censored, but the Pope resisted. After Michelangelo's death, it was decided to obscure the genitals ("Pictura in Cappella Ap.ca coopriantur"). So Daniele da Volterra, an apprentice of Michelangelo, was commissioned to cover with perizomas (briefs) the genitals, leaving unaltered the complex of bodies (see details[3]). When the work was restored in 1993, the conservators chose not to remove all the perizomas of Daniele, leaving some of them as a historical document, and because some of Michelangelo’s work was previously scraped away by the touch-up artist's application of “decency” to the masterpiece. A faithful uncensored copy of the original, by Marcello Venusti, can be seen at the Capodimonte Museum of Naples. For other uses, see Mantua (disambiguation). ... Daniele da Volterra (Volterra, 1509 - Rome, 1566), also known as Daniele Ricciarelli, was an Italian mannerist painter and sculptor. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Marcello Venusti (1512/5 - 1579) was an Italian Mannnerist painter active in Rome in mid 1500s. ... Palazzo Capodimonte. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ...


Censorship always followed Michelangelo, once described as "inventor delle porcherie" ("inventor of obscenities", in the original Italian language referring to "pork things"). The infamous "fig-leaf campaign" of the Counter-Reformation, aiming to cover all representations of human genitals in paintings and sculptures, started with Michelangelo's works. To give two examples, the marble statue of Cristo della Minerva (church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva, Rome) was covered by added drapery, as it remains today, and the statue of the naked child Jesus in Madonna of Bruges (The Church of Our Lady in Bruges, Belgium) remained covered for several decades. The Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation was a strong reaffirmation of the doctrine and structure of the Catholic Church, climaxing at the Council of Trent, partly in reaction to the growth of Protestantism. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Facade of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The Madonna of Bruges is a marble sculpture by Michelangelo, of Mary with the infant Jesus. ... View of tower from the northeast The Church of Our Lady (Dutch: Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk) in Bruges, Belgium, dates mainly from the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ...


In 1546, Michelangelo was appointed architect of St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican, and designed its dome. As St. Peter's was progressing there was concern that Michelangelo would pass away before the dome was finished. However, once building commenced on the lower part of the dome, the supporting ring, the completion of the design was inevitable. // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ...


Michelangelo the architect

Michelangelo's own tomb, at Basilica di Santa Croce di Firenze, Florence
Michelangelo's own tomb, at Basilica di Santa Croce di Firenze, Florence

Michelangelo worked on many projects that had been conceived by other men, most notably in his work at St Peter's Basilica, Rome. The Campidoglio, designed by Michelangelo during the same period, rationalized the structures and spaces of Rome's Capitoline Hill. Its shape, more a rhomboid than a square, was intended to counteract the effects of perspective. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 843 KB) De Beschreibung: Grabmal Michelangelos in der Kirche Santa Croce in Florenz Quelle: aufgenommen am 25. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 843 KB) De Beschreibung: Grabmal Michelangelos in der Kirche Santa Croce in Florenz Quelle: aufgenommen am 25. ... Façade. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the famous seven hills of Rome, the site of a temple for the Capitoline Triad: the gods Jupiter, his wife Juno and their daughter Minerva. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ...


The major Florentine architectural projects by Michelangelo are the unexecuted façade for the Basilica of San Lorenzo, Florence and the Medici Chapel (Capella Medicea) and Laurentian Library there, and the fortifications of Florence. Exterior from the Piazza San Lorenzo. ... It has been suggested that Biblioteca Mediceo Lauenziana be merged into this article or section. ...


The major Roman projects are St. Peter's, Palazzo Farnese, San Giovanni de' Fiorentini and the Sforza Chapel (Capella Sforzesca), Porta Pia and Santa Maria degli Angeli. A mid-18th century engraving of Palazzo Farnese by Giuseppe Vasi Palazzo Farnese, Rome (housing the French Embassy), is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century (Sir Banister Fletcher) (1). ... The internal face of Porta Pia Porta Pia, new gate in the Aurelian Walls. ... Santa Maria degli Angeli is the name of several churches in Italy. ...


Laurentian Library

Around 1530 Michelangelo designed the Laurentian Library in Florence, attached to the church of San Lorenzo. He produced new styles such as pilasters tapering thinner at the bottom, and a staircase with contrasting rectangular and curving forms. June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... It has been suggested that Biblioteca Mediceo Lauenziana be merged into this article or section. ... In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ...


Medici Chapel

Main article: Medici Chapel

Michelangelo designed the Medici Chapel. The Medici Chapel has monuments in it dedicated to certain members of the Medici family. Michelangelo never finished it, so his pupils later completed it. Lorenzo the Magnificent was buried at the entrance wall of the Medici Chapel. Sculptures of the "Madonna and Child" and the Medici patron saints Cosmas and Damian were set over his burial. The "madonna and child" was Michelangelo's own work. The Basilica di San Lorenzo (Basilica of St Lawrence) is one of the largest churches of Florence, Italy, situated at the centre of the city’s main market district. ... The Basilica di San Lorenzo (Basilica of St Lawrence) is one of the largest churches of Florence, Italy, situated at the centre of the city’s main market district. ... The exact same full name was also carried by his grandson Lorenzo (1492 - 1519), Duke of Urbino, with whom he is sometimes confused. ...


Michelangelo the man

Michelangelo, who was often arrogant with others and constantly dissatisfied with himself, saw art as originating from inner inspiration and from culture. In contradiction to the ideas of his rival, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo saw nature as an enemy that had to be overcome. The figures that he created are forceful and dynamic; each in its own space apart from the outside world. For Michelangelo, the job of the sculptor was to free the forms that were already inside the stone. He believed that every stone had a sculpture within it, and that the work of sculpting was simply a matter of chipping away all that was not a part of the statue. “Da Vinci” redirects here. ...


Several anecdotes reveal that Michelangelo's skill, especially in sculpture, was greatly admired in his own time. Another Lorenzo de Medici wanted to use Michelangelo to make some money. He had Michelangelo sculpt a cupid that looked worn and old. Lorenzo paid Michelangelo 30 ducats, but sold the cupid for 200 ducats. Cardinal Raffaele Riario became suspicous and sent someone to investigate. The man had Michelangelo do a sketch for him of a cupid, and then told Michelangelo that while he received 30 ducats for his cupid, Lorenzo had passed the cupid off for an antique and sold it for 200 ducats. Michelangelo then confessed that he had done the cupid, but had no idea that he had been cheated. After the truth was revealed, the Cardinal later took this as proof of his skill and commissioned his Bacchus. Another better-known anecdote claims that when finishing the Moses (San Pietro in Vincoli, Rome), Michelangelo violently hit the knee of the statue with a hammer, shouting, "Why don't you speak to me?" An anecdote is a short tale narrating an interesting or amusing biographical incident. ... Façade of the Basilica. ...


In his personal life, Michelangelo was abstemious. He told his apprentice, Ascanio Condivi: "However rich I may have been, I have always lived like a poor man." [2] Condivi said he was indifferent to food and drink, eating "more out of necessity than of pleasure"[3] and that he "often slept in his clothes and ... boots."[4] These habits may have made him unpopular; his biographer Paolo Giovio says "His nature was so rough and uncouth that his domestic habits were incredibly squalid, and deprived posterity of any pupils who might have followed him."[5] He may not have minded, since he was by nature a solitary and melancholy person; he had a reputation for being bizzarro e fantastico because he "withdrew himself from the company of men." [6] Ascanio Condivi (1525–1574) was an Italian painter and writer. ... Paolo Giovio (1483–1552) was a major Italian chronicler of the Italian Wars. ...


Relationships

Drawing for The Libyan Sybil, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Drawing for The Libyan Sybil, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The Libyan Sybil, Sistine Chapel.
The Libyan Sybil, Sistine Chapel.

Fundamental to Michelangelo's art is his love of male beauty, which attracted him both aesthetically and emotionally. In part, this was an expression of the Renaissance idealization of masculinity. But in Michelangelo's art there is clearly a sensual response to this aesthetic.[7] Such feelings caused him great anguish, and he expressed the struggle between Platonic ideals and carnal desire in his sculpture, drawing and his poetry, too, for among his other accomplishments Michelangelo was also a great Italian lyric poet of the 16th century. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (692x900, 122 KB) Study for the Libyan Sibyl , 1511, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Source:Web Gallery of Art File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michelangelo... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (692x900, 122 KB) Study for the Libyan Sibyl , 1511, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Source:Web Gallery of Art File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michelangelo... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (623x650, 123 KB) The Libyan Sibyl, 1508-12, from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Source:CGFA File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michelangelo ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (623x650, 123 KB) The Libyan Sibyl, 1508-12, from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Source:CGFA File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Michelangelo ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ...


The sculptor's expressions of love have been characterized as both Neoplatonic and openly homoerotic; recent scholarship seeks an interpretation which respects both readings, yet is wary of drawing absolute conclusions. One example of the conundrum is the story of the sixteen year old Cecchino dei Bracci, whose death, only a year after their meeting in 1543, inspired the writing of forty eight funeral epigrams, which by some accounts allude to a relationship that was not only romantic but physical as well: Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is an ancient school of philosophy beginning in the 3rd century A.D. It was based on the teachings of Plato and Platonists; but it interpreted Plato in many new ways, such that Neoplatonism was quite different from what Plato taught, though not many Neoplatonists would... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ...

La carne terra, e qui l'ossa mia, prive
de' lor begli occhi, e del leggiadro aspetto
fan fede a quel ch'i' fu grazia nel letto,
che abbracciava, e' n che l'anima vive.[8]
or
The flesh now earth, and here my bones,
Bereft of handsome eyes, and jaunty air,
Still loyal are to him I joyed in bed,
Whom I embraced, in whom my soul now lives.

According to others, they represent an emotionless and elegant re-imagining of Platonic dialogue, whereby erotic poetry was seen as an expression of refined sensibilities (Indeed, it must be remembered that professions of love in 16th century Italy were given a far wider application than now).[9] Some youths were street wise and took advantage of the sculptor. Febbo di Poggio, in 1532, peddled his charms — in answer to Michelangelo's love poem he asks for money. Earlier, Gherardo Perini, in 1522, had stolen from him shamelessly. Michelangelo defended his privacy above all. When an employee of his friend Niccolò Quaratesi offered his son as apprentice suggesting that he would be good even in bed, Michelangelo refused indignantly, suggesting Quaratesi fire the man. Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ...


The greatest written expression of his love was given to Tommaso dei Cavalieri (c. 1509–1587), who was 23 years old when Michelangelo met him in 1532, at the age of 57. Cavalieri was open to the older man's affection: I swear to return your love. Never have I loved a man more than I love you, never have I wished for a friendship more than I wish for yours. Cavalieri remained devoted to Michelangelo till his death. Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ...


Michelangelo dedicated to him over three hundred sonnets and madrigals, constituting the largest sequence of poems composed by him. Some modern commentators assert that the relationship was merely a Platonic affection, even suggesting that Michelangelo was seeking a surrogate son.[10] However, their homoerotic nature was recognized in his own time, so that a decorous veil was drawn across them by his grand nephew, Michelangelo the Younger, who published an edition of the poetry in 1623 with the gender of pronouns changed. John Addington Symonds, the early British homosexual activist, undid this change by translating the original sonnets into English and writing a two-volume biography, published in 1893. Year 1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Addington Symonds was the name of a father and son, both English writers. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Ignudo, Sistine Chapel.
Ignudo, Sistine Chapel.

The sonnets are the first large sequence of poems in any modern tongue addressed by one man to another, predating Shakespeare's sonnets to his young friend by a good fifty years. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (562x739, 35 KB) Michelangelo. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (562x739, 35 KB) Michelangelo. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ...

I feel as lit by fire a cold countenance
That burns me from afar and keeps itself ice-chill;
A strength I feel two shapely arms to fill
Which without motion moves every balance.
— (Michael Sullivan, translation)

Late in life he nurtured a great love for the poet and noble widow Vittoria Colonna, whom he met in Rome in 1536 or 1538 and who was in her late forties at the time. They wrote sonnets for each other and were in regular contact until she died, though many scholars note the intellectualized or spiritual quality of this passion. Vittoria Colonna, drawing by Michelangelo. ...


It is impossible to know for certain whether Michelangelo had physical relationships (Condivi ascribed to him a "monk-like chastity"),[11] but through his poetry and visual art we may at least glimpse the arc of his imagination.[12] Ascanio Condivi (1525–1574) was an Italian painter and writer. ...


See also

Entities named after Michelangelo include the asteroid 3001 Michelangelo and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles character Michelangelo. The following is a list of works of painting, sculpture and architecture by the Italian Renaissance artists Michelangelo. ... We dont have an article called Cappella Paolina Start this article Search for Cappella Paolina in. ... The iconic image of the Hand of God giving life to Adam. ... God creating the Earth and placing the Sun and Moon in the Heavens, ceiling fresco by Michelangelo, unrestored. ... The following list is an incomplete list of painters. ... Famous Italian painters (in alphabetical order): Francesco Albani,(1578-1660) Mariotto Albertinelli, (1474-1515) Fra Angelico, (1387-1445) Fra Bartolommeo, (1472-1517) Gentile Bellini, (c. ... This is a list of Italians or Italian-speaking/writing people that are famous. ... Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and Wife by Jan van Eyck (1434). ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition... // The history of painting reaches back in time to artifacts from pre-historic humans, and spans all cultures. ... 3001 Michelangelo is a small main belt asteroid, which was discovered by Edward L. G. Bowell in 1982. ... TMNT redirects here. ... Michelangelo (or Mikey, occasionally Mike), is a fictional character, one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (TMNT). ...


References

  1. ^ Ascanio Condivi,The Life of Michelangelo, 1553; English translation by Alice Sedgewick, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999; p. 5.
  2. ^ Condivi, p. 106.
  3. ^ Ibid.
  4. ^ Ibid.
  5. ^ Paola Barocchi (ed.) Scritti d'arte del cinquecento, Milan, 1971; vol. I p. 10.
  6. ^ Condivi,p. 102.
  7. ^ Hughes, Anthony: "Michelangelo"., page 327. Phaidon, 1997.
  8. ^ "MICHELANGELO BUONARROTI" by Giovanni Dall'Orto Babilonia n. 85, January 1991, pp. 14-16 [1]
  9. ^ Hughes, Anthony: "Michelangelo.", page 326. Phaidon, 1997.
  10. ^ "Michelangelo", The New Encyclopaedia Britannica, Macropaedia, Volume 24, page 58, 1991. The text goes so far as to claim, a bit defensively, 'These have naturally been interpreted as indications that Michelangelo was a homosexual, but such a reaction according to the artist's own statement would be that of the ignorant'.
  11. ^ Hughes, Anthony: "Michelangelo"., page 326. Phaidon, 1997.
  12. ^ Scigliano, Eric: "Michelangelo's Mountain; The Quest for Perfection in the Marble Quarries of Carrara.", Simon and Schuster, 2005. [2] Accessed January 27, 2007

Further reading

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Sala, Charles (1996). Michelangelo: Sculptor, Painter, Architect. Editions Pierre Terrail. ISBN 978-2879390697. 
  • Baldini, Umberto; Liberto Perugi (1982). The Sculpture of Michelangelo. Rizzoli. ISBN 0-8478-0447-x. 
  • Hart, Michael (1992). The 100. Carol. ISBN 0-8065-1350-0. 
  • Tolnay, Charles (1982). Michelangelo: Sculptor, Painter, Architect. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0691003375. 
  • Stone, Irving (1987). The Agony and the Ecstasy. Signet. ISBN 0-451-17135-7. 
  • Ackerman, James (1986). The Architecture of Michelangelo. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0226002408. 
  • Néret, Gilles (2000). Michelangelo. Taschen. ISBN 978-3822859766. 

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Michael H. Hart (born April 28, 1932 in New York City) is an American astrophysicist turned author and activist. ... The cover of the 1992 edition. ... Irving Stone (July 14, 1903 – August 26, 1989) was an American writer known for his biographical novels of famous historical personalities. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Persondata
NAME Michelangelo
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Buonarroti, Michelangelo; Buonarroti, Michelangelo di Lodovico
SHORT DESCRIPTION Sculptor, painter and architect
DATE OF BIRTH March 6, 1475
PLACE OF BIRTH Caprese, Italy
DATE OF DEATH February 18, 1564
PLACE OF DEATH Rome, Italy

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 5<sup>Superscript text</sup>7<!-- Comment --><blockquote> Block quote </blockquote>{| class=class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |-{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |- | row 1, cell 1 | row 1, cell 2 | row 1, cell 3 |- | row 2... Caprese Michelangelo is a village and comune in Arezzo province, (Tuscany, Italy) (43° 38′ 36″ N 11° 59′ 15″ E) where the famous artist Michelango di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was born. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 — Naples bans kissing in public under the penalty of death June 22 — Fort Caroline, the first French attempt at colonizing the New World September 10 — The Battle of Kawanakajima Ottoman Turks invade Malta Modern pencil becomes common in England Conquistadors crossed the Pacific Spanish founded a colony... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Michelangelo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3415 words)
Michelangelo's output in every field during his long life was prodigious; when the sheer volume of correspondence, sketches and reminscences that survive is also taken into account, he is the best-documented artist of the 16th century.
Michelangelo was born in 1475 near Arezzo, in Caprese, Tuscany.
Also during this period, Michelangelo painted the Holy Family and St John, also known as the Doni Tondo or the Holy Family of the Tribune: it was commissioned for the marriage of Angelo Doni and Maddalena Strozzi and in the 17th Century hung in the room known as the Tribune in the Uffizi.
Michelangelo - MSN Encarta (1190 words)
Michelangelo considered the male nude to be the foremost subject in art, and he explored its range of movement and expression in every medium.
Michelangelo strove to be accepted among his patrons as a gentleman, producing a large body of poetry and constructing a myth of noble ancestry.
Michelangelo originally intended for the piece to be placed within a shallow niche, and accordingly, he polished to a smooth finish all the surfaces that would have been visible and gave meticulous care to the drapery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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