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Encyclopedia > Michael Ramsey
Michael Ramsey

Archbishop of Canterbury

Archbishop Ramsey (left) meets Pope Paul VI
Enthroned 1961
Ended 1974
Predecessor Geoffrey Fisher
Successor Donald Coggan
Born 14 November 1904(1904-11-14)
Cambridge, England
Died 23 April 1988
Anglicanism Portal

Arthur Michael Ramsey, Baron Ramsey of Canterbury PC (14 Nov 190423 April 1988) was the one hundredth Archbishop of Canterbury. He was appointed on 31 May 1961, and was in office from June 1961 to 1974. full permission of website www. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Geoffrey Francis Fisher, Baron Fisher of Lambeth GCVO, PC (May 5, 1887 – September 15, 1972) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1945 to 1961. ... Frederick Donald Coggan, Baron Coggan PC (23 December 1909 – 17 May 2000) was the 101st Archbishop of Canterbury from 1974 to 1980, during which time he visited Rome and met the Pontiff, in company with Bishop Cormac Murphy-OConnor, future Cardinal of England and Wales. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about Cambridge, England; see also other places called Cambridge. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Photograph by Keith Edkins File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Career

Michael Ramsey was born in Cambridge. His father was a Congregationalist and mathematician, and his mother was a socialist and suffragette. He was educated at Repton School, where the headmaster was the future Archbishop Geoffrey Francis Fisher and Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he was President of the Cambridge Union Society and where his support of the Liberal Party won him praise from Herbert Asquith. During this time he came under the influence of the Anglo-Catholic dean of Corpus Christi College, Edwyn Clement Hoskyns. On the advice of Eric Milner-White he trained at Cuddesdon, where he became friends with Austin Farrer and was introduced to Orthodox Christian ideas by Derwas Chitty. He was ordained in 1928. He then became a curate in Liverpool, where he was influenced by Charles Raven. This article is about the city in England. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ... Repton School, founded in 1557, is one of the most famous co-educational public schools in the UK, located in the village of Repton, in Derbyshire, England. ... Categories: 1887 births | 1972 deaths | Archbishops of Canterbury | People stubs ... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The coat of arms for the Cambridge Union Society, which shares much in common with the coat of arms for the University of Cambridge. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The name Herbert Asquith normally refers to: Herbert Henry Asquith, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1908–1916), but may also refer to his son: Herbert Asquith, a poet. ... ... College name The College of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary in Cambridge Motto There is a toast, Floreat antiqua domus (Latin: May the old house flourish), from which the college’s nickname, ‘Old House’, is derived Founders The Guild of Corpus Christi The Guild of the Blessed Virgin... Ripon College Cuddesdon is an Anglican theological college (seminary) located in Cuddesdon, a small village a short distance from Oxford. ... Austin Farrer (1904-1968) English theologian, biblical scholar, and philosopher. ... The term Orthodox Christian refers to two Christian traditions: Oriental Orthodoxy, which separated from the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church in the 5th century; Eastern Orthodoxy, which the Roman Catholic church separated from in 1054 was the church that was started by the apostles. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ...


After this he became a lecturer to trainee clergy at The Bishop's Hostel in Lincoln, and during this time he published a book, The Gospel and the Catholic Church (1936). He then ministered at Boston Stump and at St Benet's Church, Cambridge, before being offered a canonry at Durham Cathedral and the Van Mildert Professor of Divinity at in the Department of Divinity at Durham University. After this, in 1950, he took the Regius Professor of Divinity chair at Magdalene,[1] but after only a short time he was appointed Bishop of Durham in 1952. In 1956, he became Archbishop of York, and in 1961, Archbishop of Canterbury. During his time as Archbishop, he travelled widely, and he saw the creation of the General Synod. Retirement ages for clergy were also introduced. Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... UK is dedicated to Saint Botolph, the name Boston possibly being a corruption of Botolphs Town. The Cotton Chapel, named after him, was at one time used as a school, but was restored in 1857. ... Durham Cathedrals famous Sanctuary Knocker on the North Door Ground plan of Durham Cathedral Legend of the founding of Durham depicted on cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, which is almost always referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city... The Van Mildert Professor of Divinity is one of the oldest professorships at the University of Durham. ... Affiliations 1994 Group European University Association Association of MBAs EQUIS Universities UK N8 Group Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... The Regius Professorship of Divinity is one of the oldest and most prestigious of the professorships at the University of Oxford and at the University of Cambridge. ... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as... The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations. ...


Theology and Churchmanship

As an Anglo-Catholic with a nonconformist background, Ramsey had a broad religious outlook. He had a particular regard for the Orthodox concept of "glory", and his favourite book of those he had written was his 1949 work The Transfiguration. During the J.A.T. Robinson Honest to God controversy, he published a short response entitled Image Old and New, in which he engaged seriously with Robinson's ideas. His brother Frank, who died young, had been an atheist, and he had respect for honest agnosticism and atheism, which he believed would not be a barrier to salvation. He also made a barefoot visit to the grave of Mahatma Gandhi. However, he declined to become involved in some inter-faith activities. He disliked the theology of Paul Tillich, and although he disagreed with a lot of Karl Barth's thinking, his relations with him were warm. Non conformism is the term of KKK ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... This article is about an Anglican Bishop. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... Paul Johannes Tillich (August 20, 1886 – October 22, 1965) was a German-American theologian and Christian existentialist philosopher. ... Karl Barth Karl Barth (May 10, 1886 – December 10, 1968) (pronounced bart) a Swiss Reformed theologian, was one of the most influential Christian thinkers of the 20th century. ...


Following observations of a religious mission at Cambridge, he had an early dislike of evangelists and mass rallies, which he feared relied too much on emotion. This led him to be critical of Billy Graham, although the two later became friends and Ramsey even took to the stage at a Graham rally in Rio de Janeiro. One of his later books, The Charismatic Christ (1973), engaged with the charismatic movement. Ramsey believed there was no decisive theological argument against women priests, although he was not comfortable with this observation. The first women priests in the Anglican Communion were ordained during his time as Archbishop of Canterbury, and in retirement he received the sacrament from a woman priest in the USA. For other persons named Billy Graham, see Billy Graham (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The charismatic movement began... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ...


Ecumenical activities

Ramsey was active in the ecumenical movement, and while Archbishop of Canterbury in 1966 he met Pope Paul VI in Rome, where the Pope presented him with the episcopal (bishop's) ring he had worn as Archbishop of Milan.[2] These warm relations with Rome caused him to be dogged by protests by Protestant fundamentalists, particularly Ian Paisley and John Kensit. Ramsey also enjoyed friendship with the orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople, Athenagoras, and Alexius, Patriarch of Moscow. His willingness to talk to officially-sanctioned churches in the Eastern Bloc led to criticisms from Richard Wurmbrand. He also supported efforts to unite the Church of England with the Methodist Church, and was depressed when the plans fell through. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism... Paul VI, Giovanni Battista Enrica Antonia Maria Montini (September 26, 1897 – August 6, 1978), served as Pope from 1963 to 1978. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Fundamentalism is a movement to maintain strict adherence to founding principles. ... Ian Richard Kyle Paisley (born 6 April 1926), styled The Revd and Rt Hon. ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, ranking as the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... His All Holiness Athenagoras I, by the grace of God, Archbishop of Constantinople New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch (Greek: Πατριάρχης Αθηναγόρας, born Aristokles Spyrou) (March 25, 1886 - July 6/7, 1972) was the 268th Patriarch of Constantinople from 1948 to 1972. ... Patriarch Alexius I Patriarch Alexius I (Sergey Simansky) (Russian: Патриарх Алексий I (Сергей Симанский) (October 27, 1877 – April 17, 1970), was the 14th Patriarch of Moscow and all of Russia, head of the Russian Orthodox Church between 1945 and 1970. ... The following is a list of Russian Orthodox metropolitans and patriarchs of Moscow along with when they served: Metropolitans Maximus ( 1283- 1305) Peter ( 1308- 1326) Theognostus ( 1328- 1353) Alexius ( 1354- 1378) Cyprian ( 1381- 1382), ( 1390- 1406) Pimen ( 1382- 1384) Dionysius I ( 1384- 1385) Photius ( 1408- 1431) Isidore the Apostate ( 1437... Richard Wurmbrand Richard Wurmbrand (March 24, 1909 - February 17, 2001) was a Romanian evangelical Christian minister, author, and educator who spent a total of fourteen years imprisoned in Romania. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ...


Politics

Ramsey disliked the power of the government over the church. His support for liberalising the laws against homosexuality brought him enemies in the House of Lords. Ramsey also created controversy over his call for military action against the Ian Smith regime in Rhodesia, and in his opposition to the Vietnam War. Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Rt Hon Ian Smith, Prime Minister of Rhodesia, 1964 (official portrait) Ian Douglas Smith GCLM ID (born 8 April 1919) was the Premier of the British Crown Colony of Southern Rhodesia from 13 April 1964 to 11 November 1965, and Prime Minister of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) from 11 November... This article is about the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


He opposed curbs on immigration to the UK of Kenyan Asians, which he saw as a betrayal by Britain of a promise. He was also against apartheid, and he left an account of a very frosty encounter with John Vorster. He was also a critic of Augusto Pinochet. Ramsey also opposed the granting of aid money by the World Council of Churches to guerrilla groups. A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... B. J. Vorster Balthazar Johannes Vorster (December 13, 1915 - September 10, 1983), better known as John Vorster, was Prime Minister of South Africa from 1966 to 1978, and President from 1978 to 1979. ... Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (November 25, 1915 – December 10, 2006) was President of Chile from 1974 to 1990, and was the President of the military junta from 1973 to 1981. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ...


Personal character

Ramsey was observed to be clumsy and a fidgeter, and he was unable to take part well in processions. He was frequently awkward in conversation and prone to silences, but also eloquent and poetic in public speaking. He considered becoming a monk, but instead married, and he and his wife Joan were devoted to one another. He particularly enjoyed talking to students. He was liked and respected both in the church and more widely, perhaps more so than either his immediate predecessors or successors; he had the reputation of being humane, principled, and discreet.


Retirement and legacy

After retiring as Archbishop in 1974 he was created a life peer, as Baron Ramsey of Canterbury, of Canterbury in Kent, enabling him to remain in the House of Lords where he had previously sat as one of the Lords Spiritual. Lord Ramsey was cremated; his ashes are buried at Canterbury Cathedral. He gave his name to Ramsey House, a residence of St Chad's College, University of Durham: he was a Fellow and Governor of the college (resident for a period), and he regularly worshipped and presided at the college's daily Eucharist. A building is also named after him at Canterbury Christ Church University. He also gave his name to the former Archbishop Michael Ramsey Technology College (from September 2007 St Michael and All Angels Church of England Academy) in Farmers Road, Camberwell, South East London.[3] In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom, also called Spiritual Peers, consist of the 26 clergymen of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords along with the Lords Temporal. ... St Chads College Durham University Named after Chad of Mercia Established 1904 Principal The Revd Canon Dr J. P. Cassidy Senior Tutor Dr Margaret Masson Senior Man Alistair Gordon Undergraduates 321 Postgraduates 63 Website St Chads College JCR Website Chads JCR Boat Club Website Chads Boat Club Campus... Durham University is a university in England. ... Christchurch College redirects here. ... For other uses, see Camberwell (disambiguation). ...


Michael Ramsey had no children. His elder brother, Frank P. Ramsey (b.1903, d.1930) was a brilliant mathematician and philosopher. Frank Plumpton Ramsey (February 22, 1903 – January 19, 1930) was a British mathematician who, in addition to mathematics, made significant contributions in philosophy and economics. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ...


References

  1. ^ Biography on thefreedictionary.com
  2. ^ National Catholic Reporter, The Word from Rome, 10 October 2003
  3. ^ St Michael and All Angels Academy newsletter, August 2007

Further reading

  • Owen Chadwick. Michael Ramsey: A Life. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990. ISBN 0198261896
  • J.B. Simpson. The Hundredth Archbishop of Canterbury. New York, 1962.

External links

Church of England titles
Preceded by
Alwyn Williams
Bishop of Durham
1952 – 1956
Succeeded by
Maurice Harland
Preceded by
Cyril Garbett
Archbishop of York
1956 – 1961
Succeeded by
Donald Coggan
Preceded by
Geoffrey Francis Fisher
Archbishop of Canterbury
1961 – 1974
List of Bishops of Durham. ... The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Prince-Bishop was the title given bishops who held secular powers, beside their inherent clerical power. ... The Diocese of Durham is a Church of England diocese, based in Durham, and covering the historic County Durham (and therefore including the southern part of Tyne and Wear and the northern part of Cleveland). ... Aldhun of Durham (died 1018) was the last Bishop of Lindisfarne and the first Bishop of Durham. ... Eadmund of Durham was Bishop of Durham from 1021-1041. ... Eadred was Bishop of Durham from 1041-1042. ... Eathelric was Bishop of Durham from 1042-1056. ... Ethelwin was the last Anglo-Saxon bishop of Durham (1056-1071), the last who was not also a secular ruler, and the only English bishop at the time of the Norman Conquest who did not remain loyal to William the Conqueror. ... William Walcher (d. ... William of St Calais (Carilef) (d. ... Ranulf Flambard, or Squiffy (died September 5, 1128) was Bishop of Durham and an influential government minister of William Rufus. ... Geoffrey Rufus was the tenth Lord Chancellor and Lord Keeper of England, from 1123 to 1133. ... William of St. ... Hugh de Puiset (c. ... Philip of Poitou (d. ... Richard Marsh served as Lord Chancellor of England and Bishop of Durham. ... Richard Poore (d. ... Nicholas Farnham was Bishop of Durham from 1241-1249. ... Walter of Kirkham was Bishop of Durham in 1249. ... Robert Stitchill was Bishop of Durham from 1260-1274. ... Robert of Holy Island was Bishop of Durham from 1274-1283. ... Antony Bek (d. ... Richard Kellaw was Bishop of Durham from 1311-1316  This article about a Bishop or Prince-Bishop of Durham is a stub. ... Lewis de Beaumont was Bishop of Durham from 1318-1333. ... Richard Aungerville (or Aungervyle) (January 24, 1287 - April 14, 1345), commonly known as Richard de Bury, was an English writer and bishop, He was born near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, the son of Sir Richard Aungervyle, who was descended from one of William the Conquerors men. ... Thomas Hatfield was Bishop of Durham from 1345-1381. ... John Fordham was Bishop of Durham from 1382-1388. ... Walter Skirlaw was Bishop of Durham from 1388-1406. ... Cardinal Thomas Langley (b. ... Robert Neville (1408 - 1457) was a Bishop of Salisbury and an Bishop of Durham. ... Lawrence Booth (d. ... William Dudley was Bishop of Durham from 1476-1483. ... John Sherwood was Bishop of Durham from 1484-1494. ... Richard Fox (c. ... William Senhouse (died 1505), also called William Sever, was an English priest, successively Bishop of Carlisle, 1495–1502, and Bishop of Durham, 1502–1505. ... Bainbridge, Christopher (1464?–1514), archbishop of York and cardinal, Bambridge came from a family based in Westmorland - he was a maternal nephew of Thomas Langton, Bishop of Winchester, which may account for his charmed early life. ... Thomas Ruthall, (died February 4, 1523), was a Chancellor of the University of Cambridge and Bishop of Durham. ... Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, (c. ... Cuthbert Tunstall (or Tonstall) (1474 - November 18, 1559) was an English church leader, twice Bishop of Durham. ... James Pilkington (1520 - 1576), was the Bishop of Durham from 1561 until his death in 1576. ... Richard Barnes (1532–1587) was an Anglican priest who served as a bishop in the Church of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. He was educated at Brasenose College, Oxford, where he was elected a fellow in 1552, and received his MA in 1557 and his DD in... Matthew Hutton (1529 — 1606), archbishop of York, son of Matthew Hutton of Priest Hutton, in the parish of Warton, North Lancashire, was born in that parish in 1529. ... Tobias Matthew, or Tobie (1546 - March 29, 1628), archbishop of York, was the son of Sir John Matthew of Ross in Herefordshire, and of his wife Eleanor Crofton of Ludlow. ... William James was Bishop of Durham from 1606-1617. ... Richard Neile (1562-1640) was an English churchman, bishop of several English dioceses and Archbishop of York from 1631 until his death. ... George Montaigne was Archbishop of York from July to October 1628. ... John Howson was Bishop of Durham from 1628-1632  This article about a Bishop or Prince-Bishop of Durham is a stub. ... Thomas Morton (1564 - 1659), was an English churchman, bishop of several dioceses. ... John Cosin (November 30, 1594 - January 15, 1672) was an English churchman. ... Nathanial Crew, 3rd Baron Crew (January 31, 1633–1721) was Bishop of Oxford from 1671 to 1674, then Bishop of Durham from 1674 to 1721. ... The Right Reverend William Talbot (1658–October 10, 1730) was Bishop of Oxford from 1699 to 1715, Bishop of Salisbury from 1715 to 1722 and Bishop of Durham from 1722 to 1730. ... Edward Chandler was Bishop of Durham from 1730-1750. ... Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. ... Richard Trevor was Bishop of Durham from 1752-1771. ... John Egerton (30 November 1721–18 June 1787) was an Anglican bishop. ... Thomas Thurlow was Bishop of Durham from 1787-1781. ... Shute Barrington (1734—1826), youngest son of the John Shute Barrington, 1st Viscount Barrington, was educated at Eton College and Oxford, and after holding some minor dignities was made bishop of Llandaff in 1769. ... William Van Mildert (1765–1836) was the last Prince-Bishop of Durham (1826–1836), and one of the founders of the University of Durham. ... Edward Maltby was Bishop of Durham from 1836-1856. ... A photo of Charles Thomas Longley by Lewis Carroll Charles Thomas Longley (1794-1868) was an English churchman, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1862 until his death. ... Henry Montagu Villiers (January 1813 – 9 August 1861) was a British clergyman of the Church of England. ... Charles Baring was Bishop of Durham from 1861-1879. ... Joseph Barber Lightfoot (April 13, 1828–December 21, 1889) was an English theologian and Bishop of Durham. ... Brooke Foss Westcott (January 12, 1825 _ July 27, 1901) was an English churchman and theologian, Bishop of Durham from 1890 until his death. ... Handley Moule was Bishop of Durham from 1901-1920. ... Henson in 1932 Bishop of Durham from 1920 to 1939, Anglican preacher and controversialist, Herbert Hensley Henson was born in London in 1863 and died in Hintlesham, Suffolk, in 1947. ... Alwyn Williams was Bishop of Durham from 1939-1952. ... Maurice Harland was Bishop of Durham from 1956-1966. ... Ian Ramsey was Bishop of Durham from 1966-1972. ... John Stapylton Habgood, Baron Habgood (born 1927), was Bishop of Durham between 1973 - 1983, and Archbishop of York between 1983 - 1995. ... David Edward Jenkins (born January 26, 1925) is best known as the Bishop of Durham, a post he held from 1984 until 1994. ... Michael Turnbull (b. ... Tom (N.T.) Wright, Bishop of Durham Tom (N.T.) Wright is the Bishop of Durham of the Anglican Church and a leading British New Testament scholar. ...

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