FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Michael Myers (Halloween)
Halloween character
Michael Myers
Classification: Mass murderer[1]
Signature weapon Kitchen knife
Created by: John Carpenter
Debra Hill
Portrayed by: Nick Castle, Tony Moran & Will Sandin (child)[2]
Dick Warlock & Adam Gunn (child)[3]
George P. Wilbur[4][5]
Don Shanks[6]
Chris Durand[7]
Brad Loree[8]
Tyler Mane & Daeg Faerch (child)[9]

Michael Myers is a fictional character from the Halloween series of slasher films. He first appears in John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) as a young boy who murders his older sister, then fifteen years later returns home to murder more teenagers. In the original Halloween, the adult Michael Myers, referred to as "The Shape" in the closing credits, was portrayed by Nick Castle for most of the film, with Tony Moran and Tommy Lee Wallace substituting in during the final scenes. He was created by Debra Hill and John Carpenter. Michael Myers has appeared in eight films, as well as novels, a video game and several comic books. Halloween (film) redirects here. ... Image File history File links Michaelmyers2007. ... Mass murder (massacre) is the act of murdering a large number of people, typically at the same time, or over a relatively short period of time. ... Steak Knife redirects here. ... For other persons named John Carpenter, see John Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Debra Hill (November 10, 1950–March 7, 2005) was an American screenwriter and film producer who co-wrote the horror movie Halloween. ... Nick Castle (born September 21, 1947) is an American actor,screenwriter and film director. ... Dick Warlock (born 1940 in Oakley, Ohio) is an American actor and stuntman. ... George P. Wilber is an actor who played Michael Myers in Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers and Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, the fourth and sixth films of the Halloween film series. ... Don Shanks (born Donald L. Shanks on February 26, 1950) is an American actor, known as playing the mass serial killer Michael Myers in Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers, also graduated from Southwestern High School in Piasa, Illinois. ... Brad Loree was born December 20, 1979 in Athens, Greece to a Greek mother and a Canadian father, Brad moved to America in 1996 at the age of 17 with his girlfriend Lisa Asson, to do stuntwork and modeling. ... Tyler Mane (born 23 October 1966) is a Canadian actor and former professional wrestler who worked for World Championship Wrestling as Big Sky and Nitro. ... (l) Daeg Faerch as young Michael Myers in Halloween; (r) Tyler Mane as adult Michael Myers. ... The title card seen in the original Halloween film. ... The original 1974 Black Christmas is considered the first authentic slasher. ... For other persons named John Carpenter, see John Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... Nick Castle (born September 21, 1947) is an American actor,screenwriter and film director. ... Debra Hill (November 10, 1950–March 7, 2005) was an American screenwriter and film producer who co-wrote the horror movie Halloween. ... For other persons named John Carpenter, see John Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Halloween is a 1979 novelization by Curtis Richards of the horror film Halloween (1978). ... Halloween is a video game for the Atari 2600, released in October of 1983. ... Several comic books published have been published to tie in with the Halloween film series. ...


The character is the primary antagonist in the Halloween film series, except Halloween III: Season of the Witch, which was not connected in continuity to the rest of the films. Since Castle, Moran, and Wallace put on the mask in the original film, six people have stepped into the role. There have been no actors to portray the character in consecutive films, with a new actor filling the role in each succeeding film; only one actor has portrayed the character more than once. Michael Myers is characterized as pure evil, whether directly in the films, by the filmmakers who created and developed the character over eight films, or random participants in a survey.[10][11] The title card seen in the original Halloween film. ... Halloween III: Season of the Witch is a horror film released in 1982. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ...

Contents

Appearances

Michael Myers is the primary antagonist in all of the Halloween films, with the exception of Halloween III: Season of the Witch, as that film did not feature any of the characters from the original two films and had nothing to do with Michael Myers. Michael would return immediately following Halloween III, in the appropriately titled Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers. The silver screen is not the only place Michael Myers has appeared; there have been literary sources that have expanded the universe of Michael. Halloween III: Season of the Witch is a horror film released in 1982. ... The term silver screen derives from the type of projection screen used at the start of the motion picture industry and specifically refers to the actual silver (Ag) content embedded in the material (a tightly woven fabric, either natural, such as silk, or a synthetic fiber) that made up the... Expanded Universe material (e. ...


Films

Michael Myers made his first appearance in the original 1978 film, Halloween, although the masked character is credited as "The Shape". In the beginning of the film, a six-year old Michael (Will Sandin) murders his older sister, Judith (Sandy Johnson), and is taken to a Smith's Grove - Warren County Sanitarium. Fifteen years later, Michael (Nick Castle) escapes the sanitarium and returns to Haddonfield, Illinois. Michael procedes to stalk and murder several teens. When he attempts to kill Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) she manages to fend him off long enough for Dr. Sam Loomis (Donald Pleasence), Michael's psychiatrist, to find him. Loomis shoots Michael six times in the chest, before Michael falls over the house's second-story balcony ledge. When Loomis goes to check Michael's body, he finds it missing.[2] Michael's second appearance was in Halloween's sequel, Halloween II (1981). The film picks up directly where the original ends, with Loomis still looking for Michael's body. Myers (Dick Warlock) follows Laurie Strode to the local hospital, where he wanders the halls in search of her. Loomis discovers that Laurie Strode is Michael's younger sister, and goes to the hospital to find them. Loomis causes an explosion in the operating room, and Laurie escapes as the flames engulf Loomis and Myers.[3] The following are fictional characters in the American Halloween film series. ... Sandy Johnson (born July 7, 1954 in San Antonio, Texas) is an American model and actress. ... Smiths Grove - Warren County Sanitarium is a fictional Illinois state hospital and psychiatric care facility set in real-life Warren County, Illinois. ... Nick Castle (born September 21, 1947) is an American actor,screenwriter and film director. ... Haddonfield, Illinois is a fictional place in the movie Halloween and six of its sequels. ... Laurie Strode (1961-2002) is a fictional character in the Halloween horror film series, portrayed by actresses Jamie Lee Curtis and Scout Taylor-Compton. ... Jamie Lee Curtis (born November 22, 1958) is an American film actress and an author of childrens books. ... Dr. Sam Loomis as he appeared in Halloween II. Dr. Samuel J. Loomis (1919 - 1995) was a fictional character in the Halloween film series. ... Donald Henry Pleasence, OBE (October 5, 1919 – February 2, 1995) was an English stage and film actor. ... An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ... For other uses, see Halloween II (disambiguation). ... Dick Warlock (born 1940 in Oakley, Ohio) is an American actor and stuntman. ... An operating theatre or operating room is a room within a hospital within which surgical operations are carried out. ...


Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988) picks the story up ten years after the events of Halloween II. Michael (George P. Wilbur) is revealed to have survived the explosion, but he has been held at the Ridgemont Federal Sanitarium. Michael wakes from his coma when he learns Laurie Strode was killed in a car accident, but that her daughter is still alive. Michael escapes and immediately heads to Haddonfield to kill Laurie's daughter, Jamie (Danielle Harris). The state police find Michael and shoot him several times before he falls down a mine shaft.[4] Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers (1989) begins immediately after the fourth film ends, with Michael Myers (Don Shanks) escaping the mine shaft and being nursed back to health by a local hermit. The next year, Michael kills the hermit and returns to Haddonfield to find Jamie again. Michael is eventually captured and taken to the local police station, but an unseen figure kills the officers and frees him.[6] Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers (1995) takes place approximately six years after the events of The Revenge of Michael Myers; both Jamie (J. C. Brandy) and Michael (George P. Wilbur) have disappeared from Haddonfield. The Cult of Thorn impregnate Jamie, in an effort to control Michael Myers. Michael kills Jamie, but not before she hides her newborn. Tommy Doyle (Paul Stephen Rudd) discovers Jamie's baby. While trying to protect the baby from Myers, Tommy learns that the Curse of Thorn is the cause of Michael's obsession with killing his entire family.[5] George P. Wilber is an actor who played Michael Myers in Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers and Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, the fourth and sixth films of the Halloween film series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Danielle Andrea Harris (born June 1, 1977) is an American television and film actress, perhaps best known for her roles in several of the Halloween films. ... Abandoned mine shafts in Marl, Germany. ... Don Shanks (born Donald L. Shanks on February 26, 1950) is an American actor, known as playing the mass serial killer Michael Myers in Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers, also graduated from Southwestern High School in Piasa, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... Justine Chelsea Brandy (born November 15, 1975 in Chelsea, England) is an English actress. ... Cult of Thorn is a fictional cult featured in the film Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers. ... A human infant The word Infant derives from the Latin in-fans, meaning unable to speak. ... The following are fictional characters in the American Halloween film series. ... Paul Stephen Rudd (born April 6, 1969) is an American film, television, and stage actor. ... The Thorn mark - shown for the first time on Michael Myers wrist. ...


Ignoring the events of the previous three films, Halloween H20: 20 Years Later (1998) follows Michael (Chris Durand) as he searches for Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), and her teenage son John (Josh Hartnett). Michael tracks Laurie to the private boarding school where she is headmistress and murders John's friends. After ensuring the safety of her son, Laurie battles it out with Michael, and succeeds in decapitating him.[7] Halloween: Resurrection (2002), which picks up three years after H20, retcons Michael's death, establishing that the man Laurie decapitated was a paramedic whom Michael had attacked and swapped clothes with. Michael tracks Laurie to a mental institution, where she was placed after she learned the truth of her actions. Michael kills Laurie and returns to his home in Haddonfield. There, he finds a group of college students filming an internet reality show inside his house. He begins killing each of them before being caught in an electrical fire.[8] The following are fictional characters in the American Halloween film series. ... Joshua Daniel Hartnett (born July 21, 1978) is an American actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Star of Life, a globally recognised symbol for emergency medical services A paramedic is a medical professional, usually a member of the emergency medical service, who responds to medical and trauma emergencies in the pre-hospital environment, provides emergency treatment and, when appropriate, transports a patient to definitive care... Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. ...


Michael's latest appearance is in Rob Zombie's Halloween (2007), a reimagining of the original film.[12] Zombie's film focuses more on Michael's psychology. The film follows the basic premise of the original film, with Michael (Daeg Faerch) killing his sister Judith (Hanna R. Hall), escaping Smith's Grove, and stalking Laurie Strode (Scout Taylor-Compton). In this film, Laurie is shown to be Michael's sister from the beginning, something not revealed until the original's sequel in 1981. Michael is shown to have an interest in killing animals, and with Halloween masks. During his time at Smith's Grove, he takes up the hobby of creating papier-mâché masks, which he wears constantly. Michael's (Tyler Mane) motives for coming after Laurie were altered to show that he was attempting to reunite with his sister, the one person in his family he cared for, instead of simply being out to kill her.[9] Robert Cummings (born January 12, 1965 in Haverhill, Massachusetts), better known as Rob Zombie, is an American musician, film director, and writer. ... Halloween is a reimagining of the 1978 film of the same name. ... (l) Daeg Faerch as young Michael Myers in Halloween; (r) Tyler Mane as adult Michael Myers. ... Hanna Rose Hall (born July 9, 1984) is an American actress. ... Desariee Starr Compton (born February 21, 1989) is an American actress who goes professionally by the name Scout Taylor-Compton. ... Papier-mâché around a form such as a balloon to create a pig. ... Tyler Mane (born 23 October 1966) is a Canadian actor and former professional wrestler who worked for World Championship Wrestling as Big Sky and Nitro. ...


Literature

Michael Myers made his literary debut in October 1979 when Curtis Richards released a novelization of the film. The book follows the events of the film, but expands on the festival of Samhain and Michael's time at Smith's Grove Sanitarium.[13] Michael returned to the world of literature with the 1981 adaptation of Halloween II written by Jack Martin; it was published alongside the first film sequel, with the novel following the film events, with an addition victim, a reporter, of Myers added to the novel.[14] The final novelization to feature Michael was Halloween IV, released October 1988. The novel was written by Nicholas Grabowsky, and like the previous adaptations, follows the events of Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers.[15] This page refers to the year 1979. ... Halloween is a 1979 novelization by Curtis Richards of the horror film Halloween (1978). ... Look up Samhain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Halloween series of films has been adapted into a series of novels. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Over a four month period, Berkley Books published three young adult novels written by Kelly O'Rourke; the novels are original stories created by O'Rourke, with no direct continuity with the films.[16] The first, released on October 1, 1997, titled The Scream Factor, follows a group of friends who set up a haunted house attraction in the basement of Haddonfield City Hall, only to be stalked and killed by Michael Myers while they are there.[17] The Old Myers Place is the second novel, released December 1, 1997, and focuses on a Mary White, who moves into the Myers house with her family. Michael returns home and begins stalking and attacking Mary and her friends.[18] O'Rourke's final novel, The Mad House, was released on February 1, 1998. The Mad House features a young girl, Christine Ray, who joins a documentary film crew that travels to haunted locations; they are currently headed to Smith Grove Mental Hospital. The crew are quickly confronted by Michael Myers.[19] Berkley Books is a paperback imprint of Penguin Group (USA). ... Young adult fiction (often abbreviated at YA fiction) is fiction written for, published for, or marketed to adolescents, roughly ages 12 to 18. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


The character's first break into comics came with a series of comics published by Brian Pulido's Chaos Comics. The first, simply titled Halloween, was intended to be a one-issue special, but eventually two sequels spawned: Halloween II: The Blackest Eyes and Halloween III: The Devil's Eyes. All of the stories were written by Phil Nutman, with Daniel Farrands—writer for Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers—assisting on the first issue; David Brewer and Justiniano worked on the illustrations. Tommy Doyle is the main protagonist in each of the issues, focusing on his attempts to kill Michael Myers. The first issue includes backstory on Michael's childhood, while the third picks up after the events of the film Halloween H20.[20] Brian Pulido Brian Pulido is a multi-talented creator, writer and producer of various comic books, films and related properties. ... A comic book publisher. ...


In 2003, Michael appeared in the self-published comic One Good Scare, written by Stefan Hutchinson and illustrated by Peter Fielding. The main character in the comic is Lindsey Wallace, the young girl who first saw Michael Myers alongside Tommy Doyle in the original 1978 film. Hutchinson wanted to bring the character back to his roots, and away from the "lumbering Jason-clone" the film sequels had made him.[21] On July 25, 2006, as an insert inside the DVD release of Halloween: 25 Years of Terror, the comic book Halloween: Autopsis was released. Written by Stefan Hutchinson, and artwork by Marcus Smith and Nick Dismas, the story is about a photographer assigned to take pictures of Michael Myers. As the photographer, Carter, follows Dr. Loomis he begins to take on Loomis's obsession himself, until finally meeting Michael Myers in person, which results in his death.[22] Stefan Hutchinson has plans to release a series of Halloween comics, starting in 2008, through Devil's Due publishing. The first comics will be a 4 issue mini series, titled Halloween: Nightdance, with the first issue focusing primarily on Michael Myers, with no appearances from characters from the films. The storyline will take place on October 31, 2000, so that it will fall between Halloween H20 and Halloween Resurrection. Issue #1 will follow Michael as he stalks Lisa, a fifteen year-old girl with insecurities and "a chronic fear of darkness".[23] is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Concept and creation

The character derives his name from distributor Michael Myers, who worked with Debra Hill and John Carpenter on Assault on Precinct 13. According to John Carptener, Myers helped "push [Assault on Precinct 13] into the London Film Festival, that's where my reputation kind of began, so I felt I owed him. So that was my tribute to him, he was this dearest, dearest man". Carpenter wanted to "raise this Michael Myers character up to a mythic status; make him human, yes, but almost like a force. A force that will never stop, that can't be denied."[24] He did not want to give Michael a backstory, but put him immediately into a "legendary kind of situation".[25] To elaborate, Carpenter explained that he was influenced by Yul Brynner's "killer robot that couldn't be destroyed" in Michael Crichton's Westworld.[24] Carpenter felt this kind of character, one that was "a force", would be more terrifying than personifying him. Michael mask was meant to help illustrate this further, because it would "blank out his human features […] Making him then just some sort of force of evil that is irrational, unstoppable."[25] Assault on Precinct 13 is a 1976 action / thriller movie, directed by John Carpenter. ... The Times BFI London Film Festival is the UKs largest public film event, screening 300 films from 60 countries. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ... Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... Westworld was a 1973 film written and directed by Michael Crichton. ...


When developing the 2007 Halloween remake, Rob Zombie commented on his intentions for the character, stating that he wanted Michael Myers to be the lead character in the film. Zombie felt the character could be made "more intense" if he was more than just a "faceless thing floating around in the background". Zombie believed it was important to be able to see the events that shape the character, making it "more disturbing" to the audience.[26]


Becoming "The Shape"

In the original film, three actors portrayed Michael Myers. Will Sandon played a six year-old Michael, who murders his sister Judith on Halloween night. Later in the film, Tony Moran and Nick Castle would portray the adult Michael, with Moran credited as "Michael Myers (age 23)" and Castle credited as "The Shape". Nick Castle was a friend, and former University of Southern California schoolmate, of John Carpenter. Production on Halloween was taking place near Castle's house, so he asked Carpenter if he could hang around the set, because he was attempting to get his own movies "off the ground". Carpenter agreed on the condition that Castle play the role of the masked killer. For his part, Castle was paid $25 a day.[24] Debra Hill remarks: Nick Castle (born September 21, 1947) is an American actor,screenwriter and film director. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...

"[Nick Castle's] father was a choreographer for Fred Astaire, and he just moved great. And I think John really wanted to play him as that, where he just looks, and his head turns, and he's enamored by this sister-like character that he sees in Laurie Strode. He makes the connection; he breaks out of the insane asylum and gets to his house, and sees this young girl, and makes this sort of subtle connection."[24] Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ...

Castle's motivation while filming was simple, "walk from this point to the end point, and roll"; this was reflected in Carpenter's directing, or lack of directing, as Carpenter himself admits that the only bit of direction he gave Castle was, "Do nothing, just walk. Don't act, just walk."[24] To elaborate, during filming Castle tried to find extra motivation for the character, attempting to get into the mind of someone who is mentally ill. Carpenter had to keep reminding him to keep it "simple"; he wanted Castle to make sure the character moved "gracefully" and was a "blank slate that we can project everything into, and make it much more horrifying".[25] Jamie Lee Curtis believes Castle kept the character from being more than just a "thug in a suit". Castle was replaced by Tony Moran for the scene where Michael is unmasked, because Carpenter and Hill wanted someone who had more of an "angelic" face.[24]


Moran, who was looking for work, received a call from his agent about an audition for a "B flick", where he would be playing a "psycho". Moran prepared for his audition by neglecting to sleep, shave, shower or wash his hair for three days. He wore tattered clothes, with hiking boots to the audition. After being introduced to John Carpenter, Jamie Lee Curtis and Donald Pleasence, Moran proceeded to slam his feet up on the table and demand some coffee. He startled everyone at the table, and that afternoon received a phone call that he had gotten the job. Moran would take up the role from the point that Michael is strangling Laurie, as production designer Tommy Lee Wallace had performed the job during the scene where Michael breaks through the closet and Nick Castle in the part up to that scene. Moran would film the rest of the scenes—the removal of Michael's mask, being shot by Loomis and then falling over the balcony—except where Michael's body lies on the ground outside. In response to the "angelic face" remark made by Castle, Moran contends that he was not made aware of that "concept" when he was hired, but after viewing some photos of him and Carpenter on an A&E special, he "kind of sees what [Castle] means".[27] Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ...


Stunt performer Dick Warlock played Michael Myers in Halloween II, replacing Castle who was beginning a career as a director. Warlock's previous experience in film was as a stunt double in films such as The Green Berets (1968), Jaws (1975) and the 1974 television series Kolchak: The Night Stalker. Warlock had not seen the original film before he was hired, but after getting the job we watched the film "two or three times", modeling his behavior after the few scenes Tommy Lee Wallace performed. Wallace portrayed the character in the scene where Michael attacks Laurie in the closet, and the scene where he sits up and turns toward Laurie, after having fallen down wounded from her counter-attack. Warlock modeled his movements for Halloween II after those scenes, as well as the scene where Michael tilts his head to the side while staring at the body of Bob stuck on the wall.[28] Warlock took on Michael's characteristic "breathing", which was heard in the original film, while he was behind the mask.[29] Debra Hill claims that although "the Shape" had no lines, Castle's portrayal gave them the presence that they wanted for the movie; she goes on to say that Dick Warlock was unable to emulate that presence, despite studying Castle's performance.[25] Dick Warlock (born 1940 in Oakley, Ohio) is an American actor and stuntman. ... The Green Berets is the title of a 1968 film starring John Wayne and featuring George Takei, David Janssen, Jim Hutton, and Aldo Ray. ... Jaws is a 1975 thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. ... Darren McGavin as Kolchak in The Night Stalker (1972) Kolchak: The Night Stalker is a television series that aired on ABC in 1974, about a newpaper reporter -- Carl Kolchak, played by Darren McGavin -- who investigates crimes with mysterious and unlikely causes that the proper authorities wont accept. ...


George P. Wilbur did not study any of the previous Halloween films when he took over the role in The Return of Michael Myers.[28]


The mask

Nick Castle holds up the original Michael Myers mask, which was created from a William Shatner Halloween mask
Nick Castle holds up the original Michael Myers mask, which was created from a William Shatner Halloween mask

Tommy Lee Wallace, writer/director of Halloween III: Season of the Witch, was the production designer/co-editor on Halloween, and it was up to him to find "the perfect mask" for the Michael Myers character. The mask was intended to have a "blank face", and the William Shatner Halloween mask he found was exactly what he need, "It didn't really look like anybody." Wallace cut the eyeholes larger and rounder, removed the eyebrows and sideburns, poofed up the hair so it looked "demented and strange" and finally spray-painted the mask white. Wallace explains, "It created a shiver right in the room, and we knew we had something special." John Carpenter claims that the mask looked nothing like William Shatner whatsoever, but jokes "I guess I owe the success of Halloween to William Shatner."[24] According to Jamie Lee Curtis, the mask needed to be a "human image", and the only thing in stores at the time that matched what they needed on set was the Shatner mask.[10] Carpenter elaborates: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ...

"We didn't have any money to make a mask. It was originally written the way you see it, in other words, it's a pale mask with human features, almost featureless. I don't know why I wrote that down, why Debra and I decided on that, maybe it was because of an old movie called Eyes Without a Face. It's a French film, Franju made it, this girl had a burned face so she wore this face mask, it was real creepy because it was featureless and immobile except for her eyes. So Tommy Lee Wallace, our production designer, ran up to the mask shop on Hollywood Boulevard and bought a couple, one was a clown mask, and that's, you know, one way to go, and the other he got this William Shatner Star Trek mask; Captain Kirk."[24] Eyes Without a Face (Les Yeux sans Visage) is a 1959 French film directed by Georges Franju and co-written by the duo Boileau-Narcejac Categories: Film stubs ... Georges Franju (April 12, 1912 - November 5, 1987) was a French filmmaker. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... James Kirk redirects here. ...

Contrary to reports, the mask used in Halloween II was the mask used in the original film. According to Dick Warlock, Debra Hill stored the original mask under her bed before she brought it to Warlock to wear. Warlock offers his opinion on why the mask looks different in the second film: "I think the lighting has a lot to do with the way the mask looks from film to film. The shape of my face is also totally different than [Nick] Castle's, [Tommy Lee] Wallace's or probably any of the other people who wore it in Halloween." The original mask has since been sold "to a man in Ohio. He has two haunted houses. One in Toledo and one in Tiffin. He had the mask and coveralls on display there this past October. I'm supposing he'll display them every year in one place or the other," according to Warlock.[28]


Dominique Othenin-Girard, director of Halloween 5, began casting for the Michael Myers character using the Halloween 4 mask during auditions, but was "perplexed" with Don Shanks performance. Girard wanted the character to "feel human and alive", but knew that without dialogue or facial expressions he would not be able to achieve his goal. Girard decide to use latex material to create new masks for Don Shanks, and the KNB special effects team attempted to go for a human interpretation of evil. Girard also felt it was necessary to distance himself from the "plastic, shiny look of the hockey mask of Friday the 13th". While the special effects team worked on the new masks, Girard requested that the team alter the traditional design of the nose, which he thought felt "too realistic and too normal, too round and soft, too much like a human nose". Girard wanted "the feel of a mask", something "unmovable, like a façade hiding a terrible secret behind steel".[30] Don Shanks (born Donald L. Shanks on February 26, 1950) is an American actor, known as playing the mass serial killer Michael Myers in Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers, also graduated from Southwestern High School in Piasa, Illinois. ... This article is about the typesetting system. ...


Adam Arkin, who plays guidance counselor Will Brennan in Halloween H20, remarks, "There's something that's so minimalistic and so neutral about that face, that becomes sort of indelibly edged in your memory, number one. And I think number two, you're able to project any kind of frightening idea or image on top of it."[10] // A school counselor is a counselor and educator who works in schools, and are often referred to as guidance counselors or educational counselors. In professional literature, the term school counselor is preferred. ...


Characterization

"I met this six year old child with this blank, pale, emotionless face, and the blackest eyes. The devil's eyes […] I realized what was living behind that boy's eyes was purely and simply…evil."
— Loomis' description of a young Michael was inspired by John Carpenter's experience with a real life mental patient.[24]

A common characterization is that Michael Myers is evil. John Carptener has described the character as "almost a supernatural force - a force of nature. An evil force that's loose," a force that is "unkillable"[10] His inspiration for the "evil" that Michael would embody came when he was in college. While on a class trip at a mental institution in Kentucky, Carpenter visited "the most serious, mentally ill patients". Among those patients was a young boy around twelve to thirteen years-old. The boy this "schizophrenic stare", "a real evil stare", which Carpenter found "unsettling", "creepy", and "completely insane". Carpenter's experience would inspire the characterization Loomis would give of Michael to Sheriff Brackett in the original film. Another instance of Michael's evil is the scene where he kills the Wallace's German Shepherd. Debra Hill has stated the scene shows how Michael "was really evil and deadly".[24] Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Country of origin Germany Classification Breed standards (external links) FCI, AKC, ANKC, CKC KC(UK), NZKC, UKC The German Shepherd Dog (known also as the Alsatian or Schäfer(hund)) is an intelligent breed of dog. ...


The ending scene of Michael being shot six times, and then disappearing from the ground outside the house, was meant to terrify the imagination of the audience. Carpenter tried to keep the audience guessing as to who Michael Myers really is—he is gone, and everywhere at the same time; he is more than human; he may be supernatural, and no one knows how he got that way. To Carpenter, keeping the audience guessing was better than explaining away the character with "he's cursed by some..."[24] For Josh Hartnett, who portrayed John Tate in Halloween H20, "it's that abstract, it's easier for me to be afraid of it. You know, someone who just kind of appears and, you know [Mimics stabbing noise from Psycho] instead of an actual human who you think you can talk to. And no remorse, it's got no feelings, that's the most frightening, definitely." Richard Schickel, film critic for TIME, felt Michael was "irational" and "really angry about something […] And it had a kind of primitive, obsessed intelligence". Schickel considered this the "definition of a good monster", by making the character appear "less than human", but have enough intelligence "to be dangerous".[10] Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... Richard Warren Schickel (b. ... “TIME” redirects here. ...

"Michael Myers is enduring because he's pure evil."
—Steve Miner[10]

Dominique Othenin-Girard attempted to have audiences "relate to "Evil", to Michael Myers's 'ill' side". Girard wanted Michael to appear "more human […] even vulnerable, with contradicting feelings inside of him". He illustrated these feelings with a scene where Michael removes his mask and sheds a tear. Girard explains,"Again, to humanize him, to give him a tear. If Evil or in this case our boogeyman knows pain, or love or demonstrate a feeling of regrets; he become even more scary to me if he pursue his malefic action. He shows an evil determination beyond his feelings. Dr. Loomis tries to reach his emotional side several times in [Halloween 5]. He thinks he could cure Michael through his feelings."[30]


A study was conducted by California State University's Media Psychology Lab, on the psychological appeal of movie monsters—Vampires, Freddy Krueger, Frankenstein's monster, Jason Voorhees, Godzilla, Chucky, Hannibal Lecter, King Kong, and The Alien—which surveyed 1,166 people nationwide (United States), with ages ranging from 16 to 91. It was published in the Journal of Media Psychology. In the survey, Michael was considered to be the "embodiment of pure evil"; when compared to the other characters, Michael Myers was rated the highest. Michael was characterized lending to the understanding of insanity, being ranked second to Hannibal Lecter in this category; he also placed first as the character who shows audiences the "dark side of human nature". He was rated second in the category "monster enjoys killing" by the participants, and believed to have "superhuman strength". Michael was rated highest among the characters in the "monster is an outcast" category.[11] The California State University (CSU) is one of three public higher education systems in the state of California, the other two being the University of California system and the California Community College System. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Frankensteins monster (or Frankenstein or Frankensteins creature) is a fictional character that first appeared in Mary Shelleys novel, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Jason Voorhees is a fictional character from the Friday the 13th series of slasher films. ... This article is about the character itself. ... Charles Lee Ray, a. ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... For other uses, see King Kong (disambiguation). ... The xenomorph as it appears in Alien vs. ...


In popular culture

In Robot Chicken's nineteenth episode, "That Hurts Me", Michael Myers appears as a housemate of "Horror Movie Big Brother", alongside other famous slasher movie killers such as Jason Voorhees, Freddy Krueger, and Leatherface. Myers is evicted from the house, and takes off his mask to reveal himself to be the comedian Mike Myers, and utters his Austin Powers catchphrase, "Groovy baby!" He proceeds to kill the host.[31] Robot Chicken is an Emmy award-winning American stop motion animated television series produced by Stoopid Monkey, ShadowMachine Films, Williams Street, and Sony Pictures Digital, currently airing in the US as a part of Cartoon Networks Adult Swim line-up, in the United Kingdom and Ireland as part of... List of Robot Chicken episodes That Hurts Me is the nineteenth episode of season one of the television comedy series Robot Chicken. ... Big Brother is a reality television format. ... Jason Voorhees is a fictional character from the Friday the 13th series of slasher films. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Leatherface is a fictional character in the The Texas Chainsaw Massacre movies. ... Michael Myers can refer to: The Rt Hon Sir Michael Myers was the sixth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...


In one of the various merchandises to feature the character, Michael Myers made his video game debut with the 1983 Atari video game Halloween. The game is rare to find, often being played on emulators. No characters from the films are specifically name, with the goal of the game focusing on the player, who is a babysitter, protecting children from a "homicidal maniac [who] has escaped from a mental institution".[32] This article is about the corporate game company. ... Halloween is a video game for the Atari 2600, released in October of 1983. ... This article is about emulators in computer science. ...


References

  1. ^ Stuart Fischoff, Alexandra Dimopoulos, FranÇois Nguyen, Leslie Hurry, and Rachel Gordon. "The psychological appeal of your favorite movie monsters (abstract)", ISCPubs. Retrieved on 2007-07-24. 
  2. ^ a b Debra Hill (writer) and John Carpenter (writer/director). (1978). Halloween (1978 film) [DVD]. Falcon International Productions.
  3. ^ a b Debra Hill, John Carpenter (writers) and Rick Rosenthal (director). (1981). Halloween II [DVD]. Dino De Laurentiis Corporation.
  4. ^ a b Alan B. McElroy (writer) and Dwight H. Little. (1988). Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers [DVD]. Trancas International Films.
  5. ^ a b Daniel Farrands (writer) and Joe Chappelle (director). (1995). Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers [DVD]. Miramax Films.
  6. ^ a b Michael Jacobs, Dominique Othenin-Girard, Shem Bitterman (writers) and Dominique Othenin-Girard (director). (1989). Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers [DVD]. Magnum Pictures Inc..
  7. ^ a b Robert Zapia, Matt Greenberg (writers) and Steve Miner (director). (1998). Halloween H20: 20 Years Later [DVD]. Dimension Films.
  8. ^ a b Larry Brand, Sean Hood (writers) and Rick Rosenthal (director). (2002). Halloween: Resurrection [DVD]. Dimension Films.
  9. ^ a b Rob Zombie (writer/director). (2007). Halloween (2007 film) [DVD]. Dimension Films.
  10. ^ a b c d e f John Carpenter, Jamie Lee Curtis, Josh Hartnett, Adam Arkin, Steve Miner, and Richard Schickel. Unmasking the Horror (Halloween H20 DVD Special Features) [DVD (Region 2)]. United States: Dimension Films.
  11. ^ a b Stuart Fischoff, Alexandra Dimopoulos, François Nguyen, and Rachel Gordon (2005-08-25). "The Psychological Appeal of Movie Monsters" (PDF). Journal of Media Psychology 10 (3). Retrieved on 2007-07-11. 
  12. ^ Borys Kit. "Zombie plots new mayhem for 'Halloween'", The Hollywood Reporter, 2006-06-05. Retrieved on 2007-08-11. 
  13. ^ Curtis Richards (October 1979). Halloween (novel). Bantam Books. ISBN 553132261. 
  14. ^ Jack Martin (1981-11-01). Halloween II (novel). Zebra Publishing. ISBN 089083864X. 
  15. ^ Nicholas Grabowsky (October 1988). Halloween IV (novel). Critics Choice Paperbacks/Lorevan Publishing. ISBN 1555472923. 
  16. ^ Interview with Kelly O'Rourke. Halloween Movies (2006-01-05). Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
  17. ^ Kelly O'Rourke (1997-10-01). The Scream Factory (Halloween, Book 1). Berkley Books. ISBN 157297298X. 
  18. ^ Kelly O'Rourke (1997-12-01). The Old Myers Place (Halloween, Book 2). Berkley Books. ISBN 1572973412. 
  19. ^ Kelly O'Rourke (1998-02-01). The Mad House (Halloween, Book 3). Berkley Books. ISBN 1572973420. 
  20. ^ Halloween - Michael Myers comic book titles. Movie Maniacs Comic Books. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  21. ^ The Arrow interviews Stefan Hutchinson. Arrow in the Head (2003-11-28). Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  22. ^ Halloween: Autopsis. Bloody Disgusting (2006-07-12). Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  23. ^ Stefan Hutchinson talks Halloween. Horror Comic Book News (2007-11-20). Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k John Carpenter, Debra Hill, Nick Castle, Jamie Lee Curtis, and Tommy Lee Wallace. A Cut Above the Rest (Halloween: 25th Anniversary Edition DVD Special Features) [DVD (Region 2)]. United States: Anchor Bay.
  25. ^ a b c d John Carpenter, Debra Hill, Nick Castle. Halloween Unmasked 2000 (Halloween Special Edition DVD Special Features) [DVD (Region 2)]. United States: Dimension Films.
  26. ^ Robert Mancini. "Evil Reborn: Rob Zombie resurrects a horror classic", MTV Movies. Retrieved on 2007-08-12. 
  27. ^ Sean Clark. "Moran, Tony (Halloween)", Dread Central. Retrieved on 2007-11-26. 
  28. ^ a b c Interview with Dick Warlock. Pit of Horror. Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  29. ^ Interview with Dick Warlock (2). Halloween Movies (2006-10-31). Retrieved on 2007-10-03.
  30. ^ a b Dominique Othenin-Girard. Halloween Movies (2006-04-10). Retrieved on 2007-10-03.
  31. ^ "That Hurts Me". Seth Green, Matthew Senreich. Robot Chicken. Adult Swim. 2005-07-10. No. 19, season 1.
  32. ^ Matt. "Halloween Atari video game", X-Entertainment, 2004-10-29. Retrieved on 2007-11-25. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Debra Hill (November 10, 1950–March 7, 2005) was an American screenwriter and film producer who co-wrote the horror movie Halloween. ... For other persons named John Carpenter, see John Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Rick Rosenthal (born June 15, 1949, in New York, New York) is an American film director known for his work in horror films. ... For other uses, see Halloween II (disambiguation). ... Alan B. McElroy is an American writer, director and producer. ... Dwight H. Little (born Dwight Henry Little on February 9, 1947)[2] is an American film director. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... Stephen C. Miner (born June 18, 1951) is an American film and television director. ... Dimension Films is a motion picture unit currently a part of The Weinstein Company. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Robert Cummings (born January 12, 1965 in Haverhill, Massachusetts), better known as Rob Zombie, is an American musician, film director, and writer. ... Halloween is a reimagining of the 1978 film of the same name. ... Jamie Lee Curtis (born November 22, 1958) is an American film actress and an author of childrens books. ... Joshua Daniel Hartnett (born July 21, 1978) is an American actor. ... Adam Arkin (born August 19, 1956) is an American television, film, and stage actor. ... Richard Warren Schickel (b. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... Cover of Dennis Etchisons short story collection (Stealth Press, 2001) Dennis William Etchison (born March 30, 1943 in Stockton, California), is an American writer and editor of fantasy and horror fiction. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Berkley Books is a paperback imprint of Penguin Group (USA). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Starz Home Entertainment Logo Starz Home Entertainment (formerly Anchor Bay Entertainment) is a home video/television distribution company that was formed in 1989. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... List of Robot Chicken episodes That Hurts Me is the nineteenth episode of season one of the television comedy series Robot Chicken. ... Seth Benjamin Gesshel-Green (born February 8, 1974) is an American actor, comedian and television producer. ... Matthew Ian Senreich is the director, producer and writer of the TV series Robot Chicken. ... Adult Swim is the name for an adult-oriented television programming network. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Michael Myers (Halloween) (716 words)
Michael Myers (full name: Michael Audrey Myers, also known as The Shape) is a fictional character who has appeared in all of the Halloween films, with the exception of Halloween III: Season of the Witch.
In Halloween 5, Myers remained comatose in a hospital until he was going to be taken back to Smith's Grove, and he overheard one of the ambulance drivers mentioning having a young niece by the name of Jamie Lloyd.
Myers then escapes the ambulance and tries to hunt her down, but is once again beaten by Loomis, who had been driven to the brink of insanity by his quest to destroy Myers.
Michael Myers (Halloween) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5703 words)
Michael Myers (also known as The Shape) (born October 19, 1957) is a fictional character and the principal antagonist of the Halloween film series, except Halloween III: Season of the Witch.
Loomis and Michael survived the explosion at the hospital.
The mask Michael Myers wears in the original film is a Captain Kirk mask that was painted white and had the eyes widened.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m