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Encyclopedia > Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Born: April 23, 1954
Flint, Michigan, United States
Occupation: film director, author, social commentator
Website: www.michaelmoore.com

Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. He is widely known for his outspoken, critical views on globalization, large corporations, gun violence, the Iraq War, and President George W. Bush. Image File history File linksMetadata Michaelmoore1. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flint, Michigan is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, located along the Flint River, 66 miles (106 km) northwest of Detroit. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Social commentary is the act of expressing an opinion on the nature of society. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Social commentary is the act of expressing an opinion on the nature of society. ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold in the cafeteria at Columbine High School, shortly before committing suicide. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Flint, Michigan, Michael Moore grew up in the city of Davison. At the time the neighboring city of Flint was home to many General Motors factories, where his mother was a secretary, and both his father and grandfather were auto workers. His uncle was one of the founders of the United Automobile Workers labor union and participated in the famous Flint Sit-Down Strike. Flint, Michigan is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, located along the Flint River, 66 miles (106 km) northwest of Detroit. ... Davison is a city in Genesee County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Flint, Michigan is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, located along the Flint River, 66 miles (106 km) northwest of Detroit. ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is the worlds largest automaker and has been since 1931. ... A factory worker in 1940s Fort Worth, Texas. ... The United Auto Workers (UAW), officially the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America International Union, is one of the largest labor unions in North America, with more than 700,000 members in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico organized into approximately 950 union locals. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Flint Sit-Down Strike changed the United Automobile Workers from a collection of isolated locals on the fringes of the industry into a major union and led to the unionization of the United States automobile industry. ...


Moore, an Irish American, was brought up Roman Catholic and attended a Diocesan seminary at age 14. He then attended Davison High School, where he was active in both drama and debate[1], graduating in 1972. That same year, he ran for and won a seat on the Davison school board on a platform based on firing the high school's principal, John B McKenna, and vice principal, Kanje Cohen. By the end of his term both had resigned. Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see Terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus, with its traditions first established by the Twelve Apostles and maintained through... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in theology, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ...


Moore is also an Eagle Scout, the highest rank awarded by the Boy Scouts of America, and an achievement of which he is still very proud. For his Eagle Project, he filmed a documentary pointing out various safety hazards in his community. Eagle Scout is the highest rank attainable by a Scout in the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), and is also used as a title of a Scout who has achieved this honor. ... It has been suggested that Gerald R. Ford Council be merged into this article or section. ... The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is a United States Scouting organization, with some presence in other countries. ...


After dropping out of the University of Michigan-Flint (where he wrote for the student newspaper The Michigan Times) and working for a day at the General Motors plant[2], at 22 he founded the alternative weekly magazine The Flint Voice, which soon changed its name to The Michigan Voice. In 1986, when Moore became the editor of Mother Jones, a liberal political magazine, he moved to California and The Michigan Voice was shut down. In 2003, the Star-Ledger printed an opinion piece by Paul Mulshine, where he quoted Paul Berman, who stated that Moore had been fired following a series of clashes with people on the magazine's staff, including a dispute over Moore's refusal to publish an article by Berman that was critical of the Sandinistas' human rights record. Before Moore's arrival, the magazine had commissioned the article.[3] Moore later sued for wrongful dismissal, seeking $2 million. He finally accepted a settlement of $58,000 — the amount of anticipated trial costs — from the magazine's insurance company. Some of this money provided partial funding for his first film project, Roger and Me. The University of Michigan-Flint, located in Flint, Michigan, is one of three campuses in the University of Michigan system. ... The Michigan Times is the student newspaper at the University of Michigan-Flint. ... Mother Jones is an independent, nonprofit magazine rooted in progressive political values and known for its investigative reporting. ... The Star-Ledger is the leading newspaper in New Jersey and ranks number 16 in total circulation for U.S. daily newspapers. ... Paul Berman is a prominent liberal American intellectual. ... Sandinista! is also the name of a popular music album by The Clash. ... Movie Poster for Michael Moores documentary Roger and Me Roger & Me is a 1989 American documentary film directed and reported by independent filmmaker/journalist Michael Moore. ...


Moore has been married to producer Kathleen Glynn (born April 10, 1958 in Flint) since 1990. They now live in New York City. Natalie (born 1981) is Michael's stepdaughter. He has no other children. April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ...


He has also dabbled in acting, following a 2000 supporting role in Lucky Numbers as the cousin of Lisa Kudrow's character, who agrees to be part of the scheme concocted by John Travolta's character. Lucky Numbers is a 2000 comedy film written by Adam Resnick, directed by Nora Ephron and starring John Travolta, Lisa Kudrow and Tim Roth. ... Lisa Valerie Kudrow (born July 30, 1963) is an Emmy Award and SAG-winning American actress best known for her role as Phoebe Buffay in the sitcom Friends. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an American actor, singer and entertainer. ...


Currently Moore leads Michigan's annual Traverse City Film Fest, which is also the location of the State Theater, a classic venue that Moore (as of 2006) has been attempting to purchase. Traverse City is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


Directing

Films and awards

  • Roger & Me: Moore first became famous for his controversial 1989 film, Roger & Me, a documentary about what happened to Flint, Michigan after General Motors closed its factories and opened new ones in Mexico, where the workers were paid much less. Since then Moore has been known as a critic of the neoliberal view of globalization. "Roger" is Roger B. Smith, former CEO and president of General Motors. Moore was largely taught the craft of film making by his cinematographer Kevin Rafferty, who is ironically also a first cousin of President George W. Bush. The influence of Rafferty, who co-directed the 1982 cult classic documentary film The Atomic Café, can be seen in Moore's satirical use of archival footage taken from vintage B-movies, television commercials, and newsreels that has since become a hallmark of his documentaries.
  • Canadian Bacon: In 1995, Moore released a satirical film, Canadian Bacon, which features a fictional US president (played by Alan Alda) engineering a fake war with Canada in order to boost his popularity. It is noted for containing a number of Canadian and American stereotypes, and for being Moore's only non-documentary film. The film is also the last featuring Canadian-born actor John Candy, and also features a number of cameos by other Canadian actors. It should be mentioned that in the film several potential enemies for America's next great campaign are discussed by the president and his cabinet (the scene was strongly influenced by the Kubrick film, Dr. Strangelove). His military adviser (played by Rip Torn) quickly rebuffs this idea, saying that no one would care about "...a bunch of guys driving around blowing up rent-a-cars".
  • The Big One: In 1997, Moore directed The Big One, which documents the tour publicizing his book Downsize This! Random Threats from an Unarmed American, where he criticizes mass layoffs despite record corporate profits. Among others, he targets Nike for outsourcing shoe production to Indonesia.
  • Bowling for Columbine: Moore's 2002 film, Bowling for Columbine, probes the culture of guns and violence in the United States. Bowling for Columbine won the Anniversary Prize at the Cannes Film Festival and France's Cesar Award as the Best Foreign Film. In the United States, it won the 2002 Academy Award for Documentary Feature. It also enjoyed great commercial and critical success for a film of its type and became, at the time, the highest-grossing mainstream-released documentary (a record later held by Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11). It was praised by some for illuminating a subject slighted by the mainstream media, but it was attacked by others who claim it is inaccurate and misleading in its presentations and suggested interpretations of events.
  • Fahrenheit 9/11: Fahrenheit 9/11 examines America in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks, particularly the record of the Bush administration and alleged links between the families of George W. Bush and Osama bin Laden. Fahrenheit was awarded the Palme d'Or, the top honor at the Cannes Film Festival; it was the first documentary film to win the prize since 1956. Moore later announced that Fahrenheit 9/11 would not be in consideration for the 2005 Academy Award for Documentary Feature, but instead for the Academy Award for Best Picture. He stated he wanted the movie to be seen by a few million more people, preferably on television, by election day. Since November 2 was less than nine months after the film's release, it would be disqualified for the Documentary Oscar. Moore also said he wanted to be supportive of his "teammates in non-fiction film." However, Fahrenheit received no Oscar nomination for Best Picture. The title of the film alludes to the classic book Fahrenheit 451 (about a future totalitarian state in which books are banned; paper begins to burn at 451 degrees Fahrenheit) and the pre-release subtitle of the film confirms the allusion: "The temperature at which freedom burns." At the box office, Fahrenheit 9/11 remains the highest-grossing documentary of all time, taking in close to $200 million worldwide, including United States box office revenue of $120 million.
  • Sicko (filming): Moore is currently working on a film about the American health care system from the viewpoint of mental health care, focusing particularly on the managed-care and pharmaceutical industries, under the working title Sicko. At least four major pharmaceutical companies, Pfizer, Eli Lilly and Company, AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline, have ordered their employees not to grant any interviews to Moore. [4] [5] [6] According to Moore on a letter at his website, "roads that often surprise us and lead us to new ideas -- and challenge us to reconsider the ones we began with" have caused some minor delays, and the film is set to be released sometime in 2007.[7].
  • Fahrenheit 9/11½ (pre-production): On November 11, 2004 Moore told the Hollywood trade publication Daily Variety that he is also planning a sequel to Fahrenheit 9/11. He said, "Fifty-one percent of the American people lacked information in this election, and we want to educate and enlighten them. They weren't told the truth. We're communicators, and it's up to us to start doing it now."[8] The sequel, like the original, will concern the war in Iraq and terrorism. Moore expects to complete Fahrenheit 9/11½ in 2007 or 2008.

// Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Roger & Me is a 1989 American documentary film directed and reported by independent filmmaker/journalist Michael Moore. ... Flint, Michigan is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, located along the Flint River, 66 miles (106 km) northwest of Detroit. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... The term neoliberalism is used to describe a political-economic philosophy that had major implications for government policies beginning in the 1970s – and increasingly prominent since 1980 – that de-emphasizes or rejects positive government intervention in the economy, focusing instead on achieving progress and even social justice by... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Roger Bonham Smith (1925-present) was the CEO of General Motors from 1981 to 1990. ... Kevin Rafferty is a first cousin of George W. Bush and a cinematographer who ironically taught the craft of filmmaking to Michael Moore for the 1989 film Roger & Me. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... A cult classic is a cultural artifact (e. ... The Atomic Café is an acclaimed documentary film created from a broad range of archival of film from the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s - including newsreel clips, television news footage, U.S. government-produced films (including military training films), advertisements, television and radio programs. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... A Newsreel is a documentary film that is regularly released in a public presentation place containing filmed news stories. ... This is a list of film-related events in 1995. ... Canadian Bacon is a 1995 comedy/satire, and the only fictional film written, directed and produced by Michael Moore. ... Since the office of President of the United States is somewhat hallowed, fiction writers often choose to invent a president in their stories to prevent a real one from being possibly insulted, to avoid having their stories become dated over time, for dramatic license, or to provide literary flexibility. ... Alan Alda as Benjamin Franklin Hawkeye Pierce Alan Alda (born Alphonso Joseph DAbruzzo on January 28, 1936) is an Oscar-nominated American actor, writer, director and sometimes political activist. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Strangelove redirects here. ... Rip Torn in Men in Black. ... This is a list of film-related events in 1997. ... The Big One is a movie directed in 1996 (and released in 1997) by Michael Moore during his promotion tour around the United States for his book Downsize This!. Through the 47 visited towns, Moore discovers and describes the American economic failings and the fear of unemployment of the American... Nike, Inc. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2002. ... Bowling for Columbine is a documentary film directed by and starring Michael Moore. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The C sar Award is the national film award of France first given out in 1975. ... The Academy Award for Documentary Feature is one of the most prestigious awards for documentary films. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is an award-winning and controversial documentary film by American filmmaker and anti-war activist Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004 in the run up to that years presidential election. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is an award-winning and controversial documentary film by American filmmaker and anti-war activist Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004 in the run up to that years presidential election. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957 [1]), most commonly known as Osama bin Laden is a militant Islamist and one of the founders of al-Qaeda. ... The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... See also: 1955 in film 1956 1957 in film 1950s in film years in film film // Events November 15 - The film Love Me Tender starring Elvis Presley (his first film) opens. ... The Academy Award for Documentary Feature is one of the most prestigious awards for documentary films. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... This article is about the novel. ... Sicko is the title of a documentary film by Michael Moore, scheduled for release in 2006. ... A pharmaceutical company, or drug company, is a company licensed to discover, develop, market and distribute drugs. ... Pfizer, Incorporated (NYSE: PFE), is the worlds largest pharmaceutical company based in New York City. ... One of the worlds largest corporations, Eli Lilly and Company NYSE: LLY is a global pharmaceutical company. ... AstraZeneca PLC (LSE: AZN, NYSE: AZN), is a large Anglo-Swedish pharmaceutical company formed on 6 April 1999 by the merger of Swedish Astra AB and British Zeneca Group. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a British based pharmaceutical, biologicals, and healthcare company. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fahrenheit 9/11½ is an upcoming documentary film by the American left-wing film-maker Michael Moore, planned for release in 2007. ...

Television shows

Between 1994 and 1995, he directed and hosted the television series TV Nation, which followed the format of news magazine shows but covered topics they avoid. The series was aired on NBC in 1994 for 9 episodes and again for 8 episodes on FOX in 1995. TV Nation was a satirical newsmagazine television series written, directed and hosted by Michael Moore that was broadcast in the United States on NBC in the summer of 1994, FOX in the summer of 1995, and in the UK by the BBC. It contained investigative reports into various aspects of... NBC (an abbreviation for National Broadcasting Company, its former corporate name) is an American television network based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center and is shown on basic cable in Canada. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ...


His other major series was The Awful Truth, which satirized actions by big corporations and politicians. It aired in 1999 and 2000. The Awful Truth (1999-2000) was the name of a satirical television show which was directed, written, and hosted by the American film maker Michael Moore, and funded by the British broadcaster, Channel 4. ...


Another 1999 series, Michael Moore Live, was aired in the UK only on Channel 4, though it was broadcast from New York. This show had a similar format to The Awful Truth, but also incorporated phone-ins and a live stunt each week. The show was performed around midday local time, which due to the time difference made it a late-night show in the UK. Michael Moore Live, a 1999 television show featuring political advocate Michael Moore, ran for one 6 part series. ... Channel 4 is a public-service television broadcaster in the United Kingdom (see British television). ...


In 1999 Moore won the Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Award in Arts and Entertainment, for being the executive producer and host of The Awful Truth, where he was also described as "muckraker, author and documentary filmmaker." The Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Awards are given to individuals who Playboy Enterprises believes have made significant contributions to the protection and enhancement of First Amendment rights. ...


Music videos

Moore has directed several music videos, including two for Rage Against the Machine for songs from "The Battle of Los Angeles": "Sleep Now in the Fire" and "Testify". He was threatened with arrest during the shooting of "Sleep Now in the Fire", which was filmed on Wall Street; the city of New York had denied the band permission to play there, although the band and Moore had secured a federal permit to perform. [9] Rage Against the Machine was a highly influential American rock band noted for their pioneering blend of hard rock, funk and rap as well as their vocal leftist beliefs. ... The Battle of Los Angeles is the third studio album by Rage Against the Machine. ... Sleep Now in the Fire is a rap-rock song by Rage Against the Machine, released on their album The Battle of Los Angeles in 1999 and as a single in 2000. ... Tracklist Testify [Album Version] Testify [Testifly Mix] Testify [Rowena Projects Mix] Guerrilla Radio [Live Version] Freedom [Live Version] ...


He also directed the music videos for System of a Down's "Boom!" and "All the Way to Reno (You're Gonna Be a Star)" by R.E.M.. System of a Down (also referred to as SOAD or System) is a four-piece alternative metal band that formed in 1995 in Los Angeles, California. ... Boom! is a single from System of a Downs CD Steal This Album!. The song is about the uselessness of bombs and warfare. ... All the Way to Reno (Youre Gonna Be a Star) is a song by R.E.M.. It was featured on the album Reveal and was also released as a single in 1991. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia, in early 1980 by drummer Bill Berry, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills, and vocalist Michael Stipe. ...


Appearances in other documentaries

  • Michael Moore's brief appearance in Alex Jones's Martial Law: 9/11 Rise of the Police State, Alex Jones prompts Michael Moore for an answer as to why he did not mention any of the real issues about the September 11, 2001 attacks in his film Fahrenheit 9/11. Specifically, why Michael Moore did not mention why NORAD stood down. Michael Moore's reply was simply, "Because it would be Un-American."
  • Moore appeared in the documentary The Yes Men, a documentary about two men who pose as the World Trade Organization. He appears during a segment concerning working conditions in Mexico and Latin America.
  • Moore was also interviewed for the 2004 documentary, The Corporation. One of his highlighted quotes was, "The problem is the profit motive: for corporations, there's no such thing as 'enough'." [10]
  • Moore appeared in the 2006 documentary I'm Going to Tell You a Secret, which chronicles Madonna during her 2004 Re-Invention World Tour. Moore attended her show in New York City at Madison Square Garden.

Notable men called Alex Jones: Alex Jones (U.S. journalist) Alex Jones (British playwright) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Fahrenheit 9/11 is an award-winning and controversial documentary film by American filmmaker and anti-war activist Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004 in the run up to that years presidential election. ... NORAD is short for: North American Aerospace Defense Command Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Yes Men are a group of criminals who practice what they call identity correction. They pretend to be powerful people and spokespersons for prominent organizations, accepting invitations received on their websites to appear at symposiums and TV shows. ... The World Trade Organization (WTO, French: Organisation mondiale du commerce) is an international, multilateral organization, which sets the rules for the global trading system and resolves disputes between its member states; all of whom are signatories to its approximately 30 agreements. ... The Corporation is a 2003 Canadian documentary film and book critical of the modern-day corporation and its behaviour towards society. ... Im Going to Tell You a Secret is a documentary which followed Madonna on her successful Re-Invention Tour, from dancer auditions to rehearsals and opening night all the way through the final show and her visit to Israel in the fall of 2004. ... Madonna Louise Ciccone (born August 16, 1958), better known worldwide by only her first name, is an iconic American pop singer, songwriter, musician, record and film producer, dancer, actress, author, and peace advocate whose level of fame and success has earned her superstar status for over two decades. ...

Writings and political views

Michael Moore, pictured on the cover of one of his three best-selling books, Stupid White Men.
Michael Moore, pictured on the cover of one of his three best-selling books, Stupid White Men.

Moore has authored three best-selling books: Stupid White Men cover This image is a book cover. ... Stupid White Men cover This image is a book cover. ...

After Moore's departure from Mother Jones, he became an employee of Ralph Nader. He left Nader's employment on bad terms, but Moore vociferously supported Nader's campaign for the United States presidency in 2000. References Downsize This!, Michael Moore, Perennial, ISBN 0330419153 Categories: Literature stubs | 1996 books | Politics books | Business books ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... In criminology, corporate crime refers to crimes either committed by a corporation, i. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dude, Wheres My Country? cover Dude, Wheres My Country? is a book by Michael Moore dealing with corporate and political events in the United States. ... Barbara Bush, Jeb Bush, George H.W. Bush, Laura Bush, and George W. Bush watch tee ball on the White House lawn. ... The House of Saud ( translit: ) is the royal family of Saudi Arabia. ... Office building of the bin Laden family. ... Presidential election results map. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist. ...


In exchange for jumping in the shows "traveling mosh pit," Republican Alan Keyes won the endorsement of Moore's television series The Awful Truth in 2000, although Moore does not endorse Keyes' views. This article or section should be merged with mosh. ... Dr. Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is a public speaker, former diplomat, and conservative political activist. ... The Awful Truth (1999-2000) was the name of a satirical television show which was directed, written, and hosted by the American film maker Michael Moore, and funded by the British broadcaster, Channel 4. ...


Moore became a lifetime member of the National Rifle Association upon winning an NRA tournament as a youth.[citation needed] This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association, UK The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a 501(c)(4) group for the protection of gun rights in the United States, established in New York in 1871 as the American...


In the 2004 election, Moore urged Nader not to run, despite having supported him in 2000, so as not to split the progressive vote. (Moore joined Bill Maher on the latter's television show in kneeling before Nader to plead with him to stay out of the race.) In June 2004, Moore claimed he is not a member of the Democratic party (although he registered as a Democrat in 1992 [1]). Although Moore endorsed General Wesley Clark for the Democratic nomination on January 14, Clark withdrew from the primary race on February 11. Moore drew attention when charging publicly that Bush was AWOL during his service in the National Guard (see George W. Bush military service controversy). Also, during an October 27 stop in Portland, OR, Moore called the private phone number of radio host Lars Larson, given to him by a member of the audience. Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Bill Maher, Jr. ... Wesley K. Clark Clarks signature Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... AWOL (pronounced a-wall) is an acronym for the United States and other armed forces expression Absent WithOut Leave or Absence Without Official Leave. The United States Marine Corps and the United States Navy use the term Unauthorized Absence (UA) instead. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... 1st Lt. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... Mayor Tom Potter County Multnomah County Population (2003) 538,544 Time zone Pacific (UTC−8) Portland is the largest city in Oregon, and county seat of Multnomah County. ... Lars Larson is an Oregon conservative talk radio show host that recently began a national talk radio show on the Westwood One Radio Network. ...


Moore was a high-profile guest at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, prominently seated in a box with former President Jimmy Carter and his wife. Moore also attended the 2004 Republican National Convention, (for a daily column chronicling his impressions of the convention in USA Today), where he was criticized in a speech by Republican Senator John McCain as "a disingenuous film-maker". Moore smiled and waved as people in the audience jeered at him after this comment but there was no bad behavior from either side. James Earl Carter, Jr. ... 2004 Republican National Convention Logo President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney accepted their partys nomination to run for second terms. ... USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...

Michael Moore speaks in the Carrier Dome at Syracuse University
Michael Moore speaks in the Carrier Dome at Syracuse University

During September and October 2004, Moore spoke at universities and colleges in swing states during his "Slacker Uprising Tour". The tour gave away ramen and underwear to young people who promised to vote. This provoked public denunciations from the Michigan Republican Party and attempts to convince the government that Moore should be arrested for buying votes, but since Moore did not tell the 'slackers' involved for whom to vote, just to vote, district attorneys refused to get involved. The "Underwear" tour was a popular success. Large numbers of young adults registered to vote, and by a strong percentage voted for John Kerry (Kerry 54%, Bush 44%). Nonetheless, the generally increased turnout in the election ensured that the percentage of youth voting was little different than in 2000, albeit at a higher numerical level. John Kerry eventually won the state of Michigan by 3%. fairuse from michaelmoore. ... fairuse from michaelmoore. ... The Carrier Dome is a 51,000-seat domed sports stadium located on the campus of Syracuse University in New York State, USA. It is home to the Syracuse Orange football, basketball, and lacrosse teams. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... In United States presidential politics, a swing state (also, battleground state) is a state in which no candidate has overwhelming support, meaning that any of the major candidates have a reasonable chance of winning the states electoral college votes. ... Shoyu (soy sauce) ramen. ... A pair of mens briefs Undergarments, also called underwear or sometimes intimate clothing, are clothes worn next to the skin, usually under other clothes. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ...


Quite possibly the most controversial stop during the tour was Utah Valley State College in Orem, Utah. A fight for his right to speak ensued and resulted in massive public debates and a media blitz. Death threats, bribes and lawsuits followed. The event was chronicled in the documentary film This Divided State.[12]


With the 2004 election over, Moore continues to collect information on the war in Iraq and the Bush administration in addition to his film projects. In 2006, Moore has also been involved in a email campaign regarding the 2006 United States midterm elections to draft up support for the Democrats. 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ...


Controversy and criticism

Moore has been the subject of some controversy and criticism. See Michael Moore controversies. Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an Academy Award winning American film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ...


His published work

List of books

References Downsize This!, Michael Moore, Perennial, ISBN 0330419153 Categories: Literature stubs | 1996 books | Politics books | Business books ... Adventures in a TV Nation is a book by American author and film director Michael Moore and his producer and wife Kathleen Glynn. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dude, Wheres My Country? cover Dude, Wheres My Country? is a book by Michael Moore dealing with corporate and political events in the United States. ... Will They Ever Trust Us Again? cover Will They Ever Trust Us Again? is a supplementary book by Michael Moore published after his documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 was in theaters and released on DVD. The film proved to be the most successful documentary of all time, grossing over 120 million... The Official Fahrenheit 9/11 Reader is a companion book to Fahrenheit 9/11, Michael Moores 2004 documentary film. ...

List of films

Roger & Me is a 1989 American documentary film directed and reported by independent filmmaker/journalist Michael Moore. ... Pets or Meat: The Return to Flint is a short 30 minute tv movie documentary from PBS based on the movie Roger and Me by Michael Moore. ... Canadian Bacon is a 1995 comedy/satire, and the only fictional film written, directed and produced by Michael Moore. ... The Big One is a movie directed in 1996 (and released in 1997) by Michael Moore during his promotion tour around the United States for his book Downsize This!. Through the 47 visited towns, Moore discovers and describes the American economic failings and the fear of unemployment of the American... And Justice for All is a film by Michael Moore. ... Lucky Numbers is a 2000 comedy film written by Adam Resnick, directed by Nora Ephron and starring John Travolta, Lisa Kudrow and Tim Roth. ... Bowling for Columbine is a documentary film directed by and starring Michael Moore. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is an award-winning and controversial documentary film by American filmmaker and anti-war activist Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004 in the run up to that years presidential election. ... The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Feature Films Jury Quentin Tarantino, President (United States) Emmanuelle Béart (France) Edwidge Danticat (United States) Tilda Swinton (United Kingdom) Kathleen Turner (United States) Benoît Poelvoorde (Belgium) Jerry Schatzberg (United States) Tsui Hark (Hong Kong) Peter Von Bagh (Finland) Films in Competition 2046, by Wong Kar-Wai Clean, by... Sicko is the title of a documentary film by Michael Moore, scheduled for release in 2006. ... Fahrenheit 9/11½ is an upcoming documentary film by the American left-wing film-maker Michael Moore, planned for release in 2007. ...

List of TV series

TV Nation was a satirical newsmagazine television series written, directed and hosted by Michael Moore that was broadcast in the United States on NBC in the summer of 1994, FOX in the summer of 1995, and in the UK by the BBC. It contained investigative reports into various aspects of... The Awful Truth (1999-2000) was the name of a satirical television show which was directed, written, and hosted by the American film maker Michael Moore, and funded by the British broadcaster, Channel 4. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Michael Moore Live, a 1999 television show featuring political advocate Michael Moore, ran for one 6 part series. ...

References

  1. ^ Gary Strauss (June 20, 2004). The truth about Michael Moore. USA Today. Retrieved on 2006-07-09.
  2. ^ Ron Sheldon (September 23, 1995). Exclusive Interview with Michael Moore of TV Nation. People's Weekly World.
  3. ^ Paul Mulshine (March 30, 2003). A stupid white man and a smart one. The Star-Ledger.
  4. ^ The Philadelphia Inquirer: Inqlings | Michael Moore takes on Glaxo. Michael Klein, 30 September 2005. Archive accessed 9 July 2006.
  5. ^ Common Dreams News Center: Drug Firms are on the Defense as Filmmaker Michael Moore Plans to Dissect Their Industry. Original Article - Elaine Dutka, L.A. Times, December 22, 2004. Archive accessed August 09, 2006
  6. ^ Chicago Tribune: Michael Moore turns camera onto health care industry. Bruce Japsen, 3 October 2004. Archive accessed 9 July 2006.
  7. ^ MichaelMoore.com: An Update from Michael Moore (and an invitation to his film festival). Michael Moore, 7 July 2006. URL accessed 9 July 2006.
  8. ^ Variety: Get ready for more Moore. Army Archerd, 10 November 2004. URL accessed 9 July 2006.
  9. ^ Green Left Weekly: Rage against Wall Street. Michael Moore, via MichaelMoore.com, date unspecified. URL accessed 9 July 2006.
  10. ^ Who's Who. The Corporation Film.
  11. ^ Opinion Journal from the Wall Street Journal: Unmoored from Reality. John Fund's Political Diary, 21 March 2003. URL accessed 29 August 2006.
  12. ^ This Divided State official website. Accessed 9 July 2006.

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External links

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, video games and production crew personnel. ...

Current events (fan sites and watch sites)

General criticism

is a quarterly magazine focusing on urban policy. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... David T. Hardy is an American author and attorney from Tucson, Arizona. ... Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former The New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). ... Christopher Hitchens Christopher Eric Hitchens (born in Portsmouth, England April 13, 1949) is an author, journalist and literary critic. ... Dave Kopel is an attorney, researcher and contributing editor to several publications. ... Marco Roth is an editor of n+1 magazine. ... Issue One: Negation n+1 is an American literary journal that publishes social criticism, political commentary, essays, art, poetry, book reviews, and short fiction. ...

Defense articles

  • "Conservatives Seized upon Faulty Report of Moore's Supposed Dual Voter Registrations" by Media Matters
  • "Scarborough Lied in Attempt to Catch Michael Moore Lying" by Media Matters
  • "NY Post Pointed to Comparisons of Michael Moore to Nazi-propaganda Filmmaker" by Media Matters
  • "FOX Hosts Join Drudge Sidekick in Bashing Michael Moore" by Media Matters
  • "Deception; Desperate Right Wing Attacks on Fahrenheit 9/11" a rebuttal of Dave Kopel's "59 Deceptions" by Anthony Wade

Media Matters for America is a non-profit organization founded by former conservative (now liberal activist) David Brock to refute and/or otherwise analyze conservative influence on the media. ... Media Matters for America is a non-profit organization founded by former conservative (now liberal activist) David Brock to refute and/or otherwise analyze conservative influence on the media. ... Media Matters for America is a non-profit organization founded by former conservative (now liberal activist) David Brock to refute and/or otherwise analyze conservative influence on the media. ... Media Matters for America is a non-profit organization founded by former conservative (now liberal activist) David Brock to refute and/or otherwise analyze conservative influence on the media. ...

News features


  Results from FactBites:
 
Michael Moore : EXPOSED! (984 words)
The New York Post reported on a tantrum he threw in London: "Then, on his second-to-last night, [Michael Moore] raged against everyone connected with the Roundhouse and complained that he was being paid a measly $750 a night.
In producing his Oscar-winner, Moore altered history, misled his viewers, and edited the footage and audio in such a way as to reverse the meaning.
In one case, he took a speech of a person he desired to target; the problem was that the speech was in fact conciliatory and mild.
Spinsanity - Fahrenheit 9/11: The temperature at which Michael Moore's pants burn (2986 words)
During the CNN appearance from which Moore draws the clip, reporter Candy Crowley explained that Toobin's analysis assumed the statewide consideration of "overvotes," which was not a sure thing, though there are indications that Leon County Circuit Court judge Terry Lewis, who was supervising the recount, might have directed counties to consider them.
Moore's phrasing suggests that the Bin Ladens profited from the post-Sept. 11 buildup with the United Defense IPO but were forced to withdraw after the stock sale.
Moore suggests that the US was indifferent to the Taliban's harboring of Bin Laden, but Isikoff and Hosenball point out that the administration met with the envoy in part to discuss the fate of Bin Laden, who they were pressing the Taliban to turn over.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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