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Encyclopedia > Michael Heseltine
The Rt Hon Michael Heseltine

In office
20 July 1995 – 2 May 1997
Prime Minister John Major
Preceded by Geoffrey Howe
Succeeded by John Prescott

In office
11 April 1992 – 5 July 1995
Preceded by Peter Lilley
Succeeded by Ian Lang

In office
28 November 1990 – 11 April 1992
Preceded by Chris Patten
Succeeded by Michael Howard
In office
5 May 1979 – 6 January 1983
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher
Preceded by Peter Shore
Succeeded by Tom King

In office
6 January 1983 – 7 January 1986
Preceded by John Nott
Succeeded by George Younger

Born 21 March 1933 (1933-03-21) (age 74)
Flag of Wales Swansea, Wales UK
Political party Conservative

Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. He is a patron of the Tory Reform Group. Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ... First Secretary of State is a title within the British government, principally regarded as purely honorific, currently held by the Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, CH, PC, QC (born 20 December 1926), known until 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. ... For other persons named John Prescott, see John Prescott (disambiguation). ... The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry is a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Peter Bruce Lilley (born August 23, 1943, Hayes, Kent, England, educated at Dulwich College and Clare College, Cambridge) is a British Conservative Party politician who has been a Member of Parliament MP since 1983. ... Ian Bruce Lang, Baron Lang of Monkton, PC, (born June 27, 1940) is a Scottish Conservative & Unionist politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Environment was a UK cabinet position. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944 in Bath, Somerset) is a prominent British Conservative politician and a Patron of the Tory Reform Group. ... The Rt Hon. ... // is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... Peter David Shore, Baron Shore of Stepney PC (May 20, 1924 - September 24, 2001) was a British Labour politician noted for his opposition to the European Communities. ... G-Unit member Thomas Jeremy King, Baron King of Bridgwater, CH , PC (born June 13, 1933), Educated Sheriff House, Rugby School, is a British Conservative politician who was Member of Parliament for Bridgwater in Somerset, from 1970 until 2001. ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Right Honourable Sir John William Frederic Nott (born February 1, 1932 in Bideford, Devon) was a British Conservative Party politician prominent in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... George Kenneth Hotson Younger, Baron Younger of Prestwick, 4th Viscount Younger of Leckie KT KCVO TD PC (September 22, 1931–January 26, 2003), known to many as Gentleman George, was a Scottish politician whose long career as Conservative & Unionist MP for Ayr (1964–1992) included periods as Secretary of State... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wales_2. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Tory Reform Group (TRG) is a group within the United Kingdoms Conservative Party, that uphold the One Nation Tory vision, which they describe[citation needed] as being the promotion of: Social justice Political progress Prosperity for all // Europe The TRG is commonly seen as being pro-European. ...

Contents

Early life

Heseltine was born in Swansea, Wales. He is a distant descendant of Charles Dibdin, from whom one of his middle names was taken. Heseltine was educated at Shrewsbury School and campaigned briefly as a volunteer in the October 1951 General Election before going up to Pembroke College, Oxford, where, in frustration at his inability to be elected to the committee of the Oxford University Conservative Association, he founded the breakaway Blue Ribbon Club. Julian Critchley recounts a story from his student days of how he plotted his future on the back of an envelope, a future that would culminate as Prime Minister in the 1990s. Another more detailed apocryphal version has him writing down: 'millionaire 25, cabinet member 35, party leader 45, prime minister 55'. He did become a millionaire, and a member of the shadow cabinet at the age of 41 — but failed to achieve the last two (although he would, under John Major, be appointed Deputy Prime Minister at the age of 62). For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Charles Dibdin (March 4?, 1745 - July 25, 1814), British musician, dramatist, novelist, actor and song-writer, the son of a parish clerk, was born in Southampton on or before the 4th of March 1745, and was the youngest of a family of eighteen. ... Shrewsbury School (formally known as King Edward VI Grammar School, Shrewsbury) is an independent school, located in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. ... The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ... College name Pembroke College Collegium Pembrochianum Named after The Earl of Pembroke Established 1624 Sister College Queens College Master Giles Henderson JCR President Dawn Rennie Undergraduates 408 MCR President Ross Nicolson Graduates 119 College Homepage Boat Club The lodge and the entrance to Pembroke College in Pembroke Square. ... The Oxford University Conservative Association (OUCA) is a student political organization founded in 1924 whose members are drawn from Oxford University. ... Sir Julian Michael Gordon Critchley (8 December 1930 – 9 September 2000) was a politician in the United Kingdom, educated at Shrewsbury School and Pembroke College, Oxford. ... In Judeo-Christian theologies, apocrypha refers to religious Sacred text that have questionable authenticity or are otherwise disputed. ... For other uses, see Millionaire (disambiguation). ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... A Deputy Prime Minister is a member of a nations cabinet who can take the position of acting Prime Minister when the real Prime Minister is temporarily absent. ...


Heseltine's biographers, Michael Crick and Critchley and recount how, despite not being a natural speaker, he became a strong orator through much practice, which included speaking in front of a mirror, listening to tape recordings of the speeches of Charles Hill, and taking speaking lessons from a vicar's wife. In the 1970s and 1980s Heseltine's conference speech was often to be the highlight of the Conservative Party Conference, despite his views being well to the left of Margaret Thatcher. Michael Crick is a British journalist and author. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ...


He was eventually elected to the committee of the Oxford Union after five terms at the University. The following year (1953-4) he served in top place on the committee, then as Secretary, and then Treasurer. It was during this last post that he reopened the Union cellars for business and persuaded the visiting Sir Bernard and Lady Docker to contribute to the considerable cost. After graduating with a second-class degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics (described by his own tutor as "a great and undeserved triumph"), he was permitted to stay on for an extra term to serve as President of the Oxford Union for Michaelmas term, 1954, having been elected with the assistance of leading Oxford socialists Anthony Howard and Jeremy Isaacs. The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society in the city of Oxford, England, whose membership is drawn primarily but not exclusively from the University of Oxford. ... Look up Treasurer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) is a popular interdisciplinary degree which combines study from the three eponymous disciplines. ... For the first term of many universities in the British Isles, see Michaelmas Term. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthony Bourne Howard (b. ... Sir Jeremy Isaacs (b. ...


After graduating he built up a property business in partnership with his Oxford friend Ian Josephs; with financial support from the families of both men they started with a boarding house in Clanricarde Gardens and progressed to various other properties in the Bayswater area. He also attempted to train as an accountant but did not qualify, and after failing his accountancy exams could no longer postpone National Service. He was called up in January 1959 and became a Second Lieutenant in the Welsh Guards. He left the Guards to contest the General Election that year and on business grounds was exempted from the remaining sixteen months of service. During the 1980s his habit of wearing a Guards tie, sometimes incorrectly tied with red showing on the knot, was the subject of much acerbic comment from military figures and older MPs with extensive war records. Crick estimated that he must have worn the tie on more days than he actually served in the Guards.[1] Bayswater is an area of London in the City of Westminster. ... Accountant, or Qualified Accountant, or Professional Accountant, is a certified accountancy and financial expert in the jurisdiction of many countries. ... National service is a common name for compulsory or voluntary military service programs. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. ...


Besides building a housing estate at Tenterden in Kent, which failed to sell and was beset with repair problems until after his election to Parliament, [2] he founded the magazine publishing company Haymarket in collaboration with another Oxford friend, Clive Labovitch, and early in the 1960s acquired the famous (but never profitable) magazine Man About Town, whose title he changed toTow. In 1962 he also briefly published a well-received weekly newspaper,Topi, which folded but whose journalists later became the "Sunday Times Insight" Team. Between 1960 and 1964 he also somehow found the time to be a part-time interviewer for ITV. Tenterden is a small town in the Ashford District of Kent, England. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... The Haymarket Media Group is the largest privately-owned publishing company in the United Kingdom. ... The Sunday Times is the name of several Sunday newspapers. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting...


After such rapid expansion, Heseltine's businesses were badly hit by the Selwyn Lloyd credit squeeze of 1962 and he would eventually owe £250,000 (over £3 million in 2007 prices). He claims to have been lent a badly-needed £60,000 by a bank manager who retired the same day. During the 1990s Heseltine was later to joke about how he had avoided bankruptcy by such stratagems as only paying bills when threatened with legal action, or by sending out insufficiently completed cheques, although it has never been suggested that he did not pay off all his debts eventually. It was during this period of stress that he took up gardening as a serious hobby. John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ...


In 1967 Heseltine secured Haymarket's financial future by selling a majority stake to the British Printing Corporation, retaining a large shareholding himself. Although his associates have testified to Heseltine's entrepreneurial courage and deal-making skills, it was only after Heseltine's election to Parliament that Haymarket, under the management of Lindsay Masters, grew into the company which has made Heseltine very rich, publishing a series of mundane yet profitable management and advertising journals.


Member of Parliament

He contested the safe Labour seat of Gower in 1959 and a marginal Coventry seat in 1964, before being elected as a Member of Parliament (MP) in 1966 for Tavistock in Devon, subsequently representing Henley from 1974. Following the Conservative victory in the 1970 General Election, he was promoted to the ranks of government by Prime Minister Edward Heath. In 1970, he served briefly as a junior minister at the Department of Transport, before moving to the Department for the Environment, where he was partly responsible for shepherding the Local Government Act 1972 through Parliament. He then moved to the Department of Industry from 1972 onwards. Gower is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... In physics, the term renormalization refers to a variety of theoretical concepts and computational techniques revolving either around the idea of rescaling transformations, or around the process of removing infinities from the calculated quantities (see also regularization). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Tavistock was a parliamentary constituency, centred on the town of Tavistock in Devon. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... This is a list of the Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom since 1721. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... In the United Kingdom, the Department for Transport is the government department responsible for the transport network. ... The Department for the Environment was a British government department. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As Minister for Aerospace in 1973 Heseltine was responsible for persuading other governments to invest in the Concorde, but was accused of misleading the House of Commons when he stated that the government was still considering giving financial support to the Hovertrain, when the decision to pull the plug had already been taken by the Cabinet. Although his chief critic Airey Neave disliked Heseltine as a brash 'arriviste', Neave's real target, in the view of Heseltine's PPS Cecil Parkinson, was the Prime Minister Edward Heath, whom Neave detested and later helped to topple as party leader in 1975. For other uses, see Concorde (disambiguation). ...


Heseltine became Shadow Industry Secretary in the Conservative's 1974 - 1979 opposition, gaining notoriety following a 1976 incident in the House of Commons during the debate on measures introduced by the Labour Government to nationalise the shipbuilding and aerospace industries. Accounts of exactly what happened vary, but the most colourful image portrayed Heseltine seizing the mace and brandishing it towards Labour left-wingers who were celebrating their winning the vote by singing the Red Flag, his long fair hair flowing elegantly behind him. Heseltine subsequently acquired the nickname Tarzan or, on occasion, Hezza, in imitatation of "Gazza". He was portrayed on the satirical TV puppet show, Spitting Image, as a flak jacket-wearing psychopath, in a reference to an occasion when, as Defence Secretary, he had been persuaded to don a flak jacket over his suit while inspecting troops in the rain. The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Nationalization or nationalisation is the act of transferring assets into public ownership. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Look up aerospace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The red flag is a socialist emblem associated in particular with the revolutionary left as well as with social democratic and labour traditions having been a banner used by parties such as Labour in Britain, the Socialist Party in France and other social democratic and democratic socialist groups throughout the... 1914 Edition of Tarzan of the Apes Tarzan, a fictional character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1912 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... Paul John Gascoigne (born 27 May 1967 in Gateshead, England), often referred to as Gazza, is a retired English football player who is widely regarded as one of the most gifted footballers of his generation. ... Spitting Image was a satirical puppet show that ran on the United Kingdoms ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ... A flak jacket is a form of protective clothing originally developed by the Wilkinson Sword company during World War II to help protect Royal Air Force (RAF) air personnel from the flying debris and shrapnel thrown by German anti-aircraft guns flak (Fliegerabwehrkanone), a type of exploding shell. ...


In government

He was appointed to the cabinet of Margaret Thatcher as Secretary of State for the Environment in 1979 after her election victory that year. He was a key figure in the sale of council houses and was sent in as a troubleshooter to deal with the explosion of violence in Britain's inner cities in the aftermath of the Brixton and Toxteth riots during the early 1980s. Heseltine was responsible for developing the policies that led to five bi-annual National Garden Festivals, starting in 1984. He established Development Corporations that were directly appointed by the minister and empowered to circumvent local authority planning controls. This measure proved controversial in Labour strongholds such as East London, Merseyside and North East England. He then served as Secretary of State for Defence from January 1983 - his presentational skills were used to take on the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in the June 1983 General Election - until 1986, when he resigned over the bitter dispute with the Prime Minister Thatcher over the Westland Affair. A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... The Secretary of State for the Environment was a UK cabinet position. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ... The Brixton riot of April 11, 1981 was the most serious riot in London of the century. ... The Toxteth riots of July 1981 arose out of long-standing tensions between police and the black community in inner-city Liverpool, following on from the Brixton riots earlier in the year. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The National Garden Festivals were part of the cultural regeneration of large areas of derelict land in Britains industrial districts during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... This article is about the year. ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament logo In British politics, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament has been at the forefront of the peace movement in the United Kingdom and claims to be Europes largest single-issue peace campaign. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Westland affair was a political scandal for the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher in 1986. ...


Backbenches and Leadership Contest

He then returned to the backbenches, where he became increasingly critical of Margaret Thatcher's performance, although he abstained in November 1989 when Sir Anthony Meyer challenged for the party leadership. At one point during a carefully worded statement he repeatedly insisted that he could "not foresee the circumstances" in which he would challenge her for the leadership. But circumstances altered dramatically following Sir Geoffrey Howe's resignation speech [1] in November 1990, and Heseltine announced his candidature. He did well enough in the first round of voting to prevent an outright Thatcher victory, and at one point appeared on course to beat her in the second ballot; but faced with humiliation and the bitter prospect of a Heseltine premiership, Thatcher resigned and the second ballot – which Douglas Hurd also entered – was topped by John Major. As Major was only two votes short of an overall majority, Heseltine immediately and publicly conceded defeat, announcing that he would vote for Major if the third ballot went ahead (it did not). Although for the rest of his career Heseltine's role in Mrs Thatcher's downfall earned him enmity from Thatcher's supporters in the Conservative Party, this was not universal. In a reference to the reluctance of the Cabinet to support her on the second ballot, Thatcherite Edward Leigh said of Heseltine: "At least he stabbed her in the front". A backbencher is a Member of Parliament or a legislator who does not hold governmental office and is not a Front Bench spokesperson in the Opposition. ... Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, PC (born December 20, 1926), usually known before 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Douglas Richard Hurd, Baron Hurd of Westwell, CH, CBE, PC (born 8 March 1930), is a senior British Conservative politician and novelist, who served in the governments of Margaret Thatcher and John Major between 1979 and his retirement in 1995. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


Afterwards Heseltine returned to government as Secretary of State for the Environment (with particular responsibility for replacing the poll tax; he allegedly declined an offer of the job of Home Secretary). After the 1992 general election, he was appointed Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, but chose to be known by the title of President of the Board of Trade promising to intervene "before breakfast, dinner and tea" to help British companies. In 1992, when plans were made for the privatisation of British Coal, Heseltine announced that 31 collieries were to close[2], including many of the mines in Nottinghamshire that had continued working during the 1984-5 strike. Although this policy was seen as a betrayal by the Nottinghamshire miners and the threatened miners had much more public sympathy than in 1984,[citation needed] there was hardly any organised resistance to the programme. A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ...


The government stated that since the pits were money losers they could only be sustained through unjustifiable government subsidies. Mine supporters pointed to the mines' high productivity rates and to the fact that their monetary losses were due to the large subsidies that other European nations were supplying their coal industries. Whilst Heseltine is generally seen as a centrist Conservative in the whole of Britain, his reputation in the coalfields remains low.[citation needed] The band Chumbawamba released the critical song "Mr Heseltine meets the public" that portrayed him as an out-of-touch figure; the same group had once dedicated a song to the village of Fitzwilliam, West Yorkshire, which was reduced to a ghost town following the closure of local pits. Chumbawamba are an English band who started out playing punk rock but over a 25-year career have gone on to play music in a wide range of styles, including pop influenced by dance music and world music, and now play acoustic folk music. ... Fitzwilliam is a small village on the edge of West Yorkshire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In June 1993, Heseltine suffered a heart attack whilst in Venice, leading to concerns on his ability to remain in government after he was televised leaving hospital in a wheelchair. In 1994, Chris Morris joked on BBC Radio 1 that Heseltine had died, and fellow MP Jerry Hayes soon broadcast an on-air tribute. Morris was subsequently suspended. Nonetheless Heseltine - who after being seen as an 'arriviste' in his younger days was now something of a grandee and elder statesman - reemerged as a serious political player in 1994, helped by his flirting with the idea of privatising the Post Office and by his testimony at the Arms to Iraq Inquiry (at which it emerged that he had refused to sign the certificates attempting to withhold evidence). The cover of "Private Eye" announced "A Legend Lives", and one major newspaper ended an editorial by proclaiming that "balance of probability" was that Heseltine would be Prime Minister before the end of the year. The truth of this prediction will never be known, as no leadership election emerged that autumn. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Chris Morris (born September 5, 1965 in Bristol, England) is an English satirical comedian, writer, producer, director, actor and radio DJ. Morris began his career in radio before later moving into television. ... The tone of this article is inappropriate for an encyclopedia. ... Various notable people have had their death announced in error. ...


Deputy Prime Minister

In the summer of 1995, John Major, having found himself consistently opposed by a minority of Eurosceptics in his party, challenged them to "put up or shut up" by resubmitting himself to a leadership election in which he was unsuccessfully opposed by the Secretary of State for Wales, John Redwood. There was speculation that Heseltine's supporters would engineer Major's downfall in the hope that their man would take over, but in the event they stayed loyal to Major, and Heseltine (who voted for Major and showed his ballot paper to the returning officers) was rewarded by promotion to Deputy Prime Minister. In this capacity he chaired a number of key Cabinet committees and was also an early key enthusiast for the Millennium Dome. In December 1996 Heseltine, angering eurosceptics, joined with Conservative Chancellor Kenneth Clarke in preventing any movement away from the government's official refusal to decide on whether or not to join the Single Currency. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Secretary of State for Wales is the head of the Wales Office within the United Kingdom cabinet. ... John Alan Redwood (born 15 June 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician and Member of Parliament for Wokingham. ... Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ... The O2 redirects here. ...


After Labour won the 1997 election, he suffered further heart trouble and was unable to stand for the Conservative Party leadership again, although there was still speculation that Clarke might have stood aside for him to stand as a compromise candidate. He became active in promoting the benefits for Britain of joining the single European Currency, appearing on the same stage as Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Robin Cook as part of an all-party campaign to promote Euro membership. He was also made a Companion of Honour by John Major in the 1997 resignation Honours List. The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... Robert Finlayson Cook (28 February 1946 – 6 August 2005) was a politician in the British Labour Party. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Prime Ministers Resignation Honours in the United Kingdom are honours granted by an outgoing Prime Minister following his or her resignation. ...


Retirement

He resigned his Henley-on-Thames constituency at the 2001 Election but remained outspoken on British politics. He was given a life peerage as Baron Heseltine, of Thenford in the County of Northamptonshire. Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Thenford is a village in the English county of Northamptonshire. ...


In December 2002, Heseltine controversially called for Iain Duncan Smith to be replaced as leader of the Conservatives by the "dream-ticket" of Kenneth Clarke as leader and Michael Portillo as deputy. He suggested the party's MPs vote on the matter, rather than party members as currently required by party rules. Without the replacement of Duncan Smith, the party has not "a ghost of a chance of winning the next election", he said. Duncan Smith was removed the following year. In the 2005 party leadership election, he backed the young moderniser, David Cameron. Also see: 2002 (number). ... Rt. ... This article is about Kenneth Clarke, the English politician. ... Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo PC (born 26 May 1953) is an English journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative politician. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ...


Following Cameron's election to the leadership, he set up a wide-ranging policy review. Chairmen of the various policy groups included ex-Chancellor Kenneth Clarke and other former cabinet ministers John Redwood, John Gummer, Stephen Dorrell and Michael Forsyth, as well as ex-leader Iain Duncan Smith. Heseltine was appointed to head the cities task force, having been responsible for urban policy twice as Environment Secretary under Margaret Thatcher and John Major. This article is about Kenneth Clarke, the English politician. ... John Alan Redwood (born 15 June 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician and Member of Parliament for Wokingham. ... This article or section may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to be clearer or more simplified. ... The Right Honourable Stephen James Dorrell (born March 25, 1952) is an English politician and Conservative Member of Parliament for Charnwood. ... Michael Bruce Forsyth, Baron Forsyth of Drumlean, PC, is a Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... Rt. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


Member of Parliament from 1966 to 2001: Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

He was ranked 170th in the Sunday Times Rich List 2004, with an estimated wealth of £240 million. Tavistock is a town in Devon, England, lying on the River Tavy on the edge of Dartmoor. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... , Henley-on-Thames is a town on the north side of the River Thames in south Oxfordshire, England, about 10 miles downstream and north-east from Reading, 10 miles upstream and west from Maidenhead. ... Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson (born 19 June 1964, New York)[2] is a British Conservative Party politician, journalist and former editor of The Spectator. ...


He is now a keen gardener and arboriculturalist and his arboretum is one of the most important private collections of specimens in the UK. It was featured in a one off documentary on BBC Two in December 2005.[3] A gardener is any person involved in the growing and maintenance of plants, notably in a garden. ... Good arboricultural care can reduce the risks of broken tree branches like this one Arboriculture is the selection, planting, care, and removal of individual trees, shrubs, vines, and other perennial woody plants, and the study of how they grow and respond to cultural practices and the environment. ... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


External links

Publications

  • Michael Heseltine, Raising The Sights - A Tory Perspective, in the Primrose League Gazette, vol.91, no.2, Aug/Sept 1987 edition, London.
  • Julian Critchley, Heseltine - The Unauthorised Biography, André Deutsch, London, September 1987, ISBN 0-233-98001-6
  • Michael Crick, Michael Heseltine: A Biography, Hamish Hamilton, 1997, ISBN 0-241-13691-1
  • Michael Heseltine, Life in the Jungle, Hodder & Stoughton, 2000, ISBN 0-340-73915-0

Primrose League badges The Primrose League was an organization for spreading Conservative principles amongst the British democracy, founded in 1883 and active until the mid 1990s, being finally wound up about 2003. ... Sir Julian Michael Gordon Critchley (8 December 1930 – 9 September 2000) was a politician in the United Kingdom, educated at Shrewsbury School and Pembroke College, Oxford. ... Andre Deutsch (1917–2000) was a 20th century British publisher. ... Michael Crick is a British journalist and author. ... The Hamish Hamilton logo Hamish Hamilton is a British book publisher, founded eponymously by the half-Scot half-American Jamie Hamilton (Hamish is the Celtic form). ... Hodder & Stoughton is a British publishing house, now an imprint of Hodder Headline. ...

References

  1. ^ Michael Crick, Michael Heseltine: A Biography, Hamish Hamilton, 1997, ISBN 0-241-13691-1, p92-3
  2. ^ Michael Crick, Michael Heseltine: A Biography, Hamish Hamilton, 1997, ISBN 0-241-13691-1, p105-7
Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
Henry Studholme
Member of Parliament for Tavistock
1966February 1974
Succeeded by
(constituency abolished)
Preceded by
John Hay
Member of Parliament for Henley
February 19742001
Succeeded by
Boris Johnson
Political offices
Preceded by
Albert Murray
Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Transport
1970
Succeeded by
(position abolished)
Preceded by
Peter Shore
Secretary of State for the Environment
1979–1983
Succeeded by
Tom King
Preceded by
John Nott
Secretary of State for Defence
1983–1986
Succeeded by
George Younger
Preceded by
Chris Patten
Secretary of State for the Environment
1990–1992
Succeeded by
Michael Howard
Preceded by
Peter Lilley
President of the Board of Trade
1992–1995
Succeeded by
Ian Lang
Preceded by
Sir Geoffrey Howe
(1988-1990)
Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1995–1997
Succeeded by
John Prescott

  Results from FactBites:
 
Michael Heseltine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (999 words)
Heseltine was born in Swansea, Wales, was educated at Shrewsbury School and then attended Pembroke College, Oxford and became President of the Oxford Union.
In 1993 Heseltine suffered a heart attack, leading to health concerns, particularly because he was televised leaving hospital in a wheelchair.
In December 2002 Heseltine controversially called for Iain Duncan Smith to be replaced as leader of the Conservatives by the "dream-ticket" of Kenneth Clarke as leader and Michael Portillo as deputy.
Michael Heseltine - Wicipedia (58 words)
Gwleidydd ac aelod seneddol oedd Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine of Thenford.
Michael Heseltine by Michael Crick (Hamish Hamilton, 1997)
Guardian Interview with Michael Heseltine by Simon Hattenstone http://www.guardian.co.uk/Tories/story/0,7369,466953,00.html
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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