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Encyclopedia > Michael Dwyer

Michael Dwyer (1772-1825) was a United Irish leader in the 1798 rising and later fought a guerilla campaign against the British army in the Wicklow Mountains from 1798-1803. He was born in the Glen of Imaal in 1772 and was a cousin of Anne Devlin who was to later achieve fame for her loyalty to the rebel cause following the suppression of Robert Emmet's rebellion. The Society of the United Irishmen was a political organisation in eighteenth century Ireland that sought independence from Great Britain. ... The Irish Rebellion of 1798 (Éirí Amach 1798 in Irish), or 1798 rebellion as it is known locally, was an uprising in 1798, lasting several months, against the British dominated Kingdom of Ireland. ... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... The Wicklow Mountains are a range of mountains in the south-east of Ireland. ... A remote valley in the western Wicklow Mountains, the Glen of Imaal is ringed by the Lugnaquilla massif and its foothills. ... Catherine IIs soldiers in the Russo-Turkish War, by Alexandre Benois. ... Anne Devlin was Robert Emmets Romantic friend. ... Robert Emmet Robert Emmet (4 March 1780 - 20 September 1803) was an Irish nationalist rebel leader. ...

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Dwyer in 1798 rebellion

Dwyer joined the Society of United Irishmen and fought with the rebels in battles during the summer of 1798 at Arklow, Vinegar Hill, Ballyellis and Hackettstown. He withdrew to the safety of the Wicklow Mountains in mid-July when rebels could no longer operate openly following their defeat in the disastrous midlands campaign of July 1798. Equality - It is new strung and shall be heard United Irish Symbol - Harp without Crown and Cap of Liberty The Society of the United Irishmen was a republican political organisation in eighteenth century Ireland that sought independence from Great Britain. ... The Battle of Arklow took place during the Irish Rebellion of 1798 on June 9th when a rebel force from Wexford, estimated at 10,000 strong, launched an assault into County Wicklow, on the British-held town of Arklow, in an attempt to spread the rebellion into Wicklow and to... Combatants Irish Rebels British Army, Hessian Mercenaries Commanders Rebel Council Gerard Lake Strength 20,000 15,000 Casualties 1,000 (inc. ... The battle of Ballyellis on 30th June 1798 was a clash during the 1798 rebellion between a surviving column of the dispersed Wexford rebel army and pursuing British forces which resulted in a total victory for the rebels. ... The Wicklow Mountains are a range of mountains in the south-east of Ireland. ... Anthony Perry (c. ...


Guerilla Campaign

Dwyer and his men began a campaign targeting local loyalists and yeomen, attacking small parties of the military and eluding any major sweeps against them. His force was strengthened by many deserters from the military who headed to Wicklow as the last rebel stronghold and who became the dedicated backbone of his force as they could not be expected to be included in any future offer of amnesty. For the township in Canada, see Loyalist, Ontario In general, a loyalist is an individual who is loyal to the powers that be. ... Yeoman is an antiquated term for farmers, tradesmen and other members of the early English middle class. ... Desertion is the act of abandoning or withdrawing support from someone or something to which you owe allegiance, responsibility or loyalty. ... County Wicklow (Contae Chill Mhantáin in Irish) is a county on the east coast of Ireland, immediately south of Dublin. ... Amnesty (from the Greek amnestia, oblivion) is an act of justice by which the supreme power in a state restores those who may have been guilty of any offence against it to the position of innocent persons. ...


Due to the constant hunt for him, Dwyer was forced to split and reassemble in his forces and hide amongst civilian sympathisers to elude his pursuers. In December 1799 at Derrynamuck he and about a dozen comrades were sheltering in three cottages when an informer led a large force of the British soldiers to the area. The cottages were quickly surrounded, the first two surrendering but following consultation, Dwyer and his men decided to fight on after negotiating the safe passage of the women and children. In the hopeless gunfight which followed, the cottage caught fire and only Dwyer remained unwounded. At this stage, Dwyer's comrade, Sam McAllister stood in the doorway to draw the soldiers fire on him but which allowed Dwyer to slip out and make an incredible escape.


Dwyer and Robert Emmett

Dwyer later made contact with Robert Emmet and was apprised of plans for his revolt but was reluctant to commit his followers to march to Dublin unless the rebellion showed some initial success. The subsequent failure of Emmet's rising led to a period of repression and renewed attempts by the Government to wipe out Dwyer's forces. Methods adopted included attempts to deny him shelter among the civilian population by severely punishing those suspected of harbouring his men, offering of huge rewards for information, assigning thousands of troops to Wicklow, and building a series of barracks and a military road through county Wicklow. Robert Emmet Robert Emmet (4 March 1780 - 20 September 1803) was an Irish nationalist rebel leader. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ...


In December 1803 Dwyer finally capitulated on terms that would allow him safe passage to America but the government reneged on the agreement holding him in Kilmainham Jail until August 1805, when they transported him to Australia. Victorian Wing Kilmainham Gaol, also known as Kilmainham Jail, is a former prison located in Kilmainham, Dublin, Ireland. ...


Australia

Dwyer had arrived in Sydney on 15th February 1806 and was given free settler status. He was given a grant of 100 acres of land on Cabramatta Creek in Sydney. Michael Dwyer was quoted as saying that all Irish will be free in this new country (i.e. Australia). This statement had been used against him and he was arrested in February 1807 and imprisoned. On 11 May 1807 Dwyer was charged with conspiring to mount an Irish insurrection against British rule. An Irish convict stated in court that Michael Dwyer had plans to march on the seat of Government in Australia, at Parramatta. Dwyer did not deny that he had said that all Irish will be free but he did deny the charges of organising an Irish insurrection in Sydney. Dwyer had the powerful support of Australia's first Jewish policeman, John Harris, who expressed the opinion in court that he did not believe that Dwyer was organising a rebellion against the Government in Sydney. On 18 May 1907, Dwyer was found not guilty of the charges of organising an Irish insurrection in Sydney. This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Parramatta is a city, suburb and Local Government Area in Sydney, Australia, 25 kilometres west of the central business district (CBD) in Western Sydney. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination...


Governor William Bligh disregarded the first trial acquittal of Michael Dwyer. Bligh who regarded the Irish and many other nationalities with contempt, organised another trial for Michael Dwyer in which he was stripped of his free settler status and transported to Van Diemens Land (Tasmania) and Norkfolk Island. After Governor Bligh was overthrown in the Rum Rebellion in 1808, the new Governor of New South Wales, George Johnston who was present at Dwyer's acquittal in the first trial ordered that Michael Dwyer's freedom be reinstated. Michael Dwyer was later to become Chief of Police (1813-1820) at Liverpool, New South Wales. William Bligh in 1814 Vice-Admiral William Bligh FRS RN (9 September 1754 – 7 December 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and colonial administrator. ... Emblems: Flora - Tasmanian Blue Gum; Mineral - Crocoite Motto: Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Slogan or Nickname: The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Const. ... A contemporary propaganda cartoon of Blighs arrest produced to show Bligh as being a coward The Rum Rebellion of 1808 was the only successful (if only temporarily so) armed takeover of government in Australias recorded history. ... Liverpool is a suburb in the City of Liverpool, New South Wales in the south western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ...


Dwyer died in August 1825 and is buried with his wife, Mary (nee Doyle) at Waverly Cemetery, Sydney. On his grave is inscribed the words "The Wicklow Chief" and also mentioned are the other heroes of Irish causes.


Dwyer has numerous descendants throughout Australia. In 2002, in Bungendore near Canberra, a family reunion took place with descendants of Michael Dwyer's family including descendants of related Australian Irish families the Donoghues and Doyles. One of Michael Dwyer’s sons was the owner of The Harp Hotel in Bungendore, New South Wales in circa 1838. Dwyer’s nephew John Donoghue (1822-1892), built The Old Stone House, Molongolo Rd, Bungendore, circa 1865, a huge strongly constructed Bungendore landmark and a monument to hard working Irish Australian settlers. Bungendore (postcode 2621) is a town in southern New South Wales, Australia near the Molongolo Valley and the Australian Capital Territory border. ... Cyberkinetics is an American company. ... Irish Australian is the second largest ethnic group in Australia, numbering 1,919,727 or 9. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Michael O'Dwyer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1088 words)
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Michael Dwyer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (501 words)
Michael Dwyer (1772-1825) was a United Irish leader in the 1798 rising and later fought a guerilla campaign against the British army in the Wicklow Mountains from 1798-1803.
Dwyer joined the Society of United Irishmen and fought with the rebels in battles during the summer of 1798 at Arklow, Vinegar Hill, Ballyellis and Hackettstown.
Dwyer later made contact with Robert Emmet and was apprised of plans for his revolt but was reluctant to commit his followers to march to Dublin unless the rebellion showed some initial success.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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