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Encyclopedia > Michael Curtiz
Michael Curtiz

Birth name Manó Kertész Kaminer
Born December 24, 1886(1886-12-24)
Flag of Hungary Budapest, Austria-Hungary (now Hungary)
Died April 10, 1962 (aged 75)
Flag of the United States Hollywood, California, U.S.
Spouse(s) Lucy Doraine (1918-1923)
Lili Damita (1925-1926)
Bess Meredyth (1929-1961)

Michael Curtiz (December 24, 1886 - April 10, 1962) was an Academy Award-winning Hungarian-American film director. He directed at least 50 films in Europe and a further hundred in the US, among the best-known being The Adventures of Robin Hood, Angels with Dirty Faces, Casablanca, Yankee Doodle Dandy and White Christmas. He thrived in the heyday of the Warner Bros. studio in the 1930s and 40s, where he gained a reputation for efficient competence, but also for being difficult to work with. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Lili Damita Lili Damita (July 10, 1904 – March 21, 1994) was a French actress. ... Bess Meredyth was an award-winning film writer. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... For other uses, see Casablanca (disambiguation). ... Captain Blood is an adventure novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1922. ... Four Daughters is a 1938 film which tells the story of a happy musical family whose lives and loves are disrupted by the arrival of a cynical young composer who interjects himself into the daughters romantic lives. ... Angels with Dirty Faces is a well-known and often referenced 1938 Warner Brothers film noir directed by Michael Curtiz and starring James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Pat OBrien, and the Dead End Kids. ... Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 biographical film about George M. Cohan, starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Richard Whorf, Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Hungarian-American refers to American citizens of Hungarian descent. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Errol Flynn as Robin Hood. ... Angels with Dirty Faces is a well-known and often referenced 1938 Warner Brothers film noir directed by Michael Curtiz and starring James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Pat OBrien, and the Dead End Kids. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 biographical film about George M. Cohan, starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Richard Whorf, Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney. ... White Christmas is a 1954 movie starring Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye that featured the songs of Irving Berlin, including the titular White Christmas. ... “WB” redirects here. ...


He was less successful from the late 1940s onwards, when he attempted to move from studio direction into production and freelance work, but he continued working until shortly before his death. While several of his works, such as Casablanca and Mildred Pierce, are highly regarded by film critics, opinion is still divided as to what extent his body of work is united by a personal style of his own.

Contents

Life

Early life

Curtiz was born Manó Kertész Kaminer to a Jewish family in Budapest, Hungary (then Austria-Hungary). He claimed to have been born on December 24, 1886. Both the date and the year are open to doubt: he was fond of telling tall stories about his early years, including that he had run away from home to join the circus and that he had been a member of the Hungarian fencing team at the 1912 Olympic Games, but he seems to have had a conventional middle-class upbringing. He studied at Markoszy University and the Royal Academy of Theater and Art, Budapest, before beginning his career as an actor and director as Mihály Kertész at the National Hungarian Theater in 1912.[1] The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... (Redirected from 1912 Olympic Games) The Games of the V Olympiad were held in 1912 in Sweden. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ...


Details of his early experience as a director are sparse, and it is not clear what part he may have played in the direction of several early films, but he is known to have directed at least one film in Hungary before spending six months in 1913 at the Nordisk studio in Denmark honing his craft. On the outbreak of the First World War he briefly served in the artillery of the Austro-Hungarian Army, but he had returned to film-making by 1915. In that or the following year he married for the first time, to the actress Lucy Doraine. The couple divorced in 1923. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Austro-Hungarian Army was the ground force of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. ...


Curtiz left Hungary when the film industry was nationalised in 1919, and soon settled in Vienna. He made at least 21 films for Sascha Films, among them the Biblical epics Sodom und Gomorrha (1922) and Die Sklavenkönigin (1924). The latter, released in the US as Moon of Israel, caught the attention of Jack Warner, who hired Curtiz for his own studio with the intention of having him direct a similar film for Warner Bros. (Noah's Ark, which was eventually produced in 1928). Curtiz's second marriage, to another actress, Lili Damita, lasted only from 1925 to 1926. When he went to America, Curtiz left behind at least one illegitimate son, for whom he ceased paying child support.[2] Alexander Graf Kolowrat-Krakowski at the studio in 1916. ... This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Lili Damita Lili Damita (July 10, 1904 – March 21, 1994) was a French actress. ...


Career in the US

Curtiz arrived in the United States in 1926 (according to some sources on the fourth of July, but according to others in June);[3] he took on the anglicised name 'Michael Curtiz'. He had a lengthy and prolific Hollywood career, with directing credits on over 100 films in many film genres. During the 30s, Curtiz was often credited on four films in a single year, although he was not always the sole director on these projects. In the pre-Code period, Curtiz directed such films as Mystery of the Wax Museum, Doctor X (both shot in two-strip Technicolor), and The Kennel Murder Case with William Powell as Philo Vance. In film theory, genre refers to the primary method of film categorization. ... Pre-Code films were created before the Motion Picture Production Code or Hays Code took effect on 1 July 1934 in the United States of America. ... Mystery of the Wax Museum is a mystery/horror Technicolor film released in 1933, and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Doctor X is a First National/Warner Bros. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... The Kennel Murder Case is a 1932 murder mystery novel that has a terrific first half (Chapters 1 - 10), with fictional detective Philo Vance investigating a complex, coincidence-laden, locked room murder. ... William Horatio Powell (July 29, 1892 - March 5, 1984) was an American actor, noted for his sophisticated, cynical roles. ...


In the mid-30s, he began the highly successful cycle of adventure films starring Errol Flynn that included Captain Blood (1935), The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), Dodge City, The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), The Sea Hawk and Santa Fe Trail (1940). Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Captain Blood is a 1935 swashbuckling film. ... The Charge of the Light Brigade is a 1936 historical film made by Warner Bros. ... The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ... For Michael Curtizs 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 movie). ... The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), is a romantic drama film based on the relationship between Queen Elizabeth I (played by Bette Davis) and Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (played by Errol Flynn). ... 1940s paperback edition The Sea Hawk is a novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1915. ... Santa Fe Trail is a 1940 western film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. ...


By the early 1940s Curtiz had become fairly wealthy, earning $3,600 per week and owning a substantial estate, complete with polo pitch.[4] One of his regular polo partners was Hal Wallis, who had met Curtiz on his arrival in the country and had established a close friendship with him. Wallis' wife, the actress Louise Fazenda, and Curtiz's third wife, Bess Meredyth, an actress and screenwriter, had been close since before Curtiz's marriage to Meredyth in 1929. Curtiz was frequently unfaithful, and had numerous sexual relationships with extras on set; Meredyth once left him for a short time, but they remained married until 1961, shortly before Curtiz's death.[5] She was Curtiz's helper whenever his need to deal with scripts or other elements went beyond his grasp of English, and he often phoned her for advice when presented with a problem while filming.[6] Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ... Louise Fazenda (June 17, 1895 - April 17, 1962) was an American film actor, appearing chiefly in silent film comedy films. ... Bess Meredyth was an award-winning film writer. ...


Prime examples of his work in the 1940s are The Sea Wolf (1941), Casablanca (1942) and Mildred Pierce (1945). During this period he also directed the pro-Soviet propaganda film Mission to Moscow (1943), which was commissioned at the request of president Franklin D. Roosevelt in order to aid the wartime effort. Other top Curtiz efforts were Four Daughters 1938, Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Life With Father (1947), Young Man with a Horn and The Breaking Point (1950). The Sea-Wolf is a novel written in 1904 by American author Jack London. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... For other uses, see Mildred Pierce (disambiguation). ... Mission to Moscow is a 1943 movie directed by Michael Curtiz with a screen play by Howard Koch based on the book by Ambassador Joseph E. Davies. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... FDR redirects here. ... Four Daughters is a 1938 film which tells the story of a happy musical family whose lives and loves are disrupted by the arrival of a cynical young composer who interjects himself into the daughters romantic lives. ... Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 biographical film about George M. Cohan, starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Richard Whorf, Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney. ... Life with Father is the title of a humorous autobiographical book of stories written in 1936 by Clarence Day, Jr. ... Young Man with a Horn is a 1938 novel by Dorothy Baker that is loosely based on the real life of jazz trumpet player Bix Beiderbecke. ... The Breaking Point is the second film adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel To Have and Have Not. ...


While Curtiz himself had escape Europe before the rise of Nazism, other members of his family were not so lucky. His sister's family were sent to Auschwitz, where her husband and three children died. Curtiz paid part of his own salary into the European Film Fund, a benevolent association which helped European refugees in the film business establish themselves in the US.[7] Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ...


In the late 1940s, he made a new agreement with Warners under which the studio and his own production company were to share the costs and profits of his subsequent films. These films did poorly, however, whether as part of the general decline in the film industry in this period or because Curtiz, "had no skills in shaping the entirety of a picture".[8] Either way, as Curtiz himself said, "You are only appreciated so far as you carry the dough into the box office. They throw you into gutter next day".[9] The long partnership between director and studio descended into a bitter court battle.


After his relationship with Warners broke down, Curtiz continued to direct on a freelance basis from 1954 onwards, with some of his best efforts done at Paramount, where he directed White Christmas (1954), starring Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye; We're No Angels (1955), starring Humphrey Bogart; and King Creole (1958), starring Elvis Presley. His final film, The Comancheros, was released less than a year before his death from cancer on 10 April 1962. He is interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California. Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... White Christmas is a 1954 movie starring Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye that featured the songs of Irving Berlin, including the titular White Christmas. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Were no Angels is a 1955 comedy picture starring Humphrey Bogart, Peter Ustinov and Aldo Ray. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Bogart redirects here. ... King Creole is a 1958 Elvis Presley film and soundtrack based on the 1952 Harold Robbins novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher. ... Jan. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gates of Forest Lawn Forest Lawn Memorial Park is a cemetery in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, in the United States. ... Nickname: Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ...


Curtiz was always extremely active: he worked very long days, took part in several sports in his spare time, and was often found to sleep under a cold shower.[10] He was dismissive of actors who ate lunch, believing that "lunch bums" had no energy for work in the afternoons. The flip side of his dedication was an often callous demeanour: Fay Wray said that, "I felt that he was not flesh and bones, that he was part of the steel of the camera".[11] He was not popular with most of his colleagues: "he was known as an arrogant, driving perfectionist".[12] He reserved most of his venom for subordinates rather than his stars, frequently quarelling with his technicians and dismissing one extra by saying, "More to your right. More. More. Now you are out of the scene. Go home".[13] Bette Davis refused to work with him again after he called her a "goddamned nothing no good sexless son of a bitch", and he had a low opinion of actors in general, saying that acting, "is fifty percent a big bag of tricks. The other fifty percent should be talent and ability, although it seldom is". Nevertheless, he did not offend everyone: he treated Ingrid Bergman with courtesy on the set of Casablanca, while Claude Rains credited him with teaching him the difference between film and theater acting, or, "what not to do in front of a camera".[14] Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian–American actress. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually in English, IPA notation) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award-winning and two-time Emmy Award-winning Swedish actress. ... Claude Rains (November 10, 1889 – May 30, 1967) was a British-born theatre and film actor, who later held American citizenship, best known for his many roles in Hollywood films. ...


Curtiz had a lifelong struggle with the English language and there are many anecdotes about his failures. He bewildered a set dresser on Casablanca by demanding a 'poodle', when he actually wanted a puddle of water. David Niven liked Curtiz's phrase "bring on the empty horses" (for "bring on the horses without riders") so much that he used it for the title of the second volume of his Hollywood memoirs. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... An anecdote is a short tale narrating an interesting or amusing biographical incident. ... For the political insult see poodle (insult). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Criticism

Curtiz's work has received relatively little attention from film critics: his phenomenal productivity and the variety of his output seem to make him the antithesis of the auteur theory. However these characteristics were typical of the studio system within which Curtiz worked rather than being unique to him; as Aljean Harmetz argues, "nearly every Warner Bros. picture was an exception to the auteur theory".[15] Curtiz can be seen as the ultimate studio director, who excelled at direction on set but was out of his depth when he tried to take greater control of a picture, as with his work from the late 40s onwards. Harmetz states that, "Curtiz's vision of any movie... was almost totally a visual one", and quotes him as saying, "Who cares about character? I make it go so fast nobody notices".[16] Auteurs redirects here. ... The studio system was a means of film production and distribution dominant in Hollywood from the early 1920s through the early 1950s. ... Aljean Harmetz is a Hollywood journalist and film historian. ...


Sidney Rosenzweig argues that Curtiz did have his own distinctive style, which was in place by the time of his move to America: "high crane shots to establish a story's environment; unusual camera angles and complex compositions in which characters are often framed by physical objects; much camera movement; subjective shots, in which the camera becomes the character's eye; and high contrast lighting with pools of shadows".[17] This style was not purely visual, but had the effect of highlighting the character's relationship to his environment; often this environment was identified with the fate in which the character was trapped.[18] This entrapment then forces the "morally divided" protagonist to make a moral choice. While Rosenzweig accepts that almost every film involves such moral dilemmas to some extent, it is Curtiz's directorial decisions which place the element center stage in his films, albeit at an emotional rather than an intellectual level.[19]


Awards

Curtiz received four nominations for the Academy Award for Best Director: before Casablanca won in 1943, he was nominated for Yankee Doodle Dandy in 1943, and for Angels with Dirty Faces and Four Daughters in 1939. Captain Blood came second as a write-in nomination in 1936. The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ...


Selected Hollywood filmography

Awards
Preceded by
William Wyler
for Mrs. Miniver
Academy Award for Best Director
1943
for Casablanca
Succeeded by
Leo McCarey
for Going My Way

The Cabin in the Cotton is a 1932 American drama film directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Richard (Dick) Barthelmess (May 9, 1895 - August 17, 1963) was a silent film star. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... Goodbye Again is a 1933 comedy film made by First National Pictures/Warner Bros. ... Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... Blondell in Nightmare Alley (1947) Rose Joan Blondell (August 30, 1906 - December 25, 1979) was an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... Mystery of the Wax Museum is a mystery/horror Technicolor film released in 1933, and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Lionel Atwill in Mystery of the Wax Museum Lionel Atwill (March 1, 1885 - April 22, 1946) was an English stage and film actor born in Croydon, London. ... Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian–American actress. ... Glenda Farrell (June 30, 1904 – May 1, 1971) was an American film actress. ... The Kennel Murder Case is a 1932 murder mystery novel that has a terrific first half (Chapters 1 - 10), with fictional detective Philo Vance investigating a complex, coincidence-laden, locked room murder. ... William Horatio Powell (July 29, 1892 - March 5, 1984) was an American actor, noted for his sophisticated, cynical roles. ... Philo Vance was a fictional American detective created by S. S. Van Dine in the 1920s who appeared in 12 novels. ... Jimmy the Gent is a 1934 black-and-white film starring James Cagney as an unscrupulous investigator and Bette Davis as his skeptical paramour. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Basil Rathbone (13 June 1892 – 21 July 1967), Military Cross, was a British actor most famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes and of suave villains in such swashbuckler films as The Mark of Zorro, Captain Blood, and The Adventures of Robin Hood. ... Angels with Dirty Faces is a well-known and often referenced 1938 Warner Brothers film noir directed by Michael Curtiz and starring James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Pat OBrien, and the Dead End Kids. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Dodge City is a western movie starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Alan Hale Sr. ... The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), is a romantic drama film based on the relationship between Queen Elizabeth I (played by Bette Davis) and Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (played by Errol Flynn). ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Santa Fe Trail is a 1940 western film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Virginia City is a 1940 black-and-white movie starring Errol Flynn, Miriam Hopkins, and Randolph Scott, and featuring a mustachioed Humphrey Bogart in the role of the real-life outlaw John Murrell. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Movie poster for The Sea Hawk The Sea Hawk is a 1940 adventure film about an English privateer set in the Elizabethan era, loosely based on the historical figure Sir Francis Drake. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Alan Hale Sr. ... The Sea Wolf is a 1941 black-and-white film adaptation of Jack Londons novel The Sea Wolf with Edward G. Robinson, Ida Lupino, and John Garfield. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ... John Garfield John Garfield (born March 4, 1913 in New York City; died May 21, 1952 in New York City) was an American actor. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Bogart redirects here. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually in English, IPA notation) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award-winning and two-time Emmy Award-winning Swedish actress. ... Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 biographical film about George M. Cohan, starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Richard Whorf, Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Walter Huston (April 6, 1884 – April 7, 1950) was a Canadian-born American actor. ... Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Ann Blyth Ann Marie Blyth (born August 16, 1928 in Mount Kisco, New York) is an American actress and singer, most often cast in Hollywood musicals, but who also succeeded in the dramatic roles she was given. ... Night and Day is a 1946 film made by Warner Brothers, based on the life of American composer and songwriter Cole Porter. ... This article is about the British actor. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... The Breaking Point is the second film adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel To Have and Have Not. ... John Garfield John Garfield (born March 4, 1913 in New York City; died May 21, 1952 in New York City) was an American actor. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Ill See You in My Dreams was a 1951 film starring Doris Day and Danny Thomas, directed by Michael Curtiz. ... A biographical film or biopic is a film about a particular person or group of people, based on events that actually happened. ... Gustav Gerson Kahn (November 6, 1886 - October 8, 1941) was a famous Jewish-German-American musician, songwriter and lyricist. ... Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff (born April 3, 1924)[1] is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate known as Doris Day. ... Danny Thomas (January 6, 1914 - February 6, 1991) was an American nightclub comedian and television and film actor of Lebanese Maronite Catholic descent. ... White Christmas is a 1954 movie starring Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye that featured the songs of Irving Berlin, including the titular White Christmas. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ... The Egyptian is a 1954 epic film made in Cinemascope by 20th Century Fox, directed by Michael Curtiz and produced by Darryl F. Zanuck. ... Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons in Angel Face Jean Merilyn Simmons (born January 31, 1929 in Crouch Hill, London, England, United Kingdom) is a British actress. ... Victor Mature (29 January 1913 – 4 August 1999), an American film actor, was born in Louisville, Kentucky to a Tyrolean father, Marcellus George Mature, a cutler, and a Swiss-American mother, Clara Mature. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American film and stage actress. ... Were no Angels is a 1955 comedy picture starring Humphrey Bogart, Peter Ustinov and Aldo Ray. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (IPA: ; April 16, 1921 – March 28, 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning English actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, Swiss, Russian, German and Ethiopian ancestry. ... King Creole is a 1958 Elvis Presley film and soundtrack based on the 1952 Harold Robbins novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 – July 1, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American comedy actor best known for his role as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and his frequent collaborations with fellow Odd Couple star Jack Lemmon. ... Huckleberry Finn and Jim Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) is commonly accounted as the first Great American Novel. ... Eddie Hodges (born 5 March 1947) is a former child actor and recording artist who left show business as an adult. ... Tony Randall (February 26, 1920 – May 17, 2004) was an American comic actor. ... Patty McCormack (born August 21, 1945) is an American actress. ... The Comancheros is a 1961 western film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring John Wayne and Stuart Whitman. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Stuart Whitman Stuart Whitman (born February 1, 1926 or, according to other sources 1928 or 1929) is an American actor arguably best known for playing Marshal Jim Crown in the western television series Cimarron Strip in 1967, co-starring with John Wayne in the western movie The Comancheros in 1961... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... Mrs. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Leo McCarey (October 3, 1898 - July 5, 1969) was a movie director, screenwriter and producer. ... Going My Way, a 1944 Academy Award winning film directed by Leo McCarey and starring Bing Crosby. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Rosenzweig p. 5.
  2. ^ Harmetz p. 122.
  3. ^ Rosenzweig p. 6 states July 4; Harmetz p. 63 states June.
  4. ^ Harmetz p. 76.
  5. ^ Harmetz p. 121.
  6. ^ Harmetz p. 123.
  7. ^ Harmetz p. 221.
  8. ^ Harmetz pp. 191, 332.
  9. ^ Harmetz p. 332.
  10. ^ Harmetz p. 188.
  11. ^ Harmetz p. 126.
  12. ^ Rosenzweig p. 7.
  13. ^ Harmetz p. 124.
  14. ^ Harmetz p. 190.
  15. ^ Harmetz p. 75.
  16. ^ Harmetz pp 183-4, 184.
  17. ^ Rosenzweig pp. 6-7.
  18. ^ Rosenzweig p. 158.
  19. ^ Rosenzweig pp. 158-159.

References

  • Harmetz, Aljean. Round Up the Usual Suspects: The Making of "Casablanca". Orion Publishing Co, 1993.
  • Rosenzweig, Sidney. Casablanca and Other Major Films of Michael Curtiz. Ann Arbor, Mich.: UMI Research Press, 1982.

External links

Persondata
NAME Curtiz, Michael
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Manó Kertész Kaminer
SHORT DESCRIPTION Hungarian-American film director
DATE OF BIRTH 24 December 1886
PLACE OF BIRTH Budapest, Austria-Hungary (now Hungary
DATE OF DEATH 10 April 1962
PLACE OF DEATH Hollywood, California, U.S.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Michael Curtiz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (587 words)
Curtiz had a lifelong struggle with the English language and there are many anecdotes about his failures.
Michael Curtiz is interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.
Curtiz is often used as an example of a director who was not an auteur - that is, an artist with a recognizable style; he worked in many different genres, and did not use unusual cinematography or editing.
Michael Curtiz (1149 words)
Curtiz, I believe, knows exactly what he is doing here: calmly staging a spectacle that originated in the theater and which, like Ford in Mister Roberts, he wants to convey in that aspect to some degree at least, and we may be glad he did.
Curtiz’s chiaroscuro drives all this bizarrerie like a well-laden prairie schooner, or the winds of history revealing a transcontinental railroad through the dust.
Curtiz’s single best invention occurs in the “Choreography” number where the bleakness is interrupted by Vera-Ellen’s legs (between a pink dance skirt and a pair of matching shoes) descending into frame and tapping one foot at a time, first right, then left.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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