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Encyclopedia > Michael Crawford
Michael Crawford
Birth name Michael Patrick Dumble-Smith
Born January 19, 1942 (age 64)
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Notable roles Frank Spencer in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em
The Phantom in Phantom of the Opera
Tony Awards
Best Actor in a Musical, 1988, Phantom of the Opera
Michael Crawford (right) as Frank Spencer in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em
Michael Crawford (right) as Frank Spencer in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em

Michael Crawford, OBE (born Michael Patrick Dumble-Smith, 19 January 1942 in Salisbury, Wiltshire), is an English actor and singer. He has won critical acclaim and numerous awards during his career, which includes radio, television and stage (including appearing on stage in the West End in London, and on Broadway in New York). January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... Salisbury (pronounced Solsbree or Sauls-bree) is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Some_Mothers_Do_Ave_Em_2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Some_Mothers_Do_Ave_Em_2. ... Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Salisbury (pronounced Solsbree or Sauls-bree) is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... Interior of the 1928 B. F. Keith Memorial Theatre, Boston, Massachusetts. ... // West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland . Along with New Yorks Broadway Theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of theatre in the... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and the largest city of England (strangely, England has no constitutional existence within the United Kingdom, and therefore cannot be said to have a capital). ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ...


Although he most often appears on stage, in musicals such as Phantom of the Opera and Barnum, he first became a household name and famous to millions for his role as the hapless Frank Spencer in the British television sitcom Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em (1973-78), for which he performed most of his own stunts. The series became one of the BBC's most successful programmes of all time. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ... Original cast recording Barnum is a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical with book by Mark Bramble, lyrics by Michael Stewart, and music by Cy Coleman. ... A situation comedy, usually referred to as a sitcom, is a genre of comedy programs which originated in radio. ... Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... An under 16s motorbike display team perform a potentially dangerous stunt A stunt is an unusual and difficult physical feat, or any act requiring a special skill, performed for artistic purposes in TV, theatre or cinema. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ...


Crawford has been awarded the OBE, and has also been named Showbusiness Personality of the Year by the Variety Club of Great Britain. Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are...

Contents

Biography

Crawford was, at first, raised by his widowed mother, Doris and her mother, Edith Kathleen O'Keefe, whom Michael always called "Nan". Doris' husband, Arthur Dumbell-Smith, had been killed during the Battle of Britain, less than a year after they married. Afterwards, Michael was the result of a short-lived relationship. He later lived with his grandparents Monty and Edith on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent, until his mother re-married a grocer named Den Ingram in 1945. Combatants United Kingdom Germany Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Albert Kesselring Strength initially 700; grew to nearly 1000 by the end of the Battle. ... The Isle of Sheppey is a small (36 square miles, 94 km²) island off the northern coast of Kent in the Thames Estuary, some 38 miles (62km) to the east of central London. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... A grocer is a dealer in staple foodstuffs, such as meats, produce or dairy products, and other household supplies. ...


From an early age, it was clear that he demonstrated both an aptitude for comedy and an exceptional singing voice, and at the age of seven made one of his first (and brief) public appearances as a choirboy at St. Paul's Cathedral in London, but he quickly soon left that vocation. Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, screaming. ... Look up choirboy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and the largest city of England (strangely, England has no constitutional existence within the United Kingdom, and therefore cannot be said to have a capital). ...


His first "stage" debut was in a school production of Benjamin Britten's Let's Make an Opera playing the role of Sammy the Little Sweep (who was the leading character in the opera) at Brixton Town Hall in London, England, but his big break did not come until Benjamin Britten hired him to play Sammy in a professional production of Let's Make an Opera at the Scala Theatre in London, which he alternated with another boy soprano, David Hemmings. Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten, OM CH (November 22, 1913 – December 4, 1976) was a British composer, conductor, and pianist. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan. ... David Hemmings in the late 1960s David Hemmings (18 November 1941 – 3 December 2003) was a British movie actor and director, whose most famous role was the photographer in Michelangelo Antonionis Blowup in 1966 (opposite Vanessa Redgrave), one of the films that best represented the spirit of the 1960s. ...


It was in between his performances of Let's Make an Opera and Noye's Fludde, that he was told he had to change his name (as another performer in England used the same surname). While he was riding home on a bus after an audition, he saw a truck with the slogan "Crawford's Biscuits Are Best". It was then that Michael decided to change his name to "Michael Crawford". Audition can refer to: The sense of hearing The audio editing software Adobe Audition ...


Soon afterward, the English Opera Group hired him for the role of Japeth in Benjamin Britten's opera Noye's Fludde, based on the story of Noah and the Great Flood. Crawford remembers that it was during that production that he realized he sincerely wanted a career in acting. The English Opera Group was a small company of British musicians formed in 1947 by the composer Benjamin Britten for the purpose of presenting his and other (primarily British) composers operatic works. ... Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten, OM CH (November 22, 1913 – December 4, 1976) was a British composer, conductor, and pianist. ...


His stage career began in such plays as - André Birabeau's French comedy Head of the Family, Change for the Angel, Out of the Frying Pan, Come Blow Your Horn, William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, Twelfth Night and other famous plays such as The Importance of Being Earnest, The Striplings, and The Move After Checkmate, among others. Come Blow Your Horn was Neil Simons first play, premiered in the US in 1961. ... Gāius JÅ«lius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Gaius Marcius Coriolanus is widely believed to be a legendary figure who is said to have lived during the 5th century BC. He was given the agnomen Coriolanus as a result of his action in capturing the Volscian town of Corioli in 493 BC. Venturia at the Feet of Coriolanus... Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde, a comedy of manners in either three or four acts (depending on edition) inspired by W. S. Gilberts Engaged. ...


At the same time, he also appeared in over 400 radio broadcasts on the BBC and early BBC soap-operas - such as Billy Bunter, Emergency Ward 10, Probation Officer, Two Living, One Dead, and even appearing as cabin boy, John Drake, in the TV series Sir Francis Drake , a twenty-six part adventure series made by ITC, starring Terrence Morgan and Jean Kent. Billy Bunter, the Fat Owl of the Remove, was a fictional character created by Charles Hamilton (using the nom de plume of Frank Richards) as for stories set at Greyfriars School in the boys weekly magazine The Magnet. ... Emergency Ward 10 was a British television series shown on ITV between 1957 and 1967. ... Sir Francis Drake was a British adventure television series starring Terence Morgan as Sir Francis Drake, commander of the sailing ship the Golden Hind. ...


After appearing in several British children's films,Blow Your Trumpet and Soapbox Derby, he was approached to play an American, Junior Sailen, in the film The War Lover opposite Steve McQueen in 1962. To prepare for the role, he would spend hours listening to Woody Woodbury, a famous comedian of the time, to help perfect his "American" accent. The War Lover is a 1962 film based on the John Hersey book and stars Steve McQueen, Robert Wagner and Shirley Anne Field. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was considered one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a captivating on-screen persona. ...


In 1964, he first struck stardom in the British television series, Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life playing the Mod-style, motorcycle-riding Byron and it was this role that attracted director, Richard Lester, to hire him for the roles of Colin in The Knack... And How to Get It opposite Rita Tushingham, "Hero" in the film adapation of Stephen Sondheim's musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum with Zero Mostel, Jack Gilford, Buster Keaton, and Phil Silvers; The Jokers starring Oliver Reed; and How I Won The War with Roy Kinnear and John Lennon. In between this time, he had married a fellow actress-disc jockey named Gabrielle Lewis and they had two daughters, Emma and Lucy. Richard Lester (born January 19, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a UK based film director famous for his work with The Beatles. ... Rita Tushingham, born 14 March 1940 in Liverpool, is an English actress. ... A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart. ... Mostel in Sirocco (1951) Zero Mostel (February 28, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Brooklyn-born stage and film actor best known for his portrayal of comic characters such as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof , Pseudolus in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Max... Jack Gilford Jack Gilford (July 25, 1908 – June 2, 1990) was an American actor with a long and successful career on the Broadway stage, films and television. ... Joseph Frank Keaton Jr. ... Phil Silvers TV Guide cover Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... Oliver Reed (February 13, 1938 – May 2, 1999) was an English actor known for his macho image on and off screen. ... How I Won the War is a 1967 film directed by Richard Lester. ... Roy Kinnear (January 8, 1934 – September 20, 1988) was a prolific English character actor. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ...


In 1967, he made his Broadway debut in Black Comedy/White Lies with Lynn Redgrave (making her debut as well) in which he began to demonstrate his aptitude and daring for extreme physical comedy, such as walking into and through walls in the dark. While working in the show, he was called to Hollywood to audition for the role for Cornelius Hackl in the film adaption of the musical Hello, Dolly. He was cast and shared top billing with Barbra Streisand and Walter Matthau. Hhis film success was short-lived, as his subsequent movies proved either to be mediocre or complete failures at the box-office, and he returned to England and the West End. Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Black Comedy/White Lies is a play, comprised of two unrelated acts, by Peter Shaffer. ... Lynn Rachel Redgrave OBE (born 8 March 1943 in London) is an English actress born into the famous acting Redgrave family. ... ... The Fantasticks was the longest-running musical in history. ... 1994 Cast Recording Hello, Dolly! is one of the most popular Broadway musicals ever written. ... Barbra Streisand (born April 24, 1942 as Barbara Joan Streisand), is a two-time Academy Award-winning American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, film producer and director. ... Walter Matthau Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 – July 1, 2000) was an Academy Award winning American comedy actor. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ...


For a while, his career seemed to be at a stand-still and during this period, his marriage to Gabrielle ended (although they have since reconciled as very close friends).


It wasn't until his career was revived by an invitation to star in a BBC television comedy, in the role of child-like but eternally haphazard Frank Spencer in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em. Originally the role of Frank had been offered to British actor-comedian,Ronnie Barker, but after he and another actor had turned down the role, Michael was offered and took on the challenging role. Cast alongside him was British actress, Michele Dotrice, cast in the role of his long-suffering wife Betty in 1973. The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... Ronnie Barker Ronald William George Barker OBE (September 25, 1929 – October 3, 2005), popularly known as Ronnie Barker and (as a writer) Gerald Wiley , was an English comic actor and writer. ... Michele Dotrice (b. ...


Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em soon became one of the BBC's most popular TV series and ran, at first, until 1975 when it was felt that rather than continuing to run the show until it failed in the ratings, it would be best to close while it was still a success. But because of its popularity, it was revived for a short period from 1977 to 1978, and when it finally closed in 1978, it remained one of the top-10 British TV series of all time. Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ...


At the same time he was playing in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, Michael was approached to star in the musical "Billy" (based on the novel, Billy Liar) in (1974) at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in London. Having not sung professionally in some time, since Hello, Dolly, Michael went back to studying singing seriously with vocal coach, Ian Adam, and spent hours perfecting his dancing capabilities with choreographer Onna White. Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... Billy Liar (1959) is a novel by Keith Waterhouse that was later adapted into a play, film, musical and TV series. ... The present-day Theatre Royal in Drury Lane, sketched when it was new, in 1813. ... Hello, Dolly! is a Broadway musical with a book by Michael Stewart and a score by Jerry Herman. ... Onna White (March 24, 1922 – April 8, 2005) was a Canadian choreographer and dancer, nominated for eight Tony Awards. ...


After the closing of Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em during this time, Michael continued to perform in plays and musicals, starring in the ill-fated Flowers for Algernon in the role of Charly Gurdon, based on the book with the same title and the famous Hollywood film Charly starring Cliff Robertson; Cy Coleman's Barnum (1981) (one of the longest runs by a leading man) and in the title role of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera (1986), for which he won an Olivier Award (Best Actor in a Musical), a Tony Award (Best Performance By An Actor in a Lead Role, Musical), an N.Y's Drama Desk Award, and a Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for Distinguished Achievement in Theatre (Lead Performance). Michele Dotrice and Michael Crawford as Betty and Frank Spencer Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a highly successful BBC sitcom, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction story written by Daniel Keyes. ... Spoiler warning: Charly (also spelled ChaЯly) is a 1968 film which tells the story of a mentally retarded man, working at a bakery, who becomes a subject of an experiment to increase his mental capacity. ... Cliff Robertson. ... Original cast recording Barnum is a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical with book by Mark Bramble, lyrics by Michael Stewart, and music by Cy Coleman. ... January 18, 1988 issue of Time Magazine featuring Andrew Lloyd Webber Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre and the elder brother of Julian Lloyd Webber. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ...


During the run of Phantom in Los Angeles, he was asked to perform "The Music of the Night" at the Inaugural Gala for President George Bush in Washington, D.C., on 19 January 1989. At the gala, Crawford was presented with a birthday cake (it was his own 47th birthday). George Herbert Walker Bush GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the run of The Phantom of the Opera in Los Angeles ended, Michael left acting for a while to concentrate more on his singing - by starting up a concert tour called The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber, in which he performed around the United States and Europe with a full orchestra, selected special guest singers to perform with him, and an entire choir. The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ...


In 1995, Crawford created the high-profile starring role in EFX, the $70 million production which officially opened MGM's 1700-seat Grand Theatre in Las Vegas. The Atlantic Theater label released the companion album to EFX, which was hailed as among the most spectacular and ambitious shows ever produced on the American Stage. But early into the run, Michael suffered an accident during a performance (which involved him sliding from a wire hanger from the back of the theatre all the way to the stage and then jumping down 12 feet to the stage itself) and left the show to recover from his injury, which resulted in an early-hip replacement. EFX is a Las Vegas production show residing at the MGM Grand Hotel & Casino from 1995 until 2002. ...


He also had a short comeback to Broadway as the Count von Krolock in the short-lived commercial and financial flop musical Dance of the Vampires during late 2002 and early 2003. Later, he went on to originate the role of Count Fosco in Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical The Woman in White which opened at the Palace Theatre, London, in September 2004. However, he was forced to leave the show in December 2004 due to ill health. Dance of the Vampires (or Tanz der Vampire as the original German version is named) is a musical remake of a 1967 Roman Polański film called The Fearless Vampire Killers. ... Original logo for the musical The Woman in White. ... The Palace Theatre, London, is an imposing red-brick building that dominates the west side of Cambridge Circus. ...


Crawford was invited to attend the Gala Performance of the stage version of The Phantom of the Opera on Broadway at the Majestic Theater to celebrate the show becoming the longest running musical in Broadway history (supplanting Cats). The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ... Cats is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats and other poems by T. S. Eliot. ...


He will also participate in a special, as of yet unknown, presentation to celebrate. After that, he will continue to do concerts in Australia and New Zealand.


Crawford was ranked #17 in the 100 Greatest Britons (2002) poll sponsored by the BBC. The Michael Crawford International Fan Association ([[1]]) makes large contributions to many charities. // In 2002, the BBC conducted a vote to determine whom the general public considers the 100 greatest Britons of all time. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ...


Awards

Awards won by Michael Crawford in 1988 for his performance in the title role in Phantom of the Opera on Broadway. 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ...

What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ...

Trivia

  • After further training in preparation for the second run of ‘Barnum’ Michael was awarded a British Amateur Gymnastics Association badge and certificate as a qualified coach.
  • Crawford is also known to be a bit of a prankster, including planting fake mice around mouse-phobic co-star Dale Christensen's dressing room and wearing a sign pinned to the back of his Red Death costume in Phantom of the Opera (he never turns around during the scene so the sign wouldn't show to anyone but cast members as he passed them).
  • Voted: “Funniest Man of the Year” by the U.K. T.V. Times readers.
  • As a young boy Michael sold eggs from a stall on Brixton Market in London.
  • He told the audience of one show that he opened with Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Gethsemane" because if he can hold the long note in the middle without popping an eyeball or his trousers falling down the rest of the evening was sure to go fine.
  • His daughter Lucy sings with him on the track "First Man You Remember" on one of his albums.
  • Originally thought he was going to be chosen for the role of Raoul in Phantom, even perfecting a debonair "Nelson Eddy" walk in preparation, only to find out he was going to be the "grotesque, old, and ugly" Phantom.
  • Once said he had a odd make-up issue during a Phantom show; he kisses Sarah Brightman at the end of the show... only to find that part of his make-up had come off and stuck to her face! He says he quickly pulled her back in "as if I wanted seconds and took my lip back."
  • Forbidden Broadway 3 has a parody of his varied roles and vocal styles called "Put on your Phony Voice" to the tune of "Put on your Sunday Clothes" that he sung in "Hello, Dolly"

Forbidden Broadway is an off-Broadway show created and written by Gerard Alessandrini and directed by Alessandrini and long-time collaborator Phillip George. ...

Selected filmography

Once Upon a Forest is a 1993 animated film, directed by Charles Grosvenor and released by 20th Century Fox, with an environmental theme. ... Original cast recording Barnum is a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical with book by Mark Bramble, lyrics by Michael Stewart, and music by Cy Coleman. ... Condorman is a 1981 comedy/adventure film from Walt Disney Pictures starring Michael Crawford. ... Alices Adventures in Wonderland is a 1972 British musical film based on the Lewis Carroll novel of the same name. ... The Games was a 1970 film, directed by Michael Winner. ... Hello Dolly! is a 1969 film starring Barbra Streisand. ... How I Won the War is a 1967 film directed by Richard Lester. ... A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart. ... The Knack . ... Two Left Feet is the first single from the North London indie group The Holloways. ... The War Lover is a 1962 film based on the John Hersey book and stars Steve McQueen, Robert Wagner and Shirley Anne Field. ...

Discography

Solo Albums

  • Songs from the Stage and Screen (1987)
  • Michael Crawford Performs Andrew Lloyd Webber (1991)
  • With Love/The Phantom Unmasked (1992)
  • A Touch of Music in the Night (1993)
  • Favorite Love Songs (1994)
  • On Eagle's Wings (1998)
  • In Concert (1998)
  • A Christmas Album (1999)
  • The Disney Album (2001)
  • The Early Years - MCIFA Members Only Exclusive (2001)
  • The Best of Michael Crawford - Australian Release (2002)
  • The Very Best of Michael Crawford (2005)

Cast Albums

  • A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966)
  • Hello Dolly! (1969)
  • Billy (1974)
  • Flowers for Algernon (1980)
  • Barnum (1981)
  • Phantom of the Opera (1986)
  • Highlights from Phantom of the Opera (1986)
  • Once Upon a Forest (1993)
  • EFX (1995)
  • Woman In White (2004 London Cast) (2004)

External links


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