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Encyclopedia > Michael Bishop (author)
Michael Bishop
Born: November 12, 1945
Lincoln, Nebraska
Occupation: novelist, short story writer, essayist, poet, teacher
Nationality: American
Writing period: 1970 - present
Genres: science fiction, fantasy, horror, speculative fiction, poetry
Subjects: anthropology, religion, American South
Debut works: Story: "Piñon Fall" (1970) / Novel: A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire (1975)
Influences: Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. LeGuin, Jack London, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner, Jonathan Swift
Website: http://www.michaelbishop-writer.com
Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Bantam Books, 1994 (Cover art by Michael Dudash)
Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Bantam Books, 1994 (Cover art by Michael Dudash)

Michael Lawson Bishop (born November 12, 1945 in Lincoln, Nebraska) is an award-winning American writer. Over four decades and thirty books, he has created a body of work that stands among the most admired in modern science fiction and fantasy literature. Nickname: Star City Location in Nebraska Coordinates: Country   State     County United States   Nebraska     Lancaster Founded[1]   Renamed   Incorporated 1856   July 29, 1867   April 1, 1869 Government  - Mayor Coleen Seng Area  - City 195. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the reader. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... Anthropology is the study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... Ursula K. Le Guin at an informal bookstore Q&A session, July 2004 Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929), is an American author. ... Jack London (January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916),[1][2][3] was an American author who wrote The Call of the Wild and over fifty other books. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) is one of the best-known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Mary Flannery OConnor (b. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer( first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Nickname: Star City Location in Nebraska Coordinates: Country   State     County United States   Nebraska     Lancaster Founded[1]   Renamed   Incorporated 1856   July 29, 1867   April 1, 1869 Government  - Mayor Coleen Seng Area  - City 195. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ...


Bishop received a bachelor's degree from the University of Georgia in 1967 before going on to complete a master's degree in English. He taught English at the United States Air Force Academy Preparatory School in Colorado Springs from 1968 to 1972, and later at the University of Georgia. Bishop left teaching in 1974 to become a full-time writer. A bachelors degree (Artium Baccalaureus, A.B. or B.A.) is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the state of Georgia. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate (or graduate) course of one to three years in duration. ... The U.S. Air Force Academy Preparatory School, referred to as the prep school, was established in May 1961 and is located on the grounds of the United States Air Force Academy. ... Colorado Springs is a middle-sized city, located just east of the geographic center of the state of Colorado in the United States. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the state of Georgia. ...


Bishop has twice been awarded the Nebula: in 1981 for "The Quickening" (Best Novelette) and in 1982 for No Enemy But Time (Best Novel). He has also received four Locus Awards and his work has been nominated for numerous Hugo Awards. He and British author Ian Watson collaborated on a novel set in the universe of one of Bishop’s earlier works. He has also written two mystery novels with Paul Di Filippo, under the joint pseudonym Philip Lawson. His work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Winners of the Nebula Award for best Novelette. ... Nebula Award winning novel by Michael Bishop in which a modern black American man is able to mentally project himself back to pre-human Africa, where he meets (and eventually mates) with humanitys prehistoric ancestors. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novel. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ... Paul Di Filippo is a science fiction writer born October 29, 1954 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Philip Lawson is a pseudonym used for mystery novels written by Michael Bishop with Paul Di Filippo. ...


Bishop has published more than 125 pieces of short fiction which have been gathered in seven collections. His stories have appeared in such publications as Playboy, Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, the Missouri Review, the Indiana Review, the Chattahoochee Review, the Georgia Review, Omni, and Interzone. The first issue of Playboy. ... Alfred Hitchcocks Mystery Magazine is a monthly fiction digest magazine specializing in crime and detective fiction. ... Ellery Queens Mystery Magazine is a monthly digest size fiction magazine specializing in crime fiction, particularly detective fiction. ... Asimovs Science Fiction is a science fiction magazine, first published in 1977 as Isaac Asimovs Science Fiction Magazine or IASFM for short. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ... The Indiana Review is a prominent literary magazine published at Indiana University. ... The cover of the January 1991 issue of Omni. ... Interzone is a British science fiction and fantasy magazine, published since 1982. ...


In addition to his fiction, Bishop has published poetry (gathered in two collections) and won the 1979 Rhysling Award for his poem "For the Lady of a Physicist." He has also had essays and reviews published in numerous newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Omni Magazine, and the New York Review of Science Fiction. A collection of his nonfiction, A Reverie for Mister Ray, was published in 2005 by PS Publishing. The Rhysling Awards are an annual award given for the best science fiction poetry. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer is a Knight Ridder newspaper in Columbus, Georgia. ... Omni was a magazine which contained both articles on science fact and short works of science fiction. ... The New York Review of Science Fiction (NYRSF) (ISSN 1052-9438) is a monthly science fiction critical journal, founded in 1988. ... A Reverie for Mister Ray: Reflections on Life, Death, and Speculative Fiction is a collection of nonfiction work by American writer Michael Bishop published in 2005 by PS Publishing. ... PS Publishing is a Leeds based publisher founded in 1999 by Peter Crowther. ...


He has written introductions to books by Philip K. Dick, Theodore Sturgeon, James Tiptree, Jr., Pamela Sargent, Gardner Dozois, Lucius Shepard, Mary Shelley, Andy Duncan, Paul Di Filippo, Bruce Holland Rogers, and Rhys Hughes. He has edited six anthologies, including the Locus Award-winning Light Years and Dark and A Cross of Centuries: Twenty-five Imaginative Tales about the Christ, forthcoming from Thunder’s Mouth Press. Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction; additional to forty-four books currently in print, Dick wrote several short stories and minor works published in pulp magazines. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 Staten Island, New York – May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ... James Tiptree, Jr (August 24, 1915 – May 19, 1987) was the pen name of science fiction author Alice Sheldon. ... Pamela Sargent is a Nebula Award-winning feminist science fiction author and editor. ... Gardner Dozois (born July 23, 1947) is an American science fiction author and editor. ... Lucius Shepard (born August 1947, Lynchburg, Virginia) is an American writer whose work transcends easy categorization. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Andy Duncan (born September 21, 1964) is an award-winning American science fiction and fantasy writer whose work frequently deals with Southern themes. ... Paul Di Filippo is a science fiction writer born October 29, 1954 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Bruce Holland Rogers is an American author of short fiction who also writes under the pseudonym Hanovi Braddock. ... Rhys Henry Hughes is a Welsh writer and essayist born on September 24, 1966 in Cardiff. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ...


In recent years, Bishop has returned to teaching and is writer-in-residence at LaGrange College located near his home in Pine Mountain, Georgia. He and his wife, Jeri, have a daughter and two grandchildren. His late son, Christopher James ("Jamie") Bishop, was one of the victims of the Virginia Tech massacre on April 16, 2007.[1][2] LaGrange College is the oldest private college in Georgia (it was founded in 1831), and is located in LaGrange. ... Pine Mountain is a town located in Harris County, Georgia. ... The Virginia Tech massacre was a university shooting that unfolded as two separate attacks approximately two hours apart on April 16, 2007, on the campus of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. ...

Contents

Career Overview

Early Work

Michael Bishop’s first published professional fiction sale was the short story "Piñon Fall" to Galaxy Science Fiction in 1970. It was shortly followed by "If a Flower Could Eclipse," the first story in his UrNu sequence (which is the only series of related stories in Bishop’s career). While Galaxy Science Fiction and If magazines were publishing his sf stories, the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction became Bishop’s venue for his slightly off-kilter fantasy/horror stories. This early period is also noted for a number of high profile novellas: in 1973 "Death and Designation Among the Asadi" and "The White Otters of Childhood" appeared on the shortlist ballots for both the Hugo and Nebula awards. The 1974 gonzo novella "On the Street of the Serpents" (including a character named "Michael Bishop") first appeared in an anthology of original stories. It would eventually lead to a contract for his first novel from Ballantine Books, the anthology’s publisher. The Puppet Masters by Robert A. Heinlein in Galaxy, Sept. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Puppet Masters by Robert A. Heinlein in Galaxy, Sept. ... if, subtitled Worlds of Science Fiction, was launched in March 1952, the creation, apparently, of James L. Quinn of the Quinn Publishing Company, not to be confused with Robert Guinn, who later published both If and its sister magazine Galaxy. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ...


The Anthropological Novels

Six of Bishop’s first eight novels are set on other worlds (the other two are the part of his UrNu sequence of stories.) Critic and author John Clute writes that "…his early stories and novels display considerable intellectual complexity, and do not shirk the downbeat implications of their anthropological treatment of aliens and alienating milieux…"[3] In his major essay on these early novels, author Ian Watson writes "Michael Bishop is both an exoticist and a moralist. He is sometimes guilty, in the first respect, of a certain over-writing – underlying exotic venue by exotic diction – though the two become more organically integrated as his work progresses; and in the second respect of what one might call an over-scrupulousness on the part of his characters and his perceived attitude to them… These, however, are merely the consequence of aspiration and conscience; and as more of Bishop’s work has appeared – and his reputation has grown – he has shown…a more coherent melding of exotic vision, ethics and style."[4] John [Frederick] Clute is a Canadian born author and critic who lives in Britain. ... Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ...


A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire (1975)

A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire by Michael Bishop (French Edition) / Editions Jean-Claude Lattès, 1977 (Cover art by Odile de Schwilgué)
A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire by Michael Bishop (French Edition) / Editions Jean-Claude Lattès, 1977 (Cover art by Odile de Schwilgué)

When Bishop’s first novel, A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire, was published by Ballantine Books in 1975, critics Alexei and Cory Panshin wrote that the novel "shows an interest in the anthropological comparable to Ursula Le Guin and a sense of the alien comparable to James Tiptree, Jr. But it is an individual work, Bishop’s own and no one else’s. A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire is highly imperfect. It is a pied mirror, everywhere reflecting brilliantly bright, everywhere cloudy. It leads the eyes inward, and ultimately reveals nothing clearly. Even so, it is the most impressive first novel so far seen in the Seventies." They go on to declare that "Bishop is one of the new and still rare breed of science fiction writer attempting to produce art without rejecting the pulp vigor that is science fiction’s continuing strengths."[5] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 377 × 599 pixels Full resolution (500 × 794 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Le bassin des coeurs indigo by Michael Bishop (French edition of A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire) (cover art by Odile de Schwilgué) This... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 377 × 599 pixels Full resolution (500 × 794 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Le bassin des coeurs indigo by Michael Bishop (French edition of A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire) (cover art by Odile de Schwilgué) This... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... Alexei Adam Panshin (born August 14, 1940) is an American author and critic of science fiction (SF). ... Ursula K. Le Guin at an informal bookstore Q&A session, July 2004 Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929), is an American author. ... James Tiptree, Jr (August 24, 1915 – May 19, 1987) was the pen name of science fiction author Alice Sheldon. ...


And Strange At Ecbatan The Trees (1976)

Bishop’s second novel (and first hardcover publication) takes its title from Archibald MacLeish’s poem "You, Andrew Marvell." Published by Harper & Row in 1976, it is set in the same far future as his Hugo- and Nebula-nominated novella "The White Otters of Childhood." There are two surviving races, both genetically engineered by a third, the Parfects, who also manipulate the ongoing struggle between them. Reviewer Keith L. Justice writes "If Bishop never published another word of fiction, he would still have to be considered a milestone writer in the development of contemporary sf… Writers such as Le Guin, Tiptree, and Bishop are developing a whole new generation of artistry."[6] Archibald MacLeish Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet, writer and the Librarian of Congress. ... Harper & Row is an imprint of HarperCollins. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Ursula K. Le Guin at an informal bookstore Q&A session, July 2004 Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929), is an American author. ... James Tiptree, Jr (August 24, 1915 – May 19, 1987) was the pen name of science fiction author Alice Sheldon. ...


Stolen Faces (1977)

Stolen Faces by Michael Bishop (First Paperback Edition) / Dell, 1978 (Cover art by Steve Hickman)
Stolen Faces by Michael Bishop (First Paperback Edition) / Dell, 1978 (Cover art by Steve Hickman)

In Stolen Faces (published by Harper & Row in 1977), a recently demoted commissioner has been reassigned to a colony planet to govern a compound which isolates the sufferers of a leprosy-like disease. Ian Watson writes that the novel is "about deceit, maskedness and discovery of self-truth…a harsh, arctic tale by contrast with [And Strange At Ecbatan The Trees] where the terrain may be stark but there is a mannered elegance in the tone of voice; it is a tale executed in an argot-ritualistic style."[4] Critic Richard Delap writes “There is an abundance of exploitable elements in Bishop’s story, so it is astonishing to see how the author keeps them under strict rein, always with a highly keyed visual sense but also with a literary flair that says more by implication than by direct description. The writing itself is crafted with a precision that becomes obvious only as the novel progresses.”[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Harper & Row is an imprint of HarperCollins. ... Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ... Richard Delap (1942-1987) was a US science fiction writer, editor, and reviewer. ...


Transfigurations (1979)

The Hugo- and Nebula-nominated novella “Death and Designation Among the Asadi” forms the first part of Transfigurations, a novel published in 1979 by Berkley Putnam. The story continues when the daughter of the anthropologist who studied the Asadi, a hominid-like race on the planet Bosk’veld, investigates his disappearance. In the journal Foundation, John Clute writes that the novel is "a fever of explanation. Hypothesis builds on hypothesis [as more and more data is added to the original observations], and much of the resulting construction is beautifully crafted, almost hallucinatory it is so plausible. But of course these explanations are never enough – and the intellectual tact by which Bishop makes them almost but not quite fit the data they are meant to make transparent is perhaps the strongest part of this extremely dense and carefully thought-through novel."[8] Legendary science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon writes "Michael Bishop’s Transfigurations is as complex, as carefully thought-out, and as compelling an sf novel as you’ll find anywhere, ever."[9] The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... G. P. Putnams Sons was a major United States book publisher based in New York City, New York. ... Since it began in 1972, Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction has published over 9000 pages of articles and reviews about science fiction. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 Staten Island, New York – May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ...


Eyes of Fire (1980)

In 1980, Bishop was given the unusual opportunity by editor David Hartwell to rewrite his first novel. This completely revised version (or, as Bishop has called it, wholesale reimagining[10]) was published by Pocket Books as Eyes of Fire. In his introduction to the British hardcover edition of the revised work, Bishop writes "…I still feel affection for the original version of A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire, its callow narrator, and a few of the flavorful images and metaphors with which I salted the text. But I also recognize the fumble-fingeredness and immaturity of that initial version."[11] Very few publications (mostly fanzines) took enough notice to review the new version. (Pocket Books even used the artwork of the original publisher’s edition.) In one of the rare reviews, Robert Frazier writes "In almost every detail, Eyes of Fire is crafted intelligently… It is not the type of sf that pushes to the heights of wonder. Instead it is a probing, disturbing, moving reflection on humanity… Bishop’s skill is at plumbing to the depths, and his basic tool is a two-way glass. [Other novels this year] will have to go a long distance to surpass this effort."[12] David G. Hartwell is an editor of speculative fiction. ... Pocket Books is the name of a subdivision of Simon & Schuster publishers. ... A fanzine (also called a zine) is an amateur publication created by fans of a particular cultural phenomena (such as a literary genre or type of music) to address or correspond with others who share their interest. ... Pocket Books is the name of a subdivision of Simon & Schuster publishers. ...


Under Heaven’s Bridge (1981)

When British author Ian Watson read Bishop’s A Little Knowledge (1977), he was so fascinated with the alien Cygnusians that he wrote to inquire whether Bishop had plans to write a story about the aliens’ home planet.[13] Thus began what Bishop calls "the first ever transatlantic science fiction collaboration," with all correspondence sent by post. Although often labeled as the third book in the series, it is not truly part of the main UrNu sequence. In this novel, published in the UK by Gollancz (1981) and in the US by Ace Books (1982), a Japanese linguist, crewmember of the research starship Heavensbridge, arrives on the home planet of the Kybers (so-called because they’re seemingly made of flesh and metal.) She soon learns that the planet’s sun will shortly go nova. Brian Stableford writes that the novel when compared with other recent sf collaborations "is a very solid and rewarding piece of work. Its basic premise is original and intelligently worked-out, and the storyline sustains the fascination of the reader throughout. Nevertheless, it seems to me to fall slightly behind the standard set by recent solo works by either of the two authors." He concludes that the "book is worth reading, but it is not an outstanding work in either author’s canon."[14] This is Michael Bishop’s last novel-length work of other worlds fiction. Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ... The term transatlantic refers to something occurring all the way across the Atlantic Ocean. ... Gollancz is a major British book publishing house of the twentieth century. ... Ace Books is the oldest continuing publisher of science fiction & fantasy novels, founded in 1953 by magazine publisher A. A. Wyn. ... Brian Stableford (born July 25, 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 50 novels. ...


The UrNu Sequence

With "If a Flower Could Eclipse" (1970), his second published story, Bishop began a series of stories set in the Urban Nucleus of Atlanta, one of several domed cities in his future history. Over the next decade he would write seven stories of varying length and one novel to fill in the century-long chronology. Some of the stories first appeared in such prestigious anthology series as Damon Knight’s Orbit and Terry Carr’s Universe. Four of the stories would subsequently be chosen for best-of-the-year anthologies. (N.B.: The novels A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire and Under Heaven’s Bridge are only tangentially connected to the series and thus not part of the sequence proper.) Damon Knight (September 19, 1922 – April 15, 2002) was a science fiction author, editor, and critic. ... Orbit is a long-running series of anthologies of new fiction edited by Damon Knight; often featuring work by such writers as Gene Wolfe, Joanna Russ, R. A. Lafferty, and Kate Wilhelm, who was married to Knight. ... Terry Carr (February 19, 1937 - April 7, 1987) was a science fiction author and editor. ...


A Little Knowledge (1977)

A Little Knowledge by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Berkley Putnam, 1978 (Cover art by Dean Ellis)
A Little Knowledge by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Berkley Putnam, 1978 (Cover art by Dean Ellis)

The only novel-length work in the UrNu sequence, A Little Knowledge, was published in 1977 by Berkley Putnam. Chronologically, its events fall just before the last story in the series, "Death Rehearsals." The alien Cygnusians that first appeared in the novella "Allegiances" have been brought into the domed city of Atlanta, causing quite a stir when one of them converts to the state sponsored religion. Mary S. Weinkauf writes "…this is a cleverly done book with many elements of previously admired sf…although it is maneuvered by too carefully contrived coincidences and leaves some questions at the end… [It] is a book to think about long after you put it down."[15] Richard Delap writes that "characters…scurry through this shifting maze as if they are buffeted by the social and political activities of this future world rather than by an author plotting to reach a predestined conclusion. A Little Knowledge is a lively, thought-provoking novel that will exercise your brain."[16] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... G. P. Putnams Sons was a major United States book publisher based in New York City, New York. ...


Catacomb Years (1979)

All of the previously published stories in Bishop’s UrNu sequence, along with a new novella, "Dress Rehearsals," are contained in Catacomb Years, a fix-up published in 1979 by Berkley Putnam. Bishop also wrote new connecting material and provided a timeline. Spider Robinson’s comments on the book’s structure: "Plainly [Bishop] intended the Domed City to be a metaphor for something or other…and it probably worked just fine in some of those individual novelettes, where an emotionally involving story made you overlook a shaky premise. But the "novel" has no emotional continuity… There are a few marvelous stories in this book, and one superb one ["The Samurai and the Willows"], but they are ruined by a setting which exposes their worst weaknesses."[17] Robert Frazier strongly disagrees: "Catacomb Years is not a rough sculpture with visible seams and weak welds; it is a polished puzzle entity a la Miguel Berrocal."[18] Author Elizabeth Lynn was equally impressed: "Bishop takes his wildly diverse plot elements…and weaves them into a shining and almost seamless tapestry… The material, to those who have read the pieces as they appeared…will be familiar and friendly. But set against each other they acquire new significance and a new luster. Bishop’s skill at characterization is impressive, as is his ability to juggle his cast and his numerous subplots."[19] A fix-up (or fixup) is a novel created from short stories which may or may not have been initially related, not all of which were necessarily previously published. ... G. P. Putnams Sons was a major United States book publisher based in New York City, New York. ... Spider Robinson (born November 24, 1948 in New York City) is a Canadian science fiction writer. ... Berrocal made sculpture puzzles, some gigantic, some, like these, suitable for assembling on a table top. ... Elizabeth A. Lynn (born June 8, 1946) is a US writer most known for fantasy and to a lesser extent science fiction. ...


Later Novels

No Enemy But Time (1982)

No Enemy But Time by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Timescape, 1982 (Cover art by Vincent DiFate)
No Enemy But Time by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Timescape, 1982 (Cover art by Vincent DiFate)

Perhaps Bishop’s most critically acclaimed novel is the Nebula Award winning No Enemy But Time, published in 1982 by Simon & Schuster under David Hartwell's editorship and the Timescape imprint. John Clute writes that the novel "intensified the movement of [Bishop’s] imagination to a local habitat, and for the first time introduced a protagonist of sufficient racial (and mental) complexity to carry a storyline immured in the particular and haunted by the exotic."[3] In this sophisticated twist on the traditional time-travel story, a modern day African-American man is recruited by the military for his special ability to "dream" himself into the Pleistocene era where he becomes involved with a tribe of habilines. Thomas Disch writes "Bishop is determined to write about human goodness without resorting to the mock heroics of formula adventure stories. There are no villains in the book, even among the habilines. The central and absorbing drama of the book is the hero’s growing love for the habiline, Helen. Looming behind this love story is a larger theme, the formation across the entire span of history of the Family of Man, a phrase that becomes, as the novel ripens to its conclusion, no mere liberal piety but a fully realized dramatic affirmation."[20] In one of the few mixed reviews, Tom Easton writes that "Kampa [the protagonist] is the only character who does come alive. All others are at least stiff. Some are outright caricatures. The book is not faultless, but it is overall a pleasure to read… Its treatment of anthropology is so effective that the few flaws are easily overlooked."[21] Editor and critic David Pringle writes that the novel "is narrated in an oddly detached, quizzical and dryly humorous manner… The paleo-anthropological details are superbly imagined, the African landscapes beautifully described, yet the final effect is one of coolness, distance… Michael Bishop’s prose style is learned, witty, Latinate, although salted with deliberately-placed colloquialisms and low jokes. This book is the work of a talented and serious writer."[22] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Vincent Di Fate (born Yonkers, New York November 21, 1945) is a multiple-award-winning American artist specializing in science fiction and fantasy illustration. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... David G. Hartwell is an editor of speculative fiction. ... John [Frederick] Clute is a Canadian born author and critic who lives in Britain. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) is part of the geologic timescale. ... Binomial name †Homo habilis Leakey et al, 1964 Homo habilis (IPA ) (handy man, skillful person) is a species of the genus Homo, which lived from approximately 2. ... Thomas M. Disch Thomas M. Disch (February 2, 1940 – ) is an American science fiction author. ... David Pringle (born 1950) was a Scottish science fiction editor. ...


Who Made Stevie Crye? (1984)

Who Made Stevie Crye? by Michael Bishop (British Edition) / Headline, 1987 (Cover by J. K. Potter)
Who Made Stevie Crye? by Michael Bishop (British Edition) / Headline, 1987 (Cover by J. K. Potter)

How would an author follow-up an award-winning science fiction novel? Bishop wrote a contemporary novel set in the rural American South. Mary Stevenson ("Stevie") Crye is a young widow with two children struggling to take care of her family as a freelance writer. Her typewriter has started to act up, automatically transcribing her nightmares and subsequently her future. The only American edition of Who Made Stevie Crye? was published in 1984 by the highly esteemed specialty publisher Arkham House under the editorship of Jim Turner. This original edition, as well as the British edition, was photographically illustrated by J. K. Potter. When David Pringle chose it as one of the hundred best fantasy novels, he described the novel as "a playful metafiction about the real and the fictitious, about the writer and his or her creation…" and concluded that the novel is "…a gripping and intelligent tale of the supernatural by an author who is adept at avoiding most of the clichés of the horror genre."[23] In his mixed review of the novel, Joe Sanders writes "Sometimes vivid, sometimes prosaic; sometimes involving but often affectless, this is not a novel to like casually. Even when it looks like standard mass-produced pop lit, it actually is nudging us toward something more disturbing and hilarious than we’re comfortable imagining. It finally is impressive enough to be uneasily recommended." Sanders’ editor, Robert A. Collins, chides the reviewer with the footnote "Ignore Sanders’ uneasiness, which obviously stems from his difficulty in pegging the book’s genre; Stevie Crye is a marvelous book which transcends genre, as all the best of Bishop does.”[24] Author Ian Watson writes "Here is a humane, trickster kaleidoscope questioning a genre and a market, and fiction, and reality too – yet exquisitely spiced with human reality – and delivering the eerie chill of the occult and the illicit, curdling the blood but also warming the heart."[25] Who Made Stevie Crye? is a Horror novel by author Michael Bishop. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixels Full resolution (500 × 756 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Who Made Stevie Crye? by Michael Bishop, Headline, 1987 [cover by J. K. Potter] This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixels Full resolution (500 × 756 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Who Made Stevie Crye? by Michael Bishop, Headline, 1987 [cover by J. K. Potter] This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for... Arkham House is a weird fiction specialty publishing house founded by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei. ... David Pringle (born 1950) was a Scottish science fiction editor. ... Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ...


Ancient of Days (1985)

Bishop’s 1983 Locus Award-winning novella "Her Habiline Husband" forms the first third of Ancient of Days, published in 1985 by Arbor House. It’s the story of “Adam,” one of the last surviving Homo habilis who is discovered in contemporary Georgia. In this thematic companion to his novel No Enemy But Time (with an almost inverse conceit), Bishop tackles issues of racial and cultural prejudice, and explores the question of what it means to be human. Locus reviewer Debbie Notkin writes "This is science fiction so precise and so well-thought-out that it reads like history, although little history is so well-written, or cares so much about its characters."[26] Bernard Goodman of Fantasy Review believes that "Bishop's theme of evil inherent in humanity echoes William Golding," and that the novel "in some ways…parallels Golding's Lord of the Flies." [27] The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... Binomial name †Homo habilis Leakey et al, 1964 Homo habilis (IPA ) (handy man, skillful person) is a species of the genus Homo, which lived from approximately 2. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... Sir William Gerald Golding (September 19, 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet, and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature (1983), best known for his work Lord of the Flies. ... Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding about a group of young boys who are stranded on a island and subsequently attempt to govern themselves, a task at which they fail disastrously. ...


Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas (1987)

Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas by Michael Bishop (Hebrew Edition) / Zmora-Bitan, 1999 (Cover designer unknown)
Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas by Michael Bishop (Hebrew Edition) / Zmora-Bitan, 1999 (Cover designer unknown)

Originally published as The Secret Ascension by Tor Books in 1987 (but subsequently reprinted with the author’s preferred title), this work is an homage to writer Philip K. Dick, a pastiche of his style, and includes an alternate reality version of Dick as a character. The novel is set in a world in which Richard Milrose Nixon, in his fourth term as president, holds fascistic control over America, and the science fiction works of Philip K. Dick remain unpublished, distributed underground as samizdat. Author and reviewer Orson Scott Card writes that "the climax is not just an inward epiphany for a character… [T]he world changes in wonderful strange ways, and the audience can read the book passionately, with sweating fingers, eager to see what happens next, yet reluctant to leave the present moment. Imagine: A writer who is already one of the best, taking risks and finding ways to be better."[28] Card does take Bishop to task for the author’s characterization of Richard Nixon, calling it a "caricature" and a "stock character of a madman." Locus reviewer Tom Whitmore calls the book "a masterful pastiche" and "…the closest thing to a classic Dick sf novel anyone has ever done."[29] Gerald Jonas in the New York Times writes "Mr. Bishop is a solid, serious writer whose reach (in his previous work) has always seemed to me to exceed his grasp. Here, he catches some of Dick's fire, especially in the early chapters… Then a lot happens very quickly (as in some of Dick's own novels), and the satire, which should hold things together, turns predictable. But…the ending (starring Philip K. Dick) approaches sublimity."[30] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 383 × 599 pixels Full resolution (384 × 601 pixel, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas by Michael Bishop [First Hebrew Edition) Zmora-Bitan, 1999 (cover designer unknown) This image is of a book cover... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 383 × 599 pixels Full resolution (384 × 601 pixel, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas by Michael Bishop [First Hebrew Edition) Zmora-Bitan, 1999 (cover designer unknown) This image is of a book cover... Tor Books is an imprint of Tom Doherty Associates, LLC which publishes popular fiction, and is particularly noted for its science fiction and fantasy titles. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction; additional to forty-four books currently in print, Dick wrote several short stories and minor works published in pulp magazines. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction; additional to forty-four books currently in print, Dick wrote several short stories and minor works published in pulp magazines. ... Samizdat, book published by Pathfinder Press containing a collection of forbidden Trotskyist Samizdat texts. ... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is an American author, working in numerous genres. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction; additional to forty-four books currently in print, Dick wrote several short stories and minor works published in pulp magazines. ...


Unicorn Mountain (1988)

Unicorn Mountain by Michael Bishop (German Edition) / Heyne, 1991 (Cover art by Dieter Rottermund)
Unicorn Mountain by Michael Bishop (German Edition) / Heyne, 1991 (Cover art by Dieter Rottermund)

Based upon the novel’s title and jacket art, a casual reader might have expected 1988’s Unicorn Mountain (Arbor House/Morrow) to be just another entry in the proliferating fantasy field of the Eighties. Orson Scott Card writes "The triumph of this, Bishop’s most artistically whole and successful novel to date, is that he set out to do something that is nearly impossible in fiction: He wrote a novel about constructing a tribe...To do it, he had to bring us to know and understand and care about more fully-created characters than most writers produce in a career."[31] John Clute’s assessment emphasizes another theme of the work: "Michael Bishop, whose voice is like a shout from the bottom of the well of the enormous South, and whose heart is on his sleeve, [manages] in Unicorn Mountain to generate a moving tale out of ecological disaster here and in another world, AIDS, the death of cultures, the death of species, and the slow sea-changing of America into themeparks."[32] The novel would go on to win the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 380 × 599 pixels Full resolution (468 × 738 pixel, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Unicorn Mountain by Michael Bishop (German Edition) Heyne, 1991 [cover: Dieter Rottermund] This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 380 × 599 pixels Full resolution (468 × 738 pixel, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Unicorn Mountain by Michael Bishop (German Edition) Heyne, 1991 [cover: Dieter Rottermund] This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is an American author, working in numerous genres. ... John [Frederick] Clute is a Canadian born author and critic who lives in Britain. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... The Mythopoeic Awards for literature and literary studies are given by the Mythopoeic Society to authors of outstanding works in the fields of myth, fantasy, and the scholarly study of these areas. ...


Count Geiger’s Blues (1992)

Count Geiger’s Blues by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Tor Books, 1992 (Cover art by Thomas Canty)
Count Geiger’s Blues by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Tor Books, 1992 (Cover art by Thomas Canty)

Xavier Thaxton, protagonist of Count Geiger’s Blues (subtitled "A Comedy"), is the fine arts editor for a newspaper in the fictional Southern metropolis of Salonika (a satirical/alternate reality version of contemporary Atlanta) with a particularly low opinion of pop culture. When he is accidentally exposed to illegally dumped nuclear waste, the radiation exposure turns him into a superhero (or, as Bishop has designated, a "stalwart"). Analog reviewer Tom Easton writes "This is where Bishop falters. The satire he has painstakingly created now teeters on the brink of farce. He quite properly makes the decision to yank it back from that brink, but then he loses the satire. He becomes heavy-handed and obvious."[33] Faren Miller disagrees: "The most ambitious comic books are no longer merely comic – may even incorporate tragedy in a critique of modern life as savage and acute, in its way, as the ferocious satire of Dante’s Inferno. Count Geiger’s Blues also goes beyond humor – well beyond, in its remarkable closing chapters. But they build on all that has gone before. In unleashing a startling talent for comedy and a wide-ranging knowledge of pop culture in both its absurdity and its splendor, Michael Bishop has written his best book yet."[34] John Kessel writes "Comedy is certainly a new tone from Bishop, and he demonstrates a talent for it…But it seems to me Bishop doesn’t really want to write comedy. It’s as if Bishop is running riffs on whatever wacky ideas come to hand, without much plan, holding his characters at arm’s length; as if, trying to avoid sententiousness, he has to avoid caring – but in the end can’t. The result being a loose, baggy sort of book."[35] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... April 1997 issue of Analog. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ...


Brittle Innings (1994)

Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (Italian Edition) / Fanucci Editore, 1995 (Cover art by Tiziano Cremonini)
Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (Italian Edition) / Fanucci Editore, 1995 (Cover art by Tiziano Cremonini)

Brittle Innings could for most intents and purposes be considered a sequel to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. This simple designation only begins to describe this emotionally and literately complex story. The novel, published in 1994 by Bantam Books, attempts to answer the questions: What if the doctor’s much maligned creation managed to survive his Arctic pursuit? and How would he be perceived in modern times? Bishop places him in the American Deep South during World War II playing minor league baseball. Author and critic Brian Stableford writes that "no potential reader should allow himself or herself to be put off by the seeming freakishness of its premise… There is not a wasted image or phrase in the text, which is extraordinarily rich and eminently readable from beginning to end. It is a very fine book indeed…" Concerning its relationship to Shelley’s novel, Stableford writes that "Brittle Innings seems to me to be the best sequel imaginable.”[36] The New York Times book reviewer felt uncomfortable with the mix: "The [baseball story] is the real reason to read Brittle Innings; it has a better narrative and a more meaningful message than the subplot about the literate and sometimes likable monster. Mr. Bishop's fine prose makes each of these plot lines well worth reading, but they belong in separate novels."[37] In his essay "Of (Human) Bondage in Michael Bishop’s Brittle Innings" Joe Sanders compares Bishop’s young protagonist with Philip Carey of Somerset Maugham’s Of Human Bondage. "Philip Carey's struggle toward maturity is painfully messy…unconsciously he knows what he needs: connection to and then freedom from parental authority so that he can determine his own goals in life. [Michael Bishop's] Danny Boles, with similar needs, is certain that he already has found something to believe in: baseball." Sanders concludes "Insofar as the characters of Brittle Innings learn to see life's vivid extremes and as they struggle to see more, they demonstrate that love can sometimes lead not to bondage but freedom."[38] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 371 × 599 pixels Full resolution (500 × 807 pixel, file size: 95 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (Italian Edition) Fanucci Editore, 1995 [cover: Tiziano Cremonini] This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 371 × 599 pixels Full resolution (500 × 807 pixel, file size: 95 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (Italian Edition) Fanucci Editore, 1995 [cover: Tiziano Cremonini] This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Bantam Books (established 1945), owned by Random House, is a member of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Brian Stableford (born July 25, 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 50 novels. ... Brian Stableford (born July 25, 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 50 novels. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Of Human Bondage (1915) is a novel by William Somerset Maugham. ...


Selected Short Fiction

"The Quickening", Bishop’s Nebula Award winning novelette of 1981, is, according to Brian W. Aldiss and David Wingrove "…perhaps, a perfect modern fable. A fable about America and her values. For what is being torn down stone by stone is a world spoiled by the trite commercial values of American culture."[39] It’s the story of an ordinary American man who awakes to find himself in Seville, Spain. He soon discovers that the population of the whole world has been scattered, creating a potent stew of race, ethnicity, culture and language. The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Brian Wilson Aldiss, OBE, (born August 18, 1925 in East Dereham, Norfolk) is a prolific English author of both general fiction and science fiction. ... NO8DO (I was not abandoned) Location Coordinates : ( ) Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Sevilla (Spanish) Spanish name Sevilla Founded 8th-9th century BC Postal code 41001-41080 Website http://www. ...


A major concern throughout much of Bishop’s work (and especially so in his short fiction) is the role of religion in the everyday lives of human beings. His approach has never been to either proselytize or ridicule. When several readers wrote letters of protest to Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine about its 1983 publication of Bishop’s novella "The Gospel According to Gamaliel Crucis," Isaac Asimov himself wrote an editorial defending the work and the editor’s decision to publish it. He wrote "…we had a remarkable story that considered, quite fearlessly, an important idea, and we felt that most readers would recognize its legitimacy – if not at once, then upon mature reflection."[40] Cover for an issue of Asimovs Science Fiction. ... Dr. Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920? – April 6, 1992, IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ...


When Bishop’s story "Dogs’ Lives" was reprinted in Best American Short Stories 1985, it became one of only a handful of genre stories to appear in the prestigious anthology series. The story might have languished in limbo, had the author not pulled its submission to Harlan Ellison’s never-published anthology The Last Dangerous Visions. The Best American Short Stories yearly anthology is a part of the Best American Series published by the Houghton Mifflin Company. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, essays, and criticism. ... The Last Dangerous Visions was planned to be a sequel to the science fiction short story anthologies Dangerous Visions and Again, Dangerous Visions. ...


Bibliography

Books

Novels

  • A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire (1975)
  • And Strange at Ecbatan the Trees (1976) (later republished as Beneath the Shattered Moons)
  • Stolen Faces (1977)
  • A Little Knowledge (1977); the first book in the "Urban Nucleus" series
  • Catacomb Years (1979) (fix-up); the second book in the "Urban Nucleus" series
  • Transfigurations (1979) (expansion of novella "Death and Designation Among the Asadi")
  • Eyes of Fire (1980) (a complete revision of his first novel)
  • Under Heaven's Bridge (1981, with Ian Watson)
  • No Enemy But Time (1982) (Nebula Award winner)
  • Who Made Stevie Crye? (1984)
  • Ancient of Days (1985) (Arthur C. Clarke Award nominee)
  • The Secret Ascension (1987) (later republished with the author's original title: Philip K Dick Is Dead, Alas)
  • Unicorn Mountain (1988) (Mythopoeic Award winner)
  • Count Geiger's Blues (1992)
  • Brittle Innings (1994) (Locus Award winner and Hugo Award nominee)
  • Would It Kill You to Smile? (1998, with Paul Di Filippo, as "Philip Lawson"); the first book in the "Will Keats" series
  • Muskrat Courage (2000, with Paul Di Filippo, as "Philip Lawson"); the second book in the "Will Keats" series

A fix-up (or fixup) is a novel created from short stories which may or may not have been initially related, not all of which were necessarily previously published. ... Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ... Nebula Award winning novel by Michael Bishop in which a modern black American man is able to mentally project himself back to pre-human Africa, where he meets (and eventually mates) with humanitys prehistoric ancestors. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Who Made Stevie Crye? is a Horror novel by author Michael Bishop. ... The Arthur C. Clarke Award is a British award given for the best science fiction novel first published in the United Kingdom during the previous year. ... The Mythopoeic Awards for literature and literary studies are given by the Mythopoeic Society to authors of outstanding works in the fields of myth, fantasy, and the scholarly study of these areas. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Paul Di Filippo is a science fiction writer born October 29, 1954 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Philip Lawson is a pseudonym used for mystery novels written by Michael Bishop with Paul Di Filippo. ... Paul Di Filippo is a science fiction writer born October 29, 1954 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Philip Lawson is a pseudonym used for mystery novels written by Michael Bishop with Paul Di Filippo. ...

Story Collections

  • Blooded on Arachne (1982), includes the novellas “The White Otters of Childhood” and “On the Street of the Serpents”, nine stories and two poems from 1970-1978
  • One Winter in Eden (1984), includes twelve stories from 1978-1983 with an introduction by Thomas M. Disch
  • Close Encounters With the Deity (1986), includes the novella “The Gospel According to Gamaliel Crucis” and thirteen stories from 1979-1986 with an introduction by Isaac Asimov
  • Emphatically Not SF, Almost (1990), includes nine mainstream stories from 1982-1987
  • At the City Limits of Fate (1996) (Philip K. Dick Award nominee), includes fifteen stories from 1982-1996
  • Blue Kansas Sky (2000), four novellas from 1973-2000, including the first publication of the title story
  • Brighten to Incandescence: 17 Stories (2003), a compilation of previously uncollected stories from 1971-2003

Blooded on Arachne is a collection of science fiction stories by American author Michael Bishop. ... One Winter in Eden is a collection of science fiction and fantasy stories by author Michael Bishop. ... Thomas M. Disch Thomas Michael Disch (Born February 2, 1940) is an American science fiction author and poet. ... Dr. Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920? – April 6, 1992, IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ...

Anthologies

  • Changes (1983, with Ian Watson)
  • Light Years and Dark (1984) (Locus Award winner)
  • Nebula Awards 23 (1989)
  • Nebula Awards 24 (1990)
  • Nebula Awards 25 (1991)
  • A Cross of Centuries (2007)

Ian Watson (born 1943) is a British science fiction author. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ...

Miscellaneous Books

  • Windows and Mirrors (1977), poetry collection
  • Apartheid, Superstrings, and Mordecai Thubana (1989), novella
  • Time Pieces (1998), poetry collection (includes most of the selections from Windows and Mirrors)
  • A Reverie for Mister Ray (2005), nonfiction collection

A Reverie for Mister Ray: Reflections on Life, Death, and Speculative Fiction is a collection of nonfiction work by American writer Michael Bishop published in 2005 by PS Publishing. ...

Major Stories

The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Tales from the Darkside is an anthology TV series from the 1980s produced by George A. Romero. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... The Best American Short Stories yearly anthology is a part of the Best American Series published by the Houghton Mifflin Company. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Theodore Sturgeon Award is given each year for the best science fiction short story of the year. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... The British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) annually presents four awards (though numbers have differed in previous years) based on a vote of BSFA members and recently also members of EasterCon. ...

Interviews

  • The Prophetic World of Michael Bishop, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Magazine, April 4 1976: 8-10, 20 (interviewed by Phil Garner)
  • Michael Bishop: No Two Alike, Locus #335, December 1988: 1, 65-66 (interviewed by Charles N. Brown)
  • Interview with Michael Bishop, Science Fiction Review #1, Spring 1990: 42-43, 102 (interviewed by Elton Elliott)
  • Michael Bishop: Subduing the Serpent, Locus #426, July 1996: 4-5, 73-74 (interviewed by Charles N. Brown)
  • In Prayer the Whisper of the Void October 2000 (interviewed by Nick Gevers, reprinted in The New York Review of Science Fiction #172, December 2002)
  • Michael Bishop: The Blessing and the Curse, Locus #526, November 2004: 8-9, 76-77 (interviewed by Charles N. Brown)
  • An Interview with Michael Bishop (interviewed by Kilian Melloy)
  • Eagle in a Pigeon Hole: Interview with M. Bishop (interviewed by Octavio Aragão)
  • Teamwork: Bishop, Crowther, Hutchins Et Al (interviewed by Sandy Auden)

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... The New York Review of Science Fiction is a monthly, long-running science fiction critical journal edited by David G. Hartwell and others. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ...

External links

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

References

  1. ^ Fox News. Victims of Virginia Tech Shooting.
  2. ^ "Professor among Virginia Tech victims", Los Angeles Times. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  3. ^ a b Clute, John. "Bishop, Michael." Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1993. 126.
  4. ^ a b Watson, Ian. "A Rhetoric of Recognition: The Science Fiction of Michael Bishop." Foundation 19, June 1980: 5.
  5. ^ Panshin, Alexei and Cory Panshin. Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug. 1975: 49.
  6. ^ Justice, Keith L. “Paperbacks.” Delap’s F&SF Review, Feb 1978: 27.
  7. ^ Delap, Richard. Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct. 1977: 36-37.
  8. ^ Clute, John. "Reviews." Foundation 19, June 1980: 73.
  9. ^ Sturgeon, Theodore. "Other Dimensions: Books." Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone Magazine, June 1981: 8.
  10. ^ Bishop, Michael. "First Novel, Seventh Novel." A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire. Worcester Park: Kerosina, 1989. 16.
  11. ^ Bishop, Michael. "First Novel, Seventh Novel." A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire. Worcester Park: Kerosina, 1989. 8.
  12. ^ Frazier, Robert. "Reviews, books, etc." Thrust 15, Summer 1980: 46.
  13. ^ Langford, David. "An Interview with Ian Watson." Science Fiction Review 42, Feb. 1982: 8.
  14. ^ Stableford, Brian. "Reviews." Foundation 22, June 1981: 98.
  15. ^ Weinkauf, Mary S. "Fiction." Delap’s F&SF Review, Feb 1978: 7.
  16. ^ Delap, Richard. "Books." Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct. 1977: 37.
  17. ^ Robinson, Spider. "The Reference Library." Analog: Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1979: 174.
  18. ^ Frazier, Robert. "Other Voices." Science Fiction Review 35, May 1980: 33.
  19. ^ Lynn, Elizabeth. "Bishop Knighted." Locus, Dec. 1978: 12.
  20. ^ Disch, Thomas M. "Other Dimensions: Books." Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone Magazine, June 1982: 8.
  21. ^ Easton, Tom. "The Reference Library." Analog: Science Fiction/Science Fact, Sep. 1982: 164.
  22. ^ Pringle, David. "No Enemy But Time by Michael Bishop." Science Fiction: The One Hundred Best Novels. New York: Carroll & Graff, 1985. 215.
  23. ^ Pringle, David. "Who Made Stevie Crye? by Michael Bishop." Modern Fantasy: The One Hundred Best Novels. New York: Peter Bedrick Books, 1989. 231-2.
  24. ^ Sanders, Joe. "Reviews." Fantasy Review 74, Dec. 1984: 22.
  25. ^ Watson, Ian. "Michael Bishop: Who Made Stevie Crye?." Horror: 100 Best Books. Revised ed. London: New English Library, 1992. 277.
  26. ^ Notkin, Debbie. "Locus Looks at More Books." Locus, May 1985: 15.
  27. ^ Goodman, Bernard. "News and Reviews." Fantasy Review 80, June 1985: 16.
  28. ^ Card, Orson Scott. "Books to Look For." Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Feb. 1988: 19.
  29. ^ Whitmore, Tom. "Locus Looks at More Books." Locus, Nov. 1987: 21.
  30. ^ Jonas, Gerald. "Science Fiction." New York Time Book Review, Feb. 7, 1988: 22.
  31. ^ Card, Orson Scott. "Books to Look For." Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sep. 1988: 33.
  32. ^ Clute, John. "SF Novels of the Year." The Orbit Science Fiction Yearbook Two. Ed. David S. Garnett. London: Futura Books, 1989. 310.
  33. ^ Easton, Tom. "The Reference Library." Analog: Science Fiction/Science Fact, Nov. 1992: 165.
  34. ^ Miller, Faren. "Locus Looks at Books." Locus, Apr 1992: 17.
  35. ^ Kessel, John. "Books." Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Mar. 1993: 52.
  36. ^ Stableford, Brian. "Field of Broken Dreams." Necrofile #14, Fall 1994: 3.
  37. ^ Sharp, Bill. New York Times Book Review, 10 Apr. 1994: A24.
  38. ^ Sanders, Joe. "Of (Human) Bondage in Michael Bishop’s Brittle Innings" The New York Review of Science Fiction 96 , Aug. 1996: 1-7.
  39. ^ Aldiss, Brian W. with David Wingrove. "The Stars My Detestation." Trillion Year Spree. London: Paladin, 1988. 450.
  40. ^ Asimov, Isaac. "Editorial." Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. June 1984: 10.
Persondata
NAME Bishop, Michael
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American writer
DATE OF BIRTH November 12, 1945
PLACE OF BIRTH Lincoln, Nebraska
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

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