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Encyclopedia > Mexican Federal District
Distrito Federal
Location
Boroughs
Statistics
Seat of
government
Cuauhtémoc, D.F.
Area 1,479 km²
Ranked 32nd
Population
(2000 census)
8,591,300
Ranked 2nd
Governor
(2005-2006)
Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez (interim)
Federal Deputies PRD: 27
PAN: 3
Federal Senators PAN: 1
PRD: 1
PVEM: 1
ISO 3166-2
Postal abbr.
MX-DF
D.F.

The Mexican Federal District, known in Spanish as Distrito Federal (D.F.), is an area within Mexico that is not part of any of the Mexican states, but an independent self-governing city-state and the seat of the Federal Government. The core of the vast Mexico City Metropolitan Area is within the Federal District's limits. Image File history File links Image taken from the government site of the Mexican Federal District. ... Méx DF, locator map. ... Image File history File links Boroughs_of_Mexican_Federal_District. ... Cuauhtémoc is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Political division of Mexico The following table presents a listing of Mexicos 31 federal states (and its Federal District, officially not a state), ranked in order of their surface area. ... Political division of Mexico The following table presents a listing of Mexicos 31 federal states (and its Federal District, officially not a state), ranked in order of their total population (per year 2000 census data from INEGI). ... The Head of Government ( Spanish: Jefe de Gobierno) wields executive power in the Mexican Federal District (the federal district, or D.F., is the seat of national executive, legislative, and judicial power, and is largely contiguous with the core of the sprawling Mexico City conurbation). ... Alejandro Encinas Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez is a left-wing Mexican politician affiliated to the Party of the Democratic Revolution. ... The Chamber of Deputies (Spanish: Cámara de Diputados) is the lower house of Mexicos bicameral legislature, the Congress of the Union. ... The Party of the Democratic Revolution (in Spanish: Partido de la Revolución Democrática, PRD) is one of the three main political parties in Mexico. ... The National Action Party (Spanish: Partido Acción Nacional), known by the acronym PAN, is a conservative party and one of the three main political parties in Mexico. ... The Senate (Spanish: Cámara de Senadores or Senado) is the upper house of Mexicos bicameral Congress. ... ISO 3166-2 is the second part of the ISO 3166 standard. ... The United Mexican States or Mexico (Estados Unidos Mexicanos or México) is a federal republic made up of 31 states (estados) and one Federal District, (Distrito Federal), which contains the capital, Mexico City. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides...


The border with the State of México surrounds the D.F. on the north, east and west, while the State of Morelos shares the border through the more rural and mountainous south. The pear-shaped Federal District covers a surface area of 1,479 km², with a population of some 8,591,000 according to the year 2000 census. The United Mexican States. ... Morelos is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ...


For local government purposes, executive power is held by the Head of Government of the Federal District, while legislative power is in the hands of the Legislative Assembly of the Federal District (Asamblea Legislativa del Distrito Federal). The D.F. is divided into 16 delegaciones (boroughs). Each delegación is further divided into a variable number of colonias (neighborhoods). The Head of Government ( Spanish: Jefe de Gobierno) wields executive power in the Mexican Federal District (the federal district, or D.F., is the seat of national executive, legislative, and judicial power, and is largely contiguous with the core of the sprawling Mexico City conurbation). ... The Mexican Federal District is divided into 16 boroughs (delegaciones) for local government and administrative purposes: Mexican post codes beginning with 01 are in Álvaro Obregón; those beginning with 04 are in Coyoacán, etc. ...


Should the Federal Government decide to relocate to another part of the country, Article 44 of the Mexican Constitution mandates that the Federal District would acquire full statehood and be called Estado del Valle de México (State of the Valley of Mexico). This article is about the current Political Constitution of the United Mexican States. ...


Administrative history

After the establishment of the Mexican Republic in 1824, the Mexican Congress (Congreso de la Unión) decided to create a federal district distinct from the Mexican states, based on the model of the District of Columbia in the United States. The Distrito Federal was officially created on November 18, 1824. It was a perfect circle with its center at the Plaza de la Constitución (Mexico City's Zócalo), the very heart of Mexico City, and a radius of 8.38 km.(5.2 miles). This circular territory of 220.6 km² (85.2 sq. miles) was detached from the State of México. 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years), with 43 remaining. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Zócalo, Mexico City Catedral Metropolitana Zócalo is a Mexican Spanish term for a town square or town center where social and business transactions take place. ... RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service) is an AAA (authentication, authorization and accounting) protocol for applications such as network access or IP mobility. ... The United Mexican States. ...


The D.F. created in 1824 was much larger than the municipality of Mexico City proper. It was made up of Mexico City and six other independent municipalities: Tacuba, Tacubaya, Azcapotzalco, Mixcoac, Ixtacalco, and Villa de Guadalupe. Tacuba is a municipality in the Ahuachapán department of El Salvador. ...


The D.F. was abolished on February 20, 1837 when Mexico abandoned federalism and opted for a centralized government based on the French model. February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Federalism is the idea of a group or body of members that are bound together (latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... Centralization is the process by which the activities of an organization, particularly those regarding decision-making, become concentrated within a particular location and/or group. ...


In 1846, the federal Constitution of Mexico was reestablished, and the D.F. was recreated on the same basis as in 1824.. 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1854, Mexican dictator Santa Anna enlarged the D.F. almost eight-fold, from 220 to approximately 1,700 km² (650 sq. miles), by annexing vast rural and mountainous areas of the State of México. The move was motivated by a desire to control the strategic mountain passes in the south and southwest of the Valley of Mexico. After the fall of Santa Anna, the Constitution of 1857 confirmed the enlargement of the D.F. 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Antonio López de Santa Anna Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón (sometimes spelled de Santa Ana) (21 February 1794 – 21 June 1876) was a 19th century Mexican general and dictator. ... Anahuac is a plateau in Central Mexico, at a mean elevation of 7580 ft. ...


Finally, between 1898 and 1902 the long quarrels with the states of Mexico and Morelos were put to an end by the final delimitation of the borders of the D.F., downsizing its area to 1,479 km² (571 sq. miles), which it has kept until today. 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Morelos is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ...


For more than a hundred years, there existed independent municipalities inside the D.F. From seven municipalities in 1824, the enlargement of the D.F. increased the number of municipalities to 22 in 1900. In 1903, the government of Porfirio Díaz drastically reduced the number of municipalities inside the D.F. to 13 by merging some municipalities with each other. In 1924, the municipality of General Anaya was created by taking territory from the other municipalities, thus reaching a total of 14 municipalities. 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Term of office: 29 November 1876 to 30 November 1880 (first term) – 1 December 1884 to 25 May 1911 (second term) Preceded by: Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (1876), Manuel González (1884) Succeeded by: Manuel González (1880), Francisco León de la Barra interim (1911) Date of birth... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


While the D.F. was ruled by the federal government of Mexico through an appointed governor, the municipalities ruled themselves independently, and this duality of powers created constant tensions between the municipalities and the federal government for more than a century. In 1903 already, Porfirio Díaz largely reduced the powers of the municipalities of the D.F. Eventually, in December 1928, the federal government led by the PRI decided to abolish the municipalities of the D.F. The D.F. became solely ruled by the federal government, with its inhabitants having no more say in decisions, much as what happened in the District of Columbia before 1975. 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Institutional Revolutionary Party (Spanish: Partido Revolucionario Institucional or PRI) is a Mexican political party that wielded hegemonic power in the country – under a succession of names – for more than 70 years. ...


The 14 municipalities at the time of their abolition in 1928 were: Mexico City, Guadalupe Hidalgo, Azcapotzalco, Tacuba, Tacubaya, Mixcoac, General Anaya, Cuajimalpa, San Ángel, Coyoacán, Tlalpan, Xochimilco, Milpa Alta, and Iztapalapa. The traditional neighborhood of San Angel lies to the southeast of Mexico City. ...


Following the abolition of the municipalities, the D.F. was divided into a Central Department (Departamento Central) and 13 delegaciones. The Central Department was the result of the merger of the former municipalities of Mexico City, Tacuba, Tacubaya, and Mixcoac. As for the 13 delegaciones, their limits did not correspond exactly to the limits of the abolished municipalities. Unlike the former municipalities, the Central Department and the 13 delegaciones were mere administrative divisions, without power.


In 1941, the General Anaya delegación was merged with the Central Department, which was renamed "Mexico City" (Ciudad de México), thus reviving the name of Mexico City, but not the municipality. From 1941 until 1970, the D.F. was made up of 12 delegaciones plus Mexico City, which was not a city, but merely an administrative subdivision like the former Central Department. For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1970, the subdivision of "Mexico City" was abolished and split into four delegaciones: Cuauhtémoc, Miguel Hidalgo, Venustiano Carranza, and Benito Juárez. Thus, the number of delegaciones reached 16, which is still the number of delegaciones today. Following the abolition of the "Mexico City" subdivision in 1970, the name "Mexico City" started to be used to refer to the whole D.F., and today the name Ciudad de México is a synonym for Distrito Federal. 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Cuauhtémoc is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Miguel Hidalgo is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Venustiano Carranza is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Benito Juárez is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Look up Synonym on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Synonyms (in ancient Greek syn συν = plus and onoma όνομα = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings and are interchangable. ...


In 1987, the federal government of Mexico decided the creation of an Assembly of Representatives (Asamblea de Representantes) of the D.F. This assembly, elected by the inhabitants of the D.F., had limited legislative powers. Nonetheless, it was the first time since 1928 that the inhabitants of the D.F. recovered some oversight over their local affairs. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Eventually, in 1993, full home rule was granted to the D.F. by the federal government, with the creation of an elected Head of Government of the Federal District, and a great expansion of the legislative powers of the Assembly of Representatives of the D.F., renamed Legislative Assembly of the D.F. (Asamblea Legislativa del Distrito Federal). The first Head of Government of the Federal District was elected in 1997. 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Head of Government ( Spanish: Jefe de Gobierno) wields executive power in the Mexican Federal District (the federal district, or D.F., is the seat of national executive, legislative, and judicial power, and is largely contiguous with the core of the sprawling Mexico City conurbation). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... The Mexican Federal District is divided into 16 boroughs (delegaciones) for local government and administrative purposes: Mexican post codes beginning with 02 are in Azcapotzalco; those beginning with 14 are in Tlalpan, etc. ...

External link

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Federal District: Mexican Federal District

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Mexican Federal District (2872 words)
Should the Federal Government decide to relocate to another part of the country, Article 44 of the Mexican Constitution mandates that the Federal District would acquire full statehood and be called Estado del Valle de México (State of the Valley of Mexico).
After the establishment of the Mexican Republic in 1824, the Mexican Congress (Congreso de la Unión) decided to create a federal district distinct from the Mexican states, based on the model of the District of Columbia in the United States.
In 1846, the federal Constitution of Mexico was reestablished, and the D.F. was recreated on the same basis as in 1824..
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Mexico City (1382 words)
The Mexican Federal District, known in Spanish as Distrito Federal (D.F.), is an area within Mexico that is not part of any of the Mexican states, but an independent self-governing city-state and the seat of the Federal Government.
The Federal District is coextensive with Mexico City: both are governed by a single institution and are constitutionally considered to be the same entity.
The Federal District, created in 1824, was integrated by several municipalities, one of which was the municipality of Mexico City.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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