FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Mewtwo" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mewtwo
Mewtwo
Image:Mewtwo.png
National Pokédex
Dragonite - Mewtwo (#150) - Mew

Johto Pokédex
Ho-Oh - Mewtwo (#249) - Mew
Japanese name Mewtwo
Evolves from None
Evolves into None
Generation First
Species Genetic Pokémon
Type Psychic
Height 6 ft 7 in (2.0 m)
Weight 269.0 lb (122 kg)
Ability Pressure

Mewtwo (ミュウツー Myūtsū?) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise, designed by Ken Sugimori.[1] In all aspects of the franchise, Mewtwo, as with all other Pokémon, are used to battle both wild, untamed Pokémon and tamed Pokémon owned by Pokémon trainers.[2] Image File history File links This work is copyrighted. ... This is a complete list of Pokémon which appear in the National Mode Pokédex as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. ... Dragonite , Kairyu in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 (see TFD) fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Mew ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... At the core of the multi-billion dollar Pokémon media franchise of various electronic games, ongoing anime, several manga series, collectible cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri are 493 distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon. ... Mew ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... A series of screenshots depicting Abra evolving into Kadabra In the fictional Pokémon universe, evolution ) is the change in form of a Pokémon, usually accompanied by an increase in statistic values. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Pokémon types are special attributes based partly on, and expanded from, the classical elements which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ... Pokémon types are special attributes based partly on, and expanded from, the classical elements which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... IN or in may stand for: India ISO country code Indiana state code Indium In symbol for the chemical element Intelligent network a telecommunications architecture Car designation for Ingolstadt Inch In Nomine Look up IN in Wiktionary, the free dictionary This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lbm, or sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass (sometimes called weight in everyday parlance) in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... “Kg” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Pokémon evolution be merged into this article or section. ... This is a complete list of Pokémon which appear in the National Mode Pokédex as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... i eat poop alot A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... Bulbasaur - An example of Ken Sugimoris artwork for Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen Ken Sugimori ) (born January 27, 1966 in Tokyo) is a Japanese artist most famous for being the art director of the Pokémon video game franchise. ... It has been suggested that Pokémon evolution be merged into this article or section. ... The playable characters of Pokémon Emerald In the Pokémon franchise, a Pokémon Trainer is a person who captures wild Pokémon with Poké Balls, raises them, and trains them to battle other trainers Pokémon. ...


Mewtwo's name originates from that of another Pokémon, Mew, from whom its genes originate. The "two" suffix refers to Mewtwo being a cloned and enhanced Mew. The name Mewtwo refers to the species as a whole, as well as to individual specimens in the games, anime, manga, trading cards, and other media, but canonically, there is only one Mewtwo in the Pokémon World. Mew ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... The word mew can refer to: Mew (Pokémon), a video game character Miaow or meow, the noise that cats make. ...


Mewtwo's body is light purple and has an alien-like appearance, also resembling Mew's to some degree. Look up alien in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Biological characteristics

Mewtwo is described by the in-game Pokédexes of the Pokémon video games as being cloned from Mew[3] having been created by scientists by super modifying Mew's DNA.[4] It is primarily due to this characteristic that Mewtwo is featured in the various Pokémon media as tempestuous and remorseless. A sapient being, Mewtwo is among the few Pokémon species created by humankind. Mewtwo's ears resemble small horns and its body is less feline and more humanoid than that of Mew. The original Kanto Pokédex The Johto Pokédex The Hoenn Pokédex The Pokédex , lit. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... The word mew can refer to: Mew (Pokémon), a video game character Miaow or meow, the noise that cats make. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. ... The word mew can refer to: Mew (Pokémon), a video game character Miaow or meow, the noise that cats make. ...


Due to its genetic background, Mewtwo’s powers are superior to all other Pokémon, even many of legendary or god-like regard. Mewtwo can employ telekinesis to lift people and Pokémon off the ground, or to perform self-levitation, which allows it to achieve genuine flight. All this can be done with only a minor or nearly no strain on its mind. Mewtwo has the ability to project its thoughts telepathically to others, making it one of the very few Pokémon who can directly communicate with any sort of creature. When in battle with another Pokémon, Mewtwo can easily summon a barrier of telekinetic power to protect its body, as well as erase memories. The term psychokinesis (from the Greek ψυχή, psyche, meaning mind, soul, or breath; and κίνησις, kinesis, meaning motion; literally movement from the mind)[1][2] or PK, also known as telekinesis[3] (Greek + , literally distant-movement referring to telekinesis) or TK, denotes the paranormal ability of the mind to influence matter, time...


Role

In video games

In Pokémon Red, Blue and Yellow from the first generation of games for original Game Boy, Mewtwo is found in the Unknown Dungeon, residing at its end as a Pokémon that one has a single chance to catch through battle, where it is at level 70. In Red, Blue, and Yellow, Mewtwo, was an overly powerful species with very high statistics.[5] However, with the introduction of Dark and Steel types and strong Ghost and Bug attacks in Generation Two, Mewtwo was weakened. Even so, it remains one of the strongest Pokémon in the games. For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ...

Mewtwo in the Cerulean Cave in FireRed/LeafGreen

Mewtwo can be captured in the Fire Red and LeafGreen versions as well. It lives in the Cerulean Cave at level 70. Once caught, Mewtwo can be traded to the other versions. Mewtwo has the highest Special Attack rating and a high Speed and Attack. However its Defense and Special Defense are slightly above average.[6] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 240 × 160 pixelsFull resolution (240 × 160 pixel, file size: 4 KB, MIME type: image/png) Mewtwo, as seen in the Cerulean Cave in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 240 × 160 pixelsFull resolution (240 × 160 pixel, file size: 4 KB, MIME type: image/png) Mewtwo, as seen in the Cerulean Cave in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. ... This is a list of the major cities and locations from the fictional Kanto region featured in the Pokémon series. ...


In Pokémon Stadium, Mewtwo is the boss-character of every Round of the stadium; after completing the Gym Leader Castle, the four levels of the Poke Cup, Prime Cup, Pika Cup and Petit Cup, a Level 100 Mewtwo awaits battle, and the player must be able to defeat it with a team of any six or less Pokémon to complete that round.[7] Pokémon Stadium 2 has these battles much like the previous game, but this time the battle is with the Rival who has three Pokémon at level 50: Lugia and Ho-Oh in addition to Mewtwo.[8] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Stadium 2 (Pokémon Stadium GS in Japan) is a video game for the Nintendo 64. ... This article is under construction. ... At the core of the multi-billion dollar Pokémon media franchise of various electronic games, ongoing anime, several manga series, collectible cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri are 493 distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon. ...


In the Nintendo 64 game Pokémon Snap, while Mewtwo is not physically present, an array of glowing crystals is located in the Cave course. If the center crystal is properly snapped, the photograph displays a large, holographic image of Mewtwo, one of the six "signs" required to get to Rainbow Cloud, the final course in the game. Mewtwo also appears in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon as a boss character at the end of the game and is later recruitable in the brutal 99 floor dungeon Western Cave Dungeon.[9] Mewtwo also plays a cameo in Pokémon Puzzle League.[10] The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, was Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Pokémon Snap ) is a video game developed by HAL Laboratory and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team ) and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team ) are a matched pair of Pokémon games for the Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS, respectively. ... Pokémon Puzzle League is a puzzle game for the Nintendo 64 console. ...

Mewtwo as seen in Super Smash Bros. Melee

Mewtwo made its first Smash Bros. appearance in Super Smash Bros. Melee. It is one of four playable Pokémon characters. While it has a slow running speed, has a light weight and is easy to knock out of the arena it uses quick, strong attack moves and can lift and throw items (and other players) very easily. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Super Smash Bros. ... Super Smash Bros. ...


In the Pokémon anime

Mewtwo is featured in the continuity of the anime and movie series. In the anime’s chronology, Mewtwo first appears in a special show on the "Mewtwo Returns" DVD titled The Uncut Story of Mewtwo’s Origin. Mewtwo is shown being created from the Mew's DNA by the scientist Dr. Fuji for Team Rocket. During growth, Mewtwo befriends a young girl named Amber (originally named Ai in the Japanese version), a clone of Dr. Fuji’s deceased daughter. However, the experiment encounters a tragic anomaly, and Amber disappears, leaving Mewtwo traumatized. Dr. Fuji forcefully administers serum to erase Mewtwo’s memory. Mew ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Team Rocket ) is a fictional syndicate in the metaseries Pokémon. ...


In the anime Episode 13, "Mystery at the Lighthouse" when Ash, Brock, and Misty arrived at a lighthouse and knock on the door, an image of Mewtwo is seen carved on its door, among other legendary Pokémon.[11]


Mewtwo also appears in the main anime storyline three times wearing its armor and helmet but its identity is not revealed. Its first appearance is in a Pokémon battle at the Viridian City Gym between Giovanni and Gary, who is defeated quickly.[12] The second appearance is during a brief scene with Giovanni talking to it.[13] The final appearance is when Mewtwo destroys and flees from the Gym during episode "Showdown at the Poké Corral".[14]


Pokémon: The First Movie

Mewtwo destroying the lab on Mile Island after its creation.

In Pokémon: The First Movie, Mewtwo stirs from its slumber in stasis a while after its memory is erased and it has matured. When it is told that it is a laboratory specimen for the humans who created it, Mewtwo is enraged and destroys the laboratory. It is soon found by Giovanni, who had originally ordered Mewtwo's creation, and succeeds in tricking the Pokémon by telling it that he will help "add value" to Mewtwo's life and make him stronger. Giovanni trains Mewtwo through use of a sort of armor plating in his gym in Viridian City. Upon finding out that Giovanni is using it as nothing more than a tool, it is convinced that humans are immoral. Mewtwo destroys the machinery connected to it and flies away, escaping Giovanni's clutches. It goes to New Island and sets a new goal: a global purge of humans and Pokémon, both of which it believes to be corrupt and weak; the humans in doing whatever they want and their pokémon mindlessly obeying them. Mewtwo's plans are to clone every species of Pokémon to create superior creatures- super clones like itself and wipe the planet clean of all humans and "inferior" Pokémon. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Viridian City in Fire Red/Leaf Green. ...


Mewtwo sets in motion its plan to acquire Pokémon for cloning. In order to do this, it sends letters to many trainers including Ash, inviting them to the island to meet "the world's greatest" Pokémon Master. Creating a storm so getting to the island would be more difficult, Mewtwo tests to see who are the worthiest trainers and upon their arrival, it appears before them proclaiming itself to be the world's greatest Pokémon and Pokémon Master. Mewtwo detains the trainers' Pokémon using Thief Balls, a variation of the Pokéball that captures all tamed Pokémon, even those inside their Pokéballs. Mewtwo clones each of them for itself in the lab it created. However, a wild Mew that witnessed the scientists with the fossil appears,[15] and Mewtwo immediately sets the stage for a tremendous battle with it. With that, the ultimate Pokémon battle ensues, and the chaos eventually ends when Ash throws himself into Mewtwo and Mew’s crossfire of Psychic attacks, rendering his body lifeless and stone-like. This shocks Mewtwo, and as all the Pokémon grieve, their tears caress Ash’s body and miraculously revive him. Mewtwo realizes that all living beings have virtue. Then, it erases the memories of all trainers and their Pokémon and teleports them to the places where they received their invitations before taking the Pokémon it cloned along with it on a journey westward, in search of a haven. In the fictional Pokémon Universe, being a Pokémon Master is the typical goal of a Pokémon trainer. ... Mew ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


Pokémon: Mewtwo Returns

In Pokémon: Mewtwo Returns, Giovanni, unaware of the events at New Island, locates Mewtwo hiding in Mt. Quena in the Johto region. He rallies his troops, travels west, and commences his operation to bring Mewtwo out by capturing the clones so that he can force Mewtwo to submit to his will, all of which is wholly successful. As Mewtwo has developed a sense of concern for its clones strong enough for it to put the welfare of its fellow clones over its own, it agrees to be detained by Giovanni’s mind-control machines.


However, chaos involving a swarm of disturbed Bug Pokémon ensues, and Ash and his friends, who just so happen to have been in the area when the operation took place, find Mewtwo incarcerated. Though they and Mewtwo are successful in destroying its energy prison, Mewtwo’s life force is in jeopardy, but Ash and his Pokémon carry Mewtwo to Mt. Quena’s healing spring and hurl it into the water, and Mewtwo’s body and soul are restored. Mewtwo comes to another realization: That if this natural healing water has a healing effect on his artificial body, then being a clone does not mean that one is automatically “impure”. Rejuvenated, Mewtwo emerges before Giovanni and declares that neither it nor the region belong to the Team Rocket leader. Using all its power, Mewtwo psychically moves the lake and the spring beneath the surface of Mt. Quena, and Giovanni and all of his henchmen, except Jessie and James, are moved away from the mountain with their memories erased. Mewtwo sees that Ash, his friends, Jessie, James and also their Pokémon are virtuous and trustworthy enough not to reveal the mountain’s secrets, so it does not erase their memories. After thanking Ash for all his help, Mewtwo departs to reside in solitude.


Other appearances

Mewtwo stands on a rooftop overlooking a city, cloaked in a brown cape.

The last shot of Mewtwo Returns, the "Adding to Pokémon Lore" segment that preludes the sixth Pokémon movie Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker, and the opening sequence to the eighth season of the English anime dub all contain brief scenes where Mewtwo is seen residing amongst the rooftops and alleyways of what is merely described as a faraway city. In the latter two instances Mewtwo is seen wearing a brown cape. Image File history File linksMetadata Mewtworoof. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mewtworoof. ...


Mewtwo's likeness, however, most recently appeared in the 10th anniversary television special, The Mastermind of Mirage Pokémon. The Mewtwo that appears is a Mirage Pokémon created by Dr. Yung and his "Mirage Battle System". Dr. Yung, under the alias "Mirage Master", creates Mirage Mewtwo to be completely without weaknesses and capable of using any known Pokémon attack, and he plotted to use the entity to get revenge on those who doubted him. It is thought that Dr. Yung stole the information about Mewtwo from some sort of classified Pokémon files accessible with the password Oak gave him or used Pikachu's memory about Mewtwo. Ash and his friends, along with Professor Oak, are there to witness Mirage Mewtwo’s creation and were close to being destroyed by it if it were not for the interference of a Mirage Mew, another Mirage Pokémon created by Dr. Yung that somehow acquired enough sentience to rebel against the Mirage Battle System. Mirage Mew and Pikachu destroy Mirage Mewtwo with everyone’s help and the entire location is destroyed in a flaming wreck; Dr. Yung disappears amongst the flames of his collapsing factory. However, despite marching into a burning laboratory, his remains were not recovered, implying it is possible he is still alive and in hiding. ‹ The template below (Poke-cleanup) has been proposed for deletion. ... Professor Samuel Oak[1] is a human character who appears in the Pokémon video games, anime series, and manga. ... Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


Mewtwo also appears in the live action musical Pokemon Live, along with Giovanni's mechanical clone, MechaMew2. Mewtwo appears near the end and turns MechaMew2 against Giovanni by using the memories of Ash Ketchum and how MechaMew2 was never shown kindness. Pokémon Live! is a musical stage show that toured the USA in late 2000. ...


In the anime and all games with spoken dialogue, Mewtwo is voiced by Japanese actor/singer Masachika Ichimura. In the English dub of the first movie, it is voiced by Phillip Bartlett. In the dub of the special Mewtwo Returns, Mewtwo was voiced by Dan Green. Masachika Ichimura ) (born January 28, 1949) is a Japanese voice actor (seiyū) and musical singer. ... Phillip Bartlett is an American voice actor best known as the voice of Mewtwo in Pokemon: The First Movie. ... Dan Green (born February 7, 1975 in San Rafael, California, U.S.), also credited as Jay Snyder, is an American voice actor who provided the voices of many characters in multiple cartoons and anime shows such as Pokémon and the Yu-Gi-Oh! second series anime (Yu-Gi-Oh...


In the Pokémon manga

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Blaine had cloned Mew when he worked as a scientist under Giovanni. Mewtwo was created using the DNA of both Mew and Blaine, and due to an accident during the process, Blaine gained some of the mixed DNA on his hand, allowing him to track the location of Mewtwo. Mewtwo makes a return in the FireRed/LeafGreen edition of the manga where it helps Red confront Deoxys. This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Team Rocket ) is a fictional syndicate in the metaseries Pokémon. ...


Mewtwo also appears in Toshihiro Ono's manga, Dengeki Pikachuu, in a special called "Mewtwo Strikes Back", which was published in CoroCoro Comics Magazine. The short manga focuses on the early portions of the movie, beginning with Nurse Joy tending to a sleeping Mewtwo. The manga develops, through Mewtwo's "dream", the relationship between Mewtwo and Dr. Fuji. It concludes with Fuji begging Mewtwo to destroy the lab and the doctor himself, so that neither can be further misused. Mewtwo responds that it would be an atrocity to kill one's own "father". Fuji is moved and thanks Mewtwo for the sentiment, but explains his reasoning, and Mewtwo agrees that the lab must be destroyed. In the present, Nurse Joy stands unmoved as Mewtwo weeps in his sleep.


In the Pokémon Trading Card Game

Mewtwo in the EX Team Rocket Returns set.

Mewtwo's appearances in the Pokémon Trading Card Game include basic Psychic-type cards in the Base Set,[16], Gym Challenge (as Rocket's Mewtwo),[17] , Legendary Collection,[18], Neo Destiny (as Shining Mewtwo),[19], Expedition,[20], EX Ruby and Sapphire (as Mewtwo EX),[21], EX Team Rocket Returns (as Rocket's Mewtwo EX, a Dark-type),[22], EX Delta Species (as a Steel/Fire dual type),[23], EX Holon Phantoms (Lightning-type) and EX Holon Phantoms (as Mewtwo "Star", resembling Shining Mewtwo).[24] The original Mewtwo card was a startlingly weak card, having only an average amount of hit-points, and a fairly powerful, but costly attack. Image File history File links MewtwoCard. ... Image File history File links MewtwoCard. ... This article is about the card game. ...


In addition to the above cards, a strong promotional Mewtwo card was circulated with different artwork through the TCG League and as a card packed in with the home video release of Pokémon the First Movie.


Rocket's Mewtwo in Gym Challenge was actually the first Pokémon card to feature three attacks at once. It is also one of the few Pokémon cards to have an altered art format; in order to fit the three moves, the picture was drawn smaller than usual.


In the Legendary Collection, the movie/Nintendo Power Promo Mewtwo was found instead of the original Base Set version. Mewtwo EX in EX: Ruby & Sapphire is a powered-up version of the promotional card. There was also a promo card in the first wave of the First Pokémon Movie.


References

Notes
  1. ^PokéMania,” Time.com. URL accessed on July 20, 2006.
  2. ^ Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire Review (page 1) Ign.com. Retrieved on March 3, 2007.
  3. ^ Pokédex #151: Mew. Serebii.net. Retrieved on July 25, 2006.
  4. ^ Psypoke - Psydex :: No. 150 Psypokes.com
  5. ^ Psypoke - Psydex :: No. 150 Psypokes.com
  6. ^ http://www.serebii.net/pokedex-dp/stat/sp-attack.shtml
  7. ^ http://guidesarchive.ign.com/guides/11154/mewtwobattler1.html April 13, 2007
  8. ^ http://www.n64seeker.com/link.html?id=34022 April 13, 2007
  9. ^ http://db.gamefaqs.com/portable/gbadvance/file/pokemon_fnd_red_dungeons.txt April 13, 2007
  10. ^ http://www.neoseeker.com/resourcelink.html?rlid=28981&rid=27537 April 13, 2007
  11. ^ "Mystery at the Lighthouse". Kunihiko Yuyama (Director). Pokémon Season 1. Cartoon Network. No. 13, season 1. 25 minutes in.
  12. ^ "Battle For the Badge". Kunihiko Yuyama (Director). Pokémon. Cartoon Network. 25 minutes in.
  13. ^ "It's Mr. Mime Time". Kunihiko Yuyama (Director). Pokémon. Cartoon Network. 25 minutes in.
  14. ^ "Showdown At The Poké Corral". Kunihiko Yuyama (Director). Pokémon. Cartoon Network. 25 minutes in.
  15. ^ This Mew reaches New Island by following Team Rocket's Jessie James and Meowth
  16. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/baseset.html Pokebeach.com.
  17. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/gymchallenge.html Pokebeach.com.
  18. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/legendarycollection.html Pokebeach.com.
  19. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/neodestiny.html Pokebeach.com.
  20. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/expedition.html Pokebeach.com.
  21. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/exrubyandsapphire.html Pokebeach.com.
  22. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/exteamrocketreturns.html Pokebeach.com.
  23. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/exdeltaspecies.html Pokebeach.com.
  24. ^ http://pokebeach.com/sets/exholonphantoms.html Pokebeach.com.
Publications
  • Barbo, Maria. The Official Pokémon Handbook. Scholastic Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9.
  • Loe, Casey, ed. Pokémon Special Pikachu Edition Official Perfect Guide. Sunnydale, CA: Empire 21 Publishing, 1999. ISBN 1-930206-15-1.
  • Nintendo Power. Official Nintendo Pokémon FireRed & Pokémon LeafGreen Player’s Guide. Nintendo of America Inc., August 2004. ISBN 1-930206-50-X
  • Mylonas, Eric. Pokémon Pokédex Collector’s Edition: Prima’s Official Pokémon Guide. Prima Games, September 21 2004. ISBN 0-7615-4761-4
  • Nintendo Power. Official Nintendo Pokémon Emerald Version Player’s Guide. Nintendo of America Inc., April 2005. ISBN 1-930206-58-5

It has been suggested that Pokémon Yellow and Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen be merged into this article or section. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Gold and Pokémon Silver, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters Kin and Pocket Monsters Gin , lit. ... Pokémon Crystal, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters Crystal ), is a title in the Pokémon series of RPGs for the Game Boy Color. ... Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters Ruby and Pocket Monsters Sapphire ), released on March 17, 2003 in North America for the Game Boy Advance, mark the beginning of the third generation in the Pokémon series of RPGs. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Pokémon Red and Blue. ... Pokémon Colosseum ) is the first GameCube incarnation of the Pokémon video game franchise. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – June 4, 2007 – No. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – June 4, 2007 – No. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – June 4, 2007 – No. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – June 4, 2007 – No. ... Meowth , Nyarth in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...

External links

This article contains Japanese text.
Without proper rendering support,
you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of kanji or kana.
  • Official Pokémon website
  • Bulbapedia (a Pokémon-centric Wiki) ’s article about Mewtwo as a species
  • Mewtwo’s fourth-generation Pokédex entry at Serebii.net
  • WikiKnowledge.net’s entry for Mewtwo Previously hosted by Wikibooks
Legendary Pokémon
v  d  e
Kanto
(Red/Blue/Yellow/FireRed/LeafGreen)
ArticunoZapdosMoltresMewtwoMew
Johto
(Gold/Silver/Crystal)
RaikouEnteiSuicuneLugiaHo-OhCelebi
Hoenn
(Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald)
RegirockRegiceRegisteelLatiasLatiosKyogreGroudonRayquazaJirachiDeoxys
Sinnoh
(Diamond/Pearl)
UxieMespritAzelfDialgaPalkiaHeatranRegigigasGiratinaCresseliaManaphyDarkraiShayminArceus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Poke'mon (6618 words)
Pokemon #151 is Mewtwo, who is psychic Pokémon.
Unaware of their creation's power, the scientists and their laboratory are destroyed by the awakening Mewtwo.
Mewtwo is Angry at his creators for making him into a Pokémon Frankenstein monster, so he swears revenge on the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m