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Encyclopedia > Metropolitan district

A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties.


The first metropolitan boroughs in England were created in London in 1899, ten years after the formation of London County Council. These were abolished in 1965 with the expansion of London into Greater London, and replaced with several larger London boroughs.


The current metropolitan boroughs were created in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972. New metropolitan counties were created to cover the six largest urban areas in England, and these were subdivided into metropolitan boroughs. (The new authorities were actually defined as metropolitan districts, but since they inherited the status of their predecessors, all metropolitan districts have borough or city status.) Unlike the non-metropolitan districts, the metropolitan districts were also Local Education Authorities.


In 1986 the metropolitan county councils (MCCs) were abolished (by the Local Government Act 1985) and most of their functions were devolved to the boroughs, making them to a large extent unitary authorities. However, this description is not normally used; although most of the functions of the MCCs were devolved to the boroughs, some of their functions were taken over by joint boards - the boroughs appoint councillors to these boards to run some county-wide services, including emergency services, public transport, waste disposal and civil defence.


The metropolitan boroughs are:

Metropolitan county Metropolitan boroughs
Greater Manchester Manchester, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan
Merseyside Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens, Wirral
South Yorkshire Sheffield, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham
Tyne and Wear Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Gateshead, South Tyneside, North Tyneside, Sunderland
West Midlands Birmingham, Coventry, Dudley, Sandwell, Solihull, Walsall, Wolverhampton
West Yorkshire Leeds, Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, Wakefield


For the historic London metropolitan boroughs see County of London.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Metropolitan district - definition of Metropolitan district in Encyclopedia (225 words)
A metropolitan borough or metropolitan district is the style of a sub-division of a metropolitan county.
A number of metropolitan boroughs have city status, but this is purely ceremonial and does not affect their administrative status.
In 1986 the metropolitan county councils (MCCs) were abolished and most of their functions were devolved to the boroughs, making them to a large extent unitary authorities.
Metropolitan borough - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (313 words)
A Metropolitan Borough (or Metropolitan District) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within Metropolitan Counties.
Between 1899 and 1965, Metropolitan boroughs were the sub-divisions of the County of London.
The current Metropolitan Boroughs were created in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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