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Encyclopedia > Metropolitan Opera

Coordinates: 40°46′22″N, 73°59′3″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza
The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza
Auditorium of the Metropolitan Opera
Auditorium of the Metropolitan Opera

The Metropolitan Opera Association of New York City, founded in April 1880, is a major presenter of all types of opera including Grand Opera. The Metropolitan is America's largest classical music organization, and annually presents some 240 opera performances. The home of the company, the Metropolitan Opera House is one of the premier opera stages in the world. The Met is one of the twelve resident organizations at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1727x1185, 431 KB)Photograph of the facade of the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, New York, New York. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1727x1185, 431 KB)Photograph of the facade of the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, New York, New York. ... Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 15 acre (61,000 m²) complex of buildings in New York City which serves as home for 12 arts companies. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 561 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 561 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Grand Opera is a style of opera mainly characterized by many features on a grandiose scale. ... Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 15 acre (61,000 m²) complex of buildings in New York City which serves as home for 12 arts companies. ...

Contents

History of the Company

A full house at the old Metropolitan Opera House, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Józef Hofmann, November 28, 1937.
A full house at the old Metropolitan Opera House, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Józef Hofmann, November 28, 1937.

The Metropolitan Opera Association was founded in 1880 to create an alternative to the Academy of Music. The Academy represented the highest social circle in New York society, and the board of directors were loath to admit members of new wealthy families into their circle. The initial group of subscribers included the Morgan, Roosevelt, Astor and Vanderbilt families. Their creation, The Metropolitan Opera, long outlasted the Academy. Henry Abbey served as manager for the inaugural season 1883-84 which opened with presentation of Faust (opera) on October 22, 1883. Download high resolution version (1587x966, 388 KB)A full house, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Josef Hofmann, November 28, 1937. ... Download high resolution version (1587x966, 388 KB)A full house, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Josef Hofmann, November 28, 1937. ... Józef Kazimierz Hofmann (January 20, 1876 - February 16, 1957) was a Polish-American pianist and composer. ... Academy of Music was a theatre & opera house located at East 14th Street and Irving Place in Manhattan, New York City. ... Henry Eugene Abbey (1846 - 1896) was a famous theatre manager in the United States. ... Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carrés play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Goethes Faust, Part I. It debuted at the Théatre-Lyrique in Paris on March 19, 1859. ...


Following Abbey's inaugural season, which had resulted in very large deficits, operas were given by a "pick-up" ensemble of relatively inexpensive German singers (which nevertheless included some of the most celebrated singers in Germany) who performed an international repertory, albeit in German.


This anomalous situation terminated at the time of the Great Fire, following which the Golden Age of Opera arrived at the Metropolitan under the celebrated management of Maurice Grau 1892-1903. The greatest (and most highly paid) operatic artists in the world then graced the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House, notably the brothers Jean and Edouard de Reszke, Lilli Lehmann, Lillian Nordica, Nellie Melba, Milka Trnina, Emma Eames, Sofia Scalchi, Eugenia Mantelli, Jean Lassalle, Mario Ancona, Victor Maurel, Antonio Scotti and Pol Plançon. 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Jean de Reszke, born Jan Mieczyslaw, (14 January 1850 - 3 April 1925) was a Polish operatic tenor born in Warsaw. ... Edouard de Reszke Edouard de Reszke, born as Edward (22 December 1853 - 25 May 1917) was a Polish operatic bass born in Warsaw. ... Lilli Lehmann (1848-1929) was a German operatic soprano. ... Lillian Nordica (1857 - 1914) Was an American opera soprano known internatinolay for Wagnerian roles. ... Dame Nellie Melba, GBE (19 May 1861 – 23 February 1931), born Helen Porter Mitchell, was an Australian opera soprano, the first Australian to achieve international recognition in the form. ... Milka Ternina or Milka Trnina (December 19, 1863-May 18, 1941) was a Croatian dramatic soprano. ... Emma Eames (August 13, 1865 - June 13, 1952) was a successful opera singer whose career lasted four decades. ... Sofia Scalchi (November 29, 1850-August 22, 1922) was an Italian contralto. ... Jean Lassalle (born 3 May 1955 in Lourdios-Ichère, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Aquitaine, Occitania, France) is a French Occitan politician and UDF deputy in the National Assembly. ... Mario Ancona (1860-1931) was a Italian baritone, born in Livorno, Italy, and died in Florence. ... Victor Maurel (June 17, 1848 in Marseilles-October 22, 1923 in New York City ) was a French baritone. ... Antonio Scotti Antonio Scotti (January 25, 1866-February 26, 1936) was an Italian baritone. ... Pol Plançon (1851-1914) was a French opera singer. ...


From 1898 to 1986, the Metropolitan Opera went on a six-week tour following its season in New York. These were cancelled because of financial losses.


The administration of Heinrich Conried in 1903-1908, which saw the arrival of Enrico Caruso, unquestionably the most celebrated singer who ever appeared at the Old Metropolitan, was followed by the 25-year reign, 1908-1935 of the magisterial Giulio Gatti-Casazza, whose model planning, authoritative organizational skills and brilliant casts raised the level of Metropolitan opera to a prolonged and unforgettable Silver Age. Again, the greatest singers and conductors appeared at the Met. Heinrich Conried (1855-1909) was a theatrical manager, born in Bielitz (Austria). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Enrico Caruso (February 25, 1873 – August 2, 1921) was an Italian opera singer and one of the most famous tenors in history. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Giulio Gatti-Casazza (b. ...


The noted Canadian operatic tenor, Edward Johnson, was general manager between 1935 and 1950 , successfully guiding the company through the dark years of the Depression and World War II. Zinka Milanov, Jussi Björling, Richard Tucker and Robert Merrill were first heard at the Met under his management. Sir Thomas Beecham, George Szell and Bruno Walter were among the great conductors of the Johnson era. Edward Patrick Johnson (1878-1959) was a Canadian opera singer and director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. ... Zinka Milanov (née Kunc) Zinka Milanov née Zinka Kunc (May 17, 1906 - May 30, 1989) was a Croatian-born operatic soprano. ... Johan Jonatan   (5 February 1911 – 9 September 1960) was a Swedish tenor and one of the most highly regarded opera singers of the 20th century. ... Richard Tucker (August 28, 1913 – January 8, 1975) was an American tenor. ... Robert Merrill (June 4, 1917 – October 23, 2004) was an American opera baritone. ... Thomas Beecham (April 29, 1879 - March 8, 1961) was a British conductor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bruno Walter (September 15, 1876 – February 17, 1962) was a German-born conductor and composer. ...


An aristocratic Austrian-turned-Englishman, Sir Rudolf Bing, was manager between 1950 and 1972 . Bing modernized the administration of the Company, ended an archaic ticket sales system, and ended the Company's weekly one-night stands in Philadelphia. He presided over an era of great singing and glittering new productions, and guided the company's move to a new home in Lincoln Center. Among the many great artists Sir Rudolf introduced to New York audiences were Maria Callas, Birgit Nilsson, Renata Tebaldi, Dame Joan Sutherland, Dame Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Victoria de los Ángeles, Montserrat Caballé, Mario del Monaco, Franco Corelli, Carlo Bergonzi, Nicolai Gedda, Jon Vickers, Giorgio Tozzi and Cesare Siepi. Critics of Bing complained of a lack of great conducting during his regime, but he did offer such fine conductors as Fritz Stiedry, Dimitri Mitropoulos, Pierre Monteux, Erich Leinsdorf, Fritz Reiner, Karl Böhm and Herbert von Karajan. Sir Rudolph Bing Sir Rudolph Bing (January 9, 1902 – September 2, 1997) was an Austrian-born operatic impresario. ... Maria Callas in a casual moment, 1960s Maria Callas (Greek: Μαρία Κάλλας) (December 2, 1923 – September 16, 1977) was a Greek American dramatic coloratura soprano and perhaps the best-known opera singer of the post-World War II period. ... Birgit Nilsson Birgit Nilsson (May 17, 1918 – December 25, 2005) was a great Swedish soprano who specialized in operatic and symphonic works. ... Renata Tebaldi The Italian opera singer Renata Tebaldi (February 1, 1922 – December 19, 2004) was one of the most famous sopranos of the post-war period. ... Dame Joan Sutherland, OM, AC, DBE is a great Australian opera singer noted for her contribution to the bel canto revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Elisabeth Schwarzkopf Dame Elisabeth Schwarzkopf DBE (b. ... Victoria de los Ángeles Victòria dels Àngels (November 1, 1923 – January 15, 2005) was a Catalan Spanish operatic soprano whose career began in the early 1940s and reached its height in the mid 1970s. ... Montserrat Caballé Maria de Montserrat Viviana Concepción Caballé i Folc, better known as Montserrat Caballé (born April 12, 1933), is a Catalan Spanish operatic soprano renowned for her bel canto technique and her interpretations of the roles of Rossini, Bellini, and Donizetti. ... Mario del Monaco (Florence July 27, 1915 - October 16, 1982 in Mestre) was an Italian tenor. ... Franco Corelli. ... The Italian singer Carlo Bergonzi (born 13 July 1924) is one of the most admired tenors of the post-war period. ... The Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda (born July 11, 1925) is a famous opera singer and recitalist. ... Jon S. Vickers, CC , D.Mus. ... Giorgio Tozzi (born January 8, 1923, in Chicago, Illinois) was for many years a leading bass with the Metropolitan Opera, and was seen in leading roles in nearly every major opera house worldwide. ... Cesare Siepi (February 10th, 1923 - ) is generally considered one of the finest operatic basses of the post-war period. ... Fritz Stiedry (born [October 11th 1883 in Vienna, died August 8, 1968 in Zurich) was an Austrian conductor. ... Dimitris Mitropoulos (Greek: Δημήτρης Μητρόπουλος) (March 1, 1896 – November 2, 1960) was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer who spent most of his career in the United States. ... Pierre Monteux (April 4, 1875 – July 1, 1964) was an orchestra conductor. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Karl Böhm (August 28, 1894 – August 14, 1981) was a prominent Austrian conductor. ... Herbert von Karajan (April 5, 1908 – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor. ...


Among the achievements of Bing's tenure was the integration of the Met's artistic roster. Marian Anderson's historic 1955 debut was followed by the introduction of a whole generation of fine African-American artists led by Leontyne Price (who inaugurated the new house in Lincoln Center), Grace Bumbry, George Shirley, and many others. Marian Anderson (February 27, 1897 – April 8, 1993)[1] was an American contralto, perhaps best remembered for her performance on Easter Sunday, 1939 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Anderson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Legendary Leontyne Price by Jack Mitchell, 1981 Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American opera singer (soprano). ... Grace Bumbry The American opera singer Grace Bumbry (born 4 January 1937) was one of the leading mezzo-sopranos of her generation -- although often a controversial singer. ... George Irving Shirley, b. ...


Following Bing's retirement in 1972, the Met's management was overseen by a succession of executives including Schuyler Chapin, Anthony Bliss, Bruce Crawford and Hugh Southern. All of these men led the Met in partnership with Music Director James Levine, the Met's guiding artistic force through the last third of the 20th century. James Levine (born June 23, 1943 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American orchestral pianist and conductor and most well known as the music director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ...


After a 16-year tenure, General Manager Joseph Volpe retired on 31 July 2006. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The current General Manager is Peter Gelb. Gelb began outlining his plans for the future in April 2006. These plans include more productions each year, ideas for shaving staging costs and attracting new audiences without deterring existing opera-lovers, whose average age, at the Met, is over 60. Gelb sees these issues as crucial for an organization which, to a far greater extent than any of the other great opera theatres of the world, is dependent on private financing. Peter Gelb (born 1953[1]) is an American arts administrator. ...


Gelb is being watched to see if his enthusiasm at Sony Classical, where he previously worked, for "cross-over" productions (e.g. Yo-Yo Ma playing country music) might spill over into the Met's schedules. He calls himself "an old-style producer," but saw little future for purely classical recording when working in the classical-record business, an attitude that caused some anger. Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $68. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Ma Yo-Yo Ma (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (b. ...


The Met on radio and movie theatre screens

Met radio broadcasts

The Met is also known worldwide for its live radio broadcasts. The broadcast season typically begins every year during the first week of December and presents twenty live Saturday matinee performances through May. The first broadcast was heard on December 25, 1931, a production of Engelbert Humperdinck's Hänsel und Gretel. Those initial broadcasts were, however, only partial broadcasts, when only selected acts were transmitted. Full length opera broadcasts started from March 11, 1933, with transmission of "Tristan und Isolde." The broadcasts were originally heard on NBC Radio's Blue Network and continued on the Blue Network's successor, ABC, into the 1960s. As network radio waned, the Met founded its own Metropolitan Opera Radio Network which is now heard on radio stations around the world. December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... Engelbert Humperdinck (September 1, 1854 – September 27, 1921) was a German composer, best known for his opera, Hänsel und Gretel (1893). ... Hänsel und Gretel is an opera by Engelbert Humperdinck (Humperdinck himself described it as a fairy opera. ... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American radio and television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The American Broadcasting Company ( oftenly known as ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ...


Sponsorship of the Saturday afternoon broadcasts by Texaco began on December 7, 1940 with Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro. Texaco's support continued for 63 years, the longest continuous sponsorship in broadcast history. After its merger with Chevron, however, the combined company ChevronTexaco ended its sponsorship in April 2004. Emergency grants allowed the broadcasts to continue through 2005 when the residential home building company Toll Brothers stepped in to become primary sponsor. Texaco is the name of an American oil company that was merged into Chevron Corporation in 2001. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Le Nozze di Figaro, is a comic opera composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Beaumarchais. ... Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) is one of the worlds largest global energy companies. ... ChevronTexaco Corporation ( NYSE: CVX) is one of the worlds largest global energy companies. ... Toll Brothers is a Horsham, PA based company and the largest builder of luxury homes and luxury communities in the United States. ...


In the seven decades of its Saturday broadcasts, the Met has been introduced by the voices of only three permanent announcers. The legendary Milton Cross served from the inaugural broadcast until his death in 1975. He was succeeded by Peter Allen, who presided for 29 years through the 2003-2004 season. The present host of the broadcasts, Margaret Juntwait, began her tenure the following season and now also presents all of the live and recorded broadcasts on the Met's Sirius satellite radio channel. In addition, announcer Lloyd Moss twice substituted for Cross, and Marcia Davenport was a commentator in 1973. Deems Taylor was heard briefly as co-host during the early years. Milton Cross (birthname: Milton John Cross b. ... Peter Allen, an American Broadcaster, was the host of the Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts from 1975-2004. ... Margaret Juntwait (born circa 1957) is an American radio broadcaster who is the voice of the Metropolitan Operas Saturday afternoon broadcasts. ... American author and music critic Marcia Davenport was born Marcia Glick in New York City on June 9, 1903, the daughter of opera singer Alma Gluck and Bernard Glick, and she became the step-daughter of violinist Efrem Zimbalist when Gluck remarried. ... Deems Taylor (born Joseph Taylor) (1885 - 1966) was a U.S. composer and music critic. ...


Met on satellite radio

Metropolitan Opera Radio, a 24/7 opera channel carrying four evenings each week of live broadcasts from the current season plus archived broadcasts from past seasons during other hours, was created in September 2006 when the Met started a multi-year relationship with Sirius Satellite Radio.[1] Margaret Juntwait was named the official announcer of Metropolitan Opera Radio.[2] Metropolitan Opera Radio is an all-opera radio station on Sirius Satellite Radio channel 85 and DISH Network channel 6085. ... Sirius Satellite Radio NASDAQ: SIRI is one of two satellite radio (SDARS) services operating in the United States and Canada, along with XM Satellite Radio. ...


Met broadcasts to movie theaters

Beginning with the 30 December 2006 Saturday matinee live performance of the 110-minute version of Julie Taymor's production of The Magic Flute, the Met (along with NCM Fathom)[3][4] launched Metropolitan Opera: Live in HD, a series of six productions from the 2006-07 season in 100 movie theaters across the USA, Canada, Japan, and several European countries, including Britain, Norway, Sweden and Denmark which are equipped to present high definition satellite video downloads on the big screen.[5] According to the Met's press release[6] 48 out of 60 US theaters had sold out prior to the broadcast, including venues in Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Miami and Washington, D.C., while all seven of the UK participating theatres had also sold out. These movie transmissions have received wide and generally favorable press coverage.[7] Julie Taymor (born December 15, 1952) is a critically acclaimed, Tony Award-winning American director on Broadway and in film: she is known for her visual flair and brilliantly colorful costuming choices. ... Die Zauberflöte, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... National CineMedia (NCM) is the sales and marketing arm of the three largest theater circuits in the U.S.A, representing approximately 1,105 theatres and 13,567 screens in 45 states, according to its as of December 2005. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ...


The series has continued throughout the 2006-07 season with live HD transmissions of I Puritani, The First Emperor, Eugene Onegin, The Barber of Seville, and Il Trittico. In addition, limited repeat showings of the operas have been offered in most of the presenting cities. Digital sound for the performances is provided by Sirius Satellite Radio. I puritani (The Puritans) is an opera in three acts, by Vincenzo Bellini. ... The First Emperor is an opera with a libretto written in English by Tan Dun and Ha Jin, and music by Tan Dun. ... Eugene Onegin (Russian: Евгений Онегин, BGN/PCGN: Yevgeniy Onegin) is a novel in verse written by Aleksandr Pushkin. ... The Barber of Seville (Il barbiere di Siviglia) is an opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with a libretto (based on Beaumarchaiss comedy Le Barbier de Séville) by Cesare Sterbini. ... Il trittico (The Triptych) is the title to a collection of three one-act operas, Il tabarro, Suor Angelica, and Gianni Schicchi, by Giacomo Puccini. ... Sirius Satellite Radio NASDAQ: SIRI is one of two satellite radio (SDARS) services operating in the United States and Canada, along with XM Satellite Radio. ...


The Met reports that 91% of all available seats have been sold for the HD performances.[8] According to General Manager Peter Gelb, there were 60,000 people in cinemas around the world watching the March 24 transmission of The Barber of Seville.[9]. For the 2006/7 season, it is reported that 324,000 tickets were sold worldwide, while each simulcast cost $850,000 to $1 million to produce.[10]


For the 2007-08 season, the Met has announced that eight of its season's productions will be presented Live in HD beginning December 15, 2007 with Roméo et Juliette and ending with La fille du régiment on April 26, 2008.[11]. In addition, Gelb has noted that "he expects the number of people who attend live Met performances in movie houses next season to match the cumulative audience for all 225 performances in the Met auditorium: about 800,000 people" [10]. Coverage to double the number of theaters as well as to additional countries such as France, Germany, Italy, and Spain is planned for 2007/08.[10] Roméo et Juliette (Romeo and Juliet) is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré, based on the play by Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. ... La fille du régiment (The Daughter of the Regiment) is a comic opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ...


Opera houses

The "Old Met"

The first Metropolitan Opera House opened on October 22, 1883, with a performance of Faust, was located on 1411 Broadway, the whole block between West 39th Street and West 40th Street on the west side of the street ( 40°45′15″N, 73°59′15″W) in the Garment District of Midtown. The original Metropolitan Opera House, nicknamed "The Yellow Brick Brewery", was designed by J. Cleaveland Cady and was gutted by fire on August 27, 1892. Following the fire the season 1892-93 was cancelled and the building was renovated extensively for the season after. is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carrés play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Goethes Faust, Part I. It debuted at the Théatre-Lyrique in Paris on March 19, 1859. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... J(osiah) Cleaveland Cady (Providence, Rhode Island, 1837 - April 17, 1919) was a New York-based architect whose most familiar surviving building is the south range of the American Museum of Natural History on New Yorks Upper West Side. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


As early as the turn of the century, the backstage facilities were deemed to be severely inadequate for the growing company. Various plans were put forward over the years to build a new home for the company at locations including Columbus Circle and what is now Rockefeller Center, but none of these came to fruition. Only in 1966 did the opera company move to a new house at its present location in Lincoln Center. The original building, having failed to obtain landmark status, was razed in 1967. Columbus Circle Columbus Circle is a major landmark and point of attraction in New York City. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ...


The present-day Met

The Metropolitan Opera House, with approximately 3,800 seats, is located at Lincoln Center at Lincoln Square in the Upper West Side and was designed by architect Wallace K. Harrison. Although west-east roads do not run through Lincoln Center itself, the Metropolitan Opera House is parallel to the block from West 63rd Street to West 64th Street. The rear of the House meets Amsterdam Avenue and the entrance to the Opera House is at Lincoln Center Plaza which begins at Columbus Avenue. The building is clad in white travertine and the east facade is graced with five similar arches. On display in the lobby are two murals created for the space by Marc Chagall. The gold proscenium is 54' wide and 54' high. The main curtain is custom-woven gold damask and is the largest tab curtain in the world. Lincoln Square is the name of both a square and the surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... Wallace K. Harrison is a mid-twentieth-century architect. ... View of Amsterdam Avenue looking south from the Columbia University overpass between West 116th and 117th Streets View north from the overpass Tenth Avenue / Amsterdam Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... Ninth Avenue / Columbus Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... Travertine Travertine terraces at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park A carving in travertine Travertine is a sedimentary rock. ... Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten. ... The interior of the Auditorium Building in Chicago built in 1887. ...


The "New Met" opened on September 16, 1966, with the world premiere of Samuel Barber's Antony and Cleopatra. Samuel Barber, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of classical music ranging from orchestral, to opera, choral, and piano music. ... Antony and Cleopatra is an opera in three acts by Samuel Barber. ...


The Metropolitan Opera performs grand opera in rotating repertory, each week presenting seven performances of 4 to 5 different productions. The highly mechanized stage and support space facilitates this presentation. There are 7 full stage elevators, (60' wide, with double decks) and three slipstages, the upstage one containing a 60' diameter revolve (turntable). There are 103 motorized battens (linesets) for overhead lifting and there are two 100' tall fully-enveloping cycloramas. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... A batten is a thin strip of solid material (usually wood). ... A cyclorama is a cylindrical painting designed to provide a viewer, standing in the middle of the cylinder, with a 360° view of the painting. ...


Installed in 1995 at a cost of $2 million, an electronic libretto system provides the audience with a translation of the opera’s text in English on individual screens mounted on top of each seat. Known as ‘’Met Titles’’, this system was the first in the world to be placed in an opera house with “each screen (having) a switch to turn it off, a filter to prevent the dim, yellow dot-matrix characters from disturbing nearby viewers and the potential eventually to display texts in multiple languages. Custom-designed, the system features rails of different heights for various sections of the house, individually designed displays for some box seats and commissioned translations costing up to $10,000 apiece.[12] Due to the height of and artwork on the proscenium, it was not feasible to have titles displayed above the stage, such as is found in many opera houses. The Electronic libretto system is used primarily in opera houses and is a device which presents translations of lyrics into an audiences language or transcribes lyrics that may be difficult to understand in the sung form. ...


In 1999 and in 2001, the Metropolitan Opera House hosted the MTV Video Music Awards while Radio City Music Hall was being renovated. It is regularly the location for touring opera and companies (such as the Kirov Opera), as well the principal venue for the American Ballet Theatre. The MTV Video Music Awards were established in 1984 by MTV to celebrate the top music videos of the year. ... Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The Mariinsky Theatre, known as the Kirov Opera and Ballet Theatre in 1934-92, is a historic theatre of opera and ballet in St Petersburg. ... Angel Corella as Aminta in the 2006 production of Ashtons ballet Sylvia. ...


Deaths at the Met

On March 4, 1960, Leonard Warren died of a stroke onstage after completing the aria "Urna fatale" in act two of Verdi's La Forza del Destino.[13] The American opera singer Leonard Warren (April 21, 1911 - March 4, 1960) was a famous baritone who was associated for many years with the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ... Cover of first bilingual edition of the libretto of La forza del destino, St. ...


On April 30, 1977, Betty Stone, a member of the Met chorus, was killed in an accident offstage during a tour performance of Il Trovatore in Cleveland.[14] Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ...


On January 5, 1996, tenor Richard Versalle died while playing the clerk Vitek in Leoš Janáček's The Makropulos Case. Versalle was climbing a 20-foot ladder in the opening scene when he suffered a heart attack and fell to the stage.[15] LeoÅ¡ Janáček in 1928 LeoÅ¡ Janáček ( ; July 3, 1854 in Hukvaldy, Moravia, then Austrian empire – August 12, 1928 in Ostrava, then Czechoslovakia) was a Czech composer. ... The Makropulos Case (Věc Makropulos in Czech) is an opera by Leoš Janáček, with the composers libretto drawn from the play by Karel Čapek. ...


In addition, several audience members have died at the Met. The most well-known incident was the suicide of operagoer Bantcho Bantchevsky on January 23, 1988 during an intermission of Verdi's Macbeth.[16] Bantcho Bantchevsky (also Bancho Banchevsky or Bancho Banchevski; Bulgarian: ; 1906 - January 29, 1988) was a Bulgarian-born American singer, singing coach, and translator. ... For other uses, see Macbeth (disambiguation). ...


Principal Conductors

James Levine (born June 23, 1943 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American orchestral pianist and conductor and most well known as the music director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ... Valery Gergiev Valery Abisalovich Gergiev, Russian: Вале́рий Абиса́лович Ге́ргиев (born 1953) is a Russian conductor and opera company director. ... Rafael Jeroným Kubelík (Býchory, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary, today Czech Republic, June 29, 1914 – August 11, 1996 in Kastanienbaum, Canton of Lucerne, Switzerland) was a Czech conductor and composer. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... Thomas Schippers (1930-1977) was a prominent American orchestral conductor. ... Dimitris Mitropoulos (Greek: Δημήτρης Μητρόπουλος) (March 1, 1896 – November 2, 1960) was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer who spent most of his career in the United States. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Fritz Busch (born 13 March 1890 in Siegen, died 14 September 1951 in London) was a German conductor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... Tullio Serafin (1878 - 1968) was an Italian conductor of opera. ... Artur Bodanzky (born 1877 in Vienna, died 23 November 1939 in New York) was an Austrian-American conductor particularly associated with the operas of Wagner. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Alfred Hertz was featured on the cover of Time magazine, October 31 1927 Alfred Hertz (born July 15, 1872 in Frankfurt, died April 17, 1942 in San Francisco, was a German-American conductor. ... Walter Johannes Damrosch (born in Breslau, Prussia, January 30, 1862; died in New York City, December 22, 1950) was an American symphony conductor. ... Anton Seidl (7 May 1850 - 28 March 1898) was a Hungarian conductor. ...

References

  1. ^ Peter Conrad, "Lessons from America". New Statesman, 22 January 2007.
  2. ^ Sirius Radio's announcement of new relationship with the MET
  3. ^ About NCM digital programming
  4. ^ List of Met productions presented on HD in 2007
  5. ^ Campbell Robertson, "Mozart, Now Singing at a Theatre Near You", New York Times, 1 January 2007
  6. ^ Met press release on plans and advance ticket sales for The Magic Flute, 30 December 2006
  7. ^ Elizabeth Fitzsimmons, "Movie theaters offer opera live from the Met". San Diego Union-Tribune, 31 December 2006.
  8. ^ Richard Ouzounian, "Opera Screen Dream: Met simulcasts heat up plexes in cities, stix", Variety, March 5-11, 2007, pp 41/42
  9. ^ Gelb, speaking during the intermission on 24 March 2007, noted that over 250 movie theatres were presenting the performance that day
  10. ^ a b c Daniel Watkin, "Met Opera To Expand Simulcasts In Theaters", The New York Times, May 17, 2007
  11. ^ The Met Opera’s 2007-08 Season to Feature Seven New Productions – the Most in More than 40 Years
  12. ^ Edward Rothstein, "Met Titles: A Ping-Pong Of the Mind", New York Times, 9 April 1995
  13. ^ "Leonard Warren Collapses And Dies on Stage at 'Met'," New York Times, March 5, 1960
  14. ^ "Met Singer Killed in Backstage Elevator in Cleveland," New York Times, May 2, 1977
  15. ^ "Richard Versalle, 63, Met Tenor, Dies After Fall in a Performance," New York Times, January 7, 1996
  16. ^ "METRO DATELINES; Man's Death at Opera Is Called a Suicide", The New York Times, 25 January 1988 retrieved December 1, 2006

Bibliography

  • Meyer, Martin The Met: One Hundred Years of Grand Opera, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1983. ISBN 0-671-47087-6
  • Robinson, Francis, Celebration: The Metropolitan Opera, New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc, 1979. ISBN 0-385-12975-0
  • Wasserman, Adam, "Sirius Business", Opera News, December 2006

See also

Metropolitan Opera Radio is an all-opera radio station on Sirius Satellite Radio channel 85 and DISH Network channel 6085. ...

External links

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