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Encyclopedia > Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Established 1872
Location 5th Avenue and 82nd Street, Manhattan, New York
Visitor figures 4 million/year
Director Philippe de Montebello
Website www.metmuseum.org

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is an art museum located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what is known as Museum Mile in New York City. It has a permanent collection containing more than two million works of art, divided into nineteen curatorial departments.[1] The main building, often referred to simply as "the Met," is one of the world's largest art galleries, and has a much smaller second location in Upper Manhattan, at "The Cloisters," which features medieval art. Image File history File links Metropolitam_Museum_of_Art_by_Simon_Fieldhouse. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Philippe de Montebello (born 1936) is a French-born museum curator. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Museum Mile is the name for a section of Fifth Avenue, an avenue in Manhattan in the City of New York, running from 82nd to 105th streets on the Upper East Side in a neighborhood known as Carnegie Hill. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Upper Manhattan is an area in New York City consisting of the thin, northern neck of the island of Manhattan. ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... Byzantine monumental Church mosaics are a crowning glory of Medieval Art. ...

The Great Hall
The Great Hall

Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine and Islamic art.[2] The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world.[3] A number of notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries.[4] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 926 KB) Taken by en:User:Cow Uploaded to en. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 926 KB) Taken by en:User:Cow Uploaded to en. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Ancient Egyptian art refers to the style of painting, sculpture, crafts and architecture developed by the civilization in the lower Nile Valley from c. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. ... Arts of the Far East include: Buddhist art Chinese art Japanese art Tibetan art Thai art Art of Laos Categories: Art stubs ... Oceanic art refers to the creative works made by the native peoples of the Pacific Islands and Australia, as well as their greater extent as far as Hawaii and Easter Island. ... The most famous of the surviving Byzantine mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople - the image of Christ Pantocrator on the walls of the upper southern gallery. ... The Taj Mahal, Agra. ... A musical instrument is a device that has been constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Weapon (disambiguation). ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ...


The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened on February 20, 1872, and was originally located at 681 Fifth Avenue. John Taylor Johnston, a railroad executive whose personal art collection seeded the museum, served as its first President, and the publisher George Palmer Putnam was its founding Superintendent. In 1873, occasioned by the Met's purchase of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriot antiquities, the museum took up temporary residence at the Douglas Mansion on West 14th Street; after negotiations with the City of New York, the Met acquired land on the east side of Central Park, where it built its permanent home, a red-brick Gothic Revival stone "mausoleum" designed by American architects Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mould.[5] The building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986.[6][7][8] Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... alternate logo The Central Railroad of New Jersey, more commonly known as the Jersey Central Lines or CNJ, was a regional railroad with origins in the 1830s, lasting until 1976 when it was absorbed into Conrail with the other bankrupt railroads of the U.S. Northeast. ... George Palmer Putnam (1814 - 1872) was a U.S. publisher. ... Luigi Palma di Cesnola Luigi Palma di Cesnola (July 29, 1832–November 21, 1904), an Italian American soldier and amateur archaeologist, was born near Turin. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jacob Wrey Mould (1825-1886) was an architect, illustrator, linguist and musician, noted for his many contributions to the design and construction of New York Citys Central Park. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


As of 2007, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet, more than 20 times the size of the original 1880 building.[9]

Contents

Overview

The facade of the Metropolitan Museum is one of the main features of New York City's "Museum Mile".
The facade of the Metropolitan Museum is one of the main features of New York City's "Museum Mile".

The Met's permanent collection is cared for and exhibited by nineteen separate departments, each with a specialized staff of curators, restorers, and scholars.[1] Museum Mile is the name for a section of Fifth Avenue, an avenue in Manhattan in the City of New York, running from 82nd to 105th streets on the Upper East Side in a neighborhood known as Carnegie Hill. ... Look up curator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Conservation is the profession devoted to the preservation of cultural property for the future. ...


Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine and Islamic art.[2] The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world.[3] A number of notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries.[4] Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Ancient Egyptian art refers to the style of painting, sculpture, crafts and architecture developed by the civilization in the lower Nile Valley from c. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. ... Arts of the Far East include: Buddhist art Chinese art Japanese art Tibetan art Thai art Art of Laos Categories: Art stubs ... Oceanic art refers to the creative works made by the native peoples of the Pacific Islands and Australia, as well as their greater extent as far as Hawaii and Easter Island. ... The most famous of the surviving Byzantine mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople - the image of Christ Pantocrator on the walls of the upper southern gallery. ... The Taj Mahal, Agra. ... A musical instrument is a device that has been constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Weapon (disambiguation). ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ...


In addition to its permanent exhibitions, the Met organizes and hosts large travelling shows throughout the year.[10]


The Met's director from 1955 to his death on May 11, 1966, was James J. Rorimer. He was succeeded by Thomas Hoving, who served from March 17, 1967 to June 30, 1977. The current director is Philippe de Montebello, who announced January 8, 2008 that he planned to retire at the end of the year.[11] James J. Rorimer (1905–1966), was an American museum curator and the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... Thomas P.F. Hoving (born January 15, 1931), is an American museum executive and consultant and the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... Philippe de Montebello (born 1936) is a French-born museum curator. ...


History

Opening reception in the picture gallery at 681 Fifth Avenue, February 20, 1872. Wood engraving published in Frank Leslie's Weekly, March 9, 1872.
Opening reception in the picture gallery at 681 Fifth Avenue, February 20, 1872. Wood engraving published in Frank Leslie's Weekly, March 9, 1872.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art first opened on February 20, 1872, housed in a building located at 681 Fifth Avenue in New York City. John Taylor Johnston, a railroad executive whose personal art collection seeded the museum, served as its first President, and the publisher George Palmer Putnam came on board as its founding Superintendent. Under their guidance, the Met's holdings, initially consisting of a Roman stone sarcophagus and 174 mostly European paintings, quickly outgrew the available space. In 1873, occasioned by the Met's purchase of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriot antiquities, the museum decamped from Fifth Avenue and took up residence at the Douglas Mansion on West 14th Street. However, these new accommodations were temporary. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 767 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1250 × 977 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 767 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1250 × 977 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Frank Leslies Weekly, later often known in short as Leslies Weekly was an American illustrated literary and news magazine founded in 1852 and continuing publication well into the Twentieth Century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... George Palmer Putnam (1814 - 1872) was a U.S. publisher. ... Luigi Palma di Cesnola Luigi Palma di Cesnola (July 29, 1832–November 21, 1904), an Italian American soldier and amateur archaeologist, was born near Turin. ...


After negotiations with the city of New York, the Met acquired land on the east side of Central Park, where it built its permanent home, a red-brick Gothic Revival stone "mausoleum" designed by American architects Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mould.[12] The Met has remained in this location ever since, and the original structure is still part of its current building. A host of additions over the years, including the distinctive Beaux-Arts facade, designed by Richard Morris Hunt and completed in 1926, have continued to expand the museum's physical structure. As of 2007, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet, more than 20 times the size of the original 1880 building.[13] Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jacob Wrey Mould (1825-1886) was an architect, illustrator, linguist and musician, noted for his many contributions to the design and construction of New York Citys Central Park. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... Facade of Yale Universitys Scroll and Key Society, displaying Moorish gate and patterned forecourt. ...


American decorative arts

The American Decorative Arts Department includes about 12,000 examples of American decorative art, ranging from the late seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Though the Met acquired its first major holdings of American decorative arts via a 1909 donation by Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage, wife of the financier Russell Sage, a decorative arts department specifically dedicated to American works was not established until 1934. One of the prizes of the American Decorative Arts department is its extensive collection of American stained glass. This collection, probably the most comprehensive in the world, includes many pieces by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The department is also well-known for its twenty-five period rooms, each of which recreates an entire room, furnishings and all, from a noted period or designer. The department's current holdings also include an extensive silver collection notable for containing numerous pieces by Paul Revere as well as works by Tiffany & Co. Decorative metalwork designed in the Art Deco style by Maurice Ascalon and manufactured by the Pal-Bell Company during the 1940s. ... Margaret Olivia Slocum (Mrs. ... Lady in Sag Harbor, New York who built the John Jermain Library ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) circa 1908 Louis Comfort Tiffany (February 18, 1848 – January 17, 1933) was an American artist and designer who worked in the decorative arts and is best known for his work in stained glass and is the American artist most associated with the Art Nouveau and... This article is about the chemical element. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... Tiffany Blue seen here on a Tiffany gift box. ...


American paintings and sculpture

Ever since its founding, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has placed a particular emphasis on collecting American art. The first piece to enter the Met's collection was an allegorical sculpture by Hiram Powers titled California, acquired in 1870, which can still be seen in the Met's galleries today. In the following decades, the Met's collection of American paintings and sculpture has grown to include more than one thousand paintings, six hundred sculptures, and 2,600 drawings, covering the entire range of American art from the early Colonial period through the early twentieth century. Many of the best-known American paintings are held in the Met's collection, including a portrait of George Washington by Gilbert Stuart and Emanuel Leutze's monumental Washington Crossing the Delaware. The collection also includes masterpieces by such notable American painters as Winslow Homer, George Caleb Bingham, John Singer Sargent, James McNeill Whistler, and Thomas Eakins. Download high resolution version (950x558, 918 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: American Revolutionary War Emanuel Leutze George Washington Delaware River Washington Crossing the Delaware Categories: U.S. history images ... Download high resolution version (950x558, 918 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: American Revolutionary War Emanuel Leutze George Washington Delaware River Washington Crossing the Delaware Categories: U.S. history images ... Washington Crossing the Delaware is an 1851 oil-on-canvas painting by Emanuel Leutze. ... Sacrifice by Walter Hancock, Soldiers Memorial, St. ... Hiram Powers, U.S. neoclassical sculptor. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Self portrait, 1778 Gilbert Charles Stuart (né Stewart) (December 3, 1755 - July 9, 1828) was an American painter. ... Washington Crossing the Delaware Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze (May 24, 1816 – July 18, 1868) was a German-born American painter. ... Washington Crossing the Delaware is an 1851 oil-on-canvas painting by Emanuel Leutze. ... Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an North American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... Fur traders on Missouri River, c. ... Self Portrait, 1906, oil on canvas, 70 x 53 cm, Uffizi Gallery, Florence. ... Self portrait (1872) James Abbott McNeill Whistler (July 11, 1834 – July 17, 1903) was an American-born, British-based painter and etcher. ... Self portrait (1902), National Academy of Design, New York. ...


Ancient Near Eastern art

Beginning in the late 1800s, the Met started to acquire ancient art and artifacts from the Near East. From a few cuneiform tablets and seals, the Met's collection of Near Eastern art has grown to more than 7,000 pieces. Representing a history of the region beginning in the Neolithic Period and encompassing the fall of the Sassanian Empire and the end of Late Antiquity, the collection includes works from the Sumerian, Hittite, Sassanian, Assyrian, Babylonian and Elamite cultures (among others), as well as an extensive collection of unique Bronze Age objects. The highlights of the collection include a set of monumental stone lammasu, or guardian figures, from the Northwest Palace of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II. Inhabitants of the Near East, late nineteenth century. ... Look up Cuneiform in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... The Neolithic, (Greek neos=new, lithos=stone, or New Stone Age) was a period in the development of human technology that is traditionally the last part of the Stone Age. ... Head of king Shapur II (Sasanian dynasty A.D. 4th century). ... Late Antiquity is a rough periodization (c. ... Sumer ( Sumerian: KI-EN-GIR, Land of the Lords of Brightness[1], or land of the Sumerian tongue[2][3], Akkadian: Šumeru; possibly Biblical Shinar ), located in southern Mesopotamia, is the earliest known civilization in the world. ... Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire The Hittites were an ancient people from Kaneš who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URU) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite... Head of king Shapur II (Sasanian dynasty A.D. 4th century). ... For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Elamite is an extinct language, which was spoken in the ancient Elamite Empire. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... In Mesopotamian mythology, the lammasu were legendary creatures which had the faces of men, the bodies of lions, and the wings of an eagle. ... Ashurnasirpal II, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California Ashurnasirpal II was king of Assyria from 884 BC-859 BC. Ashurnasirpal succeeded his father, Tukulti-Ninurta II, in 884 BC. He conquered Mesopotamia and the territory of what is now the Lebanon, adding them to the growing Assyrian empire. ...


Arms and armor

Arms and armor, Middle Ages main hall
Arms and armor, Middle Ages main hall

The Met's Department of Arms and Armor is one of the museum's most popular collections. The distinctive "parade" of armored figures on horseback installed in the first-floor Arms and Armor gallery is one of the most recognizable images of the museum. The department's focus on "outstanding craftsmanship and decoration", including pieces intended solely for display, means that the collection is strongest in late medieval European pieces and Japanese pieces from the fifth through the nineteenth centuries. However, these are not the only cultures represented in Arms and Armor; in fact, the collection spans more geographic regions than almost any other department, including weapons and armor from dynastic Egypt, ancient Greece, the Roman Empire, the ancient Near East, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as American firearms (especially Colt firearms) from the nineteenth and 20th centuries. Among the collection's 15,000 objects are many pieces made for and used by kings and princes, including armor belonging to Henry II of France and Ferdinand I of Germany. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 779 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1995 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 779 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1995 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Dante by Michelino The Late Middle Ages is a term used by historians to describe European history in the period of the 14th to 16th centuries (AD 1300–1500). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Early Dynastic Period of Egypt is taken to include the First and Second Dynasties, lasting from 2920 BC, following the Protodynastic Period of Egypt, until 2575 BC, or the beginning of the Old Kingdom. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Inhabitants of the Near East, late nineteenth century. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... For other uses, see CMC. Colts Manufacturing Company (CMC--formerly Colts Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company) is a United States firearms manufacturer founded in 1847. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (March 10, 1503 - July 27, 1564) was one of the Habsburg emperors that at various periods during his life ruled over Austria, Germany, Bohemia, and Hungary. ...


Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Though the Met first acquired a group of Peruvian antiquities in 1882, the museum did not begin a concerted effort to collect works from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas until 1969, when American businessman and philanthropist Nelson A. Rockefeller donated his more than 3,000-piece collection to the museum. Today, the Met's collection contains more than 11,000 pieces from sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific Islands and the Americas and is housed in the 40,000-square-foot (4,000 m²) Rockefeller Wing on the south end of the museum. The collection ranges from 40,000-year-old Australian Aboriginal rock paintings, to a group of fifteen-foot high memorial poles carved by the Asmat people of New Guinea, to a priceless collection of ceremonial and personal objects from the Nigerian Court of Benin. The range of materials represented in the Africa, Oceania, and Americas collection is undoubtedly the widest of any department at the Met, including everything from precious metals to porcupine quills. A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Satellite image of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area Sub-Saharan Africa is a geographical term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south of the Sahara, or those African countries which are fully or partially located south of the Sahara. ... Tuamotu, French Polynesia The Pacific Ocean contains an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands (the exact number has yet to be precisely determined). ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... Australian Aborigines are the indigenous peoples of Australia. ... The Asmat are an ethnic group of New Guinea, residing in the Papua province of Indonesia. ... This article is about the rodent mammal. ...


Asian art

The Met's Asian department holds a collection of Asian art that is arguably the most comprehensive in the West. The collection dates back almost to the founding of the museum: many of the philanthropists who made the earliest gifts to the museum included Asian art in their collections. Today, an entire wing of the museum is dedicated to the Asian collection, which contains more than 60,000 pieces and spans 4,000 years of Asian art. Every Asian civilization is represented in the Met's Asian department, and the pieces on display include every type of decorative art, from painting and printmaking to sculpture and metalworking. The department is well-known for its comprehensive collection of Chinese calligraphy and painting, as well as for its Nepalese and Tibetan works. However, not only "art" and ritual objects are represented in the collection; many of the best-known pieces are functional objects. The Asian wing even contains a complete Ming Dynasty garden court, modeled on a courtyard in the Garden of the Master of the Fishing Nets in Suzhou. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 552 pixelsFull resolution (4335 × 2990 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 552 pixelsFull resolution (4335 × 2990 pixel, file size: 2. ... Katsushika Hokusai, (葛飾北斎), (1760—1849[1]), was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period . ... The Great Wave off Kanagawa[1] The Great Wave off Kanagawa ) is a famous woodblock printing by the Japanese artist Hokusai. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Calligraphy is an art dating back to the earliest day of history, and widely practiced throughout China to this day. ... Wall scroll painted by Ma Lin in 1246. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... For other uses, see Ming. ... This article is about the city in Jiangsu. ...


The Costume Institute

In 1937, the Museum of Costume Art joined with the Met and became its Costume Institute department. Today, its collection contains more than 80,000 costumes and accessories. Due to the fragile nature of the items in the collection, the Costume Institute does not maintain a permanent installation. Instead, every year it holds two separate shows in the Met's galleries using costumes from its collection, with each show centering on a specific designer or theme. In past years, Costume Institute shows organized around famous designers such as Chanel and Gianni Versace have drawn significant crowds to the Met. The Costume Institute's annual Benefit Gala, co-chaired by Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, is an extremely popular, if exclusive, event in the fashion world; in 2007, the 700 available tickets started at $6,500 per person.[14] The House of Chanel, more commonly known as Chanel, is a Parisian fashion house in France founded by Coco Chanel (b. ... Gianni Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997) was an Italian designer of both clothing and theater costumes. ... For other meanings, see vogue. ... Anna Wintour (born November 3, 1949, in London) has been the editor-in-chief of American Vogue since 1988. ...


Drawings and prints

Melencolia I by Albrecht Dürer
Melencolia I by Albrecht Dürer

Though other departments contain significant numbers of drawings and prints, the Drawings and Prints department specifically concentrates on North American pieces and western European works produced after the Middle Ages. Currently, the Drawings and Prints collection contains more than 11,000 drawings, 1.5 million prints, and twelve thousand illustrated books. The collection has been steadily growing ever since the first bequest of 670 drawings donated to the museum by Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1880. The great masters of European painting, who produced many more sketches and drawings than actual paintings, are extensively represented in the Drawing and Prints collection. The department's holdings contain major drawings by Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and Rembrandt, as well as prints and etchings by Van Dyck, Dürer, and Degas among many others. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1446x1921, 1641 KB) Description: Famous engraving knwon as Melancholia I / Melencolia I Artist: Albrecht Dürer Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1446x1921, 1641 KB) Description: Famous engraving knwon as Melancholia I / Melencolia I Artist: Albrecht Dürer Source: http://www. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced ) (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528)[1] was a German painter, printmaker and theorist from Nuremberg, Germany. ... For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. ... North American redirects here. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... {{Infobox Person | name = Cornelius Vanderbilt | image = Vanderbilt. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... This article is about the Dutch artist. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Anton) van Dyck (22 March 1599 – 9 December 1641) was a Flemish artist who became the leading court painter in England. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced ) (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528)[1] was a German painter, printmaker and theorist from Nuremberg, Germany. ... Degas redirects here. ...


Egyptian art

Though the majority of the Met's initial holdings of Egyptian art came from private collections, items uncovered during the museum's own archeological excavations, carried out between 1906 and 1941, constitute almost half of the current collection. More than 36,000 separate pieces of Egyptian art from the Paleolithic era through the Roman era constitute the Met's Egyptian collection, and almost all of them are on display in the museum's massive wing of 40 Egyptian galleries. Among the most valuable pieces in the Met's Egyptian collection are a set of 24 wooden models, discovered in a tomb in Deir el-Bahri in 1920. These models depict, in unparalleled detail, a veritable cross-section of Egyptian life in the early Middle Kingdom : boats, gardens, and scenes of daily life. However, the popular centerpiece of the Egyptian Art department continues to be the Temple of Dendur. Dismantled by the Egyptian government to save it from rising waters caused by the building of the Aswan High Dam, the large sandstone temple was given to the United States in 1965 and assembled in the Met's Sackler Wing in 1978. Situated in a large room, partially surrounded by a reflecting pool and illuminated by a wall of windows opening onto Central Park, the Temple of Dendur is one of the Met's most enduring attractions. // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Djeser-Djeseru – the focal point of the complex Deir el-Bahri (Arabic دير البحري dayr al-baḥrÄ«, literally meaning, “The Northern Monastery”) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, Egypt. ... The Middle Kingdom is the period in the history of ancient Egypt stretching from the establishment of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Fourteenth Dynasty, roughly between 2030 BC and 1640 BC. The period comprises two phases, the 11th Dynasty, which ruled from Thebes and the 12th Dynasty... The Temple of Dendur is a Nubian temple built during the Roman period around 15 BC. It was dedicated to the goddess Isis, the gods Harpocrates and Osiris, as well as two deified sons of a local Nubian chieftain, Pedesi (he whom Isis has given) and Pihor (he who belongs... Map of Egypt showing the location of Aswan and Lake Nasser. ... This article is about the geological formation. ...


European paintings

Young Woman with a Water Pitcher by Johannes Vermeer
Young Woman with a Water Pitcher by Johannes Vermeer

The Met has one of the world's best collections of European paintings. Though the collection numbers only around 2,200 pieces, it contains many of the world's most instantly recognizable paintings. The bulk of the Met's purchasing has always been in this department, primarily focusing on Old Masters and nineteenth-century European paintings, with an emphasis on French, Italian and Dutch artists. Many great artists are represented in remarkable depth in the Met's holdings: the museum owns thirty-seven paintings by Monet, twenty-one oils by Cezanne, and eighteen Rembrandts including Aristotle With a Bust of Homer. The Met's five paintings by Vermeer represent the largest collection of the artist's work anywhere in the world. Other highlights of the collection include Van Gogh's Self-Portrait with a Straw Hat, Pieter Bruegel the Elder's The Harvesters, Georges de La Tour's The Fortune Teller, and Jacques-Louis David's The Death of Socrates. In recent decades, the Met has carried out a policy of deaccessioning its "minor" holdings in order to purchase a smaller number of "world-class" pieces. Though this policy remains controversial, it has gained a number of outstanding (and outstandingly expensive) masterpieces for the European Paintings collection, beginning with Velázquez's Juan de Pareja in 1971. One of The Met's latest purchases is Duccio's Madonna and Child, which cost the museum more than 45 million dollars, more than twice the amount it had paid for any previous painting. The painting itself is only slightly larger than 9 by 6 inches, but has been called "the Met's Mona Lisa". Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2536x2892, 718 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Johannes Vermeer Leadlight ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2536x2892, 718 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Johannes Vermeer Leadlight ... Vermeer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... An Old Master (or old master) is one of the great European painters who lived 1500 through 1800, or a painting by one of these painters. ... Oscar-Claude Monet (November 14, 1840 - December 5, 1926), French impressionist painter. ... Categories: 1839 births | 1906 deaths | French painters | Post-impressionism | Artist stubs ... This article is about the Dutch artist. ... View of Delft, 1660-1661 Johannes Vermeer (1632 - December 15, 1675) was a Dutch painter. ... van Gogh redirects here. ... Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c. ... St Joseph, 1642, Louvre Georges de La Tour (March 13, 1593–1652) was a painter from the Duchy of Lorraine, now in France. ... Jacques-Louis David (August 30, 1748 – December 29, 1825) was a highly influential French painter in the Neoclassical style, considered to be the prominent painter of the era. ... For others named Velázquez, see Velazquez (disambiguation). ... Juan de Pareja, as painted by Diego Velázquez (1650) Juan de Pareja (1610-1670), a native of Seville and mulatto son of a female slave, is primarily known as a member of the household and workshop of painter Diego Velázquez. ... Maestà (Madonna with Angels and Saints) (1308-11) Tempera on wood, 214 x 412 cm Museo dellOpera del Duomo, Siena Duccio di Buoninsegna (c. ... Madonna and Child (also known as the Stroclet Madonna or Stroganoff Madonna) is a panel painting by Italian Renaissance artist Duccio di Buoninsegna. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ...


European sculpture and decorative arts

European sculpture court
European sculpture court

Though European painting may have its own department, other European decorative arts are well-represented at the Met. In fact, the European Sculpture and Decorative Arts collection is one of the largest departments at the Met, holding in excess of 50,000 separate pieces from the 1400s through the early twentieth century. Though the collection is particularly concentrated in Renaissance sculpture -- much of which can be seen in situ surrounded by contemporary furnishings and decoration -- it also contains comprehensive holdings of furniture, jewelry, glass and ceramic pieces, tapestries, textiles, and timepieces and mathematical instruments. Visitors can enter dozens of completely furnished period rooms, transplanted in their entirety into the Met's galleries. The collection even includes an entire sixteenth-century patio from the Spanish castle of Vélez Blanco, meticulously reconstructed in a two-story gallery. Sculptural highlights of the sprawling department include Bernini's Bacchanal, a cast of Rodin's The Burghers of Calais, and several unique pieces by Houdon, including his Bust of Voltaire and his famous portrait of his daughter Sabine. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 750 pixel, file size: 656 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 750 pixel, file size: 656 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... A patio of the Livadia Palace in Crimea. ... Vélez-Blanco is a municipality of Almería province, in the autonomous community of Andalusia, Spain. ... A self portrait: Bernini is said to have used his own features in the David (below, left) Gian Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini) (December 7, 1598 - November 28, 1680), who worked chiefly in Rome, was the pre-eminent baroque artist. ... Auguste Rodin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Rodins The Burghers of Calais in Calais, France The Burghers of Calais (Les Bourgeois de Calais) is one of the most famous sculptures by Auguste Rodin, completed in 1888. ... Jean-Antoine Houdon (March 20, 1741 - July 15, 1828) was a French sculptor. ... For other uses, see Voltaire (disambiguation). ...


Greek and Roman art

Roman gallery
Roman gallery

The Met's collection of Greek and Roman art contains more than 35,000[15] works dated through A.D. 312. The Greek and Roman collection dates back to the founding of the museum -- in fact, the museum's first accessioned object was a Roman sarcophagus, still currently on display. Though the collection naturally concentrates on items from ancient Greece and the Roman Empire, these historical regions represent a wide range of cultures and artistic styles, from classic Greek black-figure and red-figure vases to carved Roman tunic pins. Several highlights of the collection include the Euphronios krater depicting the death of Sarpedon (whose ownership has since been transferred to the Republic of Italy), the monumental Amathus sarcophagus, and a magnificently detailed Etruscan chariot known as the "Monteleone chariot". The collection also contains many pieces from far earlier than the Greek or Roman empires -- among the most remarkable are a collection of early Cycladic sculptures from the mid-third millennium BCE, many so abstract as to seem almost modern. The Greek and Roman galleries also contain several large classical wall paintings and reliefs from different periods, including an entire reconstructed bedroom from a noble villa in Boscoreale, excavated after its entombment by the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79. In 2007, the Met's Greek and Roman galleries were expanded to approximately 60,000 square feet (6,000 m²), allowing the majority of the collection to be on permanent display.[16] The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The black-figure pottery technique is a style of ancient Greek pottery painting in which the decoration appears as black silhouettes on a red background. ... Woman officiating at an altar, Attic red-figure kylix by Chairias, c. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Euphronios krater is an ancient Greek bowl used for mixing wine with water which was created around the year 515 BC. It is considered one of the finest Greek vases in existence. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... The Monteleone chariot, as restored in 1903. ... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ... Boscoreale is a modern comune of Campania in the Parco Nazionale del Vesuvio under the slopes of Mount Vesuvius, known for the fruit and vineyards of Lacryma Christi del Vesuvio. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ...


Islamic art

The Met's collection of Islamic art is not confined strictly to religious art, though a significant number of the objects in the Islamic collection were originally created for religious use or as decorative elements in mosques. Much of the 12,000 strong collection consists of secular items, including ceramics and textiles, from Islamic cultures ranging from Spain to North Africa to Central Asia. In fact, the Islamic Art department's collection of miniature paintings from Iran and Mughal India are a highlight of the collection. Calligraphy both religious and secular is well-represented in the Islamic Art department, from the official decrees of Suleiman the Magnificent to a number of Qur'an manuscripts reflecting different periods and styles of calligraphy. As with many other departments at the Met, the Islamic Art galleries contain many interior pieces, including the entire reconstructed Nur Al-Din Room from an early 18th century house in Damascus. The Islamic Arts galleries are undergoing expansion and are projected to be closed until early 2008. Until that time, a number of items from the collection are on temporary display throughout the museum. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... Mughal Empire at its greatest extent in 1700 Capital Lahore, Delhi, Agra , Kabul, Lucknow and Bhopal Language(s) Persian (initially also Chagatai; later also Urdu) Government Absolute Monarchy , Unitary Government with a federal structure Emperor  - 1526-1530 Babur  - 1530–1539 and after restoration 1555–1556 Humayun  - 1556–1605 Akbar  - 1605... Contemporary Western Calligraphy. ... Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; almost always Kanuni Sultan Süleyman) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest-reigning Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, from 1520 to his death in 1566. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ...


Robert Lehman Collection

On the passing of banker Robert Lehman in 1969, his Foundation donated close to 3,000 works of art to the museum. Housed in the "Robert Lehman Wing," the museum refers to the collection as "one of the most extraordinary private art collections ever assembled in the United States".[17] To emphasize the personal nature of the Robert Lehman Collection, the Met housed the collection in a special set of galleries which evoked the interior of Lehman's richly decorated townhouse; this intentional separation of the Collection as a "museum within the museum" met with mixed criticism and approval at the time, though the acquisition of the collection was seen as a coup for the Met.[18] Unlike other departments at the Met, the Robert Lehman collection does not concentrate on a specific style or period of art; rather, it reflects Lehman's personal interests. Lehman the collector concentrated heavily on paintings of the Italian Renaissance, particularly the Senese school. Paintings in the collection include masterpieces by Botticelli and Domenico Veneziano, as well as works by a significant number of Spanish painters, El Greco and Goya among them. Lehman's collection of drawings by the Old Masters, featuring works by Rembrandt and Dürer, is particularly valuable for its breadth and quality.[19] Princeton University Press has documented the massive collection in a multi-volume book series published as "The Robert Lehman Collection Catalogues." Robert Lehman (September 29, 1891 – August 9, 1969) was an American banker. ... Leinster House, 18th century Dublin townhouse of the Duke of Leinster. ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... For the Catholic Liberal Arts College in New York, see Siena College. ... Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (Florence March 1, 1445 - May 17, 1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). ... Domenico Veneziano (c. ... For the Vangelis album, see El Greco (album). ... Goya redirects here. ... An Old Master (or old master) is one of the great European painters who lived 1500 through 1800, or a painting by one of these painters. ... This article is about the Dutch artist. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced ) (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528)[1] was a German painter, printmaker and theorist from Nuremberg, Germany. ... The Princeton University Press is a publishing house, a division of Princeton University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ...


Libraries

The main library at the Met is the Thomas J. Watson Library, named after its benefactor. The Watson Library primarily collects books related to the history of art, including exhibition catalogues and auction sale publications, and generally attempts to reflect the emphasis of the museum's permanent collection. Several of the museum's departments have their own specialized libraries relating to their area of expertise. The Watson Library and the individual departments' libraries also hold substantial examples of early or historically important books which are works of art in their own right. Among these are books by Dürer and Athanasius Kircher, as well as editions of the seminal Surrealist magazine "VVV" and a copy of "Le Description de l'Egypte," commissioned in 1803 by Napoleon Bonaparte and considered one of the greatest achievements of French publishing. Thomas John Watson, Sr. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced ) (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528)[1] was a German painter, printmaker and theorist from Nuremberg, Germany. ... Athanasius Kircher ( ) (sometimes erroneously spelled Kirchner) was a 17th century German Jesuit scholar who published around 40 works, most notably in the fields of oriental studies, geology and medicine. ... Surrealism is an artistic movement and an aesthetic philosophy that aims for the liberation of the mind by emphasizing the critical and imaginative powers of the subconscious. ... VVV was a journal devoted to the dissemination of Surrealism. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français...


Several of the departmental libraries are open to members of the public without prior appointment. The Library and Teacher Resource Center, Ruth and Harold Uris Center for Education, is open to visitors of all ages to study art and art history and to learn about the Museum, its exhibitions and permanent collection. The Robert Goldwater Library in the department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas documents the visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Native and Precolumbian America. It is open to adult researchers, including college and graduate students. Most of the other departmental libraries are for museum staff only or are open to the general public by appointment only. The Robert Goldwater Library in the department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, of The Metropolitan Museum of Art is a noncirculating research library dedicated to the documentation of visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Native and Precolumbian America. ... Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ...


Medieval art

The Limbourg brothers' Belles Heures of Jean of France, Duke of Berry
The Limbourg brothers' Belles Heures of Jean of France, Duke of Berry

The Met's collection of medieval art consists of a comprehensive range of Western art from the 4th century through the early 16th century, as well as Byzantine and pre-medieval European antiquities not included in the ancient Greek and Roman collection. Like the Islamic collection, the Medieval collection contains a broad range of two- and three-dimensional art, with religious objects heavily represented. In total, the Medieval Art department's permanent collection numbers about 11,000 separate objects, divided between the main museum building on Fifth Avenue and The Cloisters. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Très riches heures du Duc de Berry: Aout (August) (1412-16) Illumination on vellum, 22,5 x 13,6 cm Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry The Limbourg brothers, or in Dutch Gebroeders van Limburg (Herman, Pol, and Jean; 1385. ... The most famous of the surviving Byzantine mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople - the image of Christ Pantocrator on the walls of the upper southern gallery. ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ...


Main building

The medieval collection in the main Metropolitan building, centered on the first-floor medieval gallery, contains about six thousand separate objects. While a great deal of European medieval art is on display in these galleries, most of the European pieces are concentrated at the Cloisters (see below). However, this allows the main galleries to display much of the Met's Byzantine art side-by-side with European pieces. The main gallery is host to a wide range of tapestries and church and funerary statuary, while side galleries display smaller works of precious metals and ivory, including reliquary pieces and secular items. The main gallery, with its high arched ceiling, also serves double duty as the annual site of the Met's elaborately decorated Christmas tree. For the band Reliquary, click here. ...


The Cloisters

Main article: The Cloisters

The Cloisters was a principal project of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who was a major benefactor of the Met. Located in Fort Tryon Park and completed in 1938, it is a separate building dedicated solely to medieval art. The Cloisters collection was originally that of a separate museum, assembled by George Grey Barnard and acquired in toto by Rockefeller in 1925 as a gift to the Met.[20] I took this photo of the Cloisters in New York City, Dec 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: The Cloisters Categories: User-created public domain images ... I took this photo of the Cloisters in New York City, Dec 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: The Cloisters Categories: User-created public domain images ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ... The Park in late March 2007 Fort Tryon Fort Tryon Park is a public park located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, USA, . It is situated on a 67-acre (270,000 m²) ridge in Upper Manhattan, with a commanding view of the... George Grey Barnard, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 George Grey Barnard (May 24, 1863 - April 24, 1938) was an American sculptor. ...


The Cloisters are so named on account of the five medieval French cloisters whose salvaged structures were incorporated into the modern building, and the five thousand objects at the Cloisters are strictly limited to medieval European works. The collection exhibited here features many items of outstanding beauty and historical importance; among these are the Belles Heures du Duc de Berry illustrated by the Limbourg Brothers in 1409, the Romanesque altar cross known as the "Cloisters Cross" or "Bury Cross," and the seven heroically detailed tapestries depicting the Hunt of the Unicorn. Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A Cloister is part of cathedrals and abbeys architecture. ... Très riches heures du Duc de Berry: Aout (August) (1412-16) Illumination on vellum, 22,5 x 13,6 cm Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry The Limbourg brothers, or in Dutch Gebroeders van Limburg (Herman, Pol, and Jean; 1385. ... Interior of the Saint-Saturnin church St-Sernin, Toulouse, 1080 – 1120: elevation of the east end Romanesque sculpture, cloister of St. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... The Hunt of the Unicorn is a series of seven tapestries dating from 1495–1505. ...


Modern art

With more than 10,000 artworks, primarily by European and American artists, the modern art collection occupies 60,000 square feet (6,000 m²), of gallery space and contains many iconic modern works. Cornerstones of the collection include Picasso's portrait of Gertrude Stein, Jasper Johns's White Flag, Jackson Pollock's Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), and Max Beckmann's triptych Beginning. Certain artists are represented in remarkable depth, for a museum whose focus is not exclusively on modern art: for example, the collection contains forty paintings by Paul Klee, spanning his entire career. Due to the Met's long history, "contemporary" paintings acquired in years past have often migrated to other collections at the museum, particularly to the American and European Paintings departments. A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 - April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was an American writer who became a catalyst in the development of modern art and literature. ... Jasper Johnss Map, 1961 Jasper Johnss Flag, Encaustic, oil and collage on fabric mounted on plywood,1954-55 Detail of Flag (1954-55). ... Controversy swirls over the alleged sale of No. ... Max Beckmann (February 12, 1884 – December 28, 1950) was a German painter, draftsman, printmaker, sculptor, and writer. ... The Raising of the Cross, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp A triptych (from the Greek tri- three + ptychÄ“ fold) is a work of art (usually a panel painting) which is divided into three sections, or three carved panels which are hinged together. ... “Klee” redirects here. ...


Musical instruments

The Met's collection of musical instruments, with about five thousand examples of musical instruments from all over the world, is virtually unique among major museums. The collection began in 1889 with a donation of several hundred instruments by Lucy W. Drexel, but the department's current focus came through donations over the following years by Mary Elizabeth Adams, wife of John Crosby Brown. Instruments were (and continue to be) included in the collection not only on aesthetic grounds, but also insofar as they embodied technical and social aspects of their cultures of origin. The modern Musical Instruments collection is encyclopedic in scope; every continent is represented at virtually every stage of its musical life. Highlights of the department's collection include several Stradivari violins, a collection of Asian instruments made from precious metals, and the oldest surviving piano, a 1720 model by Bartolomeo Cristofori. Many of the instruments in the collection are playable, and the department encourages their use by holding concerts and demonstrations by guest musicians. Antonio Stradivari examining an instrument, in a Romantic 19th-century print. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... Bartolomeo Cristofori di Francesco (May 4, 1655 - January 27, 1731) was an Italian maker of musical instruments, generally regarded as the inventor of the piano. ...


Photographs

The Met's collection of photographs, numbering more than 20,000 in total, is centered on five major collections plus additional acquisitions by the museum. Alfred Stieglitz, a famous photographer himself, donated the first major collection of photographs to the museum, which included a comprehensive survey of Photo-Secessionist works, a rich set of master prints by Edward Steichen, and an outstanding collection of Stieglitz's photographs from his own studio. The Met supplemented Stieglitz's gift with the 8,500-piece Gilman Paper Company Collection, the Rubel Collection, and the Ford Motor Company Collection, which respectively provided the collection with early French and American photography, early British photography, and post-WWI American and European photography. The museum also acquired Walker Evans's personal collection of photographs, a particular coup considering the high demand for his works. Though the department gained a permanent gallery in 1997, not all of the department's holdings are on display at any given time, due to the sensitive materials represented in the photography collection. However, the Photographs department has produced some of the best-received temporary exhibits in the Met's recent past, including a Diane Arbus retrospective and an extensive show devoted to spirit photography. For other uses, see Photograph (disambiguation). ... He was a loser. ... Pictorialism was a photographic movement in vogue from around 1885 following the widespread introduction of the dry-plate process, and reached its height in the early years of the 20th century and declined rapidly after 1914. ... Edward Steichen, photographed by Fred Holland Day Edward Steichen (March 27, 1879–March 25, 1973) was an American photographer, painter, and art gallery and museum curator, born in Bivange, Luxembourg. ... The Gilman Paper Company Collection is an archive of original photographic prints and negatives, and it was donated to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For the off-road and NASCAR driver, see Walker Evans (racer). ... Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971) was an American photographer, noted for her portraits of people on the fringes of society, such as transvestites, dwarfs, giants, prostitutes, and ordinary citizens in unconventional poses and settings. ...


Special exhibitions

Frank Stella on the Roof features in stainless steel and carbon fiber several works by American artist Frank Stella. This exhibition is set in The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, offering views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline. Frank Stella La scienza della pigrizia (The Science of Laziness) 1984, oil, enamel and alkyd paint on canvas, etched magnesium, aluminum and fiberglass, National Gallery of Art Washington DC Frank Stella (born May 12, 1936) is an American painter and printmaker. ...


Coaxing the Spirits to Dance: Art of the Papuan Gulf presents some 60 sculptures and 30 historical photographs from the Gulf province of Papua New Guinea.


Acquisitions and deaccessioning

During the 1970s, under the directorship of Thomas Hoving, the Met revised its deaccessioning policy. Under the new policy, the Met set its sights on acquiring "world-class" pieces, regularly funding the purchases by selling mid- to high-value items from its collection.[21] Though the Met had always sold duplicate or minor items from its collection to fund the acquisition of new pieces, the Met's new policy was significantly more aggressive and wide-ranging than before, and allowed the deaccessioning of items with higher values which would normally have precluded their sale. The new policy provoked a great deal of criticism (in particular, from the New York Times) but had its intended effect. Thomas P.F. Hoving (born January 15, 1931), is an American museum executive and consultant and the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... A museum is distinguished a collection of often unique objects that forms the core of its activities for exhibitions, education, research, etc. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Many of the items then purchased with funds generated by the more liberal deaccessioning policy are now considered the "stars" of the Met's collection, including Velasquez's Juan de Pareja and the Euphronios krater depicting the death of Sarpedon. In the years since the Met began its new deaccessioning policy, other museums have begun to emulate it with aggressive deaccessioning programs of their own.[22] The Met has continued the policy in recent years, selling such valuable pieces as Edward Steichen's 1904 photograph The Pond-Moonlight (of which another copy was already in the Met's collection) for a record price of $2.9 million.[23] For others named Velázquez, see Velazquez (disambiguation). ... Juan de Pareja, as painted by Diego Velázquez (1650) Juan de Pareja (1610-1670), a native of Seville and mulatto son of a female slave, is primarily known as a member of the household and workshop of painter Diego Velázquez. ... The Euphronios krater is an ancient Greek bowl used for mixing wine with water which was created around the year 515 BC. It is considered one of the finest Greek vases in existence. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... Edward Steichen, photographed by Fred Holland Day Edward Steichen (March 27, 1879–March 25, 1973) was an American photographer, painter, and art gallery and museum curator, born in Bivange, Luxembourg. ...


In popular culture

  • The Met was famously used as the setting for much of the Newbery Medal-winning children's book, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, in which the two young protagonists run away from home and secretly stay several nights in the museum. However, Michelangelo's Angel statue, central to the book's plot, is purely fictional and not actually part of the museum's collection.
  • The main characters of the CW's Gossip Girl TV series usually hang out on the steps of the Met.
  • The Met was featured as the first level in the tactical first-person shooter Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Rogue Spear
  • The 1999 version of The Thomas Crown Affair uses the Met as a major setting; however, only the exterior scenes were shot at the museum, with the interior scenes filmed on soundstages.
  • In 1983, there was a Sesame Street special entitled Don't Eat the Pictures: Sesame Street at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where the cast goes to visit the museum on-location.
  • An episode of Inspector Gadget entitled "Art Heist" had Gadget and Penny and Brain travel to the Met, with Gadget being assigned to protect the artwork. But M.A.D. Agents steal the masterpieces and plan to replace them with fakes.
  • In the 2007 movie I Am Legend, the main character is shown fishing in the ruined Egyptian Wing.
  • The Met is featured in a season four episode of Project Runway, where five remaining designers must create an outfit based on a work of art.

The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... This Book is a Newbery Award winner From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. ... Portrait of Jennie movie poster Portrait of Jennie is a 1948 fantasy film based on the novella by Robert Nathan. ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... Gossip Girl is an American television teen drama based on the popular novel series of the same name written by Cecily von Ziegesar. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... For the 1999 live-action film, see Inspector Gadget (film). ... I Am Legend is a 2007 American post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Francis Lawrence and starring Will Smith. ... For the current American season, see Project Runway (season 4). ...

Gallery of paintings

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Metropolitan Museum of Art

New York City is home to hundreds of cultural institutions and historic sites, many of which are internationally known. ... Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. ...

References

  1. ^ a b The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Permanent Collection and Special Exhibitions. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  2. ^ a b de Montebello, Philippe (1997). Masterpieces of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 6-7. ISBN 0300106157. 
  3. ^ a b Pyhrr, Stuart W. (2003). Arms and Armor: Notable Acquisitions 1991-2002 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New Haven: Yale University Press, 6. ISBN 0300098766. 
  4. ^ a b Peck, Amelia (1996). Period Rooms in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 17,275. ISBN 0300105223. 
  5. ^ Visitor's Information at the Metropolitan Museum of Art website
  6. ^ Metropolitan Museum of Art. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service (2007-09-15).
  7. ^ ["Metropolitan Museum of Art", December 1985, by Carolyn PittsPDF (779 KiB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination]. National Park Service (1985-12).
  8. ^ [Metropolitan Museum of Art--Accompanying 7 photos, from 1836 to 1984.PDF (1.24 MiB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination]. National Park Service (1985-12).
  9. ^ The Metropolitan Museum of Art at HumanitiesWeb
  10. ^ Current Special Exhibitions
  11. ^ Philippe de Montebello. Times Topics. The New York Times (2008-01-10).
  12. ^ Visitor's Information at the Metropolitan Museum of Art website
  13. ^ The Metropolitan Museum of Art at HumanitiesWeb
  14. ^ Postrel, Virginia. "Dress Sense", The Atlantic, 2007-05, pp. 133. 
  15. ^ The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Works of Art: Greek and Roman Art
  16. ^ Kimmelman, Michael. "Classical Treasures, Bathed in a New Light", New York Times, 2007-04-20. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  17. ^ Metropolitan Museum of Art press release, September 1999
  18. ^ Thomas Hoving. Making the Mummies Dance. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.
  19. ^ Art Review: Feast of Illuminations and Drawings, John Russell. New York Times, February 18, 2000
  20. ^ Metropolitan Museum of Art website article on the Cloisters
  21. ^ Thomas Hoving. Making the Mummies Dance. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.
  22. ^ "Brimful museums put art under the hammer" James Bone, The Times Online. October 31, 2005
  23. ^ "Rare photo sets $2.9m sales record", BBC News, February 16, 2006

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Philippe de Montebello (born 1936) is a French-born museum curator. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... MiB redirects here. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

  • Metropolitan Museum of Art is at coordinates 40°46′46″N 73°57′47″W / 40.779447, -73.96311 (Metropolitan Museum of Art)Coordinates: 40°46′46″N 73°57′47″W / 40.779447, -73.96311 (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Metropolitan Museum of Art - The New York Times (1435 words)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the one of the world's premier cultural institutions, boasting a collection of millions of artworks and decorative objects tended by some of the nation's foremost scholars and conservators.
The museum's arms and armor collection is among the world's most comprehensive, as is its trove of ancient Egyptian art.
The newly donated collection of Abstract Expressionist paintings at the Metropolitan Museum is largely a delight from beginning to end.
Metropolitan Museum of Art in The NYC Insider: an Insider's Guide to New York City (1224 words)
In the 1960s, the Metropolitan was awarded the Temple of Dendur, a remarkable, fully intact limestone structure where the goddess Isis was once worshipped.
The museum is generally quieter in the evenings, and as a bonus, you will be able to enjoy a glass of wine at the Great Balcony Bar when you tire of viewing the exhibits.
The museum is easily accessible by public transportation via the #4, 5 and 6 subway lines to 86th Street.
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