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Encyclopedia > Metroid (series)

The Metroid (メトロイド Metoroido?) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. One of the company's most successful franchises[1], the series spans through several Nintendo systems, starting with Metroid (1986) on the Famicom Disk System, and various ports, sequels, and remakes on the NES, Game Boy, Super NES, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo DS, and Wii. Computer and video games redirects here. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... “NES” redirects here. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... NDS redirects here. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ...


The Metroid games chronicle the missions of bounty hunter Samus Aran in a science fiction setting with parallels to the Alien movies, with similarities including a female, alien-fighting protagonist, climactic self-destruct countdowns, similar character names ("Mother" versus "Mother Brain" & "Ridley" being the name of Alien's director, for example), and general tone.[2] Central plot elements are the Metroid organisms, and the Space Pirates which try to exploit the Metroids' powers. The gameplay combines adventure based on exploration and item-gathering with platformer and shooter dynamics. The Metroid games are particularly associated with nonlinear gameplay. For other uses, see Bounty hunter (disambiguation). ... Samus Aran ), is the fictional protagonist of the Metroid video game series. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Alien film series is the group of films that take place in the Alien universe. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ... This is an article about the computer and video game genre. ... Look up item in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... Shooter games cover a fairly broad spectrum of sub-genres that have the commonality of controlling a character who is usually armed with a firearm that can be freely aimed. ... In computer and video games, linearity denotes that the objectives of the game must be completed in a fixed sequence whereas non-linearity means that the player always has multiple choices. ...


As of August 2007, 10 games in the Metroid series have been released. This includes four side-scrolling games (Metroid, Metroid II: Return of Samus, Super Metroid, and Metroid Fusion), a port and a remake of Metroid, a spin-off Nintendo DS game (Metroid Prime Pinball), a first-person adventure game with wireless and online multiplayer (Metroid Prime Hunters), and a complete trilogy, with the third game in the trilogy Metroid Prime 3: Corruption released for the Wii on August 27, 2007 in North America and on October 26, 2007 in Europe. It is scheduled to be released on November 8 in Australia, and December 31 in Japan.[3] For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Side-scrolling game. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... Metroid II title screen Metroid II: Return of Samus is the second title in the Metroid series that appeared on the Nintendo Game Boy. ... “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... The Classic NES Series in North America (Famicom Mini Series in Japan and NES Classics in Europe) are a series of Game Boy Advance games that were originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System/Famicom and Famicom Disk System emulated on the Game Boy Advance. ... Metroid: Zero Mission is a part of the Metroid series and a remake of the original Metroid. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... NDS redirects here. ... Metroid Prime Pinball is a pinball video game themed after the Metroid series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Metroid Prime Hunters is a first-person shooter and adventure game for the Nintendo DS developed by NST, a Redmond-based first-party developer for Nintendo, and released on March 20, 2006. ... A trilogy is a set of three works of art, usually literature or film, that are connected and can be seen as a single work, as well as three individual ones. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Themes

The Metroid games are set in the same fictional universe. They share most main characters and fundamental gameplay elements with a few notable exceptions. A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ...


Phazon

A close-up image of Phazon

A highly radioactive and mutagetic, semi-sentient element, Phazon is a major plot point of the Metroid Prime series. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Game-play

The game-play of all Metroid games revolves around Samus collecting items, or power-ups, that give her the ability to surmount obstacles. Many of the items recur throughout the series, with some modifications, such as the Morph Ball, which allows her to curl into a small ball to access tight spaces and drop bombs. Despite the series having a chronological element to it, each game requires the acquisition of new beams for Samus's arm cannon, as well as a varying number of suit upgrades. This is usually not explained in the plot; exceptions include Metroid Prime, where a power surge causes Samus to lose all of her upgrades, Metroid Prime 2 where her upgrades get stolen by the Ing, and Metroid Fusion, where she is attacked by X parasites in the beginning of the game and her Power Suit is surgically removed.[4] In other games, such as Metroid Prime 3, Samus starts out with a number of upgrades she previously had to find, for example, the Space Jump and Varia Suit. Power Up, the Professional Organization of Women in Entertainment Reaching Up is an organization with the stated mission to promote the visibility and integration of gay women in entertainment, the arts, and all forms of media. Power Up provided funding and assistance to the 2003 short film . ...


The main enemies of the games in the Metroid series are divided into two groups: bosses and final bosses. Each game contains multiple bosses that are often encountered by entering a large sealed room and engaging in combat with a large creature. When successful, the room opens and allows further progress, usually resulting in the acquisition of an item. Final bosses at the end of each Metroid game usually consist of a fight similar to a normal boss, and then a timed dash back to Samus' gunship to complete the game. In Metroid Prime and Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, these timed escapes appear at the beginning, as well, although in Metroid Prime 3, the timed sequence is to prevent destruction rather than escape from it.[citation needed] Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ... Samuss Gunship is the vehicle seen in the video games Metroid II: Return of Samus, Super Metroid, Metroid Prime, Metroid Prime 2: Echoes, and in the opening sequence of Metroid Fusion. ...


In Metroid and Super Metroid, Kraid and Ridley make appearances as bosses, and Mother Brain appears as a final boss. In some of the games, a Metroid in some form can take the role of a boss, and sometimes even a final boss. The combat model for bosses and final bosses is usually standardized, though there are a few exceptions throughout the series. The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ...


The Metroid Prime titles diverge from the typical gameplay of the series by presenting the game through Samus's first-person perspective. As a result, the Prime titles contain heavy first-person shooter elements while retaining the sense of exploration and item collection from the 2-D series. An additional element present in the Prime series is the ability to scan creatures and objects to obtain information about them. This article is about video games. ...


Evolution of storytelling

The narration of the Metroid series has changed substantially throughout the various installments. While the original Metroid marginalized its storytelling to the accompanying instruction booklet and the ending, this was notably changed in Super Metroid, with the opening even narrated by Samus herself.[5] With the releases of Metroid Prime and Metroid Fusion, the series took on a more detailed plot, albeit using slightly different methods. While both games expanded the use of in-game cutscenes, dialogue, and narration, Prime makes use of the Scan Visor to give Samus the option of uncovering information about the plot, thus allowing the player to immerse themselves at their own pace. Metroid Prime 3: Corruption is the first game in the Metroid series to use extensive voice acting; however, Samus remains a silent protagonist.[6] “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... This article is about the game. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... Samus Aran ), is the fictional protagonist of the Metroid video game series. ... ‹ The template below (Rescue) is being considered for deletion. ...


Recurring characters

Samus Aran

Main article: Samus Aran

The heroine, Samus Aran, is a proficient galactic bounty hunter. She wears an extremely powerful and adaptable exoskeleton suit made by the ancient Chozo who specifically designed it for her. Samus Aran ), is the fictional protagonist of the Metroid video game series. ... For other uses, see Bounty hunter (disambiguation). ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ...


Space Pirates

The main antagonists of the 2D Metroid games, the Space Pirates are a hostile group of "interstellar nomads" resembling humanoid insects[7], who plunder colonies and ships. A single Pirate may have many biological differences between individuals of their own species,[8][9][10] most likely because of their willingness to perform self-experimentation and mutation. Important leaders include Ridley, the Space Pirate commander, Mother Brain, the biomechanical defense of Zebes controlled by the Space Pirates, and Kraid, a recurring boss. The organization also includes a winged, mantis-like species, the Ki Hunters.[11] The Space Pirates are interested in Metroid research, especially in using Metroids for energy generation, as soldiers, and for experimentation - their Phazon experiments produced all the Metroid variants seen in the Prime games with the exception of Prime itself. Orders Subclass Apterygota Symphypleona - globular springtails Subclass Archaeognatha (jumping bristletails) Subclass Dicondylia Monura - extinct Thysanura (common bristletails) Subclass Pterygota Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Blattodea (cockroaches) Mantodea (mantids) Isoptera (termites) Zoraptera Grylloblattodea Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets... Mantis is Greek for prophet. ...


In the Metroid Prime trilogy, the Space Pirates have distinct theme music that is featured in all three games with minor alterations in-between.[12]


Ridley

Ridley, (possible) leader of the Space Pirates

A high-ranking and bloodthirsty Space Pirate, and one of Samus's main antagonists, Ridley shares features with both the pterodactyl and the mythical European dragon. Ridley led the Space Pirate attack on Samus' home colony of K-2L, which inevitably lead to the deaths of all the colonists including Samus' mother and father, the former of which Ridley was directly responsible.[13] Samus has since had a personal vendetta against Ridley because of this, and that coupled with her objective to rid the galaxy of Space Pirates has led to numerous showdowns with the draconic boss throughout the series. It is unknown whether he is in fact the main leader of the Space Pirates, or if he takes orders from someone or something else. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ...


First appearing in the original Metroid and destroyed by Samus, Ridley is always revived by the Pirates. Later versions of Ridley included more advanced cybernetic enhancements, such as powerful kinetic weapons, missile launchers, and force-field wings. This form of Ridley is known as Meta Ridley[14] and appears in Metroid Prime and Metroid Prime 3. In Metroid Prime 3 Meta Ridley returns for a second battle as Omega Ridley[15], along with enhancements due to Phazon exposure, as well as new techniques. He also makes a cameo as an X-Parasite clone in Metroid Fusion[16] and in Super Smash Bros. Melee both as a Trophy and in the game's opening, where he is fighting Samus at Ceres Space Station.[17] Super Smash Bros. ...


Unlike many other bosses in the series, Ridley doesn't usually have any specific strategy for beating him. Rather, starting in Super Metroid, the battles against him have the player dodge the swiftly flying dragon, along with his flailing tail and his fiery breath, all the while shooting him with a large number of missiles, making him a particularly challenging opponent.[18]


Also introduced in Super Metroid was a musical theme that played during several boss battles.[19] Despite being used for other bosses, the theme became particularly associated with Ridley, and has been featured solely during all the subsequent battles against him.


Kraid

The kaiju-like Kraid is a gigantic dinosaur-like beast allied with the Space Pirates. First appearing in the original Metroid, he is the first part of the mini-boss duo along with Ridley. What rank he has in the Space Pirates is unknown, though he is possibly a guardian or other form of protector. Kraid stands approximately 40 to 50 feet (12-15 metres) in height, making him one of the largest characters in the Metroid series, and is a mottled green on his back and sides with a pale yellow belly. He has a long crocodilian snout and three red eyes, the third set between the outer eyes. His long thin arms end in two fingers armed with claws that he can throw and regenerate quickly, and from three openings in his abdomen he fires spiked projectiles at his foes.[20] With virtually impenetrable skin, Kraid can only be harmed by shooting his mouth when he roars, though he knows this and will not voluntarily open his mouth; however, a direct shot to the eyes will make him roar in pain or anger, opening a window of opportunity to damage him. Kaijū (怪獣) is a Japanese term that generically translates to monster. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ...


Kraid's appearance in Metroid was much different than his modern appearance, being around Samus' height. In Super Metroid he appears in his giant form, two screens tall and almost a screen wide. Metroid: Zero Mission retconned his size and appearance, showing he did not grow between games. Kraid also appeared in Super Smash Bros: Melee as a trophy that revealed him to be a bioengineered Space Pirate, and a stage hazard in Brinstar Depths, where he would rise from the lava lake and rotate the stage with a swipe of his claws.[21] He was also slated to appear in Metroid Prime as a boss in the Phazon Mines, with a metal dome covering his head and blue Phazon veins on his belly, but was removed due to time constraints. Despite the beta model displaying him in Phazon Mines, he was not replaced by the Omega Pirate boss.[22] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Biological engineering (a. ...


Galactic Federation

The Galactic Federation is as its name suggests, the governing body of the galaxy. It most resembles Star Trek 's United Federation of Planets, although it is far less prominent in most of the games. The GF was formed after numerous space-faring species made contact, and the subsequent cultural convergence led to rapid technological advancements.[23] They often contract Samus with large missions to complete, and aim to eradicate the Space Pirates. This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Samus trained in the Federation's military before becoming a bounty hunter. It is assumed that she left following the death of her commanding officer, Adam Malkovich. Samus has a profound respect for Adam because he died in order to save Samus in a previous mission.[24]


The Galactic Federation's soldiers use powered armor similar to Samus'; however, they are much weaker. Their technology usually bears multiple versions of their symbol, a stylized cross-shape that seems based on their visors.[25] Troopers are also given a basic repeating assault weapon, and some are equipped with the Phazon Enhancement Device. It has been suggested that the section Exoskeletons in modern and near-future technology from the article Exoskeleton be merged into this article or section. ...


Chozo

A species of bird-like bipeds, the Chozo raised Samus Aran and outfitted her with armaments.[26] They are portrayed as mysterious and sage-like throughout the Metroid series. The origins and age of the Chozo race and civilization are unknown, but they were once spread across several planets in the Metroid universe, though none have been seen alive in the current time of the games. The Chozo were extremely technologically advanced, but took pride in their elaborate statuary. They also exchanged knowledge with other genetic species, including the Luminoth of Aether, Reptilici of Bryyo, the Elysians of Elysia (robots which they themselves built), and several other as yet unseen species.[27] Robots may refer to: Robot, an dogs-mechanical or bio-mechanical device Robots (film), a computer-animated film Robots (video game), based on the movie Robots (novel), a science fiction novel by Isaac Asimov Robots (J-Pop) Robot (disambiguation) Category: ...


In the Japanese versions of the games, the Chozo are only ever identified by the generic term chōjin-zoku (鳥人族 lit. "race of bird-humans"?), of which the name "Chozo" is an anglicized version. The Chozo are almost certainly derived from the Tengu of Japanese folklore: half human, half crow tricksters who are frequently depicted as initiating warriors into supernatural martial arts techniques.[citation needed] Tengu and a Buddhist monk, by Kawanabe Kyōsai. ...


In Super Metroid, some of the Chozo statues would rise up and attack Samus; these bosses are called Torizos. It is not clear why they would attack Samus, since she is a friend of the Chozo and therefore an ally of the statues; it's possible these certain statues have been manipulated by the Pirates, decoys which they built, or, since the Torizos are usually holding an upgrade item, to prove that Samus is worthy of it.


Metroids

The eponymous in-game Metroids are large and jellyfish-like with quadripartite nuclei. They are capable of siphoning an undetectable life energy from any animal, generally causing the death of the victim in the process. This energy can also be siphoned from the Metroid in turn, allowing it to be used as a living power source. Metroid II established a five-stage life cycle in which those Metroids native to SR388 go through two stages of ecdysis followed by two stages of mutation, thus maturing through five previously unknown forms: Alpha, Gamma, Zeta, Omega, and Queen.[28] Bold text For other uses, see Jellyfish (disambiguation). ... HeLa cells stained for DNA with the Blue Hoechst dye. ... Not to be confused with Psiphon. ... It has been suggested that Vital force theory be merged into this article or section. ... Metroid II title screen Metroid II: Return of Samus is the second title in the Metroid series that appeared on the Nintendo Game Boy. ... A life cycle is a period involving one generation of an organism through means of reproduction, whether through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction. ... Ecdysis is the molting of the cuticula in arthropods and related groups (Ecdysozoa). ... For linguistic mutation, see Apophony. ... Meat Eater ant colony swarming Fire ants Eusociality is the phenomenon of reproductive specialization found in some animals. ...


Metroid Prime introduced two new, Phazon-mutated forms: Hunter Metroids, which sport tentacles enabling long-range energy siphoning;[29] and Fission Metroids, which divide into two new Fission Metroids (with different elemental weaknesses) after absorbing a discrete amount of energy. Metroid Prime 2: Echoes has a Phazon-mutated strain of Metroid, the Tallon Metroid. Instead of siphoning all of their power from victims, they can feed directly off Phazon. They are born as Infant Metroids from cocoons and mature into adulthood when exposed to Phazon. The game also introduces Dark Tallon Metroids; Tallon Metroids corrupted by the Ing. This article is about the game. ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... For the generation of electrical power by fission, see Nuclear power plant. ... Metroid Prime 2: Echoes is the direct sequel to Metroid Prime, and is the latest game in Nintendos Metroid series to appear on the GameCube. ... The tough brown cocoon of an Emperor Gum Moth. ... Metroid Prime 2: Echoes is the direct sequel to Metroid Prime, and is the latest game in Nintendos Metroid series to appear on the GameCube. ...


In Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, three new forms of Metroid appear: Phazon Metroid, which is almost exactly like a common Metroid, except that it is capable of phasing in and out of local timespace; Hopping Metroid, which cannot hover, phase out of local timespace or drain energy, but can fight using its claws as melee weapons and armor for defense; and the Metroid Hatcher, a boss which can float and spawn Phazon Metroids, but cannot phase out of local timespace.


They will appear in Super Smash Bros. Brawl as an assist trophy.[30] Super Smash Bros. ...


Metroid Prime

The main antagonist of the Metroid Prime series, Metroid Prime is a sentient Metroid heavily mutated by Phazon. After being "destroyed" by Samus, Prime returns as Dark Samus, using the power of Samus's stolen Phazon suit. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Universe of the Metroid series. ...


Release history

Metroid provided a thoroughly nonlinear gaming experience.

screenshot Nintendo Entertainment System Metroid by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... screenshot Nintendo Entertainment System Metroid by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ...

The Original Trilogy

Metroid

The original Metroid was released for the Famicom Disk System (FDS) in 1986 and the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in 1987, introducing Samus Aran, who at the time was unusual in being a female video game character; in fact, the advertisements and instruction manual described Samus as male.[31] In the Japanese version of the manual, Samus was referred to in a gender-neutral way of speech as to not spoil the surprise for the players completing the game and thus seeing Samus as a woman.[citation needed] Featuring a labyrinthine world in which the player chooses which direction to explore, it was notable for providing one of the first highly non-linear game experiences on a home console. Because of the time required to play through it, a password save system (on the NES) and a saved-game slot system (on the FDS) were implemented to let players take breaks and resume later. Metroid was among the first games with these features. Subsequent Metroid games removed the password function, relying entirely on battery-backed or memory-card saves. Metroid has remained one of the most popular games from the NES era. This article is about the first game in the series. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... “NES” redirects here. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Samus Aran ), is the fictional protagonist of the Metroid video game series. ... In computer and video games, linearity denotes that the objectives of the game must be completed in a fixed sequence whereas non-linearity means that the player always has multiple choices. ... Game console redirects here. ... A regular password-inserting screen (from Gods). ...


Metroid II: Return of Samus

The first sequel, Metroid II: Return of Samus, was released in 1991 for Nintendo's portable console, the Game Boy. Unlike Metroid, the goal is not primarily to collect items but to locate and kill Metroids. Metroid II contributed to the series' development by providing a set of new weapons and items, and also revealed some details about the Chozo and Metroids. Although it initially received positive reviews, its legacy has not been as enduring as that of either its predecessor or its successor in the series; possibly due to its greyscale graphics and comparatively linear gameplay, although it is not as linear as the later Metroid Fusion. Retro players should note that when the game is played on a Game Boy Color or Game Boy Advance system one of the built-in color palettes can be used. This also works with a Super Game Boy. Metroid II title screen Metroid II: Return of Samus is the second title in the Metroid series that appeared on the Nintendo Game Boy. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... In computing, a grayscale or greyscale digital image is an image in which the value of each pixel is a single sample. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... Super Game Boy Box art. ...


Super Metroid

Super Metroid was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) in 1994. It returned to a gameplay style closer to that of the first game, however expanding the arsenal of power-ups available to Samus. Super Metroid is set on the same planet as the original game, but with help from the capabilities of the SNES (and an unusually large cartridge at 24 megabit[citation needed]) features larger and more diverse environments, as well as a more detailed in-game plot than was found in the first two games. Super Metroid was one of the most popular games for the SNES when it debuted, receiving praise for its graphics, sound, and size. It has remained popular, frequently occupying top positions in "greatest game of all time" lists, including a number one spot awarded by Electronic Gaming Monthly. It is usually considered the prime game of the franchise, against which all subsequent games are judged. “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES, is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ...


Hiatus

Following the release of Super Metroid, the franchise was absent from Nintendo's consoles for almost 10 years. Gunpei Yokoi intended for the games to end after Super Metroid. [citation needed]Rumors existed of plans for a game to come to the Nintendo 64, but Nintendo later denied actually beginning work on such a title.[32][33][34] Fans feared that the Metroid series was dead. The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ...


Franchise Revival

Metroid Prime and Metroid Fusion

Metroid Prime introduced 3D to the series

In 2000, Nintendo announced that Retro Studios, an American developer based in Austin, Texas, was developing a new Metroid game for the Nintendo GameCube, and that Nintendo itself was creating Metroid IV for the Game Boy Advance. Both games were released in 2002 with Retro Studios' effort titled Metroid Prime and Metroid IV renamed Metroid Fusion. Prime, the first 3D Metroid game, was referred to by Nintendo as a first-person adventure, and is an "interquel" between the series' first two installments; Fusion took place some years after Super Metroid ended. Released simultaneously, the games also feature connectivity bonuses: players who beat Metroid Prime can play through the game with Samus wearing the new Fusion suit; beating Fusion allows unlocking the original Metroid as a fully playable extra. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Retro Studios is an American video game developer based in Austin, Texas, USA. It was founded in 1998 by Jeff Spangenberg as a second-party developer to Japan-based video game company Nintendo. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the game. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... Look up 3D in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with midquel. ... Connectivity is the property of a device such as a PC, peripheral, PDA, mobile phone, robot, home appliance, or car that enables it to be connected, generally to a PC or another device without the need of a PC - autonomously. ...


When released, most journalists and fans found Prime to have preserved and developed the Metroid theme and game-play, and it is among the most highly rated games of all time among game critics.[35]. Metroid Fusion, on the other hand has been given solid reviews, but criticism has been aimed at its use of in-game narratives and cut-scenes, the "hint system" which discourages exploration and adds linearity to the gameplay, and the partial demystification of Samus's character.[36].


Metroid: Zero Mission

Metroid: Zero Mission, an enhanced remake and re-telling of the original NES Metroid, was developed by Nintendo and released in 2004. It introduced new bosses and areas, as well as a more detailed story with cinematic cutscenes and several retcons. Zero Mission included an emulated version of the original Metroid as an unlockable bonus, with a new save game feature that saved the password rather than requiring it to be written down. The game could also be linked with Metroid Fusion to unlock an extra image gallery. The game received mostly positive reviews, with one of IGN's main complaints being that it is "a short adventure, only requiring about five hours to play through."[37] Metroid: Zero Mission is a part of the Metroid series and a remake of the original Metroid. ... In the video game subculture, an enhanced remake (also called updated classics) is an updated version of a video or computer game that was originally developed for a less advanced system. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ...


Other Rereleases

The third and fourth Metroid games for the Game Boy Advance were direct ports of both the original FDS Metroid and the American NES port. The FDS version was released as Famicom Mini: Metroid in Japan, and the NES version as Classic NES Series: Metroid in North America and NES Classics: Metroid elsewhere. “GBA” redirects here. ... The Classic NES Series in North America, Famicom Mini Series in Japan, or NES Classics in Europe are a series of Game Boy Advance games that were originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System/ Famicom remade for the Game Boy Advance. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... The Classic NES Series in North America (Famicom Mini Series in Japan and NES Classics in Europe) are a series of Game Boy Advance games that were originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System/Famicom and Famicom Disk System emulated on the Game Boy Advance. ... The Classic NES Series in North America, Famicom Mini Series in Japan, or NES Classics in Europe are a series of Game Boy Advance games that were originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System/Famicom remade for the Game Boy Advance. ...


Metroid Prime 2: Echoes

The GameCube title Metroid Prime 2: Echoes was also released in 2004. Like its predecessor, Metroid Prime, it was developed by Retro Studios. It is a first-person adventure in the style of the first Prime, but introduced a new device: the concept of the light and dark worlds, somewhat similar to that seen in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, but in terms of different dimensions rather than magical worlds. It incorporated combination ammo, similar to Metroid Prime Hunters. "Echoes" was also notable in being the first Metroid game to feature a multiplayer component, where up to 4 players could battle it out in a deathmatch-style setting. Metroid Prime 2: Echoes is the direct sequel to Metroid Prime, and is the latest game in Nintendos Metroid series to appear on the GameCube. ... The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, released in Japan on November 21, 1991, as ゼルダの伝説 神々のトライフォース (Zeruda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Toraifōsu, literally The Legend of Zelda: Triforce of the Gods...


Metroid Prime Hunters

In 2006, the Metroid Prime series moved to a portable platform through the release of Metroid Prime Hunters for the Nintendo DS. Notable for its usage of the Nintendo DS' ability to capably render large, 3D, free-roaming worlds, it also used a stylus-aiming control scheme, and was the first Metroid game to include Internet multiplayer gameplay. This multiplayer even gave players the option to play as other bounty hunters besides Samus, including a cybernetic Space Pirate; this is the first and so-far only game to do so.[38] While its multiplayer received widespread acclaim, the single-player mode was criticized by GameSpot and others reviewers as being "linear and uninspired," as opposed to the traditional nonlinear worlds of the other games.[39] Metroid Prime Hunters is a first-person shooter and adventure game for the Nintendo DS developed by NST, a Redmond-based first-party developer for Nintendo, and released on March 20, 2006. ... NDS redirects here. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ...


Metroid Prime 3: Corruption

On August 27, 2007, Metroid Prime 3: Corruption was released for the Wii console, concluding the Prime series; Retro Studios produced this game as well. Metroid Prime 3 introduced the use of control of the ship at certain points of the game, utilizing it as transport and to interact with the environment. The Wii remote is used as a pointer to aim Samus' right hand arm cannon, with the Nunchuck used to control Samus' movement and grappling capabilities on her left hand. The Wii remote also controls the left arm to interact with control consoles, in that the remote is moved in the direction necessary to provide the desired input (e.g., pull, twist, and push a lever). The new control scheme has been lauded as being as close to a mouse-and-keyboard PC setup as can be on a console, lacking only a quick 180-degree turn.[40]; Players are also able to use tokens earned in the game to buy extra content. The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ...


Metroid Dread

Metroid Dread was first announced in the June 2005 issue of Game Informer, and further details emerged on the magazine's Internet forums. According to the forum moderators, the game was a 2D side-scroller being developed for the Nintendo DS, and its plot follows the events of Metroid Fusion.[41] On 2005-09-19, IGN reported that Metroid Dread is indeed in development, but would probably not be formally announced for some time.[42] Nintendo had neither confirmed nor denied its existence.[42] On 2005-10-07, the Nintendo-Next website reported that the project has been cancelled, but chose not to reveal their sources.[43] 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is an American-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... A typical Internet forum discussion, with common elements such as quotes and spoiler brackets A page from a forum showcasing emoticons and Internet slang An Internet forum is a web application for holding discussions and posting user generated content. ... 2D computer graphics is the computer-based generation of digital images—mostly from two-dimensional models (such as 2D geometric models, text, and digital images) and by techniques specific to them. ... A side-scrolling game or side-scroller is a genre of video games in which the gameplay action is viewed from a side-view camera angle, and the onscreen characters generally move from the left side of the screen to the right in order to reach their goals. ... NDS redirects here. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 2006-02-17, the British Official Nintendo Magazine included Metroid Dread in their "Official Release Dates", listed under November 2006, albeit as 'TBC' (to be confirmed). However, on March 16, 2006, in the second issue of the magazine, the game was marked with a vague '2006' release date, although ONM highlighted the ambiguity surrounding the game, and suggested to wait until E3 2006 for some more concrete information. On 2006-03-23, the website N-Sider reported that the IGN editor Craig Harris was asked about Metroid Dread, and his response was that it was too early to show at E3 in 2005, but that it could be shown later that year. This lends credence to the possibility that the game has not been canceled, and that this could have been reported falsely by Nintendo-Next. [44] The game failed to make an appearance at E3 in 2006 or 2007, although this is not necessarily an indication that the game is indeed canceled. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Official Nintendo Magazine, or ONM is the UKs official Nintendo magazine, and is published by Future Publishing(OCLC 46390444). ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... N-Sider is a website that provides news, history, and opinion articles relating to Nintendo Co. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ...


Matt Casamassina, when asked about Metroid Dread in a podcast on the August 24, 2007, mentioned that "a wink to the fans" about the game was in Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, although he clarified that this was by no means a confirmation of the title. This was later explained as an in-game message in Metroid Prime 3: Corruption (by scanning a panel within the Pirate Homeworld's "Metroid Processing" room) stating "Experiment status report update: Metroid project 'Dread' is nearing the final stages of completion."[45]. In an interview, Pacini stated that this was a coincidence and not related to the rumoured game[46]. On September 6, 2007 Nintendo said they are "not making the 2D Metroid at this point in time." [47] This does not, however, rule out another 3D Metroid game. Matt Casamassina (born December 1975) is a video game journalist working for IGN. He is the author of many reviews and previews of Nintendo games,[1] and the editor-in-chief of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Chronology and story-line

The chronology of the Metroid fictional universe does not match the release order of the games. According to the official timeline released by Nintendo,[48][49] the games currently released are ordered as follows: A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ...

Metroid and Metroid: Zero Mission (1986/2004)
Samus travels through the caverns of the planet Zebes to stop the Space Pirates from exploiting the Metroid species for galactic domination. She confronts the cybernetic lifeform Mother Brain, as well as its guardians, Kraid and Ridley. In the 2004 remake Metroid: Zero Mission, it is retconned that she was ambushed by Space Pirates after defeating Mother Brain and escaped from Zebes, and her ship crash-lands back on the surface. Stripped of her Power Suit and her ship destroyed, she is forced to infiltrate the Space Pirate mothership in order to find a way off the planet with only an emergency pistol for protection. After receiving a fully powered suit from deep within the Chozo ruins, she defeats Mecha-Ridley and escapes from the mothership before it self-destructs.
Metroid Prime (2002)
Samus receives a distress signal in her new ship and travels to Tallon IV to stop the Space Pirates from exploiting a powerful radioactive substance known as Phazon. She discovers that the Chozo once settled on this planet, and their disappearance, as well as the emergence of Phazon, is due to a meteor impacting the planet decades ago. After ruining a Space Pirate mining operation and collecting the twelve Chozo Artifacts that allow access to the sealed impact crater, she confronts, and seemingly destroys, Metroid Prime, the apparent source of the planet's Phazon corruption.
Metroid Prime Pinball (2005)
Not a separate canon game in the Metroid storyline but actually retells the story of the original Metroid Prime in pinball format.[50] Despite playing as a pinball game, there are a number of powerups that can be collected in the multi-game mode, including missiles and power bombs. The game was the first to be bundled with the Nintendo DS Rumble Pak.
Metroid Prime Hunters (2006)
When the Federation receives an unusual telepathic message, Samus is sent to the remote Alimbic Cluster in the Tetra Galaxy to uncover the rumored "Ultimate Power." Six rival bounty hunters that also heard the message actively attempt to secure the power before anyone else, including Samus. It transpires that the promise of ultimate power was actually a lie sent by the creature Gorea, sealed away by the Alimbics in a void between dimensions. After killing Gorea, Samus and the 6 bounty hunters all leave the cluster, empty handed, but alive.
Metroid Prime 2: Echoes (2004)
Samus is sent to investigate the planet Aether after a squad of GF Marines was lost there. Samus finds them all dead, killed by several creatures, mainly consisting of an evil race called the Ing. Upon meeting the only remaining member of Luminoth (the others were frozen in stasis chambers until the end of the game, where the last of the energy is replaced, and Dark Aether is destroyed), Samus learns Aether has been split into two dimensions by a meteor similar to the one that crashed on Tallon IV. Samus helps save Aether from the Ing, but encounters Dark Samus in the process, a being with Samus' genetic code and a phazon-mutated version of her Varia Suit.
Metroid Prime 3: Corruption (2007)
Space Pirates shut down Galactic Federation computer systems and then engage in large scale combat in an attempt to further spread Phazon. Enormous Phazon-based seedships, known as Leviathans, impact planets and begin corrupting them with Phazon. Samus is charged with destroying the 'Phazon Seeds' and restoring functionality to the Federation's computer network. After purging three planets of Phazon (including the Space Pirate homeworld), the Federation locates the source of Phazon, planet Phaaze, which is made entirely of Phazon. As the Federation engages the Space Pirates in orbit, Samus enters the depths of the planet, and succeeds at finally destroying Dark Samus and Phazon once and for all.
Metroid II: Return of Samus (1991)
Following the events of the previous chapters, the Galactic Federation deems the Metroid species too dangerous to exist, and, after their own failed attempts, employs Samus to travel to the Metroid homeworld, SR388, and exterminate the entire species. After killing every Metroid, Samus finds an unhatched egg sac. As she prepares to destroy it, a Metroid larva pops out and decides Samus is its mother. It follows her back to her ship, and Samus hands it over to the GF for research.
Super Metroid (1994)
Samus receives a distress signal from the research lab where she took the Metroid hatchling saved at the end of the previous game. She returns just in time to see Ridley stealing the hatchling. She then follows Ridley to the rebuilt base on Zebes to stop the Space Pirates in their new plan to clone the Metroids and use them as a weapon. She kills the reborn versions of Ridley and Kraid, as well as new guardians Phantoon and Draygon, in order to confront Mother Brain once again. Samus is nearly killed in the battle, but is saved, and her suit supercharged, by the Metroid hatchling, shortly before Mother Brain kills it. Samus proceeds to destroy Mother Brain, and once again escapes Zebes during a countdown to an explosion. This time, the entire planet explodes, taking with it the few remaining cloned Metroids.
Metroid Fusion (2002)
While acting as a bodyguard for researchers on the planet SR388, Samus is infected by a creature known as the X Parasite, originally the prey of the Metroid species. Doctors surgically remove portions of her Power Suit and cure the X infection with a vaccine created from Metroid DNA, allowing her not only to survive the parasite but to absorb its life energy and use it as her own. She is then sent to investigate a disturbance at the space research facility, Biologic Space Labs, where researchers attempted to contain the infected Power Suit. It is revealed that an X mimicking Samus, nicknamed the SA-X, has taken control of Samus's suit and released other X parasites inside the other specimens, infecting the entire station as they assimilate other organisms. Samus soon discovers that the SA-X have multiplied, and that as many as ten of the beings are wandering the station. While trying to destroy SA-X, Samus uncovers a Federation research program to grow new Metroids. Realizing the threat this would pose, Samus decides to crash the station into SR388. After setting the coordinates, Samus is confronted by one of the SA-X, which mutates into a hideous beast. After Samus destroys the host, the parasite itself flees. Samus races back to her ship before the station crashes, only to run into an Omega Metroid. Samus once again finds herself moments from death, only to be saved by the X that escaped earlier, which she absorbs. She manages to destroy the Omega Metroid and escape in her ship moments before the station crashes.

This article is about the first game in the series. ... Metroid: Zero Mission is a part of the Metroid series and a remake of the original Metroid. ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... Metroid: Zero Mission is a part of the Metroid series and a remake of the original Metroid. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... This article is about the game. ... Radioactive decay is the process in which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation in the form of particles or electromagnetic waves. ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... Metroid Prime Pinball is a pinball video game themed after the Metroid series. ... A Nintendo 64 gamepad with the Rumble Pak attached. ... Metroid Prime Hunters is a first-person shooter and adventure game for the Nintendo DS developed by NST, a Redmond-based first-party developer for Nintendo, and released on March 20, 2006. ... Metroid Prime 2: Echoes is the direct sequel to Metroid Prime, and is the latest game in Nintendos Metroid series to appear on the GameCube. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... Metroid II title screen Metroid II: Return of Samus is the second title in the Metroid series that appeared on the Nintendo Game Boy. ... The entrance of the cavern system on the SR388 Overworld SR388 (sometimes SR-388, rarely SR 388) is a fictional planet in the Metroid series. ... “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... Samus fighting a Core-X which had imitated the organism Nightmare. ... Prey can refer to: Look up Prey in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A prey animal eaten by a predator in an act called predation. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ...

Important contributors

Metroid, Metroid II: Return of Samus, Super Metroid, Metroid Fusion and Metroid: Zero Mission were all developed by Nintendo's internal R&D1 section. The games which have been developed by separate teams are Metroid Prime 1, 2, and 3 (Retro Studios), Metroid Prime Hunters (Nintendo Software Technology Corporation), and Metroid Prime Pinball (Fuse Games). This article is about the first game in the series. ... Metroid II title screen Metroid II: Return of Samus is the second title in the Metroid series that appeared on the Nintendo Game Boy. ... “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... Metroid: Zero Mission is a part of the Metroid series and a remake of the original Metroid. ... Nintendo Research and Development 1 (R&D1) is Nintendos oldest development team. ... This article is about the game. ... Metroid Prime 2: Echoes is the direct sequel to Metroid Prime, and is the latest game in Nintendos Metroid series to appear on the GameCube. ... Retro Studios is an American video game developer based in Austin, Texas, USA. It was founded in 1998 by Jeff Spangenberg as a second-party developer to Japan-based video game company Nintendo. ... Metroid Prime Hunters is a first-person shooter and adventure game for the Nintendo DS developed by NST, a Redmond-based first-party developer for Nintendo, and released on March 20, 2006. ... Nintendo Software Technology Corporation (often just Nintendo Software Technology, or NST) is an American-based first-party developer for Japanese video game corporation Nintendo. ... Metroid Prime Pinball is a pinball video game themed after the Metroid series. ... Fuse Games is a Cotswold, Burford based computer and video game developer best known for developing Mario Pinball Land for Nintendo. ...


Developers

The central figures in the production and development of the Metroid series are Yoshio Sakamoto who has directed or supervised the development of all the games (excluding Metroid II), Gunpei Yokoi who headed R&D1 and produced the first three games before his death in 1997, Makoto Kanoh who directed and designed scenarios for the first three games, and Hiroji Kiyotake who designed the characters for the original game. Shigeru Miyamoto, who made the Mario and The Legend of Zelda series, has not been involved with the production of Metroid, but he did act as producer for both Metroid Prime and its sequel. Yoshio Sakamoto is a game designer at Nintendo who was the manager of the companys R&D1 studio and is known as one of the central figures behind the Metroid series of games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Shigeru Miyamoto , born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ... The Legend of Zelda ) is a high fantasy action-adventure video game series developed and published by Nintendo, and created by the celebrated game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. ...


Musicians

The Metroid series has been especially noted for its music and has had several composers during the years: This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • Hirokazu 'Hip' Tanaka - Metroid
  • Ryohji Yoshitomi - Metroid II: Return of Samus
  • Kenji Yamamoto - Super Metroid, Metroid Prime, Metroid: Zero Mission, Metroid Prime 2: Echoes, Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
  • Minako Hamano - Super Metroid, Metroid Fusion, Metroid: Zero Mission, Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
  • Kouchi Kyouma - Metroid Prime
  • Akira Fujiwara - Metroid Fusion
  • Masaru Tajima - Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
  • Lawrence Schwedler - Metroid Prime Hunters
  • James Phillipsen - Metroid Prime Hunters

In addition to these names, it should be noted that Tommy Tallarico has contributed to the Metroid Prime and Metroid Prime 2: Echoes soundtracks respectively, although to what capacity can't be determined. He has stated on his personal website that the lack of his name in the game's credits was a mistake. This was due to the internal audio department at Retro Studios being assigned to Metroid Prime after their initial project was canceled.[51] Hirokazu Hip Tanaka, 田中宏和 Tanaka Hirokazu (たなか・ひろかず)) is a Japanese composer and musician best known for his scores for various video games produced by Nintendo. ... Kenji Yamamoto (山本健誌) is a Japanese video game musician working for Nintendo. ... Minako Hamano is a Japanese composer of video game music working for Nintendo. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Tommy Tallarico (born on February 18, 1968) is an American video game music composer. ... This article is about the game. ... Metroid Prime 2: Echoes is the direct sequel to Metroid Prime, and is the latest game in Nintendos Metroid series to appear on the GameCube. ... Retro Studios is an American video game developer based in Austin, Texas, USA. It was founded in 1998 by Jeff Spangenberg as a second-party developer to Japan-based video game company Nintendo. ...


Franchise spin-offs

Comics and Cartoons

Comic books have been released based on Metroid, Super Metroid and Metroid Prime. Samus Aran and other Metroid characters also feature in the Captain N: The Game Master comic books by Valiant Comics. Mother Brain was also the main villain in the Captain N: The Game Master TV show. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Captain N: The Game Master is a cartoon series that aired on U.S. and United Kingdom television from 1989 to 1992. ... For the Hal Foster comic strip, see Prince Valiant. ...


Super Smash Bros.

Samus is also featured in the Super Smash Bros. series (Super Smash Bros., Super Smash Bros. Melee, and the upcoming Super Smash Bros. Brawl) in both Varia Suit and Zero Suit versions. This article is about the original Nintendo 64 game. ... Super Smash Bros. ... Super Smash Bros. ...


Live-action Movie

A live-action movie version of Metroid was reportedly in development by Lion Rock Productions, based around Samus Aran, along with her early battles with the Metroids and the Mother Brain. It was scheduled to be released in theaters around 2006, but either has been canceled or remains in development hell.[52] Lion Rock Productions is an independent film production company and Hollywood movie studio, founded by John Woo. ... Samus Aran ), is the fictional protagonist of the Metroid video game series. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Development hell is media-industry jargon for a film, television screenplay, or computer game[1] (or sometimes just a concept or idea) getting stuck in development and never going into production. ...


April Fools Joke

On April 1, 2005, IGN posted an article reporting that critically panned director Uwe Boll would be directing the Metroid movie, with Samus herself being portrayed by Michelle Rodriguez, despite her opinion that the Gamecube was a "machine for kids". The supposed movie, with a $19 million budget, wouldn't follow the games' storylines; instead, it would have Samus, a "scientist for the government," donning a Power Suit to defend Earth from alien invaders in the near future, in a plot similar to that of Half-Life. At the end of the "report," however, Casamassina reveals the whole article was an April Fools Joke.[53] is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Uwe Boll (pronounced []), born June 22, 1965 in Wermelskirchen, Germany) is a German director, producer and screenwriter of films often adapted from video games. ... Michelle Rodriguez, (born Mayte Michelle Rodriguez[1] on July 12, 1978 in San Antonio, Texas), is an American actress, best-known for her roles in the television series Lost and movies The Fast and the Furious, S.W.A.T. and Resident Evil. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ... ...


Speedrunning

See also: Speedrun#Metroid series

The Metroid games have been a popular target for speedrunning, the act of completing a game in the fastest time possible. In addition to the nonlinear level design that allows alternate routes to be taken through the games, the Metroid games encourage speedrunning by displaying item collection and completion time statistics at the end of the game. Speedrunning is also encouraged by the fact that completion time is one of the primary factors determining what ending the player sees, and completing the game in a short time allows the player to see Samus without her armored suit. A speedrun (IPA: ) is a play-through of a computer or video game, created with the intent of completing it as quickly as possible, optionally under certain conditions, mainly for the purposes of entertainment and competition. ... A speedrun is a play-through of a computer or video game, the whole game or a selected part such as a single level of it, with the intent of completing it as quickly as possible. ...


To finish a game as quickly as possible, speedrunners exploit glitches and secrets that provide shortcuts. There are many of these in all games, both unintentional glitches, such as the "Mockball,"[54] and features added deliberately by the developers, such as the wall jump and "shinespark"[55] (running and then crouching, allowing you to jump extremely high); they can be useful in traversing areas faster than normal.


References

  1. ^ http://gonintendo.com/?p=9575 might be slightly outdated
  2. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/?g=features&p=alien
  3. ^ http://wii.ign.com/objects/748/748547.html
  4. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Icea6IyqgyQ
  5. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EksbWofYpAo&mode=related&search=snes%20metroid
  6. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flQZJZsl_FQ Sequence in the beginning of Metroid Prime 3: Corruption where all the major characters are heard with voice acting.
  7. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/sm/smart_tour.jpg
  8. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/mp/art/space_pirate.jpg
  9. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/mp/art/trooper_pirate.jpg
  10. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/mp/art/elite_pirate.jpg Elite Pirate
  11. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/sm/smart_tour.jpg
  12. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37qoFxNCL5U&mode=related&search=
  13. ^ Metroid eManga pgs. 34-64. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  14. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tejP0L5XbKQ
  15. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glFPKDb9OyY
  16. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udyGvA5T2VY
  17. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56P3-TwuRBo at 0:26 to 0:29
  18. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrnfvBGTVGI
  19. ^ http://www.vgmusic.com/music/console/nintendo/snes/smetbatl.mid
  20. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/sm/smart_kraid01.jpg
  21. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/sb2/sb2shot_05.jpg Brinstar Depths, with Kraid looming in the background.
  22. ^ Did You Know? Classic Metroid enemy Kraid was planned to be in Metroid Prime. Generation N. Retrieved on 2007-10-25.
  23. ^ Metroid eManga pgs. 9-11. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  24. ^ Computer: Did this "Adam" care for you? Would he sit in a safe Command Room and order you to die? / Samus: He would understand that some must live and some must die... He knew what it meant. He made that sacrifice once. / Computer: So he chose life for you? Our fair warrior, Samus Aran... Your Adam gave his life so that you might keep yours... For the sake of the universe... Nintendo R&D1. Metroid Fusion. Nintendo. Game Boy Advance. (in English). 2002-11-15.
  25. ^ http://mdb.classicgaming.gamespy.com/mp3/Pvt%20Jenkins.jpg
  26. ^ Metroid eManga Vol. 2 pgs. 2-70. Retrieved on 2007-10-21.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Intelligent Systems (formerly known as R&D1) is an internal team of Nintendo Co. ... Metroid Fusion ) is a video game developed by Nintendo R&D1 and released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance portable video game system. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Retro Studios is an American video game developer based in Austin, Texas, USA. It was founded in 1998 by Jeff Spangenberg as a second-party developer to Japan-based video game company Nintendo. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is an American-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Craig Harris (born September 1972) is a video game journalist working for IGN as the Executive Editor of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... N-Sider is a website that provides news, history, and opinion articles relating to Nintendo Co. ... Matt Casamassina Matt Casamassina as depicted in Cubetoons. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... General Sir Michael Mike Jackson, GCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Gen (born 21 March 1944) is a British army officer, currently Chief of the General Staff. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Metroid (721 words)
Metroid staples such as missles, ice beam, and the morph ball are all here, and all are easy to use depite the NES pad's lack of buttons.
Metroid's gameplay gets very repetitive, and if not for the introduction of the titular aliens near the end, would become more of a chore than anything.
The classic Metroid theme is there in all its 8-bit glory, as well as a host of other sci-fi themes that add to the spooky, remote feeling of the game.
Metroid Prime (GameCube) Reviews. GameCube Games Reviews by CNET. (3317 words)
As in all other Metroid games, you'll assume the role of interstellar bounty hunter Samus Aran, whose objective this time out is to search the planet Tallon IV for signs of illicit activity on the part of the Zebesian space pirates and put a stop to them once and for all.
Metroid fans will be thrilled to find that the mechanics of Samus' morph ball ability are more enjoyable here than in any previous game in the series.
Metroid Prime is a lengthy game that should take approximately 20 hours to finish the first time through, though you could easily spend a lot more time in the game trying to find everything that's hidden away.
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