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Encyclopedia > Metis (mythology)
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Other deities
Titans
The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius
Personified concepts

In Greek mythology, Metis ("wisdom" or "wise counsel") was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. So, Athena was actually the daughter of wisdom. She was the goddess of wisdom and deep thought. Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Theia yielded to Hyperions love and gave birth to great Helios and bright Selene and Eos, who brings light to all the mortals of this earth and to the immortal gods who rule the wide sky. ... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ... In a 5th-century BC red-figure, Cronus is deceived by his wife Rhea into thinking that the Omphalos Stone is his son Zeus, and devours it instead of Zeus. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was a member of a race of giant gods known as Titans. ... This article is about the mythological figure; for other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ... Epimetheus, a Titan known for his hindsight, with Pandora and Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek Μουσαι, Mousai) are nine archaic goddesses who embody the right evocation of myth, inspired through remembered and improvised song and traditional music and dances. ... Nemesis (Νέμεσις, as well called Rhamnousia, the goddess of Rhamnous, at her sanctuary at Rhamnous, north of Marathon), in Greek mythology, is the spirit of divine retribution against those who succumb to hubris, vengeful fate personified as a remorseless goddess. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι — the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... In Greek mythology, Cratos (strength) was a son of Styx and Pallas, brother of Nike, Bia and Zelus. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... In Greek mythology, Nike (Greek Νίκη, pronounced /nike/ NEE-keh, meaning Victory) (Roman equivalent: Victoria), was a goddess who personified triumph and victory. ... The Three Graces, from Sandro Botticellis painting Primavera Uffizi Gallery In Greek mythology, the Charites were the graces. ... In Greek mythology, Adrasteia (inescapable; also spelled Adrastia, Adrastea, Adrestea) was a nymph who was charged by Rhea to raise Zeus in secret to protect him from his father Cronus (Krónos). ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (Latin) or Horai (Greek; both words mean the hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... In Greek mythology, Eros was the god responsible for lust, love, and sex; he was also worshipped as a fertility deity. ... Daughter of Nyx in Greek mythology, Apate was the personification of deceit. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Eris is also a genus of jumping spiders. ... Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... This article discusses the ancient Greek poet Hesiod. ... Drawing from a sculpture of Athena at the Louvre. ...


Metis was born of Oceanus and Tethys, of an earlier age than Zeus and his siblings. Metis gave Zeus an emetic to force Cronus to vomit out Zeus' brothers and sisters. Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Vomiting (or emesis) is the forceful expulsion of the contents of ones stomach through the mouth. ... In a 5th-century BC red-figure, Cronus is deceived by his wife Rhea into thinking that the Omphalos Stone is his son Zeus, and devours it instead of Zeus. ...


Zeus lay with Metis but immediately feared the consequences. It had been prophesied that Metis would bear a son more powerful than Zeus himself. In order to forestall these dire consequences, Zeus tricked her into turning herself into a fly and promptly swallowed her. He was too late: Metis had already conceived a child. In time she began making a helmet and robe for her fetal daughter. The hammering as she made the helmet caused Zeus great pain and Prometheus, Hephaestus, Hermes or Palamaon (depending on the sources examined) cleaved Zeus's head with an axe at the river Triton, giving rise to Athena's epithet Tritogeneia. Athena leaped from Zeus's head, fully grown, armed, and armored, and Zeus was none the worse for the experience. This article is about the mythological figure; for other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ... Hephaestus, Greek god of forging, riding an ass; Greek drinking cup (skyphos) made in the 5th century B.C. Hephaestus (World Book «hih FEHS tuhs») (Greek: Ἡφαιστος Hêphaistos) is the Greek god whose approximate Roman equivalent is Vulcan; he is the god of blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy... Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles Hermes (Greek IPA ), in Greek mythology, is the god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators, literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures and invention and commerce in general, of liars, and of... In Greek mythology, Triton is the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, the personification of the roaring waters, represented as having the upper body of a human and the tail of a fish. ...


Athena was the favorite child of Zeus and the patron deity of Athens after she gave them the gift of the olive tree.


Metis was also the mother of Porus. In Platos Symposium, Porus, or Poros, was the personification of expediency. ...


Metis, a minor moon of the planet Jupiter, was named for her in 1979. Atmospheric pressure 0 kPa Metis (IPA: , mee-tis, Greek Μήτις) is the innermost member of the Jupiters small inner moons. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Metis (mythology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (273 words)
In Greek mythology, Metis ("wisdom" or "wise counsel") was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena.
Metis was born of Oceanus and Tethys, of an earlier age than Zeus and his siblings.
Metis, a minor moon of the planet Jupiter, was named for her in 1979.
Greek mythology A-M - All About Turkey (7737 words)
In Greek mythology, Achilles was the son of Peleus, king of the Myrmidons in Thessaly, and of the sea nymph Thetis, who rendered him invulnerable, except for the heel by which she held him, by dipping him in the river Styx.
In Greek mythology Astraea was the daughter of Zeus and Themis, the goddess of justice.
In Greek mythology Ion was the son of Apollo and the Arthenian princess Creusa, whom Apollo raped on the Acropolis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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