FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Metis (moon)
Metis
Image:metis2.gif
Image of Metis was taken by Galileo's solid state imaging system between November 1996 and June 1997.
Discovery
Discovered by S. Synnott
Discovered on March 4, 1979
Orbital characteristics
Mean radius 127,691 km (0.000854 AU)
Eccentricity 0.0012
Periapsis 127,540 km (0.000853 AU)
Apoapsis 127,840 km (0.000855 AU)
Revolution period 0.294780 d (7 h 4.5 min)
Orbital circumference 802,300 km (0.005 AU)
Orbital velocity max: 31.539 km/s
mean: 31.501 km/s
min: 31.464 km/s
Inclination 2.22° (to the ecliptic)
0.00° (to Jupiter's equator)
Is a satellite of Jupiter
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter 43 km
Surface area ~5800 km2
Volume ~41,600 km3
Mass 1.2×1017 kg
Mean density 3.0 g/cm3
Surface gravity 0.016 m/s2 (0.002 g)
Escape velocity 0.027 km/s
Rotation period synchronous
Rotation velocity 19 km/h
Axial tilt zero
Albedo 0.06
Surface temp.
min mean max
K ~123 K K
Atmospheric pressure 0 kPa

Metis (mee'-təs, IPA: [ˈmiːtəs], Greek Μήτις), or Jupiter XVI, is the innermost member of the Jupiter's small inner moons and thus Jupiter's innermost moon. Photograph of the moon Metis taken by Galileos solid state imaging system between November 1996 and June 1997. ... Galileo being deployed after being launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-34 mission Galileo was an unmanned spacecraft sent by NASA to study the planet Jupiter and its moons. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stephen P. Synnott is a Voyager scientist who discovered several moons of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... In physics, an orbit is the path that an object makes, around another object, whilst under the influence of a source of centripetal force, such as gravity. ... In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any line segment from its center to its boundary. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... The astronomical unit (AU or au or a. ... In astrodynamics, under standard assumptions any orbit must be of conic section shape. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... km redirects here. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... km redirects here. ... The orbital period is the time it takes a planet (or another object) to make one full orbit. ... The circumference is the distance around a closed curve. ... The velocity of an object is simply its speed in a particular direction. ... Inclination in general is the angle between a reference plane and another plane or axis of direction. ... The plane of the ecliptic is well seen in this picture from the 1994 lunar prospecting Clementine spacecraft. ... Moons of solar system scaled to Earths Moon A natural satellite is a moon (not capitalized), that is, any natural object that orbits a planet. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... Diameter is an AAA (authentication, authorization and accounting) protocol for applications such as network access or IP mobility. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Volume, also called capacity, is a quantification of how much space an object occupies. ... A cubic kilometre (symbol km³) is an SI derived unit of volume. ... Mass is a property of a physical object that quantifies the amount of matter and energy it is equivalent to. ... The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... Acceleration is the time rate of change of velocity, and at any point on a v-t graph, it is given by the slope of the tangent to that point In physics or physical science, acceleration (symbol: a) is defined as the rate of change (or derivative with respect to... In physics, for a given gravitational field and a given position, the escape velocity is the minimum speed an object without propulsion, at that position, needs to have to move away indefinitely from the source of the field, as opposed to falling back or staying in an orbit within a... In astronomy, synchronous rotation is a planetological term describing a body orbiting another, where the orbiting body takes as long to rotate on its axis as it does to make one orbit; and therefore always keeps the same hemisphere pointed at the body it is orbiting. ... A sphere rotating around its axis. ... Axial tilt is an astronomical term regarding the inclination angle of a planets rotational axis in relation to its orbital plane. ... Albedo is a ratio of scattered to incident electromagnetic radiation power, most commonly light. ... In thermodynamics, temperature is the physical property of a system that underlies the common notions of hot and cold —something that is hotter has the greater temperature. ... The kelvin (symbol: K) is the SI unit of temperature, and is one of the seven SI base units. ... diurnal (daily) rhythm of air pressure in northern Germany (black curve is air pressure) Atmospheric pressure is the pressure above any area in the Earths atmosphere caused by the weight of air. ... The pascal (symbol Pa) is the SI unit of pressure. ... The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... The inner satellites of Jupiter are four small moons that orbit close to Jupiter, merging with its planetary ring. ...


The moon was discovered in 1979 by the Voyager 1 probe and was designated S/1979 J 3. In 1983 it was officially named after the mythological Metis, a Titaness who was the first wife of Zeus and the mother of Athena. This page refers to the year 1979. ... Voyager 1 lifted off with a Titan 3E Centaur The Voyager 1 spacecraft is an 815-kilogram unmanned probe of the outer solar system and beyond, launched September 5, 1977, and currently operational. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτάνες) were a race of powerful deities that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BCE. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ...


Metis lies within Jupiter's main planetary ring, and may be the source of the material that comprises it. Its orbit lies inside Jupiter's synchronous orbit radius (as does Adrastea's), and as a result, tidal forces are slowly causing its orbit to decay. It is also within its density's fluid Roche limit, but not its rigid Roche limit, and so avoids tidal disruption. A planetary ring is a ring of dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in a flat disc-shaped region. ... A synchronous orbit is an orbit in which an orbiting body (usually a satellite) has a period equal to the average rotational period of the body being orbited (usually a planet), and in the same direction of rotation as that body. ... Atmospheric pressure 0 kPa Adrastea (IPA: , ad-ra-stee-a, Greek Αδράστεια) is the second of Jupiters known moons (counting outward from the planet). ... Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 after breaking up under the influence of Jupiters tidal forces. ... The Roche limit is the distance within which a celestial body held together only by its own gravity will disintegrate due to a second celestial bodys tidal forces exceeding the first bodys gravitational self-attraction. ...


Metis, the moon of Jupiter, is not to be confused with the asteroid 9 Metis. An asteroid is a predominantly rocky body that orbits around its star. ... 9 Metis (mee-tis) is one of the largest Main belt asteroids. ...



(Jupiter's natural satellite navigator)
Metis | Adrastea | ...


Atmospheric pressure 0 kPa Adrastea (IPA: , ad-ra-stee-a, Greek Αδράστεια) is the second of Jupiters known moons (counting outward from the planet). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Metis (moon) (111 words)
Metis (pronounced "MEE tis") is the innermost of Jupiter's known moons.
It was discovered in 1979 by the Voyager 1 probe and named after Metis, a Titaness who was the first wife of Zeus and the mother of Athena.
This image of Metis was taken by Galileo's solid state imaging system between November 1996 and June 1997.
Sea and Sky's Tour of the Solar System: Other Jovian Moons (1209 words)
Metis was discovered by Stephen Synnott in 1979 using data from the Voyager 1 spacecraft.
] is the ninth of Jupiter's moons and is the smallest.
] is the sixteenth and outermost of Jupiter's moons.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m