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Encyclopedia > Metaphysis

The metaphysis is the body of cartilage that separates the epiphyses and the diaphysis of long bones during growth. It is this part of the bone that grows during childhood; as it grows, it ossifies near the diaphysis and the epiphyses. At roughly 18 to 25 years of age, the metaphysis stops growing altogether and completely ossifies into solid bone.


  Results from FactBites:
 
PLATE 1 (481 words)
The radiant area between the osseous femoral epiphysis and the metaphysis of the feniur is thinnest in the center.
The radiant region between the osseous tibial epiphysis and the metaphysis of the tibia is the thinnest in the center.
The metaphysis of the femur is primarily convex except for the small notch in the center.
Radiology Quiz (855 words)
The key to the diagnosis is an abnormal round piece of bone that projects between the proximal end of the ulna and the medial aspect of the distal humeral metaphysis on the frontal view (Figure E).
The medial epicondyle is the protuberance from the posteromedial aspect of the distal humeral metaphysis, from which the flexor and pronator muscles and medial collateral ligaments arise.
The medial epicondyle ossification center is usually seen by ages 4-6, and it is the last to fuse with the metaphysis, generally by age 15, earlier in females than males.
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