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Encyclopedia > Mestizo
Mestizo
Notable Mestizos:
Porfirio Díaz and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega
Total population

Official population numbers are unknown. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3465x4708, 2062 KB) en: Porfirio Díaz, former Mexican president. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz Mori (15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915) was a Mexican-American War volunteer, French Intervention hero, and President of Mexico. ... Garcilaso de la Vega, (b. ...

Regions with significant populations
Latin America
Languages
Predominantly Spanish, (with a minority of other languages), while Mestiço speaks Portuguese, and Métis speak French.
Religions
Christianity (Predominantly Roman Catholic, with a minority of Protestant); and other religions.
Related ethnic groups
European (mostly Spanish, Portuguese, French and Italian), Amerindian people, and Austronesian people.

Mestizo is a Spanish term that was formerly used in the Spanish Empire and continues to be used today in Latin America to refer to people of mixed European (Spaniard) and Amerindian ancestry living in the region of Latin America.[1] The word originated from the Romance language / Latin word Mixticius, meaning "mixed." In the Portuguese and French languages, the words Mestiço and Métis were also used in the Portuguese and French Empire to identify individuals of mixed European and Amerindian ancestry. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... The Austronesian people are a population group in Oceania and Southeast Asia who speak or had ancestors who spoke one of the Austronesian languages. ... An anachronous map of the overseas Spanish Empire (1492-1898) in red, and the Spanish Habsburg realms in Europe (1516-1714) in orange. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... The Romance languages, also called Romanic languages, are a subfamily of the Italic languages, specifically the descendants of the Vulgar Latin dialects spoken by the common people evolving in different areas after the break-up of the Roman Empire. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The term French Empire can refer to: The First French Empire of Napoleon Bonaparte (1804 - 1814 or 1815) The Second French Empire of Napoleon III (1852 - 1870) The Second French Colonial Empire (1830 - 1960) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share...

Contents

Americas

Spanish-speaking America

Main article: Hispanic America

Under the caste system of Latin America and Spain, the term originally applied to the children resulting from the union of one European and one Amerindian parent or the children of two mestizo parents. During this era, a myriad of other terms including Castizo (3/4 European and 1/4 Amerindian), Cuarterón de Indio, and Cholo (1/4 European and 3/4 Amerindian), were in use to denote other individuals of European-Amerindian ancestry in ratios smaller or greater than the 50:50 of mestizos. Today, mestizo refers to all people with discernible amounts of both European and Amerindian ancestry. Hispanic America (Hispanoamérica in Spanish) refers to those parts of the Americas inhabited by Spanish-speaking peoples. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... Castizo is a Spanish word with a general meaning of genuine. It has other more concrete meanings. ... For the Choloa language, see Emberá languages. ...


Mestizos form the majority of the population in most of Latin America; however, it is difficult to know with any reasonable precision except by genetic studies how extensive the mestizo population is. Various censuses since Spanish colonial days tracked the race of inhabitants of the Latin American countries, but even these statistics are only generally indicative since race was closely tied to official legal status (the Spanish caste system) and language use. Wealthy people paid to change or obscure their actual ancestry. Many indigenous people were classified as mestizo if they spoke Spanish or lived as mestizos. In general, the countries believed to have a majority mestizo population today are Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Guatemala, and Paraguay. In some countries like Chile and Costa Rica, the majority of the population belongs to a group referred to as "white and mestizo" where both groups are not easily separable. In Bolivia and Peru, mestizos form the second largest group. In Venezuela, they are nearly half the population and the largest group.


In Puerto Rico, genetic testing proved the largest components are Taino, European and the smallest being African. The Taino element is considered to be the foundation of Puerto Rico's ancestral society. Taina women carried the children of Spanish and African men. Genetic DNA is slanted towards Taino as being the largest component of the mtDNA, while yDNA testing shows a substantial contribution from North Africa & Southern Spain. In the Dominican Republic, mestizos of part Amerindian ancestry form a small minority of the population ranging from 10 to 20%. Almost all of the population in those countries are composed of White, African, and Mulato (1/2 European and 1/2 African) ancestry who form the majority of the population. In Argentina and Uruguay, the mestizo population form a small minority of 8% to 3% of the population. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Mulato is a mild to medium dried Poblano pepper, sold dried. ...

A representation of a Mestizo, in a "Pintura de Castas" during the Spanish colonial period of the Americas. The painting illustrates "A Spaniard and Amerindian, produce a Mestizo".
A representation of a Mestizo, in a "Pintura de Castas" during the Spanish colonial period of the Americas. The painting illustrates "A Spaniard and Amerindian, produce a Mestizo".

Representation of Mestizos during the Latin American colonial period. ... Representation of Mestizos during the Latin American colonial period. ...

Noted Mestizos migrating to Europe

Martín Cortés, son of the Spanish Conquistador Hernán Cortés and of the Náhuatl-Maya indigenous Mexican interpreter Malinche, was the first mestizo to arrive in Spain, though he did so against his will after being exiled in punishment for leading a rebellion. Hernán Cortés, the conquistador who brought the Aztec Empire under the sway of the Spanish crown, named two of his sons Martín Cortés (presumably after his own father). ... A Conquistador (Spanish: []) (English: Conqueror) was a Spanish soldier, explorer and adventurer who took part in the gradual invasion and conquering of much of the Americas and Asia Pacific, bringing them under Spanish colonial rule between the 15th and 19th centuries. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... Nahuatl is a Native American language indigenous to central Mexico. ... Maya language may refer to: generally, any one of the various Mayan languages, a related group of languages spoken by the Maya peoples of Mesoamerica specifically, Yukatek (Yucatec) Maya language is frequently referred to simply as Maya language Maya language (Brazil), an unclassified language of Brazil that may be related... La Malinche (c. ...


The first mestizos of whom there is verified evidence of willingly having set foot on European soil are the grandchildren of Moctezuma II, Aztec emperor of Mexico, whose royal descent the Spanish crown acknowledged. Of this family, the most publicized descendants are the Acosta family and the Spanish counts Miravalle, in Andalucía, Spain, who in 2003 demanded that Mexico recommence payment of the so called Moctezuma pensions the government cancelled in 1934. The interest alone of such pensions is said to be enough for every single one of Moctezuma's modern descendants to live comfortable lives. Moctezuma, also known as Motecuhzoma Xocoyotzin (usually spelled Montezuma in English) (c. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... Motto: Dominator Hercules Fundator Andalucía por sí, para España y la humanidad (Andalusia for herself, for Spain, and for humanity) Capital Seville Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 2nd  87 268 km²  17,2% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 1st  7 478 432  17,9%  85,70... For other senses of this word, see interest (disambiguation). ...


From Peru also arrived the mestizo historian known as Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, son of Spanish Conquistador Sebastián Garcilaso de la Vega and of the Inca princess Isabel Chimpo Oclloun. He lived in the town of Montilla, in Andalucía, where he died in 1616. Garcilaso de la Vega, (b. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ... Montilla a town of southern Spain, in the province of Cordova, 32 miles south of the city of Cordova, by the Cordova-Bobadilla railway. ... Motto: Dominator Hercules Fundator Andalucía por sí, para España y la humanidad (Andalusia for herself, for Spain, and for humanity) Capital Seville Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 2nd  87 268 km²  17,2% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 1st  7 478 432  17,9%  85,70...


Starting from the early 1970s and throughout all of the 1980s, Europe saw the arrival of thousands of Chileans, both mestizos and whites, seeking political refuge during the dictatorial government of Augusto Pinochet. Today, there is a growing number of mestizo immigrants in Western Europe, primarily from Ecuador and Colombia. Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (November 25, 1915 – December 10, 2006) was President of Chile from 1974 to 1990, and was the President of the military junta from 1973 to 1981. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ...


Brazil

In Brazil, the word Mestiço is used to describe individuals born from any mixture of different ethnicities. Individuals that fit the specific case of having Portuguese and Amerindian parents are commonly known as "caboclo" or, more commonly in the past, "mameluco". Individuals of white and black ancestry are described as mulattos. "Cafuzos" (known as Zambo in English) are the outcome of Amerindian and black ancestors. A Caboclo is a person of mixed Brazilian Indian and European ancestry. ... Mameluco is a term of Portuguese origin describing the first generation offspring of a Caucasian and an Amerindian. ... Mulatto (Spanish mulato, small mule, person of mixed race, mulatto, from mulo, mule, from Old Spanish, from Latin mÅ«lus. ... A representation of Zambos in Pintura de Castas during the Latin American colonial period. ...


Canada

In Canada, the Métis are regarded as an independent ethnic group. This community of descent consists of individuals descended from marriages of First Nation women, specifically Cree, Ojibway, and Saulteaux with French Canadian and British employees of the Hudson's Bay Company. Their history dates to the mid 17th century, and they have been recognized as a people since the early eighteenth. The Métis (pronounced MAY tee, IPA: , in French or , in Michif ), also historically known as Bois Brule, mixed-bloods, Countryborn (or Anglo-Métis), are one of three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ... First Nations is the current title used by Canada to describe the various societies of the indigenous peoples, called Native Americans in the U.S. They have also been known as Indians, Native Canadians, Aboriginal Americans, Amer-Indians, or Aboriginals, and are officially called Indians in the Indian Act, which... For other uses, see Cree (disambiguation). ... This article is about the native North American people. ... The Saulteaux are a First Nation in Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada. ... French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ... Hbc redirects here. ...


Their territory roughly includes the three Prairie Provinces (Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan), parts of Ontario, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, as well as parts of the northern United States (including North Dakota and Montana). The Canadian prairies is a vast area of flat sedimentary land that stretches from Ontario and the Canadian Shield to the Canadian Rockies covering much of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta - the Prairie Provinces. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saskatchewan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Traditionally, the Métis spoke a mixed language called Michif (with various regional dialects). Michif (a phonetic spelling of the Métis pronunciation of "Métif", a variant of Métis) is also used as the name of the Métis people. The name is most commonly applied to descendants of communities in what is now southern Manitoba. The name is also applied to the descendants of similar communities in what are now Ontario, Quebec, Labrador, and the Northwest Territories, although these groups' histories are different from that of the western Métis. Michif is the indigenous language of the Métis people of Canada. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Labrador (also Coast of Labrador) is a region of Atlantic Canada. ... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ...


Estimates of the number of Métis vary from 300,000 to 700,000 or more.[citation needed] In September 2002, the Métis people adopted a national definition of Métis for citizenship within the "Métis Nation." Based on this definition, it is estimated that there are 350,000 to 400,000[citation needed] Métis Nation citizens in Canada, although many Métis classify anyone as Métis that can prove that an ancestor applied for money scrip or land scrip as part of nineteenth-century treaties with the Canadian government. However, Labrador, Quebec, and even some Acadian Metis communities are not accepted by the Metis National Council and are represented nationally by the "Congress of Aboriginal Peoples."


The Métis are not recognized as a First Nation by the Canadian government and do not receive the benefits granted to First Nation peoples (see Indian Act). However, the 1982 amendments to the Canadian constitution recognize the Métis as an Aboriginal people and have enabled individual Métis to sue successfully for recognition of their traditional rights such as rights to hunt and trap. In 2003, a court ruling in Ontario found that the Métis deserve the same rights as other aboriginal communities in Canada. The Indian Act of Canada (1876) (full title An Act respecting Indians) is an Act which establishes the rights of registered Indians and of their bands. ... Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


The United States

Main article: Multiracial
The infant Jean Baptiste Charbonneau depicted on the U.S. dollar coin with his mother, Sacagawea.
The infant Jean Baptiste Charbonneau depicted on the U.S. dollar coin with his mother, Sacagawea.

In the United States, the term "multiracial" is used to indentify individuals of mixed multi-racial heritages, while "Mestizo" is the Spanish term used for the combination of European and Amerindian ancestry. Most Hispanics who have lived in the southwestern states of the United States have been identified as "white" or "Amerindian". Others have classified themselves as mestizo, particularly many of those who also identify as Mexican American, Chicano, Californio and Tejano. Actress Halle Berry was born to a white mother and a black father The terms multiracial and mixed-race describe people whose parents are not the same race, or the descendants of such mixed people. ... United States dollar coin (Sacagawea). ... United States dollar coin (Sacagawea). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver and base metal versions. ... Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... The ethnonym Mexican-American describes United States citizens of Mexican ancestry (14 million in 2003) and Mexican citizens who reside in the US (10 million in 2003). ... For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... Languages Spanish Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Mediterranean Amerindian Mestizo The Californios were Spanish-speaking inhabitants of Alta California, first a part of New Spain, later of Mexico. ... A Tejano (Spanish for Texan; archaic spelling texano) is a person of Hispanic descent born and living in the U.S. state of Texas. ...


About 35 million Hispanics counted in the Federal 2000 Census are believed to be Mestizos.[2] 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


There are many multiracial people of different ethnicities living in the United States. An explorer by the name of Jean Baptiste Charbonneau was perhaps the most notable person of mixed ancestry in the region. His father, Toussaint Charbonneau, was a French Canadian interpreter, and his mother Sacagawea was the Shoshone guide of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. He can be found depicted on the United States dollar coin along with his mother, Sacagawea. It should be noted that Mestizo is a term used in regards to places of Spanish influence and not specifically to North American Indians. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Toussaint Charbonneau (March 20, 1767 - August 12, 1843; see note) was a French-Canadian explorer and trader, and a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, best known as the husband of Sacagawea. ... Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... Lewis and Clark redirects here. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver and base metal versions. ...


The English cognate of Mestizo is Mestee, from Middle French Mestis, which is Métis in Modern French. It was widely used for mixed race people in America before the Civil War, especially for mostly white persons. After the Civil War, the one drop rule made such people black and the word fell into disuse except for members of old triracial groups such as Melungeons, Brass Ankles, Mayles, and Redbones. Middle French (French: ) is a historical division of the French language which covers the period from (roughly) 1340 to 1611 [1]. It is a period of transition during which: the French language becomes clearly distinguished from the other competing Oïl languages which are sometimes subsumed within the concept of... The one-drop theory (or one-drop rule) is the colloquial term for the standard, found throughout the USA, that holds that a person with even one drop of non-white ancestry should be classified as colored, especially for the purposes of laws forbidding inter-racial marriage. ... Melungeon (mÉ›lÊŒndÊ’ÊŒn) is a term traditionally applied to one of a number of tri-racial isolate groups of the Southeastern United States, mainly in the Cumberland Gap area of central Appalachia: east Tennessee, southwest Virginia, and east Kentucky. ... The Guineas are a Melungeon related group living in West Virginia. ... Redbones are a mixed blood group of people of unknown ancestry. ...


Asia-Pacific

Philippines

Main article: Filipino mestizo
Manuel Luis Quezon, Filipino mestizo of part Spanish descent, President of the Philippines.

In the former Spanish colony of the Philippines, the term "mestizo" originally referred to those of mixed Filipino and Spanish ancestry; however, the term soon became generic and synonymous for "mixed race." Filipino Mestizo is a term used in the Philippines, to designate Filipinos of mixed Native Filipino (Austronesian or Malay), and foreign ancestry. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (690x893, 140 KB)November 1942: President Quezon of the Philippines. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (690x893, 140 KB)November 1942: President Quezon of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Manuel L. Quezon Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina (August 19, 1878 - August 1, 1944) was the first president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines. ... Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ...


The use of the term later extended to include all Filipinos of mixed indigenous and other ancestry. A recent genetic study by Stanford University indicates that 3.6% of the population have European ancestries from Spanish and United States colonization.[3] Stanford redirects here. ... The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ...


Modern day Filipino mestizos include Filipinos of Spanish, Latin American, American (United States) ancestry, or Filipinos mixed with other Asian ancestries, including Chinese and Japanese descent. The correct term denoting Filipinos of Chinese ancestry would be "Sangley." The term used for people who possess both Spanish, Chinese, and Filipino ancestries are called "Tornatras." Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Sangley or Sangley Mestizo is a term used by Filipinos and Europeans to describe a Filipino of half Chinese-Malay blood, or of half Spanish-Chinese blood. ... Tornatras is a term denoting a Eurasian person of mixed Spanish and Chinese descent in the Philippines. ...


East Timor, Macau, Goa, and Sri Lanka

In the former Portuguese colony of East Timor, Macau, Goa, and Sri Lanka, the term "mestiço" is applied to those of mixed indigenous Austronesian, Chinese, Asian Indian, Sri Lankan, and Portuguese ancestry. They currently form a small minority of the population in those countries. Prominent mestiços in East Timor include the first President Xanana Gusmão as well as the second President José Ramos-Horta. For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... Population growth, from 443 million in 1960 to 1,004 million in 2000 Map showing the population density of each district in India Map showing the population growth over the past ten years of each district in India Map showing the literacy rate of each district in India Chart showing... Kay Rala Xanana Gusmão GCL (born José Alexandre Gusmão, on June 20, 1946) is a former militant who was the first President of East Timor, serving from May 2002 to May 2007. ... José Manuel Ramos Horta (born December 26, 1949) has been Foreign Minister of East Timor since independence in 2002, having previously been a spokesman for the East Timorese resistance in exile during the years of Indonesian occupation between 1975 and 1999. ...


Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and Palau

In the former Spanish colonies of Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and Palau, the term "mestizo" was formerly used to identify people of mixed Pacific Islander and Spanish ancestry; however, as the United States gained control of these islands after the Spanish American War in 1898, the term "multiracial" became the contemporary term used to designate individuals of mixed indigenous and American or European descent. They currently form a small minority of the population. The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States of America gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ...


See also

The Amanyé are a Native South American nation of Brazils Amazonia. ... Look up Casta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Genízaro is the Spanish word for the descendants of the (White) Spaniards and detribalized Indigenous Amerindians. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Half-caste. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Mulatto (Spanish mulato, small mule, person of mixed race, mulatto, from mulo, mule, from Old Spanish, from Latin mÅ«lus. ... A representation of Zambos in Pintura de Castas during the Latin American colonial period. ...

References

External links

Miscegenation in Spanish colonies
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African
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Spaniard
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Spaniard
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Amerindian
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African
Mulatto Criollo Mestizo Zambo
Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... West Indies redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Puerto Rican. ... North American redirects here. ... Languages Spanish Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Mediterranean Amerindian Mestizo The Californios were Spanish-speaking inhabitants of Alta California, first a part of New Spain, later of Mexico. ... Language(s) American English Spanish Spanish in the United States Ladino Religion(s) Predominantly Roman Catholic Protestant Agnostic or Atheist Jewish minorities Related ethnic groups French Americans Italian Americans Portuguese American Footnotes Excludes those not identified as Hispanic or Latino. ... For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... A Tejano (Spanish for Texan; archaic spelling texano) is a person of Hispanic descent born and living in the U.S. state of Texas. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... ... Language(s) Portuguese, Spanish, and several creoles Religion(s) Predominantly Christian (mainly Roman Catholic); minorities practicing Judaism, Islam, or no religion Related ethnic groups sub-Saharan, African American, Afro-European An Afro-Latin American (also Afro-Latino) is a Latin American person of at least partial African ancestry; the term... Mulatto (Spanish mulato, small mule, person of mixed race, mulatto, from mulo, mule, from Old Spanish, from Latin mūlus. ... Spaniard redirects here. ... This article is about U.S. white Hispanic residents. ... This article deals with the white population of Latin America. ... A representation of Zambos in Pintura de Castas during the Latin American colonial period. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Mulatto (Spanish mulato, small mule, person of mixed race, mulatto, from mulo, mule, from Old Spanish, from Latin mūlus. ... Criollo, in the Spanish colonial Casta system (caste system) of Latin America, was a person born in the Spanish colonies deemed to have purity of blood in respect to the individuals European ancestry. ... A representation of Zambos in Pintura de Castas during the Latin American colonial period. ...

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