FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Messina, Italy
Location within Italy
Location within Italy

Messina with a population of about 260,000 is the third largest city on the island of Sicily, Italy and the capital of the province of Messina. It is located at 38°11′24″ N 15°33′0″ E, near the North-East corner of Sicily, at the Strait of Messina. Download high resolution version (1805x2243, 177 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Messina, Italy Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (1805x2243, 177 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Messina, Italy Categories: GFDL images ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... Messina (It. ... Satellite photo of the Strait of Messina, taken June 2002. ...

Contents


History

Founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BCE, Messina was originally called Zancle (scythe) because of the shape of its natural harbour. (The stairs leading to the harbour are to this day called 'Scaletta Zanclea'.) In the early 5th century, Anaxilas of Rhegium renamed it Messene in honor of the Greek city Messene. See also List of traditional Greek place names. (9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC - other centuries) (800s BC - 790s BC - 780s BC - 770s BC - 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC - 730s BC - 720s BC - 710s BC - 700s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Golden age in Armenia Assyria... // Events Romulus Augustus, Last Western Roman Emperor Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. ... There is also a Messene (pronunciation: meh-SEH-neh) in Angola, see Messene, Angola and Bab Messene (pronunciation: BAHB meh-SEH-neh) in Tunisia Messene (Greek: Μεσσήνη Messínî or Messénê ) was an ancient Greek city, the capital of Messenia (until the modern prefecture was formed), founded by Epaminondas in 369... This is a list of traditional Greek place names. ...

Sextus Pompeius coin, depicting the Pharos of Messina and Scylla.
Enlarge
Sextus Pompeius coin, depicting the Pharos of Messina and Scylla.

The city was sacked in 396 BCE by the Carthaginians, then reconquered by Dionysius I of Syracuse. At the end of the first Punic War it was a free city allied with Rome. In Roman times Messina, then known as Messana, had an important pharos (lighthouse). Messana was the base of Sextus Pompeius, during his war against Octavian. Sextus Pompeius. ... Sextus Pompeius. ... Sextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey, was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC). ... In Greek mythology, Scylla, or Skylla (Greek Σκύλλα) was a name shared by two characters, a female sea monster and a princess. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC Years: 401 BC 400 BC 399 BC 398 BC 397 BC - 396 BC - 395 BC 394 BC... A map of the central Mediterranean Sea, showing the location of Carthage (near modern Tunis). ... Dionysius (c. ... The First Punic War was fought between Carthage and the Roman Republic from 264 BC to 241 BC. It was the first of three major wars between the two powers for supremacy in the Mediterranean Sea. ... Pharos is: a small island off the Egyptian coast that hosted the Lighthouse of Alexandria the etymological origin of the word lighthouse in many Romance languages, such as French (phare), Italian (faro) and Spanish (faro) Latin name for the Greek/Roman colony on the island of Hvar in the Adriatic... Sextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey, was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC). ... Bust of Augustus Caesar Caesar Augustus (Latin:IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS) ¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known earlier in his life as Gaius Octavius or Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was the first Roman Emperor and is traditionally considered the greatest. ...


After the fall of the Roman Empire, the city was successively conquered by the Goths, then by the Byzantine Empire in 535, by the Arabs in 842, and in 1061 by the Norman brothers Robert Guiscard and Roger Guiscard (later count Roger I of Sicily). The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Caesar Augustus). ... A goth girl as seen on the satirical cartoon South Park This article is about the contemporary goth/gothic subculture. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople. ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Events Oath of Strasbourg - alliance of Louis the German and Charles the Bald against emperor Lothar - sworn and recorded in vernacular languages. ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here--217. ... Norman may refer to: The Norman language The Norman people Norman architecture, the Romanesque architecture erected by the Normans. ... Robert Guiscard (i. ... Roger I (1031-1101), ruler of Sicily, was the youngest son of Tancred of Hauteville. ...


Messina was most likely the harbor at which the Black Death entered Europe in the Middle Ages. Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


The city was almost entirely destroyed by an earthquake and associated tsunami on the morning of December 28, 1908, killing over 75,000 people and destroying most of the ancient architecture. Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In June 1955, Messina was the location of the conference of western European foreign ministers which led to the creation of the European Economic Community. 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ...


Sights

Cathedral of Messina (2004)
Cathedral of Messina (2004)

The 12th century Cathedral of Messina contains the remains of Conrad, king of Germany and Sicily in the 13th century. After the quake of 1908, the cathedral was rebuilt in 1919/1920; after a fire in 1943 it had to be rebuilt again. Image File history File links Dome of Messina, 2004. ... Image File history File links Dome of Messina, 2004. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Conrad IV, Conrad of Hohenstaufen (April 25, 1228 Andria, Italy – May 21, 1254, Lavello), was king of Jerusalem (as Conrad II) 1228–1254, of Germany 1237–1254, and of Sicily (as Conrad I) 1250–1254. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


In 1957 a 220kV-overhead powerline was built across the Strait of Messina. At the time of its construction, its two pylons were the highest in the world. This powerline has since been replaced by an underwater cable, but the pylons still remain, protected as historical monuments. (See Pylons of Messina.) It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Electric power transmission. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Pylons of Messina are the pylons of the former above-ground 220kV-high voltage line crossing the Strait of Messina between Italy and Sicily, part of the power line from Sorgente to Rizziconi. ...


Famous people born in Messina

  • Antonello da Messina, Italian painter and genius of the Renaissance, was born in Messina in 1430.
  • Filippo Juvara also spelled Filippo Juvarra, Italian architect and highest exponent of the Baroque, was born in Messina in 1678.

Antonello da Messina (c. ... Filippo Juvara (Juvarra), Italian architect, was born in Messina in 1678 and died in Madrid in 1736. ...

Messina in Literature

Many writers set their works in Messina, among them:

Giovanni Boccaccio Giovanni Boccaccio (June 16, 1313 – December 21, 1375) was a Italian author and poet, the greatest of Petrarchs disciples, an important Renaissance humanist in his own right and author of a number of notable works including On Famous Women, the Decameron and his poems in the vernacular. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders May 1 Zürich joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Matteo Bandello (1480—1562) was an Italian novelist. ... Events February 12 - After claiming the throne of England the previous year, Lady Jane Grey is beheaded for treason alongside her husband. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Antony and Cleopatra is a historical tragedy by William Shakespeare, first performed in 1607 or 1608 and printed in the First Folio, 1623. ... Events January 20 - Tidal wave swept along the Bristol Channel, killing 2000 people. ... Molière, engraved frontispiece to his Works Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Molière (January 15, 1622 – February 17, 1673), was a French theatre writer, director and actor, one of the masters of comic satire. ... Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. ... Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 – May 9, 1805), usually known as Friedrich Schiller, was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Silvio Pellico (born June 24, 1788 in Saluzzo (Piedmont); died January 31, 1854) was an Italian dramatist. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) was a profoundly influential German philosopher, psychologist, and classical philologist. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Giovanni Pascoli (December 31, 1855—April 6, 1912) was an Italian poet and classical scholar. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elio Vittorini (July 23, 1908 - February 12, 1966) was an Italian writer and novelist. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Stefano DArrigo (b. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Julien Green French born Catholic author of several novels including Leviathen and Each In His Own Darkness. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Messina, Italy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (593 words)
Messina with a population of about 260,000 is the third largest city on the island of Sicily, Italy and the capital of the province of Messina.
Antonello da Messina, Italian painter and genius of the Renaissance, was born in Messina in 1430.
Francesco Maurolico, Italian astronomer and mathematician, was born in Messina in 1494.
AllRefer.com - Messina, Italy (Italian Political Geography) - Encyclopedia (388 words)
Messina was subsequently allied with Rome, and it shared the history of the rest of Sicily.
Messina later came under the rule of the Angevins, the Aragonese, and the Spanish Bourbons.
The earthquake of Dec. 28, 1908, destroyed 90% of Messina's buildings, including fine churches and palaces, and cost about 80,000 lives; afterward the city was completely rebuilt in conformity with standards for quake-resistant construction.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m